REVIEW: INTO THE DARK – ALL THAT WE DESTROY

Into the Dark (2018)

Starring

Israel Broussard (Happy Death Day)
Aurora Perrineau (Truth or Dare)
Dora Madison (Bliss)
Frank Whaley (Luke Cage)
Samantha Mathis (American Psycho)

94506290_10163515007515333_2681161054246928384_nChelsea Stardust’s All That We Destroy is the antithesis Mother’s Day feature to Troma’s splattery, schlocky exploitation (Mother’s Day) that once dominated May’s most honorable Sunday (for genre fans). Where Charles Kaufman favors shock and awe, Stardust brings method and layered trauma to this month’s Into The Dark segment. It’s a portrait of a serial killer under mama’s containment, but not in a mentor/trainee scenario. Screenwriters Sean Keller and Jim Agnew splice scientific reinvention, parent/child complications, and the unanswerable constants of human nature into a true crime podcast’s next subject. Making a murderer, Into The Dark style.dca1b830-6d09-11e9-a3dc-758db1ea2737_800_420Samantha Mathis stars as Dr. Victoria Harris, a renown geneticist who works from home in close proximity to son Spencer (Israel Broussard). Victoria’s current project involves cloning, memory loss, and a recycled tragedy from Spencer’s past, which explains why the boy is under issued house arrest. An opening sequence that involves Spencer and Victoria’s latest “Ashley” (Aurora Perrineau) makes it clear that we’re witnessing no mere business trial. Victoria is doing this for Spencer’s sake, and the more we learn about his current condition or relationship with “Ashley,” the darker Victoria’s motives and caretaking becomes.IJFWY4On an aesthetic level, All That We Destroy modestly likens to Leigh Whannell’s Upgrade given how they’re both independent features (on different levels) that build all-involving futuristic worlds. Each time an “Ashley” awakens, she’s covered in this sludgy black primordial goop like rejuvenating motor oil. We’re grounded to the Harris estate much like Spencer, but Stardust maximizes details like holographic smartphones made from rectangular glass or communication devices that can project users into an alternate realm for face-to-face chats no matter location. Hence how Victoria contacts husband Parker (Frank Whaley), who’s off premises while Victoria fights for their child’s well-being alone. Stardust’s world is cerebral, entrapping, and thoroughly imagined, making the most of minimalist means.Screen-Shot-2020-02-21-at-1.32.41-PMOn the flip side, All That We Destroy continues Into The Dark’s visual proclivity to not play up the festiveness of holidays. When Hulu and Blumhouse announced their holiday horror venture, collaborative expectations assumed something livelier in tonality. Stardust’s themes undoubtedly align with Mother’s Day, but the drabness of sterile household drama and surgical sincerity run a bit dry at times. Victoria’s morally ambiguous treatment of Spencer implies a mother’s undying love that’s so different than Parker’s more matter-of-fact, disassociated father. Based on storyboarded arcs, we’ve seen killers be humanized as children while interacting with loved ones who desperately want to help. All That We Destroy goes a step further based on Victoria’s motherly devotion, but bloodline complications fail to riff on terrifying psychological torment with sustained “mad scientist” tragedy.ITD_IJFWY_SEW_21292RVictoria’s parental capacity for compassion is also her biggest fault, as extended absences from company premises lead to quotes like, “If I were a man they’d call me an eccentric or a genius, not an overprotective mother.” Mathis’ performance separates ma’s from pa’s (in this scenario) by connecting with Victoria’s protective instincts at all costs. For how detached Israel Broussard’s Spencer remains while a rotating door of Aurora Perrineau-played victims relives the same hell in different vessels, Mathis’ hope falls on blank stares. As a parent, there’s nothing scarier than not being able to save or “fix” your child. Victoria’s “progress” is rooted in these very fears, which Mathis helplessly evokes in fits of unenviable frustration.review-blumhouses-into-the-dark-all-that-we-destroy-on-huluWhat helps All That We Destroy is never having to question *if* Spencer is a killer. That’s all sorted out in the film’s opening scene. Stardust opens the door for character-building additions such as his artistic talents (sketches are intriguing), the addition of Dora Madison as love interest/nosy neighbor Marissa Cornell, and more than just stories about animal abuse or playground misbehaving. We’re able to appreciate core chemistries and acting, even though establishing details are base-value generic. As I said, you’ve seen these serial killer signs laid out over and over, with little more to be added here. Themes of sacrificial victimization, biological advancement, and a mother’s forever championing are far more intriguing.into-the-dark-may-3-800x337All That We Destroy is a tale of heartache, inevitability, and how a mother’s role can never be overstated. Chelsea Stardust demonstrates a keen eye for finding value in indie productions, even if the story itself is somewhat expected despite human replication breakthroughs. Samantha Mathis gives her life for child, Israel Broussard coldly attempts to kick his habit, and in the end, we’re treated to parenthood tribulations no mother or father could fathom navigating. Violent cinematography and Broussard’s commitment to robotic depravity are the highlights here, making for another by-the-books Into The Dark watch that’s recommendable enough for your late-night streaming needs.

