Krysten Ritter (Veronica Mars)
Rachael Taylor (Transformers)
Eka Darville (Power Rangers RPM)
J.R. Ramirez (Arrow)
Terry Chen (Bates Motel)
Leah Gibson (Rise of The Planet of The Apes)
Carrie-Anne Moss (The Matrix)
Janet McTeer (The White Queen)
Callum Keith Rennie (Battlestar Galactica)

Krysten Ritter in Jessica Jones (2015)


Hal Ozsan (Redline)
Maury Ginsberg (Two Guys and a Girl)
Angel Desai (Black Knight)
Rebecca De Mornay (Risky Business)
Elden Henson (Daredevil)
Wil Traval (Once Upon a Time)
David Tennant (Doctor Who)
John Ventimiglia (The Sopranos)
Lisa Tharps (Law & Order: SUV)

The first season of Marvel’s Jessica Jones was a kind of miracle, combining a taut and entertaining superhero narrative with one of the most nuanced explorations of domestic abuse and sexual violence ever put on screen. Krysten Ritter’s prickly, guarded, hard-drinking Jessica is a female superhero with unique significance. Her very existence—a woman with literal super-strength who still fell prey to a male predator—skewers accepted narratives about victimhood, while her determined independence cuts through expectations of how women are “supposed” to act after assault.Krysten Ritter in Jessica Jones (2015)Ritter’s performance in the second season is a few degrees more emotional, as Jessica—prompted by her best friend Trish (Rachael Taylor)—finally begins to set in the trauma of her past. That trauma encapsulates not only Kilgrave’s abuse, but the car accident that killed her family and landed her in a hospital where mysterious, horrific, superpower-inducing experiments were conducted on her. And she’s not sad or scared about what was done to her; she’s furious. In an anger management support group she reluctantly attends, participants bounce a ball against the wall to relieve stress while they share their stories. Jessica bounces it so hard she smashes a hole in the wall, before confirming: “Still angry.” Female anger is often stigmatized; women put on a calm face for fear of being labelled crazy or hysterical or a bitch. To see it expressed so openly and so often in a Netflix comic-book adaptation feels faintly revolutionary.Rachael Taylor and Eka Darville in Jessica Jones (2015)That’s also true of the new season’s handling of Jessica’s sex life. When a midtown douche notices Jessica in a bar and leers—“Nice ass”—she wheels around and snaps, “What did you say?” Surely she’s about to kick his ass, you think. Smash-cut to: Jessica having joyless sex with this loser in a bathroom stall, her face a mask, her detachment painfully clear. It’s a stark contrast to her passionate clinches last season with Luke Cage (Mike Colter), which served to show that being raped did not define her. Then, sex was a way in which she reclaimed her body and her selfhood; now, it’s a way for her to dissociate. This coping mechanism is explored in greater depth following the introduction of her new love interest Oscar (JR Ramirez), a big-hearted family man who’s bewildered by Jessica’s resistance to intimacy.Krysten Ritter in Jessica Jones (2015)The plot thread driving the new season is Jessica and Trish trying to uncover the truth about 20 missing days from Jessica’s past: 20 days during which she went into hospital almost dead, and emerged with superpowers. Though she has total amnesia about this time, it gradually becomes clear that her origin story is similar to that of this season’s Big Bad (played by Janet McTeer), a mysterious, preternaturally strong young woman who was subjected to the same experiments as Jessica, and came out a “monster.” The presence of a super-powered villain terrorizing New York yet again only heightens the public backlash against “supers,” although the bigotry faced by Jessica and others like her is the one place where the show’s allegories feel clumsy, particularly in a scene where someone pointedly refers to “you people.”While the new season—at least for its first five episodes—lacks a threat as propulsive and engaging as Kilgrave, its ensemble also feels better served. Carrie Anne Moss’s steely, high-powered lawyer Jeri Hogarth, by now a mainstay of the Marvel TV universe, is propelled in a rich, moving new direction by some unexpectedly brutal news. And Trish’s history as a child star takes on new complexity when she’s forced by necessity to seek out a producer who assaulted her when she was a teenager. The moment in which Jessica confronts this particular creep, and denounces “pricks like you who think you can take whatever, or whoever, you want” would have been a thrill no matter the context, but in this Time’s Up moment in Hollywood it’s a particularly cathartic standout. As a female superhero whose anger makes her powerful, and whose trauma has no impact on her strength, Jessica Jones has never felt more essential.



