REVIEW: LEGENDS OF TOMORROW – SEASON 2

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Starring

Victor Garber (Alias)
Brandon Routh (Superman Returns)
Arthur Darvill (Doctor Who)
Caity Lotz (The Pact)
Franz Drameh (See)
Matt Letscher (Her)
Maisie Richardson-Sellers (The Originals)
Amy Louise Pemberton (The Laundromat)
Nick Zano (2 Broke Girls)
Dominic Purcell (Prison Break)

Recurring / Notable Guest Cast

Neal McDonough (Van Helsing)
Stephen Amell (Arrow)
John Rubinstein (Chilling Adventures of Sabrina)
Matthew MacCaull (Tomorrowland)
Sarah Grey (Power Rangers)
Rebecca Roberts (Pompeii)
Patrick J. Adams (Suits)
Mei Melançon (Pathology)
Sab Shimono (Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles III)
Grant Gustin (Glee)
Emily Tennant (Mr. Young)
Lance Henriksen (Aliens)
Graeme McComb (Bates Motel)
Johnathon Schaech (Prom Night)
Christina Brucato (The Intern)
Jeff Fahey (The Lawnmower Man)
David Ramsey (Dexter)
Emily Bett Rickards (Brooklyn)
Danielle Panabaker (The Crazies)
Carlos Valdes (The Flash)
Melissa Benoist (Jay & Silent Bob Reboot)
Donnelly Rhodes (Battlestar Galactica)
Lucia Walters (The 100)
John Barrowman (Torchwood)
Noel Johansen (Somewhere Between)
Elyse Levesque (The Originals)
Wentworth Miller (Underworld)
Katie Cassidy (Gossip Girl)

