REVIEW: THE HOBBIT: THE BATTLE OF THE FIVE ARMIES – EXTENDED EDITION

Starring

Martin Freeman (Black Panther)
Ian Holm (Alien)
Ian McKellen (X-Men)
Richard Armitage (Hannibal)
Luke Evans (Dracula Untold)
Orlando Bloom (Pirates of The Caribbean)
Evangeline Lilly (Ant-Manand The Wasp)
Lee Pace (Guardians of The Galaxy)
Graham McTavish (Outlander)
Ken Stott (Fortitude)
Aidan Turner (Beautiful Darkness)
Dean O’Gorman (Young Hercules)
Benedict Cumberbatch (Doctor Strange)
Manu Bennett (Arrow)
Mark Hadlow (King Kong)
Jed Brophy (Heavenly Creatures)
Adam Brown (The Emoji Movie)
John Callen (The Rainbow Warrior)
Peter Hambleton (A Twist In The Tale)
William Kircher (Shark In The Park)
James Nesbitt (Jekyll)
Stephen Hunter (Blue World Order)
Cate Blanchett (Hanna)
Hugo Weaving (The Matrix)
Christopher Lee (Star Wars – Episode II)
Sylvester McCoy (Doctor Who)
John Tui (Power Rangers SPD)
Billy Connolly (The Man Who Sued God)
Stephen Fry (V For Vendetta)
Ryan Gage (Outlaw)
Mark Mitchinson (Mortal Engines)
Sarah Peirse (Heavenly Creatures)

Benedict Cumberbatch in The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies (2014)Reaching the finish line of Peter Jackson’s The Hobbit Trilogy is an accomplishment for both viewer and director. The film picks up seconds after The Desolation of Smaug ends: The great, fire-breathing dragon (voiced by Benedict Cumberbatch) descends upon Laketown, bathing its residents in a sea of fire. Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman), Thorin Oakenshield (Richard Armitage) and the dwarves watch in horror from Erebor, while Bard the Bowman (Luke Evans) battles the dragon in Laketown, earning the respect of its people. Gandalf the Grey (Ian McKellen) remains the captive of the Necromancer – aka Sauron (also voiced by Cumberbatch) – as Galadriel (Cate Blanchett) and Elrond (Hugo Weaving) conspire to free him. Soon Thorin, like Smaug before him, becomes obsessed with the Lonely Mountain’s treasure, and incites a war with the elves, led by Thranduil (Lee Pace) and trailed by Legolas (Orlando Bloom) and Tauriel (Evangeline Lilly). Also approaching is Azog’s orc army, which threatens to overpower any one of the protagonist armies. If you’re counting armies, that’s the dwarves, elves, men from Laketown, orcs, and wild wolves, who also show up to claim the Arkenstone.Richard Armitage in The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies (2014)This extended cut adds approximately twenty minutes of new footage, much of which is incorporated into the battle sequences. This version actually earned an R rating, which again proves that the MPAA is scared of its own shadow. Other than some CGI blood splatter and an over-the-top scene where Legolas decapitates a couple of orcs while hanging upside down, this is decidedly PG-13 material. The opening battle at Laketown is the film’s most exciting, as the circling, taunting Smaug remains a visually and narratively compelling character thanks to Cumberbatch and some incredible visual effects.Martin Freeman and Ken Stott in The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies (2014)This extended cut does provide a few welcome character moments that improve the film. Jackson really underwhelms with the too-brief Gandalf/Sauron fight he previewed in An Unexpected Journey, but at least that is given a bit more screen time here. Better are added moments between Bilbo and Bofur (James Nesbitt) and extended scenes where Thorin contemplates whether or not to engage in battle against the elves and men. We also see the annoying Alfrid (Ryan Gage) die on screen, so there’s that to look forward to.Luke Evans, John Bell, Peggy Nesbitt, and Mary Nesbitt in The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies (2014)At the end of this epic, This film stands as a decent conclusion to Peter Jackson’s epic trilogy. the film is presented here with 20 minutes of additional footage. Fans will no doubt want to own this extended edition, which offers fantastic picture and sound quality and hours upon hours of extras.

