REVIEW: ALIEN: RESURRECTION

 

CAST

Sigourney Weaver (Galaxy Quest)
Winona Ryder (Star Trek)
Michael Wincott (The Crow)
Dan Hedaya (The Book of Daniel)
J. E. Freeman (Miller’s Crossing)
Brad Dourif (Curse of Chucky)
Raymond Cruz (My Name Is Earl)
Kim Flowers (Another Day In Paradise)
Gary Dourdan (CSI)
Ron Perlman (Hellboy)
Leland Orser (Seven)

In 2379, two hundred years after the events of Alien 3, military scientists on the space vessel USM Auriga create a clone of Ellen Ripley using DNA from blood samples taken before her death. The Alien queen’s DNA was mixed in with Ripley’s, and the clone grows up with an embryo inside it. The scientists extract the embryo, raise it and collect its eggs. The Ripley clone is kept alive for further study. As a result of the alien’s DNA inside her, she develops enhanced strength and reflexes, has acidic blood and a psychic link with the Aliens. Also, the alien’s genetic memory allows the clone to have some of Ripley’s memories.

A group of mercenaries, Elgyn, Johner, Christie, Vriess, Hillard and Call, arrive at Auriga on their ship Betty. They deliver several kidnapped humans in stasis. The military scientists use the humans as hosts for the Aliens, raising several adult Aliens for study.

The Betty crew soon encounters Ripley. Call recognizes her name and tries to kill her, suspecting she may be used to create more Aliens. The Aliens have already matured and escape confinement by killing off one of their own and using the acidic blood to burn through their enclosures. They damage the Auriga and kill the crew members who do not evacuate, including General Perez and Elgyn. Military scientist Dr. Wren reveals that the ship’s default command in an emergency is to return to Earth. Realizing this will unleash the Aliens on Earth, Ripley, the mercenaries, Wren, a Marine named DiStephano and surviving Alien host Purvis decide to head for the Betty and use it to destroy the Auriga. Along the way, Ripley encounters the grotesque products of failed attempts to clone Ripley. The surviving one begs Ripley to mercy kill her, and she complies.

As the group makes their way through the damaged ship, they swim through a flooded kitchen. They are chased by two Aliens. One is killed, while the other snatches Hillard. As they escape the kitchen, the Alien returns and blinds Christie, who sacrifices himself to kill the Alien so the others can escape. After Wren betrays the group, Call is revealed to be an android. Using her ability to interface with the Auriga’s systems, Call sets it on a collision course with Earth, hoping to destroy the Aliens in the crash. She cuts off Wren’s escape route, and directs the Aliens towards him. Ripley is captured by the Aliens, while the others head for the Betty. Wren shoots Purvis and takes Call hostage, demanding that she abort the collision. An injured Purvis attacks Wren and forces his head to his chest just as the Alien embryo he is carrying bursts through his ribcage, causing it to go through Wren’s head and kill them both. The survivors shoot the embryo.
Ripley is taken to the Alien nest, where the Queen, now possessing a womb as a result of the genetic mixture, gives birth to a Newborn, a Xenomorph with human traits. The hybrid Alien recognizes Ripley as its mother, kills the queen Alien and Dr. Jonathan Gediman, a scientist previously captured and cocooned. Ripley takes advantage of the distraction to escape and makes her way to the Betty.The Newborn reaches the Betty and attacks Call. It kills DeStephano when he tries to help her. Ripley finds her way onto the ship and saves Call by distracting the Newborn. Using her acidic blood, Ripley melts the glass of a window and pushes the Newborn towards the hole. It is violently sucked through the hole due to decompression. The countdown on the Auriga continues as the survivors escape in the Betty. The Auriga collides with Earth, causing a large explosion. Call and Ripley look down at Earth, and when Call asks what Ripley wants to do next, she says, “I’m a stranger here myself.” In an alternate ending that is used in some extended adaptations, the Betty lands in a ruined Paris.Alien: Resurrection is a good film, but, as keeping with part 3 rather than parts 1 and 2, it’s better more as another `stand-alone’ film. An Alien film shouldn’t just be `good,’ it should be absolutely amazing, setting the standards for adult sci-fi/horror to come. This one is a nice effort at the mistakes made in part 3, but it’s still inferior to Aliens.

