REVIEW: SERVING SARA

CAST

Matthew Perry (The Odd Couple)
Elizabeth Hurley (EDtv)
Bruce Campbell (Ash vs Evil Dead)
Vincent Pastore (The Family)
Cedric The Entertainer (Kingdom Come)
Amy Adams (Man of Steel)
Terry Crews (The 6th Day)
Jerry Stiller (Zoolander)
Marshall Bell (A Nightmare on Elm Street 2)
Joe Viterelli (Analyze That)
Alaina Huffman (Staragte Universe)
Mike Judge (King of The Hill)

Joe Tyler (Matthew Perry), a process server, is a week late serving a Mafia kingpin known as Fat Charlie (Joe Viterelli) with a summons to appear as a witness in court. Joe’s abrasive boss Ray (Cedric the Entertainer) ridicules him while complimenting Joe’s rival, Tony (Vincent Pastore), for serving multiple summonses in record time. Willing to give Joe one last shot, Ray gives him an assignment to serve British socialite Sara Moore (Elizabeth Hurley) with divorce papers from her husband, Gordon (Bruce Campbell), who is at his ranch in Texas with his mistress, Kate (Amy Adams), while Sara is vacationing in upstate New York.
While Joe is attempting to serve Sara, Tony tips her off, thus revealing that Joe has been failing lately because Tony is sabotaging his efforts. Eventually Joe does serve her, but is mugged soon thereafter. Joe and Sara are forced to take the same bus; while they are riding together, Joe informs her that, under Texas law, she stands to gain nothing from the divorce. When she learns that “half of everything” would apply if the papers had been served under New York law, Sara offers Joe a million dollars to serve her husband and rip up her papers. Despite knowing that he might lose his job, Joe agrees and the two set off together to serve Gordon.
When Ray hears of their plan, he informs Gordon and sends Tony off to re-serve Sara. Gordon hires a bodyguard (Terry Crews) to protect himself, and Joe, expecting Tony to tail him, leaves a set of bogus clues that lead Tony to Miami, Florida, Bangor, Maine, and then Amarillo, Texas, where Tony is shot in the back as he attempts to get on the grounds of the wrong ranch to try to serve the papers. Sara and Joe trail Gordon to his ranch, but Gordon evades them. At the ranch, Sara takes some money and Gordon’s passport so that he can not leave the country. Sara and Joe stay overnight at a hotel, and Joe tells Sara of his dream of owning a vineyard. While Sara is bathing, Joe goes to the bar, and Gordon’s mistress appears to suggest a new deal to Joe; for one million dollars from the divorce settlement, she will reveal Gordon’s location. Joe agrees, but the entire deal is a setup to get Tony into the hotel room to serve Sara, which he does. Furious, Sara kicks Joe out.
While Joe contemplates his lost fortune and budding affection for Sara, he notices Tony’s watch in the picture Tony took of him serving Sara, and calls Ray to inform him that Tony forgot to set his watch to Central Time Zone, so that the papers do not take effect until 7:04 pm Central Time. With mere minutes until they both lose a fortune, Joe and Sara trail Gordon to a monster truck rally. They evade both Gordon’s bodyguard and Tony, and with seconds to spare, Sara knocks Gordon out by dropping a six-pack of beer on his head. Joe serves him under New York law and Gordon takes the papers. Tony and the bodyguard are carried out of the stadium on stretchers and then attempt to fight one another. The final scene shows Joe and Sara at Joe’s vineyard, where they taste-test a bottle of Joe’s first vintage before going inside to have sex.
I enjoyed this  road comedy. The highlight was Bruce Campbell and a before she was famous appearance from Amy Adams.

REVIEW: THE 6TH DAY

CAST

Arnold Schwarzenegger (End of Days)
Michael Rapaport (My Name Is Earl)
Tony Goldwyn (Kiss The Girls)
Sarah Wynter (Lost Souls)
Wendy Crewson (The Good Son)
Rodney Rowland (Veronica Mars)
Terry Crews (White Chicks)
Colin Cunninhgam (Elektra0
Robert Duvall (The Judge)
Michael Rooker (Guardians of The Galaxy)
Steve Bacic (Andromeda)
Ellie Harvie (The New Addams Family)
Don S. Davis (Stargate SG.1)
Hiro Kanagawa (Heroes Reborn)
Ben Bass (Bride of Chcuky)
Colin Lawrence (Watchmen)
Mark Gibbon (Man of Steel)
Peter Kent (Total Recall)
Gerard Plunkett (Sucker Punch)