REVIEW: THE HOBBIT: THE BATTLE OF THE FIVE ARMIES

Starring

Martin Freeman (Black Panther)
Ian Holm (Alien)
Ian McKellen (X-Men)
Richard Armitage (Hannibal)
Luke Evans (Dracula Untold)
Orlando Bloom (Pirates of The Caribbean)
Evangeline Lilly (Ant-Manand The Wasp)
Lee Pace (Guardians of The Galaxy)
Graham McTavish (Outlander)
Ken Stott (Fortitude)
Aidan Turner (Beautiful Darkness)
Dean O’Gorman (Young Hercules)
Benedict Cumberbatch (Doctor Strange)
Manu Bennett (Arrow)
Mark Hadlow (King Kong)
Jed Brophy (Heavenly Creatures)
Adam Brown (The Emoji Movie)
John Callen (The Rainbow Warrior)
Peter Hambleton (A Twist In The Tale)
William Kircher (Shark In The Park)
James Nesbitt (Jekyll)
Stephen Hunter (Blue World Order)
Cate Blanchett (Hanna)
Hugo Weaving (The Matrix)
Christopher Lee (Star Wars – Episode II)
Sylvester McCoy (Doctor Who)
John Tui (Power Rangers SPD)
Billy Connolly (The Man Who Sued God)
Stephen Fry (V For Vendetta)
Ryan Gage (Outlaw)
Mark Mitchinson (Mortal Engines)
Sarah Peirse (Heavenly Creatures)

Martin Freeman in The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies (2014)The Battle of the Five Armies proves to be an accurate title for the last entry in the series. This entry picks up directly where The Desolation of Smaug left off with the impending doom of Laketown because of the approaching dragon Smaug. The people of the Laketown struggle during their confrontation with Smaug and try to defeat the dragon. It is ultimately up to the heroic Bard (Luke Evans) to try and stop Smaug from obliterating everything in the path and save Laketown. Thranduil (Lee Pace) now seeks the sacred jewels of his people and arrives with the elves to get them back from the dwarf kingdom. The humans of Laketown seek shelter and gold so they can rebuild their town. The dwarves, having been without their home for so long, unite and fight to protect the reclaimed mountain kingdom. Increasing chaos ensues as the orcs arrive and bring with them bats bred for war and goblins. The threat of the rise of Sauron (the Necromancer) looms in the background.The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies (2014)As the story progresses, it becomes clear a war is brewing in Middle Earth between the dwarves, the elves, the orcs (under the separate commands of Azog and Bolg), and the men of Laketown (who are fighting alongside Bard). Gandalf (Ian McKellen) must try and prevent the battle that looms but is faced with escaping the grasp of the necromancer with the help of Galadriel (Cate Blanchett). Upon arriving outside of the dwarf kingdom before the battle begins, Gandalf tries uniting the men, dwarves, and elves as he senses the impending war approaching with the orcs and wants the armies strengths combined so they can defeat the orcs. Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman) also tries to unite the divided armies of men, dwarfs, and elves. Legolas (Orlando Bloom) and Tauriel (Evangeline Lilly) continue to be an aid to the dwarfs as needed and are thrust directly into the ensuing battle.Jed Brophy, John Callen, Martin Freeman, Peter Hambleton, William Kircher, James Nesbitt, Dean O'Gorman, Ken Stott, Stephen Hunter, Aidan Turner, and Adam Brown in The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies (2014)Dwarf leader Thorin (Richard Armitage) has become obsessed with finding the Arkenstone: the heart of the mountain. It is kept by Bilbo Baggins as he dislikes the way that power and greed has overtaken Thorin’s mind. Bilbo tries to remind Thorin of his important duties to those in need. Thorin, blinded by gold and the rage of his past, has to overcome his demons to fight as a hero once more before the war has ended. Bilbo, a true friend to Thorin, remains by his side as he faces a inner struggle to regain his sanity and to fight for what is right.Evangeline Lilly and Peggy Nesbitt in The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies (2014)Following An Unexpected Journey and The Desolation of Smaug, The Battle of the Five Armies is easily the most action-packed of the three films. The entire film serves to act as a concluding act to the series. It concludes the story that was established in the first Hobbit film and brings additional closure to the entire six-film saga as it creates a bridge between series. With great adventure, action, and dramatic closure, The Battle of the Five Armies is another excellent experience in the cinematic land of Middle Earth. The performances are impressive across the board in this film. Martin Freeman serves as a sort of anchor to the proceedings with his lovable performance as Bilbo. Richard Armitage brings dramatic weight to the character of Thorin with his remarkable performance. As always, the great Ian McKellen makes Gandalf one of the series most beloved characters.Richard Armitage in The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies (2014)Rightfully so. Evangeline Lilly does a superb job in the role of Tauriel. She brings her best to the part and makes an excellent action-hero. It’s a lot of fun to see Orlando Bloom bringing the character of Legolas back. Cate Blanchett is as good as always and Luke Evans brings something uniquely special to the film with his role as Bard. These performances mesh together remarkably well and help the film to succeed during both moments of spectacle and dramatic events occurring between the characters.