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REVIEW: ALIEN 3

CAST

Sigourney Weaver (Galaxy Quest)
Charles S. Dutton (Mimic)
Charles Dance (Game of Thrones)
Brian Glover (An American Werewolf In London)
Ralph Brown (The Crying Game)
Paul McGann (Queen of The Damned)
Danny Webb (Locke)
Lance Henriksen (Hellraiser 8)
Pete Postlethwaite (Solomon Kane)
Holt McCallany (Heroes)

A fire starts aboard the Colonial Marine spaceship Sulaco. The computer launches an escape pod containing Ellen Ripley, the young girl Newt, Hicks, and the damaged android Bishop; all four are in cryonic stasis. Scans of the crew’s cryotubes show an Alien facehugger attached to one of the members. The pod crash-lands on Fiorina “Fury” 161, a foundry facility and penal colony inhabited by male inmates with histories of physical and sexual violence. Inmates recover the pod and its passengers.

Ripley is awakened by Clemens, the prison doctor, who informs her that she is the sole survivor. Ripley is warned by the prison warden, Harold Andrews, that her presence may have disruptive effects. Ripley insists that Clemens perform an autopsy on Newt; he asks what they are looking for in the body of a girl who had obviously drowned. Ripley lies to him that they are investigating a possible case of cholera, but secretly fears that Newt has been impregnated with an alien embryo. Clemens firmly responds by stating that there hasn’t been a case of cholera reported for 200 years. The autopsy is conducted and no embryo is found. A funeral is held for Newt and Hicks and their bodies are cremated in the facility furnace. In another section of the prison, an alien bursts out of the chest of a prison dog named Spike. The Alien kills several members of the colony and returns outcast prisoner Golic to his previously psychopathic state. Ripley re-activates Bishop, who confirms that an Alien came with them to Fiorina in the escape pod. Ripley informs Andrews of her encounters with the Aliens and suggests everyone work together to hunt down and kill it. Andrews, highly skeptical, does not believe her story, but explains that the facility has no weapons; their only hope is the rescue ship being sent for Ripley by the Weyland-Yutani Corporation.

The Alien surprises Ripley and Clemens in the prison infirmary, whereupon it kills Clemens. It examines Ripley, but spares her and retreats. Andrews orders Aaron to take her back to the infirmary, but he is (ironically) ambushed and killed by the Alien. Ripley rallies the inmates and proposes they pour flammable toxic waste into the ventilation system and ignite it to flush out the Alien. However, the Alien’s intervention causes an explosion and several inmates are killed. With Aaron’s help, Ripley, who has not been feeling well this whole time, scans herself using the escape pod’s medical equipment and discovers the embryo of an Alien Queen growing inside her. She also discovers that Weyland-Yutani hopes to turn the Queen embryo and the adult Alien into biological weapon.

Deducing that the Alien will not kill her because of the embryo she carries, Ripley begs Dillon to kill her; he agrees only if she helps the inmates kill the adult creature first. They form a plan to lure the creature into the foundry’s molding facility, trap it via a series of closing doors, and drown it in molten lead. The bait-and-chase plan results in the death of every prisoner except Morse and Dillon. Dillon remains in the mold to distract the Alien, allowing it to tear him apart as Morse pours the molten lead onto them. The Alien is covered in molten metal but escapes the mold; Ripley activates the fire sprinklers, causing the Alien’s exoskeleton to cool rapidly and shatter, killing it.

