25 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS REVIEW: FULL HOUSE – THE CHRISTMAS EPISODES

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MAIN CAST

Bob Saget (How I Met Your Mother)
John Stamos (Scream Queens)
Dave Coulier (The Real Ghostbusters)
Candace Cameron Bure (Journey Back To Christmas)
Jodie Sweetin  (Redefining Love)
Mary-Kate Olsen  (Beastly)
Ashley Olsen (It Takes Two)
Lori Loughlin (When Calls The Heart)
Andrea Barber (Days of Our Lives)
Scott Weinger (Shredder)

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RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Yvonne Wilder  (West Side Story)
John Aprea  (Bullitt)
Nancy Dussault  (The In-Laws)
Jordan Christopher Michael  (The Flavour)
Yvette Nipar  (Robocop: The Series)
Debra Stipe (Queen Sugar)
Robyn Donny  (Love Stinks)
Sherrie Rose  (Unlawful Entry)
Mickey Rooney (Night at The Museum)

2.9) OUR VERY FIRST CHRISTMAS SHOW

The family is on a flight to Colorado to spend Christmas with some relatives, and this is a trip that Danny has spent months planning – but on the way to Colorado, a blizzard forces an emergency landing at an unfamiliar airport. The family is forced to spend Christmas in the baggage claim room, where everyone thinks Christmas is ruined this time around. Among the things that happen here are: Jesse’s father Nick tries to get Jesse to kiss Becky under a mistletoe, D.J. is upset that the gifts that the family brought along on the flight with them are missing, and Michelle is afraid of Lionel (Sorrell Booke), a man who made her cry on the airplane because of his toupee. Jesse, becoming ever so frustrated by everyone’s sour attitudes, speaks to the people in the baggage claim room about the real meaning of Christmas. Then Santa Claus shows up and shows the family where the missing gifts are, and it turns out that Lionel is Santa Claus.

3.11) AFTERSHOCKS

In the wake of a frightening earthquake, Danny is initially willing to deny Stephanie’s excessive clinginess. It all seems relatively harmless to him at first, but Danny finally recognizes the seriousness of the situation when his distraught daughter won’t even let him go on a business dinner for a few hours. Unable to get Stephanie to share her feelings with him, Danny reluctantly agrees that this is not something that a dad can handle on his own. Meanwhile, D.J.—who wakes up one morning with a zit on her nose—nervously anticipates her role in a school play.

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4.13) HAPPY NEW YEAR

Danny and Jesse set up Joey with a date for New Year’s Eve, but he becomes so smitten with her that he wants to elope. Meanwhile, Rusty convinces Stephanie that he is going to kiss her at midnight, but when midnight comes and Rusty reveals he was just kidding, Stephanie ends up kissing him.

6.12) A VERY TANNER CHRISTMAS

The Tanners celebrate Christmas, only for D.J. to find out that Steve is planning to move to Florida for college, upon graduating. Meanwhile, Becky misses having white Christmases in Nebraska, and Jesse takes Stephanie and Michelle to a homeless shelter to show them the real meaning of Christmas.

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7.13) THE PERFECT COUPLE

Joey gets a job as the host of a local game show, The Perfect Couple. He gets the family to do the first show with him, with D.J. and Steve as the dating couple, Jesse and Becky as the married couple, and Danny and Vicky as the engaged couple. Vicky cannot make it on time, so Danny has to pair up with an old woman named Estelle. The director of the show tells Joey to embarrass the contestants, and he does, much to the family’s dismay. At the end of the show, Vicky arrives and tells Danny that she accepted a job as a network anchor in New York City. Danny tells her that he cannot take a long-distance relationship, and the two break off their engagement and break up, although they still have feelings for each other. Back at home, Stephanie has trouble getting Nicky and Alex into their pajamas and in bed.

8.11) ARREST YE MERRY GENTLEMAN

Jesse and Michelle get locked in a toy store on Christmas Eve when they attempt to return a gift to the grumpy owner (Mickey Rooney). The twins begin to fear Santa Claus. The owner then dresses as Santa Claus and comes to the Tanners’ home, after they realize what a nice man he is.