Brandon Routh in Legends of Tomorrow (2016)DC’s Legends of Tomorrow was a solid addition to The CW’s superhero lineup in its first season. Sure , the show had problems, but the ensemble approach and time travel elements definitely set it apart from the likes of The Flash and Arrow. But in hindsight, Season 1 seems like a test-run for the show Legends would become in its second season. This year, the show trimmed most of what didn’t work and replaced it with elements that did. As a result, Legends became not just the best superhero series on The CW, but quite possibly on any network.Kwesi Ameyaw, Matthew MacCaull, Dan Payne, Patrick J. Adams, Sarah Grey, and Maisie Richardson-Sellers in Legends of Tomorrow (2016)A lot of what didn’t work about Season 1 can be pinned squarely on the shoulders of Vandal Savage (Casper Crump) and his millennia-long feud with Hawkgirl (Ciara Renée) and Hawkman (Falk Hentschel). But with Savage being decisively killed off and the Hawks shuffled off the main stage in the Season 1 finale, the show was free to move forward in the Season 2 premiere, “Out of Time.” And move forward it did.
Surprisingly, “Out of Time” didn’t pick up directly from Season 1’s cliffhanger and the introduction of Rex Tyler (Patrick J. Adams). Instead, the season opened with a weird but engaging detour that saw newcomer Nate Heywood (Nick Zano) turn to Oliver Queen (Stephen Amell) for help in tracking down the time-displaced Legends. That served as a great introduction for Nate and a fun way of reconnecting with the old gang one by one. Nate almost immediately settled in as a valuable new addition to the team dynamic, what with his brotherly bond with Atom (Brandon Routh) and his seemingly doomed romance with Vixen (Maisie Richardson-Sellers).Vixen proved to be another strong addition to the mix. Richardson-Sellers faced a bit of an uphill battle early on considering that Arrow had already introduced a different version of the character in live-action. But the writers worked in this “recasting” in a clever way, and it wasn’t long before Amaya emerged as a character very distinct from her granddaughter in terms of personality and motivations.
Victor Garber, Dominic Purcell, Brandon Routh, Nick Zano, Caity Lotz, Franz Drameh, and Maisie Richardson-Sellers in Legends of Tomorrow (2016)The Hawks weren’t the only characters to be pruned from the cast for Season 2. Captain Cold (Wentworth Miller) was also gone, though he served as much use in death as he did in life when it came to advancing Heat Wave’s (Dominic Purcell) character arc. Rory’s struggle to accept the Legends as his new family was easily one of the most compelling storylines of this season, and that arc became all the more crucial in the final few episodes.Johnathon Schaech and Caity Lotz in Legends of Tomorrow (2016)Rip Hunter (Arthur Darvill) also played a drastically different role this season. He more or less sat out the first half of the season, with his whereabouts (or whenabouts) a mystery and his absence forcing White Canary (Caity Lotz) to step up as team captain. That was another inspired change, one that built on several years’ of growth Sara has experienced on both this show and Arrow. And even when Rip did resurface in the latter half of the season, his role constantly shifted and defied expectations. He was an antagonist to the team this year as often as he was an ally.
David Ramsey, Brandon Routh, Nick Zano, Stephen Amell, Melissa Benoist, Franz Drameh, Grant Gustin, and Maisie Richardson-Sellers in Legends of Tomorrow (2016)If any character didn’t quite receive the attention they deserved this year, it was Jax (Franz Drameh). While his partner Professor Stein (Victor Garber) dealt with some rather drastic time aberration problems, Jax never really seemed to have a overarching struggle this season. That’s something the writers might want to focus on in Season 3. The conflict in Season 1 was propelled mainly by Rip’s efforts to stop Vandal Savage and prevent the deaths of his family. Season 2 took a little while to develop its own clear mission statement. The first couple episodes offered a fun crossover with the WWII-era Justice Society, but after that the show lost some momentum while the writers worked to establish the true conflict. That spawned a couple of relatively weaker episodes like “Shogun,” where it seemed like the team was doing little more than ticking off boxes on their historical guidebooks. “Outlaw Country” was another relative disappointment, as it didn’t quite justify the decision to send the team back to the Wild West and reunite with Jonah Hex (Johnathon Schaech).John Barrowman in Legends of Tomorrow (2016)However, the show was off to the races again once the Legion of Doom was introduced and the Spear of Destiny emerged as the major catalyst for Season 2. MacGuffin or not, the Spear was a compelling plot device, and one that reminded viewers once again that the Arrow-verse writers are willing to dig very deep when it comes to taking advantage of the rich tapestry that is the DC Universe. By the time the show reached the midseason finale point with “The Chicago Way” it built up a newfound momentum that carried it right along to the finish.Matt Letscher in Legends of Tomorrow (2016)The Legion themselves also provided the show with the compelling, enjoyable villain it lacked in Season 1. Sure, you could argue that the show played it safe by drawing on a handful of popular villains from The Flash and Arrow rather than introducing a new threat. But half the fun of serialized superhero universes is watching heroes and villains alike grow and evolve. Legends’ take on the Legion built directly on the idea that all of these villains had failed on their own, and all sought the Spear of Destiny as a means of rewriting their own histories. Plus, it was just plain fun to watch Reverse-Flash (Matt Letscher), Damien Darhk (Neal McDonough) and Malcolm Merlyn (John Barrowman) interact. You can’t throw three hotheaded, self-interested villains into one room and not expect tempers to flare and betrayal to flow like wine. Letscher was particularly engaging all season long, doing a lot to stand out in a role that had previously been dominated by Tom Cavanagh. Thawne worked as a villain because his goals were so simple and understandable. Thawne’s role and the surprise return of another villain built very cleverly on the foundation laid in The Flash’s first two seasons.There was ample drama to go around over the course of these 17 episodes, whether that involved Rip’s shifting motivations, Amaya confronting her inevitable destiny or Rory trying to find his purpose in a world without Snart. The final few episodes capitalized on that drama well, tying up a number of loose ends and further establishing the Legends as a close-knit but very dysfunctional family.Brandon Routh, Elyse Levesque, Nick Zano, Caity Lotz, Franz Drameh, and Maisie Richardson-Sellers in Legends of Tomorrow (2016)At the same time, the show developed a very terrific sense of humor this year, and that was probably its strongest asset. Legends became the much-needed antidote to the DC Extended Universe, a place where color doesn’t exist and no one seems to remember how to crack a smile. And with Arrow and The Flash both moving in darker directions this year, Legends was frequently a welcome and much-needed source of levity each week. You can point to any number of standout moments where Legends allowed its writers and actors to revel in being silly. There was the hilarious and unexpected musical number in “Moonshot.” There was the fact that the team found themselves trapped in a garbage compactor with a young George Lucas. There was Ray using Tyrannosaur urine as a means of creating a barrier around his prehistoric fort. Week after week, the cast and crew embraced the goofy side of the DCU and crafted a show that was as much about the thrill of adventure as it was costumed character drama and plot twists.