Space Sentinels (1977)


George DiCenzo (She-Ra)
Evan C. Kim (V)
Dee Timberlake (The Bionic Woman)
Lou Scheimer (He-Man)
Linda Gary (Spider-Man 90s)
Alan Oppenheimer (Transformers)
Ted Cassidy (The Addams Family 60s)
Erika Scheimer (She-Ra)

The Space Sentinels, or The Young Sentinels, as it was originally named; was a fun series with flaws. Like much of Filmation’s shows, it was done on the cheap, with repeated use of stock footage. The concept owed much to other sources, with the robot MO conjuring up Star Wars, and the Sentinels from different worlds, taken from Green Lantern (although, to be fair, Green Lantern borrowed it from the Lensmen saga). The voice acting was typical for Filmation, bland at times, but with some good moments. Still, the stories were imaginative, for the most part.
hhThe Sentinels faced adversaries like Morpheus, a rogue Sentinel with all of their powers; Anubis, an alien being who was worshipped as a god by the ancient Egyptians; a sorceress; giant robots; and other menaces. Astrea was the leader, able to change shape into any animal form. Hercules was the strong man, and a bit of a dope. Mercury was the speedster and resident jokester; and MO, short for Maintenance Operator, was the comic relief and handy-robot. They were advised by Sentinel One, a sentient computer, which provided information and ran the functions of their ship. He appeared as a holographic projection of a head.gG1XGf6
Filmation did have one feature that made them stand out from other studios: they were very socially progressive. There was a diverse racial mix within the group; Astrea was African,Mercury was Asian. Astrea was the leader, and clearly the most intelligent. This was still fairly radical in the 70’s.




Bruce Campbell (Jack of All Trades)
Ray Santiago (My Name Is Earl)
Dana DeLorenzo (2 Broke Girls)
Lucy Lawless (Spartacus)
Michelle Hurd (Daredevil)
Ted Raimi (Xena: Warrior Princess)
Pepi Sonuga (Famous in Love)

Bruce Campbell in Ash vs Evil Dead (2015)


Joel Tobeck (Young Hercules)
Lee Majors (The Six Million Dollar Man)
Stephen Lovatt (Spartacus: Gods of The Arena)
Stephen Ure (Deathgasm)
Ellen Sandweiss (Oz The Great and Powerfui)
Campbell Cooley (Power Rangers Ninja Steel)
Sara West (Dead Girls)
Nicholas Hope (Soul Mates)