REVIEW: MORTAL ENGINES

Starring

Hera Hilmar (Anna Karenina)
Robert Sheehan (The Umbrella Academy)
Hugo Weaving (V For Vendetta)
Jihae (2B)
Ronan Raftery (Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them)
Leila George (The Kid)
Patrick Malahide (Luther)
Stephen Lang (Avatar)
Colin Salmon (Krypton)
Mark Mitchinson (Power Rangers Megaforce)
Andrew Lees (The Originals)
Sarah Peirse (Heavenly Creatures)
Mark Hadlow (King Kong)
Caren Pistorius (Denial)
Joel Tobeck (Ash vs Evil Dead)
Stephen Ure (Deathgasm)
Nathaniel Lees (Young Hercules)

Hera Hilmar in Mortal Engines (2018)Following a cataclysmic conflict known as the Sixty Minute War, the remnants of humanity regroup and form mobile “predator” cities. Under a philosophy known as “Municipal Darwinism”, larger cities hunt and absorb smaller settlements in the “Great Hunting Ground”, which includes Great Britain and Continental Europe. In opposition, settlements of the “Anti-Traction League” have developed an alternative civilization consisting of “static settlements” (traditional, non-mobile cities) in Asia led by Shan Guo (formerly China), protected by the “Shield Wall”. Relics of 21st-century technology such as toasters, computers, and smartphones are valued as “Old-Tech.”Hera Hilmar and Jihae in Mortal Engines (2018)The city of London captures a small mining town called Salzhaken, absorbing its population and resources, under orders of Lord Mayor Magnus Crome. Tom Natsworthy, a young Apprentice Historian, arrives at London’s “Gut” to collect Salzhaken’s Old-Tech for London’s Museum. Hester Shaw, a masked woman among the Salzhakens, attempts to kill Thaddeus Valentine, Head of the Guild of Historians, but Tom intervenes, pursuing Hester to a chute. Hester escapes, but not before telling him that Valentine murdered her mother and scarred her face. When Tom informs Valentine of this, he pushes Tom down the chute.Hera Hilmar in Mortal Engines (2018)Tom and Hester are forced to work together to traverse the Hunting Ground, finding refuge in a town called Scuttlebug, but the owners lock them in a cell, intending to sell them as slaves. Hester confides that Valentine killed her archaeologist mother Pandora after stealing a piece of Old-Tech she found in a dig in the Dead Continent of Americas, whilst young Hester escaped with a necklace her mother gave her. Meanwhile, Valentine frees Shrike, a reanimated cyborg known as a “Stalker”, from an offshore prison to find and kill Hester. At the slave market of Rustwater, Tom and Hester are rescued by Anti-Traction League agent Anna Fang. During the chaos, they are pursued by Shrike, whom Hester reveals she knows. Hester explains that Shrike had found and raised her, and Hester promised to let him turn her into a Stalker like himself, but she left after discovering that London was in the