REVIEW: THE ORDER – SEASON 1

Sarah Grey in The Order (2019)

Starring

Jake Manley (Heroes Reborn)
Sarah Grey (Power Rangers)
Sam Trammell (Imperium)
Matt Frewer (The BFG)
Max Martini (The Town)

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RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Katharine Isabelle (Hannibal)
Jewel Staite (Firefly)
Kawennahere Devery Jacobs (American Gods)
Louriza Tronco (Make It Pop)
Ty Wood (Chilling Adventures of Sabrina)
Adam DiMarco (The Magicians)
Aaron Hale (Miss Sloane)
Jedidiah Goodacre (The Originals)
Dylan Playfair (Descendants 2)
Hiro Kanagawa (Izombie)
Emily Holmes (Snakes on a Plane)
Julia Benson (Stargate Universe)
Kayla Heller (Snowcoming)
Ian Tracey (Bates Motel)
Françoise Yip (Aliens vs Predator 2)

a4763c55-70a8-4acf-a9c2-4b41593fd64d-screen-shot-2019-03-06-at-31130-pmNetflix shows like The Order have an advantage that series that release episodes a week apart don’t have. Potential audiences can give a new show a quick opening binge right away rather than only viewing the always tricky pilot to prove that it’s worthy of being added to their viewing schedule. The Order is definitely a supernatural show that stands alongside The Magicians or The Vampire Diaries, but the true twist to the witches versus werewolves premise doesn’t show up until third episode. College campus drama tropes bog down the first episode a bit, but the central conflict is wholly unique with plenty of humor and well-written dialogue to smooth out the rough edges.MV5BZjZmYjQ2ZTktY2NjOS00NTg5LWJlYWMtNDE5ZDhhNjg5ODYzXkEyXkFqcGdeQW1yb3NzZXI@._V1_UX477_CR0,0,477,268_AL_On the one hand, The Order should be commended for not holding the viewer’s hand during key parts of the opening narrative. Jack Morton (Jake Manley of iZombie) and his grandfather (Matt Frewer of Orphan Black) clearly have some sort of ulterior motive for getting him into Belgrave University as a freshman, but the audience has to figure out why on its own, and the details that unfold go from simple to complex pretty quickly. On the other hand, the manner in which Jack is admitted and his almost immediate encounters with frat boys and townie-hating rich kids is meant to be accepted with a hand wave and does feel a bit rushed.the-order-netflix-season-2-4-1551991441704Given the hurry to establish the campus atmosphere, it’s remarkable how quickly chemistry forms between Jake and sophomore college tour guide Alyssa Drake (Sarah Grey of Legends of Tomorrow). Despite moments of overt flirtation on Jake’s part and even briefer flickers of mutual attraction, The Order is not in any rush to bring these two together or create any weird love triangles. A level of respect is built between them based on intelligence and an understanding that some of those around them, both magic users and regular students, are jerks with poor judgment.ty5y54yIt’s interesting that The Order pokes fun at ritualistic fraternity initiations immediately before bringing us into the pledge process for the titular Hermetic Order of the Blue Rose, which includes — you guessed it — the presentation of a magically appearing blue rose to the potential Neophytes. Even those established in the Order, such as college chancellor Vera Stone (Katharine Isabelle of The Arrangement) and the higher level students like Alyssa, indulge in the use of robes and masks, but somehow the secret society comes across as neither haughty nor ridiculous. It’s just Hogwarts or Brakebills with a dash of alumni politics, and it works.the-order-e1551988902714The question is how many viewers will stay tuned in long enough to realize that the initial conflict that’s presented in which Neophytes are supposedly being killed by werewolves is not nearly as Saturday B-movie as it may sound nor is it in fact a true representation of the nature of the animosity between witches and werewolves at all? Jake’s place in the Order may have a lot to do with the mission imposed upon him by Grandpa Pete, but by episode three, it becomes so much more than that. And again, the friendships that Jake makes along the way (some of which lie in direct opposition to each other) are a bit rushed, but the humor that comes from the Neophytes playing with magic way beyond their understanding or Jack’s R.A. (Adam DiMarco of The Magicians, oddly enough) trying to figure out what to do with his new resident is definitely worth overlooking the artificially acclerated bonding. Fellow Neophyte Gabrielle (Louriza Tronco of Spiral) is especially delightful and will quickly remind The Magicians fans of an early Margo, and she and Brandon (Aaron Hale of Pure) importantly add some much needed diversity to the lily white cast.the-order-season-1-on-netflix-ofSo ignore the loglines and stick around until The Order shows you what it’s really all about. With engaging characters and with several compelling paths set before its protagonist, this show has legs if it plays its cards right. Characters whom you assume are good might not be so honest, and those portrayed as evil aren’t necessarily so. Achieving that level of complexity so quickly is worth the sacrifice of a little exposition. Now if you’ll excuse me, I have seven more episodes to binge.