The Weyland–Yutani commando team arrives, including a man who looks identical to Bishop and explains that he is Bishop’s creator. He tries to persuade Ripley to undergo surgery to remove the Queen embryo, which he claims will be destroyed. Knowing he is lying, Ripley refuses and steps back onto a mobile platform, which Morse positions over the furnace. The Weyland–Yutani team shoot Morse in the leg in a late effort to stop him; Aaron strikes the man with a wrench and is shot dead. The commando team begs Ripley to let them have the “magnificent specimen” but their efforts are in vain. Ripley throws herself into the furnace, just as the infant Alien Queen begins to erupt from her chest. Ripley grabs it to prevent it from escaping as they both fall into the furnace to their deaths. The facility is closed and the only surviving inmate, Morse, is led away.Panned by many for it’s undoubtedly bleak tone, butchered by the studio so the film didn’t make cinematic sense, and unappreciated at the time by most of the public, Alien 3 has gone on to be re-evaluated by many as, if not a masterpiece, at least a very fine example of the sci fi genre. It has now been re-edited (not by Fincher who has disowned the film) to include a whole host of originally discarded scenes that flesh out the story. The wonderful sunset bathed beach scenes with Ripley covered in oil and almost dead, saved by doctor Charles Dance, are beautifully shot. The dead bull scene is back and is much more powerful than the one it replaces. A whole plot-line regarding an inmate’s relationship with the Monster is reintroduced to great effect. This is a major reworking of the film and not just at weak here and there. Cast members were hired again to re-voice scenes for the restoration and to increase sound quality in some areas. The running time is increased by about 25 minutes.

REVIEW: ALIENS

CAST

Sigourney Weaver (Galaxy Quest)
Michael Biehn (The Terminator)
Paul Reiser (Life After Beth)
Lance Henriksen (Hellraiser 8)
Bill Paxton (Agents of SHIELD)
William Hope (Submerged)
Ricco Ross (Death Wish 3)
Jenette Goldstein (Titantic)

Ellen Ripley is rescued after drifting through space in stasis for 57 years. She is debriefed by her employers at the Weyland-Yutani Corporation over the destruction of her ship, the USCSS Nostromo; they are skeptical of her claims that an Alien killed the ship’s crew and forced her to destroy the ship.

The exomoon LV-426, where the Nostromo encountered the alien eggs, is now home to the terraforming colony Hadleys Hope. When contact is lost with Hadleys Hope, Weyland-Yutani representative Carter Burke and Colonial Marine Lieutenant Gorman ask Ripley to accompany Burke and a Colonial Marine unit to investigate the disturbance. Traumatized by her encounter with the Alien, Ripley initially refuses, but she relents after experiencing recurring nightmares about the creature; she makes Burke promise to destroy, and not capture, the Aliens. Aboard the spaceship USS Sulaco, she is introduced to the Colonial Marines, their commanding officer Lieutenant Gorman, and the android Bishop, toward whom Ripley is initially hostile following her experience with the traitorous android Ash aboard the Nostromo.

A dropship delivers the expedition to the surface of LV-426, where they find the colony deserted. Inside, they find makeshift barricades and signs of a struggle, but no bodies; two live facehuggers in containment tanks in the medical lab; and a survivor, a traumatized young girl nicknamed Newt who used the ventilation system to evade capture or death. The crew uses the colony’s computer to locate the colonists grouped beneath the fusion powered atmosphere processing station. They head to the location, descending into corridors covered in Alien secretions.

At the center of the station, the marines find the colonists cocooned, serving as incubators for the Aliens’ offspring. When the marines kill a newborn Alien, the Aliens are roused and ambush the marines, killing and capturing several. When the inexperienced Gorman panics, Ripley takes control of their vehicle and rams it through the nest to rescue marines Hicks, Hudson, and Vasquez. Hicks orders the dropship to recover the survivors, but a stowaway Alien kills the pilots, causing it to crash into the station. Ripley, Newt, Gorman, Burke and the remaining marines barricade themselves inside the colony command center.

Ripley discovers that Burke deliberately sent the colonists to investigate the derelict spaceship where the Nostromo crew first encountered the Alien eggs, believing he could become wealthy by recovering Alien specimens for use as biological weapons. She threatens to expose him, but Bishop informs the group of a greater danger: the power plant was damaged by the dropship crash, and will soon explode with the force of a 40-megaton thermonuclear weapon. He volunteers to crawl through several hundred meters of piping conduits to reach the colony’s transmitter and remotely pilot the Sulaco’s remaining dropship to the surface.

