REVIEW: THE SILVER SURFER

CAST

Paul Essiembre (Chloe)
James Blendick (Tommy Boy)
Colin Fox (Goosebumps)

Image result for silver surfer cartoon
RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Dennis Akayama (Wild Roses)
Lawrence Bayne (Muatnt X)
Christopher Birtton (X-Men:TAS)
Alyson Court (Elvis Meets Nixon)
David Hemblen (Earth: Final Conflict)
Don Francks (La Femme Nikita)
John Neville (Odyssey 5)
Cedric Smith (Mutant X)

Image result for silver surfer cartoonOne of Marvel’s best ever in the animated arena. Yes, they only made one season and it ended on a cliff-hanger, but that had precious little to do with the series itself. Apparently it rated rather well. The problem was never with the show, but with the company that made it. Unfortunately that went belly-up.For the purists, it is true that this show isn’t strictly in accordance with cannon. But then, what superhero cartoon is? Like most animated shows derived from comic books, this production re-imagines the universe on which it is based in accordance with its own needs. While it can’t match the sheer intricacy and detail of the comic book universe with its decades of backstory, it does make good use of the time and space available.

My only real issue with the show’s departures from cannon is that for some reason its creators decided to make Thanos a worshipper of Chaos rather than of Death. I’m not sure if the worship of Death was considered a bit too strong for what was at least nominally a children’s show, but from an adult perspective, I do consider that a mistake. That one issue aside, the story can hold its own when compared to Marvel’s comic book epics. I’ve always loved the way Marvel does cosmic, and this show does not disappoint. It positively explodes with all the electrifying energy, godlike power, and inhuman solemnity and portent that makes all of Marvel’s best cosmic epics what they are. When you’re watching this show, you do buy into the idea that these are indeed cosmic beings whose deeds shape and destroy worlds, thence echo throughout their universe, and even perhaps throughout other universes as well.

But where this show really excelled was on a visual level. Although the CGI may be technically a bit on the crude side by today’s standards (remember, this is a show made in the late 90’s), on an artistic level it is a triumph. The show’s creators did a magnificent job of integrating Jack Kirby’s original vision with the latest technology available at the time of the show’s creation. The integration isn’t as seamless as that to be found in more modern efforts, but then, it doesn’t try to be. The 2D and 3D artwork are at all times clearly distinguishable from one another, but the overall effect is still glorious.

Advertisements

REVIEW: FANTASTIC FOUR: WORLDS GREATEST HEROES

MAIN CAST

Hiro Kanagawa (Heroes Reborn)
Lara Gilcrhsit (Defying Gravity)
Christopher Jacot (Mutant X)
Brian Dobson (Dragon Ball Z)
Samuel Vincent (Totally Spies!)
Paul Dobson (Transformers: Armada)
Sunita Prasad (Bates Motel)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST STARS

Mark Acheson (Elf)
Michael Adamthwaite (Stargate SG.1)
Andrew Kavadas (Ninja Turtles: NExt Mutation)
Venus Terzo (Arrow0
Lee Tockar (Beast Wars)
John Novak (Wishmaster 3 & 4)

This series, which started in September of 2006, features the four core characters of the series: Reed Richards (a.k.a. Mister Fantastic, a scientist whose body can stretch like rubber and the brains behind the operation), his girlfriend Susan Storm (a.k.a. The Invisible Woman), her younger brother Johnny Storm (a.k.a. The Human Torch), and of course, Benjamin Grimm (better known as the ever lovin’ blue eyed Thing), a rock encrusted strong man. These four live inside the mammoth Baxter Building in the middle of Manhattan where they also have their base of operations and a wide array of technical gadgetry courtesy of Richards’ incessant inventing. They use their powers for good, to protect the people of not only New York but of the world against many different antagonists, specifically their arch-enemy, Doctor Doom.

Marvel, in conjunction with Moonstone Animation, has done a very good job with this series. While the animation is obviously very influenced by Japanese manga and anime, the show is very much in the spirit of the early Lee/Kirby comic book masterpieces and it turns out to be a lot of fun. The fact that the Fantastic Four do more than just square off against Doctor Doom each week leads to encounters with familiar villains such as The Mole Man, The Puppet Master, and even the Super Skrull! Guest appearances from instantly recognizable heroes such as The Hulk, Prince Namor The Submariner, and Iron Man add to the fun but what makes this series work is the way that the writers have nailed the team dynamic so important to the comic book’s success. The stories may be a little simple by some standards and you could make the argument that they’re geared towards a young audience than they maybe need to be but they really are in keeping with the early episodes of the comic books that inspired them and for that reason they turn out to be quite enjoyable doses of action and escapism.

As mentioned, the animation has been inspired by Japanese culture and so the characters don’t always look as Kirby-esqe as purists will probably want them to. Likewise, some of the CGI used in the backgrounds doesn’t blend as flawlessly as it could. That said, Kirby’s sense of grandeur and design is apparent throughout the series in the gadgets, the villains, and many of the backgrounds in the series. The voice actors suit the characters well with Brian Dobson as The Thing really standing out/p>
Ultimately this material isn’t going to blow your mind. It isn’t deep or particularly Earth shattering in any way but it does feel in tune with the source material and as far as superfluous bits of animated entertainment go, it’s just a lot of fun.