REVIEW: CLICK

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CAST

Adam Sandler (50 First Dates)
Kate Beckinsale (Underworld)
Christopher Walken (The Prophecy)
David Hasslhoff (Knight Rider)
Henry Winkler (Happy Days)
Julie Kavner (The Simpsons)
Sean Astin (The Goonies)
Jonah Hill (Cyprus)
Jake Hoffman (Hook)
Katie Cassidy (Arrow)
Cameron Monaghan (Gotham)
Jennifer Coolidge (2 broke Girls)
Terry Crews (White Chicks)
Rob Scneider (The Hot Chick)
James Earl Jones (Star Wars)
Carolyn Hennesy (Legally Blonde 2)

Michael Newman is overworked and under appreciated by his boss, worse still, he doesn’t have enough hours in the day to devote time to his loving family. But then he happens upon eccentric salesman Morty, who puts a universal remote control Michael’s way, a control that perfectly controls his life…….at first.ClickFilms that deal with second chances via gods, angels and devils are not in short supply, everything from the mighty It’s A Wonderful Life, to the amiable Mr Destiny have covered this fantastical field. Enter Click, starring Adam Sandler {Newman}, another spin on the genre with the added kick of encompassing modern day technology into the equation. Split very much into two vastly different halves, Click finds Sandler reining in his usual shouty goof ball persona. Naturally for the first part we get the comedy set ups, at times hilarious and at others a little crass, but it’s never sledgehammer comedy of the like that Sandler has previously served up in spades. The reason for the restraint becomes evident when the films second half arrives, full of emotional fortitude it’s something of a shock at first to grasp the switch in tone, but it works real well, and it’s testament to Sandler’s straight acting ability that he manages to sway the viewer into this fantastical realm.ClickClick is no genius piece of work, and for the genre it tackles it’s probably some way short of being up with the best. It does however punch the right buttons. From Sandler and a highly accomplished supporting cast {Kate Beckinsale, Christopher Walken, Sean Astin and Henry Winkler}, to its delightful and rewarding finale, this most definitely is one that is worth punching play.

REVIEW: GET SMART’S BRUCE AND LLOYD: OUT OF CONTROL

CAST

Masi Oka (Heroes)
Nate Torrence (Zootropolis)
Jayma Mays (The Smurfs)
Marika Dominczyk (Brothers & Sisters)
J.P. Manoux (Euro Trip)
Larry Miller (10 Things I Hate About You)
Bryan Callan (The Hangover)
Patrick Warburton (Family Guy)
Terry Crews (Serving Sara)
Anne Hathaway (The Dark Knight Rises)

Both being national security agencies, the CIA and CONTROL have a sometimes friendly, sometimes not so friendly rivalry. CONTROL may now have the upper hand in the rivalry when Bruce and Lloyd, two of their nerdish inventors working in the gadgets laboratory, are close to perfecting their optical camouflage technology (OCT), aka an invisibility cloak. This is much to the chagrin of their counterparts at the CIA, Bob and Howard. The more personal rivalry between Bruce/Lloyd and Bob/Howard is fostered by their respective bosses, who happen to be competitive twin brothers. Bruce and Lloyd may be in deep trouble when their only prototype of the OCT goes missing. They initially believe that Bob and Howard may have it or worse that it has fallen into the hands on CONTROL’s arch enemy, KAOS. But they discover that it was stolen by a beautiful woman named Isabella, working for her country, Maraguay. Bruce and Lloyd, with Bruce’s girlfriend and fellow CONTROL technology geek Nina at their side.

The Movie takes place at the same time as Get Smart (2008) showing us what Bruce and Lloyd were upto, also features a small cameo from Anne Hathaway.  It’s a fun companion to the film and is well worth watching.

REVIEW: GET SMART (2008)

CAST

Steve Carrell (Date Night)
Anne Hathaway (The Dark Knight Rises)
Dwayne Johnson (Hercules)
Alan Arkin (Argo)
Terence Stamp (Superman 1 & 2)
Terry Crews (Serving Sara)
David Kochner (American Dad)
Bill Murray (Lost In Translation)
Patrick Warburton (Family Guy)
Masi Oka (Heroes)
Nate Torrence (Zootropolis)
Ken Davitian (Borat)
Jessica Barth (Ted 1 & 2)
Larry Miller (10 Things I Hate About You)
James Caan (Elf)
Geoff Pierson (Dexter)
Danielle Bisutti (Curse of Chucky)
Kevin Nealon (Weeds)
Cedric Yarbrough (The Boss)
Matthew Glave (Argo)

Get Smart (2008 Movie) images Get Smart HD wallpaper and background photos

When Siegfried (Terence Stamp), the leader of KAOS, engineers a massive plan to sell nuclear weapons to all of America’s enemies, it’s up to the agents of CONTROL to stop him. However, almost all of those agents have been assassinated, forcing The Chief (Alan Arkin) to promote analyst Maxwell Smart (Steve Carell) to spy duty as Agent 86. Paired with Agent 99 (Anne Hathaway), the duo partake in a little globetrotting to sniff out KAOS’s plans, while a peculiar competitive/romantic chemistry forms between them. When matters go from bad to worse, it’s up to 86 and 99 to thwart KAOS’s evil scheme and save the world from certain doom.