Ripley and Newt fall asleep in the medical laboratory, awakening to find themselves locked in the room with the two facehuggers, which have been released from their tanks. Ripley triggers a fire alarm to alert the marines, who rescue them and kill the creatures. Ripley accuses Burke of releasing the facehuggers so that they would impregnate her and Newt, allowing him to smuggle the Alien embryos past Earth’s quarantine, and of planning to kill the rest of the marines in hypersleep during the return trip so that no one could contradict his version of events. Before the marines can kill Burke, the electricity is cut and Aliens assault through the ceiling. Hudson, Burke, Vasquez and Gorman are all killed and Newt is captured.

Ripley and an injured Hicks reach Bishop in the second dropship, but Ripley refuses to abandon Newt. The group arrives at the processing station, allowing a heavily armed Ripley to enter the hive and rescue Newt. As they escape, the two encounter the Alien queen in her egg chamber. Ripley destroys the eggs, enraging the queen, who tears free from her ovipositor. Pursued by the queen, Ripley and Newt rendezvous with Bishop and Hicks on the dropship. All four escape moments before the station explodes with the colony consumed by the nuclear blast.

On the Sulaco, the group discover the Alien queen stowed away on the dropship’s landing gear. She emerges and tears Bishop in half. The queen advances on Newt, but Ripley clashes with her using an exosuit cargo-loader and expels it through an airlock into space. Ripley, Newt, Hicks and the badly damaged Bishop enter hypersleep for the return trip to Earth.This film cannot be praised enough. Although there are those who feel it is inferior to the first because it has more action and supposedly weaker characterisation, it has to be said that the two films are different entities, the first a horror, the second a sci-fi action. Like The Terminator, Cameron puts in many effective scares so that it transcends the genre, becoming something more.

REVIEW: ALIEN

CAST

Sigourney Weaver (Galaxy Quest)
Tom Skerritt (Poison Ivy)
Veronica Cartwright (The Witches of Eastwick)
Harry Dean Stanton (Avengers Assemble)
John Hurt (Hellboy)
Ian Holm (The Hobbit)
Yaphet Kotto (Midnight Run)

The commercial spacecraft Nostromo is on a return trip to Earth with a seven-member crew in stasis: Captain Dallas, Executive Officer Kane, Navigator Lambert, Science Officer Ash, Warrant Officer Ripley, and Engineers Parker and Brett. Detecting a mysterious transmission, possibly a distress signal, from a nearby planetoid, the ship’s computer, Mother, awakens the crew. Following standard company policy for such situations, the Nostromo lands on the planetoid and Dallas, Kane, and Lambert head out to investigate, damaging their ship upon landing in dust. They discover the signal is coming from a derelict alien spacecraft. Inside, they find the remains of a large alien creature whose ribcage appears to have exploded from the inside.

On the Nostromo, Ripley determines that the transmission is not a distress signal but a warning. In the alien ship, Kane discovers a chamber containing hundreds of eggs. As he inspects one, a creature springs out, spits acid through his space helmet and attaches itself to his face. Dallas and Lambert carry the unconscious Kane back to the Nostromo. As acting senior officer, Ripley refuses to let them aboard, citing quarantine regulations, but Ash violates protocol by overriding Ripley’s lock and letting them in. The crew are unable to remove the creature from Kane’s face, as its grip is strong and its blood is an extremely corrosive acid. It eventually lets go, crawls away, and dies.

The crew repair the ship and lift off. Kane awakens and seems healthy, but during the crew’s final meal before re-entering stasis, he chokes and convulses in pain before a small alien creature bursts from his chest, killing him, and escapes into the depths of the ship to molt. Since attacking the creature with conventional weapons could result in its corrosive blood breaching the ship’s hull, the crew attempts to locate and capture it with motion trackers, nets, electric prods, and flamethrowers.

Brett is sent to look for the crew’s cat, Jones, and the now fully grown alien attacks him and disappears with his body into the air shafts. After a heated discussion, the group devises a plan to jettison the creature out of the ship. Dallas enters the Nostromo’s labyrinthine ventilation shafts, intending to force the alien into an airlock, but it ambushes him. Lambert, realizing the alien is killing the crew one by one, implores the others to escape in the ship’s shuttle. Now in command, Ripley explains that the shuttle will not support four people, and recommends that they continue with Dallas’ plan of flushing the alien out.

