REVIEW: DERAILED (2005)

CAST

Clive Owen (Sin CIty)
Jennifer Aniston (Just Go With It)
Vincent Cassel (Black Swan)
Melissa George (A Lonely Place To Die)
Giancarlo Esposito (Ali)
RZA (G.I. Joe Retaliation)
Xzibit (XXX 2)
Addison Timlin (Little Sister)
David Morrissey (Basic Instinct 2)

Charles Schine (Clive Owen), is an advertising executive. His marriage to Deanna (Melissa George) is deteriorating, and his daughter Amy (Addison Timlin) suffers from diabetes, requiring expensive medication. Charles’s story is being written down by an unidentified man in a prison cell. On a commuter train, Charles encounters an alluring woman named Lucinda Harris (Jennifer Aniston). She is a married financial adviser. The two show each other photographs of their respective daughters and begin to talk. A mutual attraction develops, and the two begin meeting frequently. Ultimately, they decide to consummate their affair and wind up in a seedy hotel. An armed man—later identified as Philippe LaRoche (Vincent Cassel)—bursts into the hotel room, beats Charles, and brutally rapes Lucinda. Charles and Lucinda agree not to report the crime, as they do not want their spouses to learn of the affair. Shortly after, Charles is blackmailed by LaRoche, who threatens to kill his family if he does not pay $20,000, which Charles promptly pays. A month later, the attacker calls again, this time demanding $100,000.

Charles explains his situation to Winston (RZA), an ex-con who works as a repairman in his building and whom Charles had earlier befriended. Winston offers to scare off LaRoche for ten percent of the payout. Charles agrees and embezzles the money from his company. He and Winston travel to the meeting location specified by LaRoche, intending to get the drop on him. However, before they can act, Winston is shot and killed. LaRoche appears and takes the money, leaving Charles to dispose of the body. Afterwards, Charles is questioned by detective Franklin Church (Giancarlo Esposito) about Winston’s murder. Later, Charles receives a call from LaRoche who claims that he will kill Lucinda if Charles doesn’t deliver the $100,000. Charles takes the money from an account meant for his daughter’s medical treatment and makes the payoff.hqdefault

The next day, Charles stops by Lucinda’s company to ask to see her and is introduced to the real Lucinda Harris. The woman he met on the train is identified as Jane, a temp who had worked there briefly. He goes to Lucinda’s apartment, which he realizes is actually in the process of being rented out. Seeing that Lucinda’s photograph of her daughter was actually a cut out of a stock picture in a brochure, Charles realizes Jane was in on the scam. He tracks her down and sees her kissing LaRoche. Determined to retrieve his stolen money, he follows Jane’s moves and sees that she is seducing another unsuspecting businessman (David Morrissey). He rents a room in the same hotel where Jane, LaRoche, and their partner Dexter (Xzibit) set him up and awaits them as they snare their new target. Jane and the businessman go to the room, but Charles knocks LaRoche unconscious before he can follow them. Charles breaks in and demands the return of his money. A gunfight ensues, and everyone is shot but Charles, who watches Jane die. Charles, while in his rented room, is cleared by the police near the crime scene. As he leaves the hotel lobby, the continued investigation has all contents from the hotel safe laid out on the front desk. Charles casually identifies his briefcase, which still contains his money, and quietly leaves the hotel.Derailed-2005-film-images-648d925b-10f3-4fdd-841b-ab8c727c77fCharles is later accused by his boss Eliot (Tom Conti) of stealing money from the company, and he is arrested for embezzling the $10,000 that he paid Winston and is sentenced to six months of community service, teaching in a prison. During one of his classes, he comes across the story about him written on one of the students papers. The unknown writer instructs him to go to the laundry room. There, Charles finds LaRoche, who survived the gunfight. LaRoche threatens to continue to disrupt Charles’s life, but Charles reveals that he has planned the encounter. He produces a shank, which Winston had given him, and stabs LaRoche to death. As Charles leaves, he encounters Detective Church who indicates that he knows LaRoche killed Winston. While Church suspects Charles of killing LaRoche, he lets him return to his family, where Charles reconciles with his wife and daughter.I found the story line original and, at times, truely frightening. Jennifer Anniston is excellent, as is Clive Owen. The added plot twists only add to the film. One of the best thrillers I have seen- well worth a watch.