REVIEW: THE NEW DAUGHTER

CAST

Kevin Costner (Man of Steel)
Ivana Baquero (Pan’s Labyrinth)
Gattlin Griffith (Green Lantern)
Samantha Mathis (American Psycho)
Noah Taylor (Powers)
Margaret Anne Florence (My Super Ex-Girlfriend)
James Gammon (Cool Hand Luke)
Sandra Ellis Lafferty (Containment)

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John James (Kevin Costner), a recently divorced novelist, moves into an old house in the country with his teenage daughter, Louisa (Ivana Baquero), and young son, Sam (Gattlin Griffith). John and Louisa’s relationship is strained; She accuses him of never loving her mother and ruining everything. On the family’s first night in the house, Louisa hears strange noises outside her bedroom window. Unseen by her is a humanoid creature lurking outside on the roof. The following day, while exploring the surrounding fields and forest, the children come across a large mound. Louisa is instantly attracted to it, but Sam is reluctant to go near it. In town, John learns that his house is locally infamous for the disappearance of a woman who lived there. Upon returning home, he finds Louisa’s pet cat mutilated near the house.Vile-2

Louisa returns to the mound after school and, while relaxing in the sunshine, hears strange noises. As Louisa hears what sounds like approaching animal growls, the film jump-cuts to John cutting his hand while washing dishes. That night John finds a trail of muddy footprints leading from the open front door to the bathroom. Louisa is inside with the door locked, sitting in the tub as the shower washes her extremely muddied body. The muddy water is shown turning red with blood as it reaches the drain. Later that night, John finds Louisa sleepwalking. When he takes her back to bed, he finds a strange doll made from straw, inside of which is a dark ball containing a live spider. The next morning Louisa comes down for breakfast wearing a short dress and make-up. When John asks her about the doll, she claims not to have seen it.vile-primor_avi_snapshot_01_03_01_[2013_02_15_14_37_00]Louisa is bullied by a preppy girl in the staircase of their school. Meanwhile, at home, John comes across a pile of muddy clothes in her bedroom. While investigating outside the house, he finds the head of Louisa’s doll at the mound, and the bloody remains of a blackbird. John is called to come to pick up Louisa, who says she does not feel well. In the infirmary he passes the preppy girl, who had apparently “fallen” down the stairs and injured her arm. Sam’s teacher, Cassandra (Samantha Mathis), gives John her phone number, offering her friendship. He is later startled to find a nest of spiders in the kitchen drawer where he’d placed the straw doll. That night John sees Louisa emerging from the woods, even though he had previously ordered her to be home by dark. He calls attention to scarring visible on the skin around her neck, but Louisa storms off without explanation. At dinner she eats in an animal-like manner, as if starved. John contacts Cassandra one night, and they meet sociably. While John is away, Louisa hears noises outside the house and exits. As John is returning home in his car, he sees a shadowy figure running through the woods in front of the house, which vaguely looks like Louisa. He exits his car and follows sounds of animal growls, but rushes back growing fearful. A stone hits his window and he speeds back to the house. Asking Louisa if she’d been outside, she says no. He orders her not to go near the mound any more.The-New-Daughter-Moviescreenies-12