Accessing Mother, Ripley discovers that Ash has secretly been ordered to return the alien to the crew’s employers, who consider the crew expendable. When Ripley confronts Ash, he tries to choke her to death. Parker intervenes and knocks off Ash’s head, revealing him to be an android. Parker reanimates Ash’s head, and Ripley interrogates him. They learn he was assigned to the Nostromo to convince the crew to capture the creature and return it for analysis, even at the expense of the human personnel. Ash taunts them about their chances of survival against the “perfect organism.” Parker turns a flamethrower on Ash.

Ripley, Lambert and Parker agree to set the Nostromo to self-destruct and escape in the shuttle. However, Parker and Lambert are ambushed and killed by the alien while gathering life-support supplies. Ripley initiates the self-destruct sequence and heads for the shuttle with Jones, but the alien blocks her path. She retreats and unsuccessfully attempts to abort the self-destruct sequence, then returns to retrieve Jones, finding the alien gone. She narrowly escapes in the shuttle as the Nostromo explodes.

As she prepares to enter stasis, Ripley discovers the Alien is aboard the shuttle. She dons a spacesuit and opens the shuttle’s airlock, causing explosive decompression which forces the Alien into the shuttle’s open doorway. She propels it into space by shooting it with a grappling hook, but the gun catches in the closing door, tethering the alien to the shuttle. Ripley activates the engines, blasting the alien into space. After recording the ship’s final log entry, she places herself and Jones into stasis for the voyage home.Quite simply one of the best films ever made.

REVIEW: THE DEFENDERS

CAST

Charlie Cox (Stardust)
Krysten Ritter (Veronica Mars)
Mike Colter (Zero Dark thirty)
Finn Jones (Game of Thrones)
Élodie Yung (Gods of Egypt)
Sigourney Weaver (Avatar)
Rachael Taylor (The Loft)
Eka Darville (Power Rangers RPM)
Elden Henson (The Hunger Games: Mockingjay)
Deborah Ann Woll (Ruby Sparks)
Jessica Henwick (Game of Thrones)
Ramón Rodríguez (The Taking of Pelham 123)
Rosario Dawson (Sin City)
Scott Glenn (The Silence of The Lambs)
Simone Missick (K-Town)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Wai Ching Ho (Cadillac Man)
Carrie-Anne Moss (Chuck)
Peter McRobbie (16 Blocks)
Rob Morgan (Stranger Things)
Marko Zaror (Machete Kills)

 

The Defenders is Marvel’s best Netflix show, hands down.  While the crossover between Daredevil, Jessica Jones, Iron Fist, and Luke Cage can occasionally veer into a fragmented set of mini-episodes early on, the awesome foursome eventually unites to form a show greater than the sum of its parts. The street-level superheroes provide a fantastic eight-episode run with high stakes, a frenzied pace and, most importantly, effortless chemistry.Things don’t start off that way, though. The opening pair of episodes read almost as a greatest hits collection of each hero’s respective shows before the narrative eventually relents and shoehorns the plot in a comically convenient way for the four to come together. The lack of instant gratification can be grating, but this is easily relieved by the fun interaction between fan-favourites that leads up to the team-up. Misty Knight and Jessica Jones’ brief scenes are worth the price of admission alone and there are a few, shall we say interesting, crossovers you won’t see coming. Without giving too much away, a cataclysmic event is unleashed upon New York and The Defenders, each following their own leads, stumble into each other’s paths in the same building. And then things get good. Really, really good. Unsurprisingly, The Hand are the villains of the season and are led by Sigourney Weaver’s Alexandra. Her performance is tempered by an unidentified terminal illness which spurs her character on and at least drives her away from the realms of cartoonish MCU villain as  she has an actual character arc rather than the bland go there, be evil trope of prior bad guys. When the show does focus on The Defenders (and, in fairness, that’s 90% of the time) the show is a rollercoaster of wisecracks, quips and, yup, Jessica Jones’ side-eye. It’s glorious fun and, for my money, feels like a much bigger event than The Avengers ever was. There’s a spine-tingling moment, complete with an inspirational score bubbling up in the background, where the four heroes unite to take on a foe at the midway point which ranks as an all-time great Marvel moment.Yes, The Defenders run is short, but those thinking a mere eight episodes won’t cut it can have their fears put to rest. Coupled with Game of Thrones season 7’s clipped seven-episode run, it feels like we’re reaching a watershed point in television where shows don’t need to be chained to a long episode run anymore. Barely a second is wasted in The Defenders: Every quiet character moment is poignant and fleshes out something or someone; every action sequence leads to something bigger, better, and more shocking; and every one-liner and on-the-nose dig at Iron Fist will make you laugh. Nothing outstays its welcome.