 

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REVIEW: EASTERN PROMISES

CAST

Viggo Mortensen (Lord of The Rings)
Naomi watts (Insurgent)
Vincent Cassel (Black Swan)
Armin Mueller-Stahl (The Dust Factory)
Sinéad Cusack (V For Vendetta)
Donald Sumpter (Game of Thrones)
Josef Altin (the Young Victoria)
Tatiana Maslany (Orphan Black)
Tamer Hassan (Clash of The Titans)

Anna Khitrova, a British-Russian midwife at a London hospital, finds a Russian-language diary on the body of Tatiana, a 14-year-old girl who dies in childbirth. She also finds a card for the Trans-Siberian Restaurant, which is owned by Semyon, an old vor in the Russian Mafia. Anna sets out to track down the girl’s family so that she can find a home for the baby girl, having meetings with Semyon, whom she initially regards as friendly. Anna’s mother Helen does not discourage her, but Anna’s Russian uncle and self-proclaimed former KGB officer, Stepan, whom Anna asks for help with the translation of the diary, urges caution. Through translation of the diary, Anna comes to learn that Semyon and his ignorant, unstable son Kirill had raped the girl, gotten her addicted to heroin and forced her into prostitution. Ultimately, Anna realizes that the baby was fathered by Semyon not Kirill.

Kirill’s driver is Nikolai Luzhin, who also serves as the family “cleaner”, removing evidence and dumping murdered bodies in the River Thames. Through Nikolai, Semyon, fearing prosecution, promises to give the location of the girl’s family to Anna if she hands back the diary. Nikolai takes the diary and gives a location, but urges Anna to keep the baby in London. Semyon distrusts Anna’s uncle Stepan and orders Nikolai to kill him. Nikolai accepts and soon Stepan goes missing. As Nikolai’s star rises within the vory, Semyon sponsors him as a full member, due in part to Nikolai’s protection of Semyon’s incompetent son, who authorized a hit on a rival Chechen vory leader with the help of a Kurdish associate, Azim. The hit was ill-advised and not approved by Semyon. Two Chechen hit-men soon arrive in London seeking vengeance and kill Azim’s mentally handicapped nephew who also took part in the hit. Semyon hatches a plan to trick Nikolai into taking Kirill’s place during a meeting at the baths with Azim. The Chechens attack, thinking Nikolai is Kirill, but Nikolai kills them both, ending up in the hospital with severe wounds.

It is revealed that Nikolai is actually an FSB agent who has infiltrated the gang, working under license from the British Government. As part of his undercover duties, Nikolai was able to read Tatiana’s diary before Semyon destroyed it and hatches a plan with his handler to have Semyon arrested for statutory rape, with a paternity test of Tatiana’s baby as evidence. Stepan is also safe, hiding in a 5-star hotel in Edinburgh for protection. Semyon orders Kirill to kidnap the baby girl and kill her. But as Kirill sits by the Thames working up the courage to throw the child in, Nikolai and Anna find him and persuade him to give the baby back. Nikolai and Kirill embrace as Nikolai tells him that his father is finished and they are now the bosses. Nikolai succeeds Semyon as boss of the organization and Anna gains custody of Tatiana’s baby, whom she names Christine.

Written by Steve Knight, whose previous credits include Stephen Frears’ decent ‘Dirty Pretty Things’, ‘Eastern Promises’ is a darker, more claustrophobic film. Its characters undergo torturous physical – even spiritual – transformations in a way that deliberately undermines and clouds its conclusion. One suspects the Russian accents have been overdone in places, but this is as unsettling and provocative as cinema gets.

 

REVIEW: JASON BOURNE

CAST

Matt Damon (The Martian)
Tommy Lee Jones (Batman Forever)
Alicia Vikander (Ex_Machina)
Vincent Cassel (Black Swan)
Julia Stiles (Silver Linings Playbook)
Riz Ahmed (Four Lions)
Ato Essandoh (Django Uncahined)
Gregg Henry (Guardians of The Galaxy)

A decade after he exposed Operation Blackbriar and disappeared, Jason Bourne has finally recovered from his amnesia, isolating himself from the world and making a living by taking part in illegal fighting rings. In Reykjavík, Nicky Parsons, who has been collaborating with a hacktivist group led by Christian Dassault, hacks into the CIA’s mainframe server in order to expose the CIA’s black ops programs. In the process, Parsons finds documents that concern Bourne’s recruitment into the Treadstone program and his father’s role in the program, and she decides to travel to Athens to find and inform him. Parsons’ system intrusion alerts Heather Lee, the head of the CIA’s cyber ops division, and CIA Director Robert Dewey.