Steve Carrell was terrific as Agent 86 and seemed to capture the essence of Maxwell Smart. Not only did his portrayal of him resembled that of Don Adams’ from the sound of Smart’s voice to the delivery of Smart’s lines, Carrell managed to inject a bit of his own personality to create a new Smart that didn’t stray too far away from the old. Anne Hathaway was perfect as Agent 99. She did bear some resemblance to Barbara Feldon and actually delivered her lines in a similar manner as her at times. But more importantly, she had great chemistry with Carrell.
Unlike previous film adaptations of old television series that only superficially resembled their TV series counterpart, this film can truly be considered a big screen version of the Get Smart TV series.

REVIEW: BRIDESMAIDS

CAST

Kristen Wiig (Zoolander 2)
Maya Rudolph (Gattaca)
Rose Byrne (Spy)
Melissa McCarthy (Tammy)
Wendi McLendon-Covey (Bewitched)
Ellie Kemper (The Office)
Chris O’Dowd (St. Vincent)
Jill Cayburgh (The Rockford Files)
Terry Crews (White Chicks)
Matt Lucas (Alice Through The Looking Glass)
Ben Falcone (The Nines)
Jessica St. Clair (The Dictator)
Jon Hamm (The A-Team)
Paul Feig (Sabrina: TTW)
Rebel Wilson (Grimsby)
Jillian Bell (Rough Night)

Rose Byrne and Kristen Wiig in Bridesmaids (2011)

Though Wiig has popped up recently in Whip It and Adventureland, to fine successes, Bridesmaids marks her first leading performance, and she’s found the right one to start with in Annie. A broke, cynical chef who’s recently closed her Milwaukee bakery, losing her boyfriend in the process, she now works in a jewelry store, sleeps with a handsome but asinine man-child (Jon Hamm) looking for a no-strings sex-buddy, and avoids her odd British brother-sister roommates. Annie’s sad-sap state makes for a near-perfect character in which Wiig can flaunt her ill-at-ease style, uncomfortable in her unerring self-created awkwardness. She’s a sad character, almost aggressively so, which might rub some the wrong way because of how resolutely she keeps herself at arm’s length from contentment. Yet there’s something relatable about her self-deprecation, especially once her childhood friend Lillian (Maya Rudolph) asks her to be the maid-of-honor at her wedding — and to do the planning and organizing that comes with the territory.

Naturally, Annie meets an eclectic group of Lillian’s friends and soon-to-be family who will fill out the rest of the wedding court: a sex-minded mom (Wendi McLendon-Covey, Reno 911) with a ton of kids and a biting attitude; a virginal mouse of a newlywed (Ellie Kempler, The Office); bullish sparkplug Meghan (Melissa McCarthy, Mike and Molly), the government-employed sister to the groom; and Helen (Rose Byrne, Get Him to the Greek), a well-to-do housewife trying to strong-arm her way into Annie’s spot as maid-of-honor. Feig realizes that these are all types, and he lets them run loose with their quirky mannerisms, but he doesn’t go too outlandish to make them feel like far-removed caricatures.


Annie’s rattled by the duties and the feeling that her friend’s slipping away, not to mention her own monetary and relationship woes, which zigzags along the significant events in Bridesmaids that hallmark most pre-wedding lead-ups. Sure, if you want to boil it down to the least-common denominator, Feig’s picture can essentially be labeled a female iteration of The Hangover, where the ritual of strippers, alcohol, and wild partying in the groom’s rite of passage are replaced with luncheons, dress-fittings, and bridal showers. But this isn’t a frilly affair, nor is it simply a fantastical lampoon on idealized planning. Compliments of Wiig and Mumolo’s sharply-written script, Lillian’s path down the aisle turns into a stylized elevated-reality daze of misfortune, often due to her best-friend trying to cling onto what she finds familiar by her own means. But it’s got something else behind its gags: when it hits over-the-top notes that play to the dreamed-up fantasies of weddings and the gleeful pre-events, it also double-backs to Annie’s shambled life, lending genuineness to the missteps she makes.

Rose Byrne, Melissa McCarthy, Maya Rudolph, Wendi McLendon-Covey, Kristen Wiig, and Ellie Kemper in Bridesmaids (2011)
Maybe it’s because the humor’s supported by a heartfelt backbone that it’s both effective and affective, extending beyond its gags into this clever, modest portrait of a woman in a growing stage that just so happens to be hysterically funny. Annie’s shown at her most desperate — sleeping with a slimeball, losing her penniless and destitute battle with the rich-and-beautiful Helen, and slowly but unsuccessfully building a relationship with an affable cop, Rhodes (Chris O’Dowd), who’s got a thing for carrots — and her state informs the hoopla that Wiig and Mumolo have written, always with some underlying purpose that ties back to the lowly baker trying to maintain a stranglehold on her old life. Bridesmaids might be out to prove that the girls are capable of playing just as dirty as the guys.