Ash vs Evil Dead (2015)Though not without a few stumbles, Ash vs Evil Dead’s second season was a definite improvement over its freshman year run. Not that Season 1 wasn’t fun and ferocious gooey gory goodness, but it didn’t quite have a handle on Ash, as a character, like Season 2 did. Last year, Ash seemed to bounce back and forth between total doofus and a more earnest sort of hero who was in the midst of a transformative arc. What was needed — and yes, it’s tricky — was a blend of the two. Ash needed to become less of a reluctant savior while still being fundamentally, you know, Ash.This is where Season 2 really nailed it. Sure, we got some truly awesome action set pieces involving rampaging killer cars, diabolical devil trees, and all sorts of evil minions of hell — sequences that awesomely pushed us to our hardcore gore, and good taste, limits — but what resonated the most about this second year was how well Ash came off as a character. Ash was allowed to be smart, but in his own goofball way. For example, he’d have ideas to track down books and demons that involved raging alcohol-infused parties and his iguana’s pet tracker. Plans that sounded totally asinine but fell into that “so dumb they actually worked” category. Even Ruby, Ash’s biggest critic, constantly had to admit that Ash, for better or worse, could get things done.Bruce Campbell, Ray Santiago, and Dana DeLorenzo in Ash vs Evil Dead (2015)Bringing Ash back home and revealing that he’d been ostracized by his town and family after the blood-soaked events of the Evil Dead films was a crucial part of this blending. Ash was given, of all things, an off-screen backstory and through this he could be afforded spare moments of vulnerability. Ash could bicker with his bigoted, bitter father (infused with wonderful crotchetiness by Lee Majors) while we, the viewers, could know that he secretly longed for his love and approval.Bruce Campbell and Ray Santiago in Ash vs Evil Dead (2015)Pablo’s story this year, as a wannabe warrior-turned-living version of the Necronomicon, helped give the season a nice flow. Season 1 was a road trip. Not every stop along the journey hit the mark. This time, even with the time travel, Ash sorta stayed put in Elk Grove and it was Pablo’s connection to the book, and the rise of Baal, that moved us groovily through the story. Pablo’s death also really added a cool exclamation point that the final two episodes needed. Sure, Ash’s little burrito would come back to life by the end, but Ash’s grief over losing his friend is what led to the final defeat of Baal.Lucy Lawless and Joel Tobeck in Ash vs Evil Dead (2015)Another thing that Season 2 brought to the table was a better take on Lucy Lawless’ Ruby. Essentially the straight-laced reactive character in the group (though everyone side-eyes Ash), Ruby joined the Ghostbeaters this year as a half-demon who’d made a horrible mistake. Season 1 never gave us her origins or (well explained) motivations, so it was fitting to see her change completely and get rebooted for the good guys. Unfortunately, this Ruby died in the finale and was replaced with 80s evil Ruby..Bruce Campbell in Ash vs Evil Dead (2015)Ruby was in Kelly’s ear all season, talking destiny and taking matters into her own hands. Then Kelly even had her own “Ash Fight” when Ash was supposedly under the control of Baal and she got to throw down with the demented therapy puppet (which was amazing). She became even more of badass than season 1 and it will be interesting to see what becomes of Kelly in season 3.Dana DeLorenzo in Ash vs Evil Dead (2015)I’d be remiss if I closed this review without mentioning Ash being dragged up into a possessed corpse’s butt. This season definitely went above and beyond when it came to, um, orifices and fluids (of all kinds), but this moment, back in the second episode, was really one of the most gag-worthy and “out there” moments the show has ever done, finally taking full advantage of being on an anything goes network like Starz. It was magnificent and, though the show may try, it’ll probably never be topped.
bp1o7i3a6alalclalucbAsh vs Evil Dead: Season 2 gave us a fully realized Ash, who was both hilarious and valiant, while also fleshing out his character more with a great “town boogeyman” backstory. It would have been nice to see Kelly’s arc land somewhere more significant, but overall this was a raunchy, gloppy good time filled with grit and guts.


The Tick (2017)


Peter Serafinowicz (spy)
Griffin Newman (Draft day0
Valorie Curry (Blair Witch)
Brendan Hines (Lie To Me)
Jackie Earle Haley (Watchmen)
Yara Martinez (Jane The Virgin)

Peter Serafinowicz in The Tick (2017)


Francois Chau (Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II)
Townsend Coleman (Black Moon Rising)
Bryan Greenberg (Prime)
Alan Tudyk (Firefly)
Scott Speiser (6 Ways To Die)