In Greece, Parsons and Bourne meet at Syntagma Square in the midst of a violent anti-government protest. They evade the CIA teams sent to locate them, but Parsons is killed by the Asset, an ex-Blackbriar program assassin who also holds a personal grudge against Bourne, having been captured and tortured following Bourne’s actions that exposed Blackbriar. Before she dies, Parsons is able to pass the key to a luggage locker that holds the CIA files on to Bourne. Intending to find the answers about his past and family, Bourne locates Dassault in Berlin. Decrypting Parsons’s files, Bourne discovers that his father, Richard Webb, was an analyst for the CIA and was involved with the creation of the original Treadstone program. However, malware planted in the files alerts the CIA to Bourne’s location, and Dewey sends a team to capture him while Lee remotely erases the files to prevent another leak. Dassault attacks Bourne, but is killed in the fight. Lee takes the opportunity to alert Bourne to the team’s presence as she believes that he can be persuaded to return to the agency. Using the few leads he gathered in Berlin, Bourne tracks Malcolm Smith, a former Treadstone surveillance operative, in London and arranges to meet him in Paddington Plaza.

Lee persuades Dewey to allow her to contact Bourne in person to attempt to bring him back in. Dewey agrees, but secretly authorizes the Asset to eliminate Lee’s team and kill Bourne, who he believes cannot be reasoned with. Knowing that the CIA is watching him, Bourne evades Lee and the Asset long enough to confront Smith. Smith admits that Richard Webb created Treadstone, but tried to prevent them from recruiting Bourne. Under Dewey’s orders, the Asset killed Richard Webb and staged his death as a terrorist attack to persuade Bourne to join Treadstone. Smith is killed by the Asset while Bourne escapes and finds Lee, who admits that she is not comfortable with Dewey’s methods and directs him to a technology convention in Las Vegas.

Dewey is scheduled to attend the convention for a public debate on privacy rights with Aaron Kalloor, the CEO of social media enterprise Deep Dream. Kalloor is the public face of corporate social responsibility in the Internet age, but he has secretly been funded by Dewey, who intends to use Deep Dream for real-time mass surveillance alongside the reborn of targeted assassination programs Treadstone, Blackbriar, Outcome and LARX, now collectively known as “Iron Hand”. Suspecting that Kalloor will refuse to allow the CIA access to Deep Dream, Dewey authorizes the Asset to assassinate Kalloor and Lee, whom he no longer trusts. Bourne arrives at the convention in time to thwart the assassination and confronts Dewey in his suite. Dewey appeals to Bourne’s sense of patriotism as he stalls for time, knowing that agents are closing in. Bourne kills Jeffers, Dewey’s right-hand man, while Lee kills Dewey before he can shoot Bourne. Bourne covers up Lee’s involvement before giving chase to the Asset and finally kills him by breaking his neck after a long fight in a sewer.
In the aftermath, Lee convinces Edwin Russell, the Director of National Intelligence, that Dewey’s methods were outdated and offers herself as a candidate to become Dewey’s replacement as CIA Director, to act as Russell’s eyes and ears within the CIA. She outlines her plan to use Bourne’s trust to bring him back to the agency, but recognizes the need to kill him if he refuses. Lee approaches Bourne, promising him that the CIA will become the organization he thought it was when he joined. Bourne asks for time to consider her offer, but leaves a recording of her conversation with Russell in her car, making it clear that he does not trust her, before he disappears again.Whilst others find it quite easy to knock this movie, comparing it with each of the other Bourne films I was very content to see this Damon-Greengrass reunion. Due homage is paid to the back story, but this film will be remembered for the non-stop action. In fact it would be impossible to squeeze in any more. The screen is filled with mayhem and chaos particularly fitting the Greece location shots and following the usual cat and mouse manoeuvring between Bourne and the cronies at Langley. Vincent Cassell is Bourne’s nemesis – and this time it’s personal. This movie met my expectations and Bourne fans will not be disappointed.