The next day, John’s agent drives up to the house and they talk about the house. Inside, Sam is directed by Louisa to climb the ladder to the attic. Sam falls when frightened by animal noises there. He requires stitches, and John berates Louisa for not caring for her younger brother. That night, John searches the internet, finding an article about burial mounds. He telephones an expert on the subject, Professor White (Noah Taylor), but is ignored. He then researches the previous owner of the house, Sarah Wayne; she disappeared one day without a trace, after having locked her teenage daughter Emily in her bedroom from the outside. Emily was eventually found alive and went to live with her grandfather, Roger Wayne (James Gammon). John leaves the children with a babysitter and goes to find Roger Wayne. As Louisa watches him drive away from her window, scarring can be seen on the nape of her neck. She then returns to the mound. John arrives at Roger Wayne’s empty house, but lets himself in and looks around. In the girl’s room he finds a strange nest made from twigs and straw, and a depiction of the burial mound drawn onto a wall with the word “home” below it. Roger arrives and confronts John with explanations of what had occurred with Emily, that he burned down his house with her inside, insisting that it wasn’t his granddaughter anymore.The-New-Daughter-Moviescreenies-7While John is away, the babysitter is locked out of the house, as animal growls are heard approaching. Sam hides in his room as he hears the babysitters cries for help. John arrives home, comforts a frightened Sam, and rushes to Louisa to ask what happened to the babysitter. She says she does not know. After reporting the babysitter’s disappearance to police, John takes an ill Louisa to bed. She tearfully asks if he’s going to leave her as her mother did. He tells her he never will. That night, John dreams of a doorway on top of the burial mound and Louisa transforming into a creature who announces “I’m your new daughter”. The next day he finds a nest in Louisa’s closet similar to the one at Roger’s house. John calls a contractor to destroy the mound that day. Professor White, having called back to ask about the mound, suddenly arrives and pleads with John to wait. He tells John of an ancient civilization who worshiped the burial mounds, believing them to be the homes of ancient Gods, or “mound-walkers”. He mentions a ritual exchange of gifts — including small straw dolls, as John had found — and the mound-walkers’ search for a young girl with whom to mate and give birth to a new generation of deities to reclaim the earth. Horrified by this, John instructs the bulldozer to start. When it digs into the mound, the body of the babysitter is uncovered. Louisa, meanwhile, in the schoolyard, is scraping the ground with her fingers. John is taken to the police station for questioning while Cassandra looks after the kids.009TND_Ivana_Baquero_008That night, as officer Ed Lowry (Erik Palladino) drives John home, they are attacked, and Lowry is dragged from the patrol car by a creature. John continues home, discovering it in disarray and finding Cassandra with her throat slit. She dies while motioning toward Louisa standing in the doorway. John gathers the children to leave, but Louisa refuses. Mound-walkers begin attacking the house, and John kills three. After the attack, Louisa is missing. Her screams can be heard coming from the mound. John leaves Sam in his room, tells him to wait for the police, and tells him “be a big boy”. John goes to the mound to rescue Louisa and finds a tunnel leading into it. He pierces a can of gasoline, sets explosives left from the postponed demolition by the tunnel entrance, sparks a flare for light and crawls inside. Louisa is found unconscious and covered in mud. As he carries her out, angered creatures howl and give chase. Meanwhile, Sam has exited the house, clutching a framed family portrait and looking into the dark toward sounds coming from the mound. John escapes the mound with Louisa and blocks the tunnel with the leaking fuel canister, but another mound-walker is already there outside. Louisa collapses and begs her father not to leave her. John looks down at her and sees her beginning to transform into one of the creatures. He drops a flare into the leaking diesel fuel and the mound goes up in a huge explosion. As Sam watches, the flames are reflected on the glass of the frame. A figure is seen emerging, although its identity is unclear. Sam asks, “Daddy?”, as shadows can also be seen moving in the trees and house behind him. A growling creature emerges directly behind him as the screen goes black.Vile-1In a genre that is quickly becoming based only on graphic, grotesque, shocking blood and gore sequences and predictable horror and grisly effects, this thriller is actually attractive for all the right reasons and should be enjoyed highly by those that appreciate true horror/thriller films as opposed to the blood soaked hacker/slasher movies that are being pumped out monthly

REVIEW: LOST – SEASON 3

Starring

Evangeline Lilly (Ant-Man and The Wasp)
Matthew Fox (Alex Cross)
Josh Holloway (Colony)
Elizabeth Mitchell (V)
Henry Ian Cusick (Hitman)
Dominic Monaghan (Flashforward)
Naveen Andrews (The Brave One)
Michael Emerson (Arrow)
Jorge Garcia (How I Met Your Mother)
Daniel Dae Kim (Insurgent)
Yunjin Kim (Shiri)
Terry O’Quinn (The Rocketeer)
Emilie de Ravin (Operation: Endgame)
Rodrigo Santoro (300)
Kiele Sanchez (A Perfect Getaway)
Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje (Suicide Squad)