 

 

 

 

 

REVIEW: HAPPILY N’EVER AFTER

 

CAST

Sarah Michelle Gellar (Cruel Intentions)
Freddie Prinze, Jr. (Scooby-Doo)
Andy Dick (Dude, Where’s My Car?)
Wallace Shawn (The Princess Bride)
Patrick Warburton (Family Guy)
George Carlin (Dogma)
Sigourney Weaver (Alien)
Michael McShane (Office Space)
John DiMaggio (Futurama)
Tom Kenny (The Super Squad Show)
Kath Soucie (Rugrats)
Tress MacNeille (The SImpsons)
Kevin Michael Richardson (The Cleveland Show)

The story begins with the idea that the Wizard (George Carlin) controls all of the fairy tales and maintains the balance of good and evil in Fairy Tale Land. With the help of his assistants the uptight Munk (Wallace Shawn) and the decidedly goofy Mambo (Andy Dick), the Wizard is checking to make sure that all the fairy tales under his care are “on track” to have their traditional happy endings. As we meet him however, the Wizard is leaving for Scotland for a long-overdue vacation. He leaves the kingdom in the hands of Munk and Mambo.Ella is a girl who is better known as Cinderella (Sarah Michelle Gellar). She lives as a servant to her step family, dreams of the Prince (Patrick Warburton) who will sweep her off her feet. Her best friend at the palace is Rick (Freddie Prinze, Jr.), the palace dishwasher. Rick takes it upon himself to deliver the invitations to the royal ball to Ella. Ella sees Rick only as a friend, but Rick secretly loves Ella, although he is too cool and proud to admit it. Rick can’t really understand what Ella likes about the Prince. Rick’s Three Amigos, the comic chefs (all voiced by Phil Proctor, Rob Paulsen and Tom Kenny) in the palace kitchen, believe that Rick has a bad case of “Prince envy”. The Prince does everything by the book, and plans to meet his maiden at the ball.However, things don’t go as planned at the ball. Thanks to the assistants, Ella’s evil stepmother, Frieda (Sigourney Weaver) gains access to the Wizard’s lair during the Prince’s ball. She manages to chase off Munk and Mambo and tip the scales of good and evil, causing a series of fairy tales to go wrong and have unhappy endings, including Jack getting stepped on by the Giant (John DiMaggio) yet surviving, Rumpelstiltskin (Michael McShane) winning his bet with the miller’s daughter (Jill Talley) and taking her baby, and the unseen demise of Little Red Riding Hood. She summons an army of Trolls, witches (Tress MacNeille and Jill Talley), three Big Bad Wolves (Jon Polito and Tom Kenny), the Giant (John DiMaggio), and Rumpelstiltskin to her castle. Ella finds out and escapes to the woods where she meets Munk and Mambo. The trio set out to find the prince who has goes looking for his maiden (not knowing it was actually Ella) in hopes that he will defeat Frieda and save the day.Together, they flee to the Seven Dwarfs (all played by Tom Kenny and John DiMaggio) home. Witches and trolls led by The Ice Queen attack them. The Seven Dwarfs hold off the trolls, while they flee with the help of Rick who had stolen a flying broom. Frieda decides to go after Ella herself. She succeeds in capturing her and returns to the palace, with Rick, Munk and Mambo in pursuit. Frieda tortures Ella because if the story had run its course she would have married the prince while Frieda would never get anywhere in life. Rick, Munk, and Mambo slip into the castle and attack Frieda. During the fight, Frieda generates a pit in the floor. Mambo knocks her in, but she uses her staff to fly back up again. After a short battle, in which Rick takes a blast meant for Ella and falls into a deep sleep, Frieda creates a portal by accident. Ella knocks Frieda back and punches her into the portal. Rick awakes from the spell and he and Ella kiss, finally admitting their feelings for each other.Ella and her true love Rick decide to choose their destinies in a world of happy endings and get married. Rumpelstiltskin has shown throughout the movie that he has come to care for the baby and the miller’s daughter lets him stay in the castle as the baby’s nanny. The Wizard returns from vacation where he wasn’t told about what happened while he was away. In the final scene, Frieda is shown trapped in the Arctic surrounded by elephant seals.In an animated movie where fairy tale characters run amok, the movie coasts along without much madness infused. But definitely easy enough for its intended target audience – the children – to understand and enjoy.