REVIEW: BIRTHDAY GIRL

CAST

Nicole Kidman (Stoker)
Ben Chaplin (Cinderella)
Vincent Cassell (Black Swan)
Mathieu Kassovitz (War & Peace)
Ben Miller (Johnny English)

John Buckingham (Ben Chaplin), a lonely St Albans bank clerk, orders a mail-order bride Nadia (Nicole Kidman) from Russia on the Internet. John is uncomfortable and shy, but Nadia is sexually bold. Though Nadia cannot speak English and John cannot speak Russian, they soon bond. Later on, a man she introduces as her cousin Yuri (Mathieu Kassovitz) and his friend Alexei (Vincent Cassel) turn up to celebrate her birthday. Alexei soon shows that he has a temper. After a violent altercation, Alexei holds Nadia hostage and demands a ransom from John. John has grown to care for Nadia and is forced to steal from the bank where he has worked for ten years. After the ransom is paid, he realises that he has been the victim of an elaborate con. Nadia, Yuri, and Alexei are criminals, and Alexei is actually Nadia’s boyfriend.

John learns that the trio have carried out the same scam on men from Switzerland and Germany, among others. They take him prisoner, strip him down to his underpants, and tie him to a toilet in a motel. He eventually manages to free himself and quickly learns that Nadia has been left behind after Alexei discovered she was pregnant. John gets dressed and subsequently gets into a scrap with Nadia, who later reveals that she can indeed speak English and that her name is not Nadia.

John takes Nadia to turn her into the police – hoping to clear his name as a wanted bank robber. Ultimately, however, he sympathises with her and decides against it. He leaves her at the airport, where she is kidnapped by Alexei – who now wants Nadia to have the baby. John rescues her, tying Alexei to a chair. They make common cause against the two Russian men. Nadia informs John that her real name is Sophia. John, disguised as Alexei, leaves for Russia with Sophia.

The movie is grungy, dark and feels independent – it’s hard to imagine Hollywood royalty Nicole Kidman signing onto it, but she is really the reason this film remains interesting and engaging. Without her, I don’t think I would have bothered to sit through all of it.

REVIEW: SHREK

 

 

CAST

Mike Myers (Austin Powers)
Eddie Murphy (Dr. Dolittle)
Cameron Diaz (Bad Teacher)
John Lithgow (3rd Rock From The Sun)
Vincent Cassel (Ocean’s Thirteen)
Conrad Vernon (Bee Movie)
Chris Miller (Turbo)
Cody Cameron (Open Season)

 

Shrek, a green ogre who loves the solitude in his swamp, finds his life interrupted when many fairytale characters are exiled there by order of the fairytale-hating Lord Farquaad. Shrek tells them that he will go ask Farquaad to send them back. He brings along a talking Donkey who is the only fairytale creature who knows the way to Duloc.

Meanwhile, Farquaad tortures the Gingerbread Man into giving the location of the remaining fairytale creatures until his guards rush in with something he has been searching for: the Magic Mirror. He asks The Mirror if his kingdom is the fairest of them all but is told that he is not even a king. To be a king he must marry a princess and is given three options, from which he chooses Princess Fiona, who is locked in a castle tower guarded by lava and a dragon. The Mirror tries to mention “the little thing that happens at night” but is unsuccessful.

Shrek and Donkey arrive at Farquaad’s palace in Duloc, where they end up in a tournament. The winner gets the “privilege” of rescuing Fiona so that Farquaad may marry her. Shrek and Donkey easily defeat the other knights in wrestling-match fashion, and Farquaad accepts his offer to move the fairytale creatures from his swamp if Shrek rescues Fiona.

Shrek and Donkey travel to the castle and split up to find Fiona. Donkey encounters the dragon and sweet-talks the beast before learning that it is female. Dragon takes a liking to him and carries him to her chambers. Shrek finds Fiona, who is appalled at his lack of romanticism. As they leave, Shrek saves Donkey, caught in Dragon’s tender clutches, and forces her to chase them out of the castle. At first, Fiona is thrilled to be rescued but is quickly disappointed when Shrek reveals he is an ogre.