54e985cb6bc6317f8a658bf206d27762These episode are fun to watch around the holiday time, and with Fuller House celebrating Christmas in the Second Season you have plenty of episodes to watch and spend Christmas with the Tanner family.

REVIEW: RUN…IF YOU CAN

CAST

Martin Landau (Ed Wood)
Yvette Nipar (Robocop: The Series)
Jerry Van Dyke (The Middle)
Morgan Douglas (Chopping Mall)
Sandy Berumen  (Jade)
Kerrigan Mahan (Mighty Morphin Power Rangers)

teenage-mutant-ninja-turtles-2017-season-5-episode-16-the-frankenstein-experimentKim Page is a college student whose house sitting for one of her parent’s friends, and this house is a wealthy looking villa. Watching TV one-night the picture changes to a couple having sex. Then suddenly the man suffocates the lady and wraps her up in a plastic bag. Then it goes back to old movie she was watching. Thinking nothing much of it at first, this changes when it seems to happen every night with a different lady being killed. Kim starts to believe she’s going crazy, because no one else seems to get the signal. However at the same time there is a killer within the area who is disposing of his victims the same way.MV5BMTY2Mjk1MzgyOF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwMjUyMzQzMTE@__V1_SY1000_CR0,0,1428,1000_AL_This low-budget late 80s psychotic serial killer feature is an unfairly forgotten staple as the concept driving it is an innovative, offbeat one and the lead actress Yvette Nipar chips in with a strong, capable performance. It’s on the cheap and that shows up quite noticeably, in somewhat of a made for TV feel. It’s a real slow build-up, constructing the situation (bringing in characters), setting the tone and finally making it a real dangerous predicament. At times repetitive, but only within the last half-hour does the story really become threatening and suspenseful when the killer targets our heroine.Run if you Can wasn’t what I was expecting, but it turned out to be interesting little low-rent b-grade straight-to-video thrill

REVIEW: FREDDY’S NIGHTMARES – SEASON 1 & 2

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MAIN CAST

Robert Englund (Wishmaster)

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RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Lar Park-Lincoln (Friday The 13th – Part VII)
Yvette Nipar (Robocop: The Series)
Lori Petty (Tank Girl)
Mariska Hargitay (Law & Order: SVU)
Shiri Appleby (Roswell)
Joyce Hyser (The Flash 90s)
Sarah Buxton (Little Children)
George Lazenby (Winter Break)
Andrew Prine (V)
Jeremy Roberts (Hercules: TLJ)
Brad Pitt (Fight Club)
Bill Moseley (Army of Darkness)
Jeffrey Combs (Gotham)
Eva LaRue (CSI: Miami)
Dick Miller (Gremlins)
Jeff Conaway (Babylon 5)
Charles Cyphers (Halloween)
Anne Lockhart (Battlestar Galactica)
Kyle Chandler (Supoer 8)
Tracey Walter (Batman)
Jeff Yagher (V)
Marc Alaimo (Star Trek: DS9)
Sherman Howard (Superboy)
Christine Belford (Wonder Woman TV)
Sandahl Bergman (Conan The Barbarian)
Clifton Collins Jr. (Westworld)
Morris Chestnut (Kick-Ass 2)
Penny Johnson Jerald (Star Trek: DS9)
Raymond Cruz (My Name Is Earl)
Paul Ben-Victor (Daredevil)
Ellen Albertini Dow (Wedding Crashers)
Brett Cullen (Joker)
Tamara Glynn (Halloween 5)
Leland Crooke (Angel)
Timothy Bottoms (The Paper Chase)
David Kaufman (Superman: TAS)
Dick Gautier (Transformers)
Wings Hauser (Rubber)
Richard Eden (Robocop: The Series)
Robert F. Lyons (Death Wish II)
Fabiana Udenio (Austin Powers)
Clayton Landey (Sully)
Tim Russ (Star Trek: Voyager)