Great Hunting Ground. On London, Valentine’s good-natured daughter Katherine grows estranged from her father, especially after Apprentice Engineer Bevis Pod informs her that Valentine pushed Tom down the chute, and they learn Valentine’s energy project in the re-purposed St Paul’s Cathedral is more than it seems.Hera Hilmar in Mortal Engines (2018)Hester and Tom travel on Anna’s airship the Jenny Haniver to the airborne city Airhaven, meeting other Anti-Traction League members. Tom realizes Pandora discovered a key component for MEDUSA, a quantum energy-based superweapon used during the war, capable of instantly destroying cities; the Guild of Engineers have stolen the remaining components from Tom’s workshop and rebuilt the weapon under Valentine’s orders. Shrike catches up with them, resulting in a fierce skirmish that critically wounds him and destroys Airhaven. Realizing that Hester is in love with Tom, he frees her of her promise before perishing. As Hester, Tom, and Anna travel to the Shield Wall with the surviving Anti-Tractionists, Valentine kills Crome in a coup and musters support from Londoners by vowing to destroy the Shield Wall with MEDUSA and lead them to a new Hunting Ground in Asia. Anna convinces Governor Kwan to launch the Anti-Tractionist airship fleet against London, but MEDUSA destroys the fleet and blasts a hole through the Shield Wall. Hester discovers that her mother’s necklace hides a “crash drive” with a kill switch for MEDUSA. Hester, Tom, Anna, and the remaining Anti-Tractionists lead a raid against London, braving the city’s anti-aircraft defences.Hester and Anna infiltrate St Paul’s, and though Valentine mortally wounds Anna during a sword duel, Hester disables MEDUSA with the crash drive. Still determined to destroy the Shield Wall, the insane Valentine has his henchmen kill the city’s control crew and ram it into the Wall. With Katherine’s help, Tom uses the Haniver to destroy London’s engine. Hester catches and fights Valentine aboard his airship, where he reminds her that he is her father. Tom rescues Hester and shoots down Valentine’s ship, which is crushed by London’s slowing tracks, killing Valentine. The surviving Londoners, led by Katherine, make peace with the Anti-Tractionists, whilst Tom and Hester travel in the Haniver to see the world.Hera Hilmar in Mortal Engines (2018)The movie manages to entertain. It is a pity it was a box office flop. Probably because of the concept itself which is hard to sell, the lack of efficient marketing, the bad critic reviews and mostly the lack of big names that would draw interest. Not to mention the competition with other movies launched in the same period such as Aquaman. You will not regret seeing the movie if you want to see a visually stunning modern fairy tale. But don’t expect Lord of The Rings.