The Tick (2017)I’ll admit it. When I heard Amazon was rebooting superhero sendup “The Tick,” I wasn’t exactly thrilled. I started watching the first six episodes mostly opposed to the idea, arms crossed, mumbling things like “this isn’t my ‘Tick.'” You know what? I was wrong. Completely wrong. Please accept my apologies for being such an obstinate fool. Now that I’ve seen a full season of “Tick” creator Ben Edlund’s and Executive Producer Barry Josephson’s vision for rebooting the franchise, I’m convinced this might be the best iteration yet. We still get to enjoy the goofball antics of Tick and Arthur, complete with hilarious sight gags, puns and awkward moments, but by making Arthur (Griffin Newman) the focus this time around, there’s an added thread that offers better opportunities for characters to evolve and grow.Peter Serafinowicz in The Tick (2017)If the original live-action series offered nonstop laughs in an insane asylum, this “Tick” provides a laugh a minute, but they’re far more satisfying. Don’t worry though, hard-core fans: classics like “SPOON!” still work comfortably within the show’s framework. Peter Serafinowicz’s version of the Tick is the same one we’ve known and loved for over 30 years: a superpowered, super joyful, big blue something or other with a head full of cotton balls. After six episodes, Arthur finally came to some acceptance of his role as a kind-of-hero in this world where supers and villains are the norm. The back half of the season deals with the return of diabolical evildoer The Terror (perfectly depicted by psychopath-playing expert Jackie Earle Haley) and his plot to kill beloved superhero Superian (Brendan Hines). In those second six eps, the show sets up some decent stakes, pays off nearly every storyline it opens up, and still manages to leave a couple of juicy morsels for the next round.Scott Speiser in The Tick (2017)The Tick still seeks answers as to who (or what) he is, and Arthur continues to grapple with what it means to be a hero and whether he’s accepting that answer. Edlund and Josephson are clearly dedicated to world-building beyond their two main characters, and the show absolutely benefits from a three-dimensional secondary cast. Even characters like hard-core vigilante Overkill (Scott Speiser) and Arthur’s sister Dot (Valorie Curry) experience good growth throughout the season. In a world where superheroes rule, watching “The Tick” is a refreshing roast of all the ridiculous tropes and cliches we’re so used to seeing in just about every other genre show out there. Now that Amazon Video is available on Apple TV (and most other streaming platforms and devices), there’s no excuse for you to miss out. Each episode is only 25 minutes long, so binging all 12 shouldn’t take you more than six hours, but you’ll definitely know if you’re on board for “The Tick” or not after the first half dozen. Amazon already gave the green light to a second season, which should bow sometime in early 2019. The entire season 1 is now available for streaming on Amazon Prime Video.Peter Serafinowicz and Griffin Newman in The Tick (2017)