MV5BNTIzODY4NjMtZGE0NC00NTI1LWE1OTktYjNkZjkzZGNhMDA2XkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNzQ1NjgzOTA@._V1_Based on the popular horror series, Freddy’s Nightmares was a Tales From The Crypt style anthology/spin off which focused on a series of events that people would find themselves in when they went to sleep from embarrassing situations to terrifying blood curdling nightmares, which they sometimes did not wake up from.Image result for FREDDY'S NIGHTMARESThe master behind all these nightmares was none other than Freddy himself, who would narrate every now & then throughout the episodes, an interesting theme & idea the series had which lifted it up above many similar anthologies, was to basically have two episodes in one, in which the the survivor of the first half of the episode would meet his or her death in the second half, usually friends or family members of the characters that have died in the first half. While other episodes featured characters from another episode popping up in others (most of which met their demises in the follow up episodes).

MV5BYmQ0MThmZGItYzhkOC00ZTIzLTliZWMtN2VjNWZjMTIwZmMzXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNzQ1NjgzOTA@._V1_Despite his many brief pop up appearances, Freddy was the main focus of a few episodes such as The pilot episode No More Mr. Nice Guy(Directed by Texas Chainsaw Massacre’s own Tobe Hooper!! & my personal favorite out of all the ones Freddy was in) which was a prequel set before the original Nightmare on elm Street,  where Freddy due to an unjust law system was set free after murdering a series of  little children, outraged, the parents decide to take the law into their own hands including a police officer, who’s twin daughters were on the verge of death when he saved them & arrested Freddy. Burned alive in his boiler room, he returned as a badly burned boogeyman to kill & torture some of those responsible for his execution, this episode was very entertaining bringing back the creepy nightmarish monster of the original, rather than the jokey character he later became in parts 3 & up. It’s second half, Sisters Keeper was also pretty decent, other episodes Freddy appeared in were, Freddys Tricks & Treats, Safe Sex, Photo Finish, Dreams Come True, It’s My Party & You’ll Die If I Want You Too!Image result for FREDDY'S NIGHTMARESThe last episode I mentioned which was both scary & hilarious when Freddy decides to attend his class reunion, killing off all of his graduating class including the pretty girl who stood him up & best of all we even got to see Freddy’s nerdish pal from high school!. Another great thing about the series was it’s many familiar acting faces such as Brad Pitt, Dick Miller, and many others.  All in all if you ever get a chance to view the episodes, I do recommend them. A lot of them weren’t great, but unlike Friday The 13th: The Series, at least this had the character from the movies in them & connected to the movies, rather than being in name only, with the humorous Freddy character actually playing better on the small screen than he did on the big screen & a few episodes were actually better than many of the Nightmare sequels!

REVIEW: WALKING TALL: LONE JUSTICE

CAST

Kevin Sorbo (Supergirl)
Yvette Nipar (Robocop: The Series)
Haley Ramm (Disconnect)
Elizabeth Barondes (Made)
Rodrigo De La Rosa (Capadocia)
Jenny Shakeshft (W.)
Jonny Cruz (Matador)
Gail Cronauer (JFK)
Jackson Hurst (NCIS: Los Angeles)

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The film takes place one year following the events of Walking Tall: The Payback. In Dallas, when the two prime witnesses against the drug-lord Octavio Pérez are murdered by his gangsters in a safe-house, the testimony of FBI-agent Kate Jensen and three other agents become the only chance to keep the criminal in prison. They are lodged in another safe-house to wait for the trial, but the place is invaded by the criminals and the agents are executed. However, Kate is only wounded and her boyfriend Nick believes that there is a traitor in the agency and decides to bring her to his ranch in the country to protect her life with his reliable local friends.FIaUxJYPZlBQfb_1_aIt’s nice to see Kevin Sorbo back in his action roots, once again the story has nothing to do with Walking Tall 1 but is a direct sequel to the second one. It’s an average action Direct to DVD outing, but it works , it is what it’s meant go be.