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In the near future, the cloning of animals and human organs has become routine. Cloning entire humans, however, is prohibited by what are known as “Sixth Day” laws. Billionaire Michael Drucker, owner of cloning corporation Replacement Technologies, hires charter pilot Adam Gibson and partner Hank Morgan for a ski trip. Due to Drucker’s prominence, the two must first undergo blood and eye tests to verify their aptitude. On the day of Drucker’s arrival, Adam finds that his family dog Oliver has died, and Hank offers to fly Drucker instead to allow Adam time to have the pet cloned. After visiting a “RePet” shop, he remains unconvinced.
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Adam returns home and discovers that not only has Oliver already been cloned, but a purported clone of himself is with his family. Replacement Technologies security agents Marshall, Talia, Vincent and Wiley arrive with the intention on killing Adam. Adam escapes and this chase results in the deaths of Talia and Wiley. Both are later cloned. Adam seeks refuge at Hank’s apartment after the police betray him to the agents. A while later, Tripp (whom Adam recognizes from the ski trip) kills Hank and is mortally injured by Adam. Revealed as a religious anti-cloning extremist, Tripp informs Adam that Hank was a clone, since he killed the original one on the mountaintop earlier that day, to be able to kill Drucker, who was also a clone, and there’s now a new Drucker clone. Tripp then commits suicide to avoid being captured by Marshall and the others. The agents arrive again and Adam is able to kill Talia again, and steals her thumb. Adam sneaks into Replacement Technologies with Talia’s thumb and finds Dr. Griffin Weir, the scientist behind Drucker’s illegal human-cloning technology. Weir confirms Tripp’s story, adding that to resurrect Drucker the incident had to be covered up and Adam was cloned because they mistakenly believed he had been killed. Weir explains that Drucker – who already died years before – could lose all his assets if the revelation became public, since clones are devoid of all rights. Sympathetic with Adam’s plight, Weir gives him a memory disk (syncording) of the Drucker clone but warns him that Drucker may go after the other Adam and his family. Weir also discovers that Drucker has been engineering cloned humans with fatal diseases as an insurance policy against betrayal. Upon finding out that his own wife was one such victim, Weir confronts Drucker who then shoots him dead while promising to clone both him and his wife.
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Drucker’s agents abduct the Gibson family and Adam comes face to face with his clone. After punching the clone for sleeping with his wife, Adam teams up with his doppelgänger and the two devise a plan to destroy Drucker’s facility. While Adam wrecks the security system and gets himself captured, the clone sneaks in, plants a bomb and rescues his family. Drucker tells Adam that he himself is the clone; the other Adam is the original one. Enraged, Adam fights off Drucker’s agents and Drucker is mortally wounded. Drucker manages to clone himself before he dies but the malfunctioning equipment causes the new Drucker to be incomplete. As the cloned Adam fights his way to the rooftop, he is rescued via helicopter by the real one. Meanwhile, the new Drucker falls to his death and the facility explodes.
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Now having a more moderate view of cloning, the real Adam arranges for his clone to move to Argentina to start a satellite office of their charter business. The clone’s existence is kept a secret, especially upon discovering that his DNA has no embedded illnesses, giving him a chance at a full life. As a parting gift to the Gibson family, the clone gives them Hank’s RePet cat, Sadie. The real Adam gives the clone a flying send-off.

75785aa8a4d7471c917c7abed895f35a_compressedThe film is fast paced, while raising interesting questions about the morals of cloning. Arnies acting is as wooden as ever, but he has such screen presence this can as ever be forgiven. The special effects are good and make for a believable future.

REVIEW: CLICK

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CAST

Adam Sandler (50 First Dates)
Kate Beckinsale (Underworld)
Christopher Walken (The Prophecy)
David Hasselhoff (Knight Rider)
Henry Winkler (Happy Days)
Julie Kavner (The Simpsons)
Sean Astin (The Goonies)
Jonah Hill (Cyprus)
Jake Hoffman (Hook)
Katie Cassidy (Arrow)
Cameron Monaghan (Gotham)
Jennifer Coolidge (2 broke Girls)
Terry Crews (White Chicks)
Rob Scneider (The Hot Chick)
James Earl Jones (Star Wars)
Carolyn Hennesy (Legally Blonde 2)