Seijuu_sentai_gingaman_by_butters101-d73akqu“We pierce through the galaxy with legendary blades.” is the theme of Seijuu Sentai Gingaman. This was the first work that Yasuko Kobayashi had done as a Super Sentai headwriter. This series may have come out as one of the best series in the 1990s.gingamanreviewThe story of Gingaman begins with the inauguration of the would be 133rd Gingaman team by lineage. Although Hyuga would have beent he 133rd Ginga Red but fate soon made his younger brother Ryoma as the show’s main protagonist instead. The other Gingamen are Hayate (Ginga Green), Gouki (Ginga Blue), Hikaru (Ginga Yellow) and Saya (Ginga Pink). Later on, Hyuga returns and becomes the sixth ranger inheriting the anti-hero Bullblack’s powers after the latter’s heroic sacrifice.gingamanreviewThe Gingamen as warriors are imbued with this “Earth Power” that allows them to harness power from nature. Ryoma uses fire, Hayate uses wind, Gouki uses water, Hikaru uses lightning and Saya uses petals. The heroes had lost their home the Ginga Forest to the Balban and are forced to live with the “normal world” where they must learn to adjust. The plot kind of feels like it was taken from Flashman’s rangers where they must try to adjust to a new environment. The heroes must defend the Earth from the Balban Pirates before the Earth becomes their next target for destruction. To guide them in the city, they were assisted by the talking tree Moak and the acorn fairy Bokku. They live in a ranch where Harukiko and his son Yuuta accommodate them and knew of their identity as the 133rd Gingamen.gingamanreviewThe Balban are a group of intergalactic pirates who for some reason could breathe even in the vacuum of space. Captain Zahab and his pirate crew have been plundering and then destroying planets turning them into jewels. Whatever reasons Captain Zahab had, it felt like he was trying to achieve immortality and/or possibly godhood. The Earth becomes the only planet standing in his way as he was defeated by the first Gingamen. These space pirates were sealed off for centuries but were awakened by an earthquake in the modern day. They seek to get whatever energy they could to revive their giant monster Daitanic so they can proceed to destroy Earth.tumblr_inline_n877ce7Bx41rdhiybThe main villain crew of Captain Zahab has Shelinda as his steerwoman, Pucrates as his advisor and the four generals. The four generals are Sanbash the leader of the insect-like humanoid monsters, Budo leads a samurai-themed gang of monsters. Illies is an Egyptian themed sorceress who uses magically themed monsters. Batbas is a viking themed general with mechanical robotic beasts who cause havoc. Like the generals in Goranger, the generals only replaced each other when the previous one got destroyed in the conflict though they all appeared in the beginning. The reason was because Captain Zahab wanted to make sure they prevented any sabotaging done towards each other though it proved useless. Later, Dark Merchant Biznella came in later in the series to assist Balban.tumblr_inline_n877ce7Bx41rdhiybWhile my first exposure to Yasuko Kobayashi as a writer was Samurai Sentai Shinkenger, Gingaman was where I soon knew of how she started off as a headwriter right after she was an important secondary writer a year before with Denji Sentai Megaranger. She started out pretty good and she had a lot of good assistance from Naruhisa Arakawa and Junki Takegami as major secondary writers together with Shigenori Takatera as the head producer. Like during the time Toshiki Inoue was the head writer of Chojin Sentai Jetman – the series tried to blend in a lot of stuff from Hirohisa Soda’s era and became a successful series. This was just a preview of what we might expect from Kobayashi’s style as a head writer. This was also where Arakawa was also getting more of an idea on how he wanted to write Tokusatsu his style after he wrote Megaranger’s finale.Tumblr_n7z4uoApvM1s5uxaeo7_1280As I watched through this series and having seen more 90s Super Sentai, I really felt that it was a nice series though I wonder why was it really named Gingaman? After seeing Zyuohger’s premiere episodes, I felt like maybe Gingaman should have been named as Zyuohman or Seijuuman instead because it felt like it was too attached to the forest? I even thought that maybe its U.S. adaptation Power Rangers Lost Galaxy should have been named as Power Rangers Star Beasts instead of the official title it got. The show had some really good writing and production styles involved making it memorable. I felt that like Jetman, it should’ve gotten a post-series TV special (ex. a Hero Encyclopedia) but maybe it was hard to beat Jetman’s record. Instead, we had Timeranger get a post-TV series special where the Timerangers explained about the 23 previous Super Sentai series prior to them. Overall, it’s been an enjoyable series to watch.


Sonequa Martin-Green in Star Trek: Discovery (2017)


Sonequa Martin-Green (The Good Wife)
Doug Jones (Hellboy)
Shazad Latif (Penny Dreadful)
Anthony Rapp (A Beautiful Mind)
Mary Wiseman (Longmire)
Jason Isaacs (Peter Pan)

Mary Wiseman in Star Trek: Discovery (2017)


Wilson Cruz (13 Reasons Why)
Mary Chieffo (Miss Dial)
Sam Vartholomeos (Bull)
Emily Coutts (Crimson Peak)
Chris Violette (Power Rangers SPD)
Michelle Yeoh (Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon)
James Frain (Gotham)
Rekha Sharma (Battlestar Galactica)
Raven Dauda (Gossip)
Jayne Brook (Gattaca)
Mia Kirshner (The Vampire Diaries)