REVIEW: WALKING TALL: THE PAYBACK

CAST

Kevin Sorbo (Supergirl)
A.J. Buckley (CSI: NY)
Yvette Nipar (Robocop: The Series)
Haley Ramm (Disconnect)
Jenny Shakeshft (W.)
Marc Macaulay (Swamp Thing: The Series)
Richard Dillard (The Last Stand)
Gail Cronauer (JFK)

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This time, the plot focuses on a local hero who takes justice into his own hands. Ex military Nick (Kevin Sorbo) returns to his hometown. His father, the sheriff, tries to stand up against a brutal gang of ruthless criminals who intimidate and blackmail the people to sell them their business. He then is killed by the gang’s leader Harvey Morris.walkingtall-2048x854With the help of a FBI agent and a few old friends, Nick himself becomes sheriff, then vows to do everything in his power to destroy the gang and their ruthless leader, and win back his city. Eventually he shoots Morris and his gang.936full-wedding-crashers-screenshot1

Kevin Sorbo is famous now for doing mostly direct to DVD films like this, but this one and its follow-up are actually quite good, obviously there’s no Rock in this or the third one but Kevin Sorbo is a worthy replacement

REVIEW: VAMPIRE CLAN

CAST
Drew Fuller (Charmed)
Alexandra Breckenbridge (The Walking Dead)
Timothy Lee DeProest (Dragon Age)
Marina Black (Swordfish)
Kelly Kruger (Mysterious Skin)
Richard Gilliland (Star Kid)
Larry Dick (Speck)
Mimi Craven (Swamp Thing)
Stacy Hogue (The Perfect Tenant)
Spencer Redford (Look)
Yvette Nipar (Robocop: The Series)
Nate Dushku (Antitrust)

This 2002 drama horror is based on the horrific true story of the 1996 Vampire Killings in Florida and starts with Jeni Wendorf [Stacy Hogue] on an illicit rendezvous with her boyfriend, returning home late she finds her mum and dad dead and younger sis Heather [Kelly Kruger] has run off with the four killers. All five are soon caught and the police begin their investigations. The charismatic leader Roderick ‘Rod’ [Drew Fuller] is questioned and tells part of the story, claiming they are a vampire clan. As the film, and interrogations develop the story is revealed, but are they really vampires or just troubled teens living a vampiric lifestyle and exactly what did happen at the family home.MV5BNzk3ZWY1MGYtZDBmNy00NDdmLTk3Y2EtYWFiOGNkNTAxZjE3XkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMjczNjE2MDg@._V1_
This is a gripping story illustrating the ease one can be lured into dangerous friendships. With some bad language and bloodied corpses it merits its 15 age rating. What makes this is that it seems to stick to the facts of the case and doesn’t embellish it in any way  and is generally well acted by the cast. Adding to the disturbing nature is the fact that the killers were only aged 16 or so at the time -something not made apparent in the film. A Great film that’s made more disturbing by the fact the its based on a true story.

REVIEW: THE FLASH (1990)

CAST

John Wesley Shipp (Dawsons Creek)
Amanda Pays (The Knife)
Alex Desert (Swingers)