REVIEW: POWER RANGERS (2017)

CAST

Dacre Montgomery (Stranger Things)
Naomi Scott (Terra Nova)
RJ Cyler (War Machine)
Ludi Lin (Monster Hunt)
Becky G. (Empire)
Elizabeth Banks (The HUnger Games)
Bryan Cranston (Breaking Bad)
Bill Hader (Superbad)
David Denman (Outcast)
Sarah Gray (Legends of Tomorrow)
Wesley MacInnes (Smallville)
Garry Chalk (Arrow)
Patrick Sabongui (The Flash)
Erica Cerra (The 100)
Jason David Frank (Mighty Morphin Power Rangers)
Amy Jo Johnson (Mighty Morphin Power Rangers)
Anjali Jay (Supergirl)
Caroline Cave (Van Helsing)
Fred Tatasciore (Hulk Vs)
Matt Shively (American Housewife)

Twenty years after the last Power Rangers theatrical release, the sci-fi series returns with an updated visual style and reconfigured storyline, as the Saban Entertainment property moves from 20th Century Fox to Lionsgate. Unlike the TV program (still running after 24 seasons), the feature films faded away after 1997’s Turbo: A Power Rangers Movie, the follow-up to Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie, released two years earlier.
This version creatively reimagines the Power Rangers’ origins by establishing them as a team of intergalactic protectors, which certainly provides a high degree of flexibility for potential future iterations. Its worldwide appeal should assure satisfactory initial results.

An opening flashback reveals that the original Power Rangers were actually humanoid-like extraterrestrials, arriving on earth millions of years ago as Zordon (Bryan Cranston) and his team of Rangers attempted to defend the planet from power-hungry alien invader Rita Repulsa (Elizabeth Banks). When an errant meteor strikes, Zordon’s Rangers are all killed and he almost perishes before his loyal robot assistant Alpha 5 (Bill Hader) saves him by uploading his consciousness into their spacecraft’s computer system, while Rita’s body is consigned to the depths of the ocean. Digitally imprisoned within the ship indefinitely, Zordon will have to wait until the power coins that enable the development of Ranger superpowers are discovered sometime in the distant future before he can be freed.More than 60 million years later, a decrepit gold mine outside the rural California town of Angel Grove attracts the attention of outcast teen tech-whiz Billy (RJ Cyler), who’s focused on a project started by his late father to unearth a mysterious energy source within the mountainside. Billy gets some unexpected assistance from disgraced football star Jason (Dacre Montgomery), who needs his help hacking the tracking anklet the local police department forces him to wear after he’s apprehended for staging a disastrous high school prank. It turns out that some other marginalized teens are also drawn to the mountain, including bad boy Zack (Ludi Lin), ostracized cheerleader Kimberly (Naomi Scott) and (in one of the first representations of an LGBTQ superhero character) gay-questioning Trini (Becky G).
After Billy’s homemade explosive device blows away the wall of the mine, they discover the buried power coins and quickly begin developing unexpected super-abilities, including incredible strength and agility. It’s not until they discover Zordon’s buried spaceship and encounter Alpha 5, however, that they begin to understand their anointed role as Zordon’s next team of Power Rangers. As the kids struggle to control their newfound talents, the revival of Rita from deep beneath the ocean snaps their situation into sharp focus when she arrives in Angel Grove seeking Zordon and begins destroying the town. If the Rangers can’t find a way to come together and form a cohesive team, they’ll never be able to defeat Rita and save the world from her destructive ambitions.
For longtime fans, the newest installment preserves some of the most beloved characteristics of the original franchise, updated to reflect technological advances. The Rangers’ color-coded power suits now benefit from nanoparticle properties and the robotic mecha assault vehicles known as Zords that they pilot take on enhanced battle capabilities, while Rita’s menacing sidekicks the Putties and the gigantic warrior Goldar get more polished, fluid CGI representations. (And yes, the “Go Go Power Rangers” theme song makes a triumphant return.)