Jason Isaacs and Sonequa Martin-Green in Star Trek: Discovery (2017)Exposition done with, characters established both narratively and in our hearts, this run of episodes really got to play with the best parts of Star Trek canon. As many avid fans guessed, the Discovery did indeed end up in the Mirror Universe, a.k.a. a version of the universe in the OS episode Mirror, Mirror, where the crew were faced with (sometimes comically) evil versions of themselves. in Discovery, they go a step further, inverting the politics of the universe in one of the most well constructed arcs that any piece of Star Trek media has ever executed. In this universe, it is the tyrannical and thoroughly speciesist Terran empire which brutally subjugates all other alien races, who have banded together in a rebellion. This framing of the humans as a force of evil in the universe is boldly brilliant, forcing both characters and audiences to question morality in its deepest and most primal sense.Sonequa Martin-Green in Star Trek: Discovery (2017)Sonequa Martin-Green’s Michael Burnham is faced with her greatest challenge yet. While in the first half Michael was coming to terms with embracing her humanity, her stint in the parallel universe puts her very humanity to the test. Watching her staunch morals come into conflict with necessity and the fight for survival makes for truly captivating television. Martin-Green is a master of subtlety, and conveys emotion so skilfully through the layer of Vulcan conditioning that Michael carries. Cadet Tilly (Mary Wiseman) gets to try on a new brutal persona, complete with flat-ironed hair and an sexy evil outfit. Much more sinister in her new persona is Michelle Yeoh, who’s back as the evil version of the killed-too-soon Philippa Georgiou. Yeoh is a force of nature, effortlessly selling the icy calculation and savagery of the Terran Emperor. She also gets to entertain us all with her amazing martial arts skills, which adds an exciting new dimension to the fight scenes.Doug Jones and Mary Wiseman in Star Trek: Discovery (2017)The decision to cast Jason Isaacs as Lorca finally makes sense after the big twist in this half of the season, and he plays his role with gumption. He’s always been morally grey, but the slow easter eggs leading up to the big reveal really does have audiences only figuring it out in time to yell it right before Michael realises. It’s good writing, plain and simple. When was the last time you were really surprised by a twist in a TV show? I haven’t been shocked as well as that for a long time. The best part about that reveal is that the pay-off both plot wise and emotionally is massive. Less impactful is the death of Dr. Culver (Wilson Cruz). In that case, it seemed like he had to be killed off in order for the plot to work — to add complexity to Stamets (Anthony Rapp)’s otherwise pretty boring role, and to cement Ash’s descent. Shazad Latif once more is the stand-out actor of the show. He conveys the complex PTSD and trauma scenes just as well as he does the tender emotional ones. He really does have the biggest and most impressive range, and never once fails to deliver. Unfortunately, the script lets him down a little in places. One aspect that consistently frustrated me was the insistence of the script in making Ash’s trauma somehow about Michael. Though she is the protagonist, it felt forced and frankly disrespectful for every scene where Ash deals with his trauma to be shut down by Michael.Michelle Yeoh and Sonequa Martin-Green in Star Trek: Discovery (2017)In the same vein, though L’Rell was a character I found myself rooting for at the very beginning of the show, it’s impossible for audiences to ignore, like the narrative seems to, everything that she put Ash through. She’s been portrayed as a horrific abuser in relation to Ash’s storyline, yet somehow the explanation of Ash’s biological state seemed to absolve her of this in the eyes of the characters. Though the conclusion of the plot of Q’onos is clever and elevates the peaceful and hopeful ideals that Star Trek holds dear, it throws Ash under the bus in a way that doesn’t sit right with me. Though it loses momentum very slightly after they arrive back in their own universe, overall the pacing and structure of this half of the season works very well. The costuming and sets particularly are even more detailed and pertinent than in the first half of the season. The final ten minutes or so are a change of tone — very cheesy, but ultimately incredibly satisfying. The message of hope and idealism is broadcast loud and clear, hopefully heralding a 2018 where people in our world can aspire to be more like Michael Burnham.Michelle Yeoh in Star Trek: Discovery (2017)The closing moments were perhaps even more satisfying — who else shrieked when they saw NCC-17…?! Don’t you love a good Star Trek reference in your Star Trek!? Season 2 has thankfully been confirmed, so prepare yourselves for Captain Pike of the Enterprise to arrive on the scene to shake things up!