Recuring / Notable Guest Cast

Paula Marshall (Gary Unmarried)
Michael Nader (All My Children)
Tim Thomerson (Trancers)
Priscilla Pointer (Carrie)
Lycia Naff (Lethal Weapon)
Richard Belzer (Scarface)
Robert Hooks (Star Trek III)
M. Emmet Walsh (Blade Runner)
Vito D’Ambrosio (Bones)
Wayne Pére (CLoak & Dagger)
Justin Burnette (Hearts Afire)
Biff Manard (The Wrong Guys)
Mike Genovese (ER)
Sven-Ole Thorsen (Mallrats)
Dick Miller (Gremlins)
Clarence Clemons (Blues brothers 2000)
Ian Buchanan (Panic Room)
Elizabeth Gracen (Highlander: The Raven)
Miguel Fernandes (Relic Hunter)
Clifton Collins Jr. (Westworld)
Chuck Hicks (Dick Tracy)
Wes Studi (Mystery Men)
Robert Shayne (Adventures of Superman)
Jonathan Brandis (IT)
Perrey Reeves (Child”s Play 3)
Kirk Baltz (Face/Off)
Mark Dacascos (Kamen Rider: Dragon Knight)
Adam West (Batman)
Patricia Tallman (Babylon 5)
Jason Bernard (Liar Liar)
Lois Nettleton (Centennial)
Ian Abercrombie (Birds of Prey)
Anthony Starke (Hand of God)
Sherrie Rose (Black Scorpion)
Gloria Reuben (Lincoln)
Deborah May (The Walking Dead)
Christopher Neame (The Prestige)
Ken Foree (The Lords of Salem)
Angela Bassett (Green Lantern)
Jay Arlen Jones (Eight Legged Freaks)
Joyce Hyser (The Wedding Pact)
Timothy Stack (My Name Is Earl)
Remy Ryan (Robocop 3)
Yvette Nipar (Robocop: The Series)
Bryan Cranston (Breaking Bad)
Kimberly Neville (Noises Off…)
Robert Z’Dar (Maniac Cop)
Robert O’Reilly (Star Trek: DS9)
Richard Burgi (The Green Inferno)
Denise Crosby (Star Trek: TNG)
Jeri Ryan (Star Trek: Voyager)
Michael Champion (Total Recall)
Lisa Darr (Popular)
Jeffrey Combs (Re-Animator)
François Chau (The Tick)
Lenny von Dohlen (Electric Dreams)
David Cassidy (The Partridge Family)
Signy Coleman (The X-Files)
Carolyn Seymour (Congo)
Bill Mumy (Lost In Space)
Matt Landers (Die Hard)
Victor Rivers (Hulk)
Claire Stansfield (Xena: WP)
Corinne Bohrer (Veronica Mars)

 The series is a mash-up of the Barry Allen and Wally West eras of the comics. The show’s producers, Danny Bilson and Paul De Meo, wisely chose to use the Barry Allen version of the character (played by John Wesley Shipp). This was probably due to the greater story possibilities that Allen’s job as a police forensic scientist could offer. It didn’t matter that Barry had been killed off in the comics five years prior to the show. The character of Dr. Tina McGee (played by the savoury Amanda Pays) comes from the Wally West comics. She is a scientist who helps Barry understand and cope with his new powers of super speed.  The solid performances of the core cast make this show work despite its cartoony conventions. Barry Allen is an easy character to like because we can appreciate and empathize with his underdog-makes-good nature. Barry has always been inferior to his Dad and his overachieving older brother Jay. When he gains his extraordinary powers we can’t help but think that it couldn’t have happened to a more deserving guy.

Also noteworthy is the impish chemistry between Shipp and Pays. Their characters have an intimate, yet platonic relationship that is almost as charming as Pays’ accent. Alex Désert is underused as Barry’s friend and coworker, Julio Mendez. Désert’s easy-going, friendly presence provides a necessary counterpoint to Barry’s no-nonsense ‘get-the-job-done’ attitude. It’s too bad that he didn’t have more to do than set Barry up on blind dates and make wisecracks. The show was produced in the wake of the massive success of Tim Burton’s 1989 Batman film. The mood and tone of that movie is a huge influence on the first few episodes of The Flash, especially the Pilot episode, “The Origin of a Super Hero.” That episode begins with an establishing shot of Central City that is a blatant copy of the opening scene in Batman where we first see Gotham. We also see the same ‘evil steam’ shooting up from the sewers and citizens scurrying to get indoors, away from all the immoral activity that abounds on the mean streets of Gotham . . .er. . . Central City. Later on, the confrontation between Flash and the bad guy is also an obvious lift from Batman, complete with the “You made me!” line.As the series progresses, it stops trying to ape the manner and feel of Batman and takes on more of a 1940s film-noir motif – only a lot more colourful. The ‘Tim Burton Effect’ still lingers though. One such pastiche, which ironically is not in the Pilot episode, is the use of period props such as 1950s automobiles. Burton can get away with such an aesthetic because his films often take place in an ambiguous timeline where stylistically, anything goes. In The Flash, the out-of-time props are an unnecessary distraction. They’re especially irrelevant during the episode titled “Ghost in the Machine” where The Ghost, a villain from the 1950s, comes out of a deep freeze to again wreak havoc on Central City in 1990. It’s hard to buy into The Ghost’s future shock when people are still wearing trilbies and driving around in Ford Fairlanes.
The show didn’t have great villains but like most genre entertainment, thinking is the real enemy. The Trickster, played by Mark Hamill, is definitely the show’s greatest and most memorable antagonist, even if he is just a check-in-the-box inclusion of a Joker-like homicidal clown. Hamill is great, playing the character as an obsessed, erotomaniacal master-of-disguise while the script, unfortunately, wants him to be a poor man’s Joker. Ironically, he would later go on to recycle his Trickster performance as the voice of the Joker on Batman: The Animated Series. Even Captain Cold works reasonably well within the context of the series, reinvented here as an albino mercenary with an ice gun. Actor Michael Champion plays the role relatively straight and plausible, as if shooting people up with frost is an everyday occurrence. He even gets to deliver the line, ‘The Iceman Cometh,’ six years before Arnold Schwarzenegger would as Mr. Freeze in Batman and Robin.