REVIEW: HEAVENLY CREATURES

CAST
Kate Winslet (Divergent)
Melanie Lynsky (Two and a Half Men)
Sarah Peirse (The Hobbit 2 & 3)
Diana Kent (Billy Elliot)
Clive Merrison (Saving Grace)
Simon O’ Connor (Dangerous Orphans)
Jed Brophy (Brain Dead)
Peter Elliott (800 Words)
Darien Takle (Xena)
In 1950s Christchurch, New Zealand, a 14-year-old girl from a working-class family, Pauline Parker (Lynskey), befriends the more affluent English 15-year-old Juliet Hulme (Winslet) when Juliet transfers to Pauline’s school. They bond over a shared history of severe childhood disease and isolating hospitalizations, and over time develop an intense friendship. Pauline admires Juliet’s outspoken arrogance and beauty. Together they paint, write stories, make Plasticine figurines, and eventually create a fantasy kingdom called Borovnia. It is the setting of the adventure novels they write together, which they hope to have published and eventually made into films in Hollywood. Over time it begins to be as real to them as the real world. Pauline’s relationship with her mother, Honora, becomes increasingly hostile and the two fight constantly. This angry atmosphere is in contrast to the peaceful intellectual life Juliet shares with her family. Pauline spends most of her time at the Hulmes’, where she feels accepted. Juliet introduces Pauline to the idea of “the Fourth World”, a Heaven without Christians where music and art are celebrated. Juliet believes she will go there when she dies. Certain actors and musicians are “saints” in this afterlife.
During a day trip to Port Levy, Juliet’s parents announce that they are going away and plan to leave Juliet behind. Her fear of being left alone makes her hysterical, culminating in her first direct experience of the Fourth World, perceiving it as a land where all is beautiful and she is safe. She asks Pauline to come with her, and the world that Juliet sees becomes visible to Pauline, too. This is presented as a shared spiritual vision, a confirmation of their “Fourth World” belief, that influences the girls’ predominant reality and affects their perception of events in the everyday world.
Juliet is diagnosed with tuberculosis and is sent to a clinic. Again her parents leave the country, leaving her alone and desperately missing Pauline. Pauline is desolate without her, and the two begin an intense correspondence, writing not only as themselves, but in the roles of the royal couple of Borovnia. During this time Pauline begins a sexual relationship with a lodger, which makes Juliet jealous. For both of them, their fantasy life becomes a useful escape when under stress in the real world, and the two engage in increasingly violent, even murderous, fantasies about people who oppress them. After four months, Juliet is released from the clinic and their relationship intensifies. Juliet’s father blames the intensity of the relationship on Pauline and speaks to her parents, who take her to a doctor. The doctor suspects that Pauline is homosexual, and considers this a cause of her increasing anger at her mother as well as her dramatic weight loss.
Juliet catches her mother having an affair with one of her psychiatric clients and threatens to tell her father, but her mother tells her he knows. Shortly afterward, the two announce their intention to divorce, upsetting Juliet. Soon it is decided that the family will leave Christchurch, with Juliet to be left with a relative in South Africa. She becomes increasingly hysterical at the thought of leaving Pauline, and the two girls plan to run away together. When that plan becomes impossible, the two begin to talk about murdering Pauline’s mother as they see her as the primary obstacle to their being together. As the date of Juliet’s departure nears, it is decided that the two girls should spend the last three weeks together at Juliet’s house. At the end of that time, Pauline returns home and the two finalize plans for the murder. Honora plans a day for the three of them at Victoria Park, and the girls decide this will be the day. Juliet puts a broken piece of brick into a stocking and they go off to the park. After having tea, the three walk down the path and when Honora bends over to pick up a pink charm the girls have put there, Juliet and Pauline bludgeon her to death.
In a postscript, it is revealed that the next day Pauline’s diary was found in which the plan for the murder had been outlined which led to Pauline and Juliet getting arrested. The two are tried, convicted, and sentenced to prison. It is a condition of their eventual release that they never meet again.
Peter Jackson starts the movie by emphasizing what a beautiful, peaceful country (via a cheesy 1950s documentary) New Zealand is. But beauty is not everything — fairy tales can become nightmares. Jackson doesn’t just show the audience what the two girls did, but showed why they did it. Even then, he doesn’t make excuses. At first the movie seems almost whimsical, with fairy tale figures coming to life, beautiful woodlands, and hillsides transforming into blooming gardens. Nobody except Peter Jackson could have pulled off the idea of including living clay figurines or four-foot-wide butterflies. Somehow it not only works, but adds to the surreality of the story.

But as the girls go deeper into infatuated madness, Jackson warps the whimsical world around them. Settings get darker and more distorted, and the line between fantasy and reality is completely wiped out. The scripting keeps that creepiness going (“Our main idea for the day was to murder Mother. But the movie really centers around Melanie Lynskey and Kate Winslet, and these two carry the movie beautifully. Lynskey can switch in an instant from sullenness to smiles, naive girl to murderous woman. And the luminous Kate Winslet plays the devil-may-care Juliet, whose vivacity and charm overrule any of Pauline’s reservations. “It’s everyone else who’s bonkers!” she says gleefully when Pauline casts doubt on her own sanity. The most terrifying horror is the real kind — the kind that is in the human heart. With its brilliant direction and equally good acting, “Heavenly Creatures” is destined to be a modern classic.