Emily Deschanel (Easy)
David Boreanaz (Angel)
Michaela Conlin (Enchanted)
T.J. Thyne (Ghost World)
Tamara Taylor (Serenity)
John Boyd (Lady In The Water)

Emily Deschanel and Eric Millegan in Bones (2005)


Michael Grant Terry (Veronica Mars)
Eric Millegan (The Phobic)
Tim Guinee (Iron Man)
Ravi Kapoor (Flight)
Sara Rue (Mom)
Ryan O’Neal (Love Story)
Carla Gallo (Superbad)
Patrick Gallagher (Sideways)
Justin Welborn (The Signal)
Melanie Paxson (Descendants)
Edward Asner (Elf)
Hal Holbrook (The Fog)
June Squibb (The Big Bang Theory)
Pej Vahdat (Lie To Me)
Jack Plotnick (Mystery Men)
Patricia Belcher (Jeepers Creepers)
Laura Spencer (The Big Bang Theory)
Joel David Moore (Julia X)
Marsha Thomason (lost)
Julie Claire (Devious Maids)
Ignacio Serricchio (The Wedding Ringer)
David Koechner (Anchorman)
Dave Thomas (Arrested Development)
Brandon Soo Hoo (Ender’s Game)
Eugene Byrd (Heroes)
Eddie McClintock (Warehouse 13)
Miranda Frigon (Next)
Lindsey Haun (Shrooms)
Wolfgang Bodison (A Few Good Men)
Stephen Fry (V For Vendetta)
Erin Way (Colony)
Jaime Bergman (Soulkeeper)
Betty White (The Golden Girls)
Fred Stoller (Little Man)
Cyndi Lauper (Mad About You)
Meagen Fay (That’s My Boy)
Tiffany Hines (Nikita)
Brit Shaw (Nashville)
Gerard Celasco (Moneyball)

One of television’s most beloved crime series draws to a close with even more suspense, fun and sexiness than ever. Brennan’s (Emily Deschanel) uncanny forensic skills help resolve even grislier cases, including a retirement home murder, a possible death by robot, and the slaying of a close friend. Along the way, family tragedy strikes and Booth (David Boreanaz) lands in the crosshairs of a serial killer. And a former Jeffersonian accused of murder kidnaps Brennan, prompting a shocking move by Booth. The fascinating storylines, heart and humour of Bones is here in all 12 episodes of the final season. David Boreanaz and Emily Deschanel in Bones (2005)Fans here have just twelve more opportunities to revisit Washington’s (fictitious) Jefferson Institute Laboratory. As ever Brennan and all painstakingly probe gory human remains to identify not only corpses but those who caused their demise. No matter how far-fetched such activities may seem, all are based on work creator Kathy Reichs does in real life.
David Boreanaz and Emily Deschanel in Bones (2005)There is the usual successful mixture of “yuk factor” and much that is very funny (especially when Brennan and Booth are amongst lumberjacks and lumberjills, not to mention when undercover at a car demolition darby). Far more serious is a very real threat with explosive developments. Not all key characters to survive intact! The Suspense is genuine.
Michaela Conlin, Emily Deschanel, Tamara Taylor, and T.J. Thyne in Bones (2005)Treats abound. They include the welcome return of former apprentices, one in particularly dramatic circumstances. A care home episode allows veterans to demonstrate their ability still to deliver the goods – Ed Asner in his late eighties, Hal Holbrook over ninety. Elsewhere Betty White, another nonagenarian, mischievously contributes.David Boreanaz, Emily Deschanel, and Dave Thomas in Bones (2005)All cast are on fine form. Over the twelve years their characters have evolved. That marriage of Brennan and Booth gave Emily Deschamel and David Boreanaz a rich new vein for comedy, they often at odds about the best way to bring up their young (Brennan insisting fairy stories be the violent originals).
David Boreanaz and Emily Deschanel in Bones (2005)Modest extras, it interesting to see Kathy Reichs herself participating. Movingly the stars look back over the years, tears evident as they realize this truly is the end. No series can please everyone all the time. (Some may have found much of the music track surplus to requirements.) BONES, though, consistently succeeded more than most. 246 episodes. This final season, shorter perhaps than many would have wished, represents a fitting fond farewell. Thanks go to all responsible for a show that for so long many have looked upon as special.
David Boreanaz and Emily Deschanel in Bones (2005)