As the three journey to Duloc, Fiona urges the two to camp out for the night while she sleeps in a cave. Shrek and Donkey stargaze while Shrek tells stories about great ogres and says that he will build a wall around his swamp when he returns. When Donkey persistently asks why, he says that everyone judges him before knowing him; therefore, he feels he is better off alone, despite Donkey’s admission that he did not immediately judge him when they met.

Along the way, Shrek and Fiona find they have more in common and fall in love. The trio is almost at Duloc, and that night Fiona shelters in a windmill. When Donkey hears strange noises coming from it, he finds Fiona turned into an ogre. She explains her childhood curse and transforms each night, which is why she was locked away, and that only her true love’s kiss will return her to her “love’s true form”. Shrek, about to confess his feelings for Fiona with a sunflower, partly overhears them, and is heartbroken as he mistakes her disgust with her transformation to an “ugly beast” as disgust with him. Fiona makes Donkey promise not to tell Shrek, vowing to do it herself. The next morning, Shrek has brought Lord Farquaad to Fiona. The couple return to Duloc, while a hurt Shrek angrily leaves his friendship with Donkey and returns to his now-vacated swamp, remembering what Fiona “said” about him.

Despite his privacy, Shrek is devastated and misses Fiona. Furious at Shrek, Donkey comes to the swamp where Shrek says he overheard Donkey and Fiona’s conversation. Donkey keeps his promise to Fiona and tells Shrek that she was talking about someone else. He accepts Shrek’s apology and tells him that Fiona will be getting married soon, urging Shrek into action to gain Fiona’s love. They travel to Duloc quickly, thanks to Dragon, who had escaped her confines and followed Donkey.

Shrek interrupts the wedding before Farquaad can kiss Fiona. He tells her that Farquaad is not her true love and only marrying her to become king. The sun sets, which turns Fiona into an ogre in front of everyone in the church, causing a surprised Shrek to fully understand what he overheard. Outraged by Fiona, Farquaad orders Shrek killed and Fiona detained. Shrek whistles for Dragon who bursts in along with Donkey and devours Farquaad. Shrek and Fiona profess their love and share a kiss; Fiona is bathed in light as her curse is broken but is surprised that she is still an ogre, as she thought she would become beautiful, to which Shrek replies that she is beautiful. They marry in the swamp and leave on their honeymoon while the rest celebrate by singing “I’m a Believer”.

Shrek is a sprawling surge into fairytale archetypes and stereotypes – the ogre, the noble steed, the damsel in distress, the evil lord, a fire-breathing dragon, Pinnochio, the three little pigs, the medieval tournaments and the festering forest swamp – it indulges and loses itself in the fun of these staples and it makes no pretense about it. The creators at DreamWorks Studios brush up on an old fairytale premise of a hero saving the damsel in distress from the dragon’s keep with intelligent, deft strokes. The result is a meticulously animated, hilarious, heartwarming fluff of a film.

REVIEW: BLACK SWAN

 

CAST

Natalie Portman (Thor)
Mila Kunis (Ted)
Vincent Cassel (Jason Bourne)
Barbara Hershey (Falling Down)
Winona Ryder (Edward Scissorhands)
Ksenia Solo (Lost Girl)
Kristina Anapau (Cursed)
Janet Montgomery (Wrong Turn 3)
Sebastian Stan (Captain America: The First Avenger)
Toby Hemingway (The Finder)

Nina Sayers (Natalie Portman), is a professional dancer in a New York ballet company. Nina lives in New York City with her overprotective mother, Erica (Barbara Hershey). The company is preparing to open the season with Swan Lake. The director, Thomas Leroy (Vincent Cassel), is looking for a new principal dancer after forcing Beth Macintyre (Winona Ryder) into retirement. Thomas wants the same ballerina to portray the innocent, fragile White Swan as well as her mysterious, sensual twin, the Black Swan. Nina auditions for the part, performing flawlessly as the White Swan, but she is not able to emulate the characteristics of the Black Swan. Upset, Nina approaches Thomas and asks him to reconsider her as the lead role. Thomas forcibly kisses Nina, and she displays a change of character and bites him, convincing him that she has the ferocity to play the Black Swan. Nina begins to witness strange happenings, and her mother finds scratches on her back.