Michael Newman is overworked and under appreciated by his boss, worse still, he doesn’t have enough hours in the day to devote time to his loving family. But then he happens upon eccentric salesman Morty, who puts a universal remote control Michael’s way, a control that perfectly controls his life…….at first.ClickFilms that deal with second chances via gods, angels and devils are not in short supply, everything from the mighty It’s A Wonderful Life, to the amiable Mr Destiny have covered this fantastical field. Enter Click, starring Adam Sandler {Newman}, another spin on the genre with the added kick of encompassing modern day technology into the equation. Split very much into two vastly different halves, Click finds Sandler reining in his usual shouty goof ball persona. Naturally for the first part we get the comedy set ups, at times hilarious and at others a little crass, but it’s never sledgehammer comedy of the like that Sandler has previously served up in spades. The reason for the restraint becomes evident when the films second half arrives, full of emotional fortitude it’s something of a shock at first to grasp the switch in tone, but it works real well, and it’s testament to Sandler’s straight acting ability that he manages to sway the viewer into this fantastical realm.ClickClick is no genius piece of work, and for the genre it tackles it’s probably some way short of being up with the best. It does however punch the right buttons. From Sandler and a highly accomplished supporting cast {Kate Beckinsale, Christopher Walken, Sean Astin and Henry Winkler}, to its delightful and rewarding finale, this most definitely is one that is worth punching play.

REVIEW: GET SMART’S BRUCE AND LLOYD: OUT OF CONTROL

CAST

Masi Oka (Heroes)
Nate Torrence (Zootropolis)
Jayma Mays (The Smurfs)
Marika Dominczyk (Brothers & Sisters)
J.P. Manoux (Euro Trip)
Larry Miller (10 Things I Hate About You)
Bryan Callan (The Hangover)
Patrick Warburton (Family Guy)
Terry Crews (Serving Sara)
Anne Hathaway (The Dark Knight Rises)

Both being national security agencies, the CIA and CONTROL have a sometimes friendly, sometimes not so friendly rivalry. CONTROL may now have the upper hand in the rivalry when Bruce and Lloyd, two of their nerdish inventors working in the gadgets laboratory, are close to perfecting their optical camouflage technology (OCT), aka an invisibility cloak. This is much to the chagrin of their counterparts at the CIA, Bob and Howard. The more personal rivalry between Bruce/Lloyd and Bob/Howard is fostered by their respective bosses, who happen to be competitive twin brothers. Bruce and Lloyd may be in deep trouble when their only prototype of the OCT goes missing. They initially believe that Bob and Howard may have it or worse that it has fallen into the hands on CONTROL’s arch enemy, KAOS. But they discover that it was stolen by a beautiful woman named Isabella, working for her country, Maraguay. Bruce and Lloyd, with Bruce’s girlfriend and fellow CONTROL technology geek Nina at their side.

The Movie takes place at the same time as Get Smart (2008) showing us what Bruce and Lloyd were upto, also features a small cameo from Anne Hathaway.  It’s a fun companion to the film and is well worth watching.

REVIEW: GET SMART (2008)

CAST

Steve Carrell (Date Night)
Anne Hathaway (The Dark Knight Rises)
Dwayne Johnson (Hercules)
Alan Arkin (Argo)
Terence Stamp (Superman 1 & 2)
Terry Crews (Serving Sara)
David Koechner (American Dad)
Bill Murray (Lost In Translation)
Patrick Warburton (Family Guy)
Masi Oka (Heroes)
Nate Torrence (Zootropolis)
Ken Davitian (Borat)
Jessica Barth (Ted 1 & 2)
Larry Miller (10 Things I Hate About You)
James Caan (Elf)
Geoff Pierson (Dexter)
Danielle Bisutti (Curse of Chucky)
Kevin Nealon (Weeds)
Cedric Yarbrough (The Boss)
Matthew Glave (Argo)

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When Siegfried (Terence Stamp), the leader of KAOS, engineers a massive plan to sell nuclear weapons to all of America’s enemies, it’s up to the agents of CONTROL to stop him. However, almost all of those agents have been assassinated, forcing The Chief (Alan Arkin) to promote analyst Maxwell Smart (Steve Carell) to spy duty as Agent 86. Paired with Agent 99 (Anne Hathaway), the duo partake in a little globetrotting to sniff out KAOS’s plans, while a peculiar competitive/romantic chemistry forms between them. When matters go from bad to worse, it’s up to 86 and 99 to thwart KAOS’s evil scheme and save the world from certain doom.

Steve Carrell was terrific as Agent 86 and seemed to capture the essence of Maxwell Smart. Not only did his portrayal of him resembled that of Don Adams’ from the sound of Smart’s voice to the delivery of Smart’s lines, Carrell managed to inject a bit of his own personality to create a new Smart that didn’t stray too far away from the old. Anne Hathaway was perfect as Agent 99. She did bear some resemblance to Barbara Feldon and actually delivered her lines in a similar manner as her at times. But more importantly, she had great chemistry with Carrell.
Unlike previous film adaptations of old television series that only superficially resembled their TV series counterpart, this film can truly be considered a big screen version of the Get Smart TV series.