Michael Nader’s stone-faced overacting as outlaw motorcycle gang leader, Nicholas Pike is way too over-the-top to be taken seriously. Casting soap opera or sitcom actors as villains is always a bad idea. The difference between Hamill and Nader’s performances is that Hamill is trying to be humourous, Nader isn’t. David Cassidy and his widow’s peak are unfortunately a non-presence as Mirror Master in “Done with Mirrors.” He comes off as more of a Bizarro-Keith Partridge than a threatening adversary. One of the highlights of the series is “Fast Forward” where Flash is accidentally propelled 10 years into a bleak future where his powers are unstable. He’s got to find a way to get back to his own time and set things right. Every super hero / sci-fi show has to have its ‘evil parallel universe’ or ‘undesirable future’ story and The Flash is no exception. This episode reminds me of the 1960s Spider-Man cartoon where Spidey would be sucked into some twisted alternate dimension that he would have to fight his way out of. The scene where Flash is “falling” into the psychedelic void is a direct homage to that show. It really is an entertaining story if you can plow through the painful first act of Nader’s scenery chewing and hamming it up.One episode that is way more endearing than it probably has any right to be is “Twin Streaks” where an obligatory mad scientist type tries to clone Flash and ends up creating a sort of Bizarro-Flash in a story that vaguely resembles Bride of Frankenstein. The laughs, intentional or not, are effortless. Bizarro-Flash or Pollux as he’s called, wears a blue Flash costume. It would have been a nice wink-nudge to the fans if they had given him a yellow suit as a reference to Professor Zoom, the Reverse-Flash. Zoom was mentioned in another episode, after all. One of the show’s major clunkers is “Be My Baby” where Barry has to care for an infant that was left on his doorstep. It’s nothing but recycled humour from 3 Men and a Baby and countless sitcoms. This episode reads like an attempt to inject some feel-good, warm fuzzy moments into the show. I actually felt sorry for the then-unknown Bryan Cranston, who had the thankless job of playing the bad guy on this one. If the show’s producers truly wanted to feature more heartwarming stories they could have done an episode or episodes that focused on the heroic endeavors that Flash has performed for the medical community. There was one story from Mike Baron’s run on the comic where Wally West was charged with transporting a human heart across the US to a transplant patient. Story lines such as these could have been an untapped goldmine of drama and suspense as long as they didn’t get too sappy with it. It also would have been a welcome break from the hit-or-miss villain of the week.

Shirley Walker’s score music is tailor made to suit the flavour of each individual episode. “Beat the Clock”, a story about a jazz musician falsely accused of killing his wife, appropriately has a lonely sounding Chicago jazz score while “Watching the Detectives” features music that evokes old private-eye films of the 1940s to compliment that episode’s subject matter. The Flash’s opening theme song is composed by Danny Elfman and sounds like a recycled version of his Batman theme. The Flash is a keen show that had the potential to be much greater than it was. Its adherence to the original source material and the earnest portrayal of the characters by the core cast give the series its irresistible allure. This is essential viewing for comic book and sci-fi fans and it definitely deserves a spot on your DVD shelf.