Josh Holloway in Lost (2004)

Recurring / Notable Guest Cast

Julie Adams (Code Red)
Brett Cullen (Ghost Rider)
M.C. Gainey (Breakdown)
William Mapother (The Mentalist)
Julie Bowen (Modern Family)
John Terry (Full Metal Jacket)
Michael Bowen (Kill Bill)
Tania Raymonde (Texas Chainsaw)
Rob McElhenney (Wonder Boys)
Paula Malcomson (The Hunger Games)
Ian Somerhalder (The Vampire Diaries)
Chris Mulkey (Whiplash)
Justin Chatwin (War of The Worlds)
Kim Dickens (Gone Girl)
Bill Duke (Black Lightning)
Adetokumboh M’Cormack (Gods & Heroes)
Andrew Divoff (Wishmaster)
Aisha Hinds (Cult)
François Chau (The Tick)
Nathan Fillion (Firefly)
Fredric Lehne (Men In BLack)
Zeljko Ivanek (Heores)
Nestor Carbonell (Bates Motel)
Robin Weigert (Jessica Jones)
Alan Dale (Ugly Betty)
Sonya Walger (Flashforward)
Shishir Kurup (Coneheads)
Fionnula Flanagan (The Others)
Bai Ling (The Crow)
Diana Scarwid (Wonderland)
Cheech Marin (Coco)
Kimberley Joseph (Hercules: TLJ)
Sung Hi Lee (The Girl Next Door)
April Grace (A.I.)
Shaun Toub (Iron Man)
Gabrielle Fitzpatrick (MMPR: The Movie)
Kevin Tighe (My Bloody Valentine)
Cleo King (Mike & Molly)
Patrick J. Adams (Legends of Tomorrow)
Billy Dee Williams (Star Wars)
Daniel Roebuck (Final Destination)
Beth Broderick (Sabrina: TTW)
Andrew Connolly (Heroes)
Marsha Thomason (White Collar)
Jon Gries (Welcome To The Jungle)
Doug Hutchison (Punisher: War Zone)
Samantha Mathis (American Psycho)
Carrie Preston (True Blood)
Sterling Beaumon (The Killing)
Sam Anderson (Angel)
L. Scott Caldwell (Chilling Adventures of Sabrina)
Andrea Gabriel (2 Broke Girls)
Neil Hopkins (The Net 2.0)
Tracy Middendorf (Scream: The Series)
Lana Parrilla (Once Upon A Time)
Malcolm David Kelley (Detroit)
James Lesure (Las Vegas)
Fisher Stevens (Hackers)
Mira Furlan (Babylon 5)

This season is easily broken down into two separate parts; the first six episodes that aired before an eight week hiatus and then the rest of the season. Even though the first six are considered part of the third season, they feel much more like a prologue. Very little time is spent with the survivors on the beach and the main focus of the story is Jack (Matthew Fox), Kate (Evangeline Lilly) and Sawyer’s (Josh Holloway) imprisonment by the Others.Evangeline Lilly in Lost (2004)The second half of the season also featured some of the show’s best episodes to date. Including the brilliantly told “Flashes Before Your Eyes”, which is an interesting twist on Lost’s flashback scenario. Other episodes like “The Man from Tallahassee” and “The Brig” answered long asked questions while “The Man Behind the Curtain” and “One of Us” gave us a much needed back-story on both Ben (Michael Emerson) and Juliet (Elizabeth Mitchell).Really, the only weak point of the final sixteen-episode run would be “Stranger in a Strange Land”, an episode that primarily focused on the origins and meaning of Jack’s tattoo. We still don’t really understand the significance and we’re not too sure if the writers do either as they never bring up the subject again for the rest of the season.Terry O'Quinn in Lost (2004)Even “Expos¿”, an episode that featured fan-hated Nikki (Kiele Sanchez) and Paulo (Rodrigo Santoro), told an interesting “Twilight Zone” style story and we couldn’t be happier with the conclusion.If you were to suggest that the theme for season one was man vs. the unknown and that season two’s was man vs. machine it would be fair to suggest that the theme for season three is man vs. man, as the main crux of the season deals with the survivors of Flight 815 dealing with the Others. There is a constant power struggle between the two groups and the narrative frequently shifts back and forth from the Others camp to the survivor’s beach. Intertwined throughout, are personal struggles for several of the characters in both camps and we realize as the story pushes forward that even though they are enemies, their survival appears to be dependant on each other.At the core of this struggle is Benjamin Linus, and it would be a sin not to mention Michael Emerson’s fantastic performance as the enigmatic leader of the Others. He never once falters in portraying a creepy and unnerving nemesis for the survivors of Flight 815 and in particular, John Locke.Evangeline Lilly in Lost (2004)Terry O’Quinn puts in an equally inspired performance and every time these two appeared on screen together, you knew something special was about to happen. Everything culminates in what can be described as one of the best season finales in recent memory. Carlton Cuse and Damon Lindelof deliver a brilliantly told story that is full of emotion, suspense and action.