Screenwriter John Gatins succeeds in effectively distilling the Power Rangers’ sprawling mythology into a manageable scope and dialing back the campy humor and martial arts fixations that characterized the TV series and liberally informed the feature films. The current version instead emphasizes more realistic dramatic situations by imbuing each Ranger with some type of personal issue. Whether they’re dealing with bullying, alienation or sexual orientation, these teens are more three-dimensional than their Ranger predecessors.Standing out in a field of largely emerging young talent, Cyler (Me and Earl and the Dying Girl) strikes a heartfelt balance between Billy’s obsessive and creative tendencies, playing them against one another for both humor and emotional impact. Cranston as the pompous alien with unrealistic expectations and Hader as the ever-optimistic robot form a resourceful if unexpected comedic team, but can’t quite match Banks for Rita’s sheer delightfulness , she is having fun and it shows oin the big screen.Israelite, building on his experience with teen sci-fi feature Project Almanac, orchestrates a vastly more complex array of characters, action set pieces and technical resources for a combined effect that maintains dramatic tension. CGI characters and special effects sequences by Weta Workshop are seamlessly integrated and consistently thrilling. This is a brilliant retelling the classic story for a new age.

REVIEW: IZOMBIE – SEASON 2

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MAIN CAST

Rose McIver (Power Rangers RPM)
Malcolm Goodwin (The Bellman)
Rahul Kohli (Happy Anniversary)
Robert Buckley (Killer Movie)
David Anders (Alias)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Steven Weber (2 Broke Girls)
Molly Hagan (No Good Nick)
Nick Purcha (Cold Zone)
Adam Rose (Up In The Air)
Leanne Lapp (Grace Encounters 2)
Bryce Hodgson (Kid Cannabis)
Carmen Moore (Arrow)
Kurt Evans (Izombie)
Jessica Lu (God Friended Me)
Robert Knepper (Cult)
Justin Prentice (13 Reasons Why)
Carrie Anne Fleming (Supernatural
David Starzyk (Veronica Mars)
Brian Markinson (Tribal)
Aly Michalka (Two and a Half Men)
Serge Houde (50/50)
Ona Grauer (V)
Lucia Walters (Stargate Atlantis)
Anne Marie DeLuise (Smallville)
Raphael Sbarge (Once Upon A Time)
Jessica Harmon (The 100)
Robert Salvador (Arrow)
Eddie Jemison (Waitress)
Steven Williams (21 Jump Street)
Rick Fox (Oz)
Kevin McNulty (Timecop)
Natalie Brown (Bitten)
Emy Aneke (The Predator)
Greg Finley (The Flash)
Brooke Lyons (2 Broke Girls)
Anna Galvin (Tin Man)
Ben Lawson (No Strings Attached)
Lee Garlington (Cobra)
Daniella Alonso (The Hills Have Eyes II)
Fiona Vroom (Power Rangers)
Kristen Bell (The Good Place)
Colin Lawrence (Watchmen)
Patrick Gallagher (Glee)
Bradley Stryker (Smallville)
Michael Kopsa (Fantastic Four)
Enrico Colantoni (Veronica Mars)
Kacey Rohl (Arrow)
Genevieve Buechner (Caprica)
Ali Liebert (Wonder)
Zak Santiago (Shooter)
Chasty Ballesteros (The Internship)
Sarah Grey (The Order)
Wesley MacInnes (Power Rangers)
Andrea Savage (Veep)
Ken Marino (Agent Carter)