REVIEW: BRIDESMAIDS

CAST

Kristen Wiig (Zoolander 2)
Maya Rudolph (Gattaca)
Rose Byrne (Spy)
Melissa McCarthy (Tammy)
Wendi McLendon-Covey (Bewitched)
Ellie Kemper (The Office)
Chris O’Dowd (St. Vincent)
Jill Cayburgh (The Rockford Files)
Terry Crews (White Chicks)
Matt Lucas (Alice Through The Looking Glass)
Ben Falcone (The Nines)
Jessica St. Clair (The Dictator)
Jon Hamm (The A-Team)
Paul Feig (Sabrina: TTW)
Rebel Wilson (Grimsby)
Jillian Bell (Rough Night)

Rose Byrne and Kristen Wiig in Bridesmaids (2011)

Though Wiig has popped up recently in Whip It and Adventureland, to fine successes, Bridesmaids marks her first leading performance, and she’s found the right one to start with in Annie. A broke, cynical chef who’s recently closed her Milwaukee bakery, losing her boyfriend in the process, she now works in a jewelry store, sleeps with a handsome but asinine man-child (Jon Hamm) looking for a no-strings sex-buddy, and avoids her odd British brother-sister roommates. Annie’s sad-sap state makes for a near-perfect character in which Wiig can flaunt her ill-at-ease style, uncomfortable in her unerring self-created awkwardness. She’s a sad character, almost aggressively so, which might rub some the wrong way because of how resolutely she keeps herself at arm’s length from contentment. Yet there’s something relatable about her self-deprecation, especially once her childhood friend Lillian (Maya Rudolph) asks her to be the maid-of-honor at her wedding — and to do the planning and organizing that comes with the territory.

Naturally, Annie meets an eclectic group of Lillian’s friends and soon-to-be family who will fill out the rest of the wedding court: a sex-minded mom (Wendi McLendon-Covey, Reno 911) with a ton of kids and a biting attitude; a virginal mouse of a newlywed (Ellie Kempler, The Office); bullish sparkplug Meghan (Melissa McCarthy, Mike and Molly), the government-employed sister to the groom; and Helen (Rose Byrne, Get Him to the Greek), a well-to-do housewife trying to strong-arm her way into Annie’s spot as maid-of-honor. Feig realizes that these are all types, and he lets them run loose with their quirky mannerisms, but he doesn’t go too outlandish to make them feel like far-removed caricatures.


Annie’s rattled by the duties and the feeling that her friend’s slipping away, not to mention her own monetary and relationship woes, which zigzags along the significant events in Bridesmaids that hallmark most pre-wedding lead-ups. Sure, if you want to boil it down to the least-common denominator, Feig’s picture can essentially be labeled a female iteration of The Hangover, where the ritual of strippers, alcohol, and wild partying in the groom’s rite of passage are replaced with luncheons, dress-fittings, and bridal showers. But this isn’t a frilly affair, nor is it simply a fantastical lampoon on idealized planning. Compliments of Wiig and Mumolo’s sharply-written script, Lillian’s path down the aisle turns into a stylized elevated-reality daze of misfortune, often due to her best-friend trying to cling onto what she finds familiar by her own means. But it’s got something else behind its gags: when it hits over-the-top notes that play to the dreamed-up fantasies of weddings and the gleeful pre-events, it also double-backs to Annie’s shambled life, lending genuineness to the missteps she makes.

Rose Byrne, Melissa McCarthy, Maya Rudolph, Wendi McLendon-Covey, Kristen Wiig, and Ellie Kemper in Bridesmaids (2011)
Maybe it’s because the humor’s supported by a heartfelt backbone that it’s both effective and affective, extending beyond its gags into this clever, modest portrait of a woman in a growing stage that just so happens to be hysterically funny. Annie’s shown at her most desperate — sleeping with a slimeball, losing her penniless and destitute battle with the rich-and-beautiful Helen, and slowly but unsuccessfully building a relationship with an affable cop, Rhodes (Chris O’Dowd), who’s got a thing for carrots — and her state informs the hoopla that Wiig and Mumolo have written, always with some underlying purpose that ties back to the lowly baker trying to maintain a stranglehold on her old life. Bridesmaids might be out to prove that the girls are capable of playing just as dirty as the guys.