REVIEW: AFFLUENZA


CAST

Grant Gustin (The Flash)
Ben Rosenfield (6 Years)
Gregg Sulkin (Runaways)
Nicola Peltz (Bates Motel)
Steve Guttenberg (Police Academy)
Samantha Mathis (American Psycho)

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Suburbia, 2008. Swept up in a heady pre-recession world of absentee parents, plentiful booze and casual sex, aspiring photographer Fisher Miller escapes his middle-class life for the moneyed mansions of the young, beautiful elite. With a stash of high-quality weed and a vintage camera, he gains access to his gorgeous cousin Kate’s circle of wealthy and indulged friends, just as their entitled reality is about to spin out of control. A revealing take on the hidden perils of privilege.Affluenza works simply to re-introduce the same themes to a younger audience, preferring that great author’s voice to any echo of its own. But if The Great Gatsby had to be (slightly) updated to reflect our times, at least the end product is a film with good performances, effective direction and a satisfying bite.accused-17

REVIEW: BROKEN ARROW

CAST

John Travolta (The Punisher)
Christian Slater (True Romance)
Samantha Mathis (American Psycho)
Delroy Lindo (Up)
Bob Gunton (Argo)
Frank Whaley (Vacancy)
Shaun Toub (Iron Man)
Casey Biggs (Star Trek: DS9)
Kurtwood Smith (Agent Carter)
Carmen Argenziano (Stargate SG.1)
French Stewart (3rd Rock From The Sun)
Raymond Cruz (Breaking Bad)
Vyto Ruginis (The Fast and The Furious)
Chris Mulkey (Captain Phillips)

Major Vic Deakins (John Travolta) and Captain Riley Hale (Christian Slater) are pilots in the United States Air Force. After a sparring match, they are assigned to a top secret evening exercise over Utah, flying a B-3 Stealth Bomber (a fictional iteration of the B-2 Spirit stealth bomber) with two B83 nuclear bombs on board. After successfully evading Air Force radar during the exercise, Deakins distracts and attacks Hale. A struggle ensues, ending when Deakins ejects Hale. Deakins then releases the bombs from the plane without detonating them, and reports that Hale’s gone rogue. He then ejects from the bomber himself, leaving it to crash on the mountainside over the Utah canyons.broken-arrow-john-travolta-small-head-2