An intoxicated Beth angrily confronts Thomas and Nina. Nina is worried that she will befall the same eventual fate as Beth, but stays quiet. Thomas tells Nina she needs to give herself to the sensuality of the Black Swan. He tells her to go home and masturbate, which she does. The next day, Nina finds out that Beth was seriously injured in a car accident, and Thomas tells her it was a suicide attempt. Nina realizes Beth will never dance again, and tearfully unpacks her belongings in Beth’s former dressing room.

Thomas tells Nina to watch Lily (Mila Kunis), another dancer in the company, whom he describes as lacking Nina’s flawless technique but possessing an uninhibited quality that Nina has not shown. The relationship between Nina and Lily grows tense. During rehearsal, Thomas kisses Nina passionately, but leaves abruptly and tells her she must seduce him with her dancing. Nina finds unexplained scratches and blood on her body. Nina and her mother have an argument, interrupted by Lily’s unexpected arrival at their apartment. Lily and Nina go for a night out.

At a restaurant that evening, Lily offers Nina a capsule of ecstasy to help her relax. Initially, Nina turns it down, but later accepts a drink with ecstasy powder in it. Nina returns home late with Lily, fights with her mother, barricades herself in her room, and has sex with Lily until the latter seemingly smothers her with a pillow. The next morning, Nina wakes up alone and late for the dress rehearsal. When she arrives at the studio, she finds Lily dancing the Black Swan. After she confronts her, Lily admits she spent the night with a man she met at the club, and Nina realizes the encounter didn’t really happen. Nina’s hallucinations become stronger and more graphically sexual and violent.

Nina trashes the apartment and slams her bedroom door on her mother’s hands, and has hallucinations of becoming freakishly swanlike. Concerned about Nina’s behavior, her mother tries to prevent her from performing on opening night in an effort to keep her daughter safe. An enraged Nina forces her way out of the apartment. Thomas had assigned understudy Lily to take over, but is impressed at Nina’s confidence, and lets her play the Swan Queen. The first act goes well, until Nina is distracted by a hallucination during a lift, causing her partner to drop her. Distraught, she returns to her dressing room and finds Lily there. Lily announces her plans to play the Black Swan. Nina shoves her into a mirror, shattering it. Lily, seemingly dead, awakens, and her face changes shape, now a copy of Nina’s. The doppelganger starts to strangle Nina, who then grabs a shard of glass and stabs her rival in the stomach, apparently killing her. The doppelganger’s face reverts to that of Lily’s. Nina hides the body and returns to the stage.

Sprouting feathers, her arms become black wings as she finally loses herself and is transformed into a black swan. At the end of the act, she receives a standing ovation. Offstage, Thomas and the rest of the cast congratulate her on her stunning performance. Nina takes Thomas by surprise and kisses him. Back in her dressing room before the final act, Nina is congratulated by Lily, revealing that their fight was, again, imaginary. The mirror, however, is still shattered. Nina removes a small shard from her own body and realizes she stabbed herself. Dancing the last scene, in which the White Swan throws herself off a cliff, Nina spots her mother weeping in the audience. As Nina falls backward onto a hidden mattress, the theater erupts in thunderous applause. Thomas and the cast gather to congratulate her—only to find that she is bleeding profusely. As the white ceiling lights envelop her, she whispers, “I felt it. Perfect. It was perfect.”

As well as Portman shining, it is Aronofsky’s direction that makes the film. Akin to the work of Dario Argento, `Black Swan’ mixes ripe drama with horrific imagery. This is not a horror film as such, but does play on the psychology of is characters and you as an audience. `Black Swan’ is a great film.