Consistently offering clever, witty and fun episodes, iZombie solidified itself as one of the most entertaining series on TV in its second season. Rob Thomas and Diane Ruggiero-Wright had already created an offbeat yet inviting world in Season 1 and in Season 2 they built upon it, putting the characters into more intense and involving situations, all while still maintaining the show’s crucial, knowing sense of humor.The cast continue to be one of the most likeable you’ll find, anchored by the excellent Rose McIver. Okay, it’s one of the show’s reaches that pretty much every brain Liv eats is a very focused, specific type of person, but that’s just part of the deal here. And it gives McIver so much to work with, as she goes all in playing Liv taking on personas as varied as a coach, a stalker, a costumed vigilante or a tough stripper. Every week, McIver is given something different to play and she consistently nails it, with ongoing mileage gotten out of how out there and uncharacteristic Liv gets, depending on her latest brain meal.After his heartbroken ex-fiancé character take a surprising (and awesome) turn at the end of Season 1, Robert Buckley’s Major got a great storyline in Season 2, as he found himself working for Vaughn Du Clark (Steven Weber), tasked with assassinating zombies – all while actually locking them up instead, which put him in a very precarious position both with Du Clark and the cops and the FBI, who were getting closer and closer to him for his actions in both Season 1 and 2.The fact that those investigating Major’s crimes were Clive (Malcolm Goodwin) and his FBI partner/love interest Dale Bozzio (Jessica Harmon) only increased the tension, even while Clive and Dale made a great pairing – with Harmon effortlessly fitting in on the show, as the somewhat goofy Dale provided a great foil for the somewhat stoic Clive. And in the midst of this, having Clive begin to slowly notice the things that were off about Liv was continually intriguing, since it was inevitable that Clive would one day find out The Secret.Blaine (David Anders) in the meantime had to adjust to life as a human again – for awhile at least, as he never kept his nose clean and eventually became one of the undead again, with Anders always bringing a wonderfully quirky/funny approach to the character. McIver and Rahul Kohli continued to be a delightful duo in all the scenes between Liv and Ravi and Kohli shined throughout the season, though I do hope Season 3 can perhaps give Ravi more of his own storyline at some points beyond the ongoing search for a cure or the burgeoning love triangle between Ravi, Peyton (Aly Michalka) and Blaine. The end of the season, as Ravi began to suspect Major was up to no good – and their big confrontation about it – showed how strong it can be to use the usually comic presence of Ravi in a dramatic manner that would be interesting to explore again.As Season 2 progressed, one really strong element was how it began to bring together several storylines. We began to see Major’s growing interaction with Blaine begin to bring him even more in focus as a suspect for Dale and Clive, while Peyton’s return — it was good to see Michalka, who also fits in great with this cast, get more to do — had her wrapped up with Blaine (in more ways than one) and helping lead us to a new villain on the show, Stacey Boss (Eddie Jemison).

Best of all, the “brain of the week” storylines began to becoming increasingly tied into the main stories as well. And yes, this meant sometimes you had to accept a bit more coincidence on the show, but it still was exciting and gratifying to see how all the different elements were intersecting in different ways and how Liv could learn new info thanks to a new murder victim connected in ways that were sometimes not apparent on the surface.When it came to Big Bads, Vaughn Du Clark certainly delivered. Stephen Weber seemed to be having a ball in the role and was delightfully awful as the energetic, confident mega-douche of a sports drink company CEO. He was also given a great foil in Gilda (Leanne Lapp), his daughter, who was just as corrupt as her dad. Gilda has no qualms about manipulating Major, Liv or anyone else and Lapp brought just the right attitude to the character – even as we saw just how awful Du Clark was as a dad, giving us a tinge of sympathy, or at least understanding, about why she was the way she was, even as it was clear she needed to be stopped. The season also ended in an epic, satisfying manner, with Clive finally finding out the truth, an all-out “Romero Zombie” attack and both Du Clark and Gilda being taken out – all while we met a huge new player on the scene that looks to be upending the show in a huge way.Nearly every week, iZombie continued to deliver in its second season and the show easily overcame any sophomore slump worries. The creators and cast seem to know exactly the right  tone to go for here, offering up a show that has a fun, accessible vibe but can get suitably intense, dramatic and gory when need be. When the CW gave all of their series early renewals last year, iZombie was one of the ones I know I was celebrating the most. Bring on Season 3!