A search and rescue team is sent to recover the warheads. They do not find the warheads and report a “Broken Arrow”, a situation wherein nuclear weapons are missing. The team later locates the warheads in a canyon but are killed by mercenaries, including Sgt. Kelly (Howie Long), a corrupt member of the team. Deakins arrives moments later and plots his next move with Pritchett (Bob Gunton), the operation’s financier. They plan to blackmail the government with the threat of detonating the warhead in a civilian area. Hale survives the ejection and is found by Park Ranger Terry Carmichael (Samantha Mathis). He convinces her to help him track down Deakins and foil his plot. After recovering one of the warheads from a hijacked Humvee and escaping to a nearby copper mine, Hale attempts to disable them using a safety feature which would render them unusable, by intentionally entering the arming code incorrectly. However, Deakins had anticipated this possibility, and rigged the device. As a result, Hale’s action instead arms the warhead, setting the detonation timer for 30 minutes.tftds_shot7lUnable to disarm the warhead, Hale hides the unarmed one deep in an abandoned mine. Deakins arrives and secures the unarmed warhead. He then shortens the detonation time to 13 minutes and destroys the keyboard so the device cannot be stopped, then leaves Hale and Terry to die. A NEST team helicopter chases Deakins’ team. During the chase, Deakins kills Pritchett when he becomes fed up with the latter’s complaints. Hale and Terry escape from the mine via an underground river just before the bomb detonates. The bomb’s EMP destroys the NEST helicopter, allowing Deakins to escape. Terry and Hale track him to a motorboat used for transporting the warhead. While trying to steal the boat, Terry is forced to hide on board while Deakins moves the warhead. Military forces rescue Hale.lovers-vow2Hale deduces that Deakins intends to use a train to transport the warhead. Travelling on helicopter with Colonel Wilkins (Delroy Lindo), Hale locates and infiltrates the train, and finds Terry. A gunfight ensues and the helicopter is destroyed; Wilkins and most of Deakins’ mercenaries are killed. With his own helicopter sabotaged by Hale and his plan falling apart, Deakins decides to detonate the nuke regardless. Not wanting to die, Kelly holds Deakins at gunpoint and orders him to disarm the weapon. Hale takes advantage of the situation and kicks Kelly out of the train to his death.Terry detaches the rear section of the train (with the bomb) from the front, but gets into a shootout with the engineer. The latter is shot and falls on the train brakes, causing the train to stop. The detached boxcars continue to coast at high speed. Meanwhile, Deakins, still in possession of a device that can either disarm or detonate the bomb instantly, forces Hale to drop his gun and challenges him to close-quarters combat. Hale eventually overpowers Deakins, acquires the detonator, disarms the warhead and leaps out of the train. As the detached boxcars slam into the halted front half, the warhead flies into Deakins, and the entire train derails and explodes, incinerating him.Hale finds Terry and the damaged nuclear warhead. The two formally introduce themselves to each other amidst the wreckage.tales-from-the-darkside-deborah-harry-blondie-matthew-lawrenceTravolta ham’s it up a bit but makes an impressive villain. Slater is a bit underplayed as the hero. The action is fast flowing with no disjointed bits for love scenes etc. The special effects are good and as with most modern day action movies you have to sit back and watch, tongue in cheek for the most part, letting your vision take control and ignore some of the more unbelievable bits.

REVIEW: BURIED

 

CAST

Ryan Reynolds (Deadpool)
José Luis García Pérez (La verdad)
Robert Paterson (Faust)
Stephen Tobolowsky (Groundhog Day)
Samantha Mathis (American Psycho)
Kali Rocha (Buffy)
Chris Willaim Martin (The Vampire Diaries)
Anne Lockhart (Tangled)

For several seconds after the opening credits of Buried have ended, the screen is dark, the soundtrack silent. Director Rodrigo Cortés holds that empty screen for as long as he can, and then he keeps holding it; we lean forward, peering into the darkness, straining our ears for any sound that will punctuate the stillness. (It’s a brilliant, if risky, tool for focusing an audience.) Finally, thankfully, there is a quiet cough, then breathing, breathing which becomes more panicked in the darkness. As Paul Conroy (Ryan Reynolds) wakes from a blackout, bound and gagged, he lights his Zippo and realizes what has happened. He’s been buried alive.

Conroy is a contractor in Iraq, a truck driver for a company that (he stresses at one point) is not Blackwater. His convoy was ambushed by a band of insurgents; many of his co-workers were killed. He has been placed in a rickety old wood coffin and buried somewhere in Iraq, who knows where; he’s got his Zippo and his flask, and his abductors have left a Blackberry, which they use to inform him that he is being held for ransom. They don’t seem concerned that he can also call for help, because no one can help him.

Cortés tells Paul’s story in (basically) real time, the 90 minutes or so he’s got until his phone battery, Zippo, and air all run out. So it is the tale of a man trapped, in a seemingly impossible situation, who must keep his wits about him and focus on his own possible survival, slim though his odds may be. The challenge that Cortés places on himself (and on screenwriter Chris Sparling) is borderline masochistic: he stays inside that 2’x7′ box with Conroy for the entirety of the picture. No prologues, no flashbacks, no cutaways, nothing but what is happening right there in that moment, pushed in, pressed up, squished like a vice.

Sparling’s clever screenplay seems to think through every possible action and reaction, and then push two steps ahead; he’s playing three-dimensional chess, and if there are holes in the logic or progression of events, I didn’t see them.  Reynolds, the only face on screen for the entire 90+ minutes, gives an unassuming, matter-of-fact, and ultimately effective performance.