REVIEW: OCEAN’S THIRTEEN

CAST

George Clooney (The Ides of march)
Brad Pitt (Troy)
Matt Damon (Green Zone)
Elliott Gould (American History X)
Al Pacino (Devils Advocate)
Don Cheadle (Iron Man 3)
Casey Affleck (Gone Baby Gone)
Scott Caan (Gone In 60 Seconds)
Bernie Mac (Mr. 3000)
Carl Reiner (Two and a Half Men)
Michael Mantell (Secretary)
Eddie Izzard (Hannibal)
Ellen Barkin (Brooklyn’s Finest)
Noureen DeWulf (Anger Managment)
Julian Sands (Gotham)
Vincent Cassel (Black Swan)
Andy Garcia (The Unsaid)
Oprah Winfrey (The Color Purple)
Eddie Jemison (IZombie)

Reuben Tishkoff is conned by Willy Bank, his former business partner, by being forced to sign over the ownership rights of the new hotel-casino they were building together, “The Bank”. Reuben suffers a heart attack and becomes bedridden. Daniel Ocean offers Bank a chance to set things right, given his long history in Las Vegas and the fact that he “shook hands with Sinatra,” though Bank refuses. To avenge Reuben, he gathers his partners-in-crime and plans to ruin Bank on the opening night of the hotel.
First, they plan to prevent “The Bank” from winning the prestigious Five Diamond Award, which all of Bank’s previous hotels have won. Saul Bloom poses as the reviewer of the board, while the real reviewer is treated horribly during his stay by Ocean’s associates and the staff on their payroll. Next, they plan to rig the casino’s slot machines and games to force a payout of more than $500 million in winnings, forcing Bank to cede control of the casino to the board. This requires defeating “The Greco Player Tracker,” a state-of-the-art artificial intelligence system that ensures that all winnings are legitimate by measuring the players’ biometric responses for authenticity. They trick Bank into carrying a cell phone with a magnetron to disrupt the Greco. Ocean’s team acquires one of the giant drills used to bore the Channel Tunnel to simulate an earthquake under the hotel on opening night to ensure that the Greco shuts down. Rusty poses as a seismologist to tell Bank that an earthquake evacuation code is necessary for his new hotel, to which Bank reluctantly agrees to put in. When the team tries to drill towards The Bank, however, the drill breaks, forcing them to approach Terry Benedict, their previous antagonist, to fund the purchase of a second drill. As Benedict has a grudge against Bank, he offers Ocean the funds only if they also steal four necklaces Bank bought representing the four Five Diamond Awards, worth some $250 million, now on display in a secured case at the top of the hotel.
On opening night, FBI agents have been informed that machines have been rigged by Livingston Dell, and have identified him. This was intended, resulting in the card-shuffling machines being replaced by Roman Nagel, as Livingston was unable to effectively rig them. Basher distracts Bank long enough to allow Virgil and Turk Malloy to change the group’s FBI records, including their names and appearances, to prevent being identified alongside Livingston. Linus Caldwell seduces Bank’s assistant to gain access to the display and switch the diamonds with fakes. He is interrupted by the lead FBI agent, who explains the diamond theft to Bank’s assistant. Linus is arrested, but as they exit in the elevator, the lead agent is revealed to be his father, Robert ‘Bobby’ Caldwell, who is in on Ocean’s plan. As they exit to the roof of the hotel for extraction via helicopter, they are caught by François “The Night Fox” Toulour, whom Benedict had ordered to intercept the diamonds. Linus gives the diamonds to Toulour, who escapes by parachuting off the hotel. However, upon Toulour’s exit, Linus, Bobby, and Basher extract the entire display case of the real diamonds from the hotel via the helicopter as Ocean had already been aware of Toulour’s presence in the hotel.
The plan continues as expected. Virgil and Turk Malloy use the drill to simulate the earthquake and, with “The Greco” disrupted via the magnetron in Bank’s phone, and guests leaving the hotel with their massive winnings because of the hotel’s new earthquake evacuation protocol, Bank realizes his ruin. As the guests evacuate the hotel outside, Bank sees the helicopter flying off with the diamonds. So does Toulour, who discovers that he holds only the fakes. Ocean lets Bank know that they did everything for Reuben. Bank cannot get revenge as he cannot prove that Ocean did anything illegal and all of Bank’s connections like Ocean better than Bank himself. The group uses the money they made off with to buy property north of the Las Vegas Strip for Reuben. To punish Benedict for attempting to steal the diamonds, Ocean donates his $72 million portion of the take to charity, forcing Benedict to publicly admit his philanthropy via television appearances. As the group disperses, Rusty ensures that the real Five Diamond reviewer, who suffered numerous discomforts during his stay at the hotel, is compensated by allowing him to win the jackpot on a rigged slot machine at the airport.
Silly but suave and a fine evening’s entertainment, just like the first two in this trilogy