REVIEW: FUTURAMA – SEASON 1-4

MAIN CAST

Billy West (Duck Dodgers)
Katey Segal (8 Simple Rules)
John DiMaggio (TMNT)
Maurice LaMarche (Freakazoid)
Lauren Tom (Bad Santa)
Phil LaMarr (Free Enterprise)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

David Herman (Angel)
Frank Welker (Transformers)
Tom Kenny (Spongebob)
Tress MacNeille (The Simpsons)
Nancy Cartwright (The Simpsons)
Dawnn Lewis (Dreamgirls)
Pamela Anderson (Baywatch)
John Goodman (10 Cloverfield Lane)
Nora Dunn (New Girl)
Kath Soucie (Rugrats)
Parker Posey (Superman Returns)
Stephen Hawking (The Big Bang Theory_
Nichelle Nichols (Star Trek)
Sarah Silverman (School of Rock)
Bea Arthur (The Golden Girls)
Jan Hooks (3rd Rock From The Sun)
Hank Azaria (The Simpsons)
Lucy Liu (Kill Bill)
Coolio (Batman and Robin)
Sigourney Weaver (Alien)
William Shatmer (Batman vs Two-Face)
Leonard Nimoy (Star Trek)
Walter Koenig (Babylon 5)
George Takei (Heroes)
Jonathan Frakes (Star Trek: TNG)
Bumper Robinson (Sabrina: TTW)
Roseanne Barr (Roseanne)
Dan Castellaneta (The Simpsons)

Futurama is Matt Groening’s superb follow-up to The Simpsons, a cartoon that reinvented the genre. Futurama follows the very silly exploits of Fry, an intergalactic delivery boy and his human, alien, robot and other assorted weirdo friends, as they make deliverys, jump dimensions, get beaten at atomic-mutant basketball, blow up planets, have snoo-snoo, start wars, meet Al Gore and have problems tuning the television in in their new apartment.On first glance, this series bears striking similarities to its predecessor. The animation is of the same simple yet effective style (only with more 3D modelling) and the humour is in the same vein of ironic, post-modern tomfoolery.  Futurama has the same high standard of sophisticated and low-brow humour; (numerous) references to Richard Nixon and the dense symbolism of Melville’s Moby Dick sit alongside Fantastic Voyage journeys up a main character’s arse.Perhaps a major difference, that might have no importance overall, is that whereas The Simpsons is populated by either children or adults, Futurama mostly focuses on those in between those age groups. Standout characters include Zapp Brannigan, a Shatnerian, pompous buffoon, who sees himself as an intergalactic alien-killing, velour-adoring, love-making machine and Calculon, a thespian-bot whose overly dramatic pronouncements are distinctly at odds with his career in the robot soap opera `All My Circuits.’To conclude, if you enjoyed The Simpsons (but think it’s not as good as it used to be), then you will love (all four glorious series – all hail!) of Futurama. An unimaginative reviewer might write that Futurama is to The Jetsons what The Simpsons is to The Flintstones, so I’ve written it, which won’t help you to appreciate just how great Futurama is. From the fabulous retro-futurist robot designs to the scuzzy New New York labourer who deliberately ruins the veneer of `the future’ with his string vest and pot-belly, Futurama consistently hits the mark.