REVIEW: BASEketball

CAST

Trey Parker (Orgazmo)
Matt Stone (Terror Firmer)
Dian Bachar (Two Guys and a Girl)
Yasmine Bleeth (Game Over)
Jenny McCarthy (Santa Baby)
Ernest Borgnine (From Here To Eternity)
Robert Vaughn (Superman III)
Victoria Silvstedt (Boat Trip)
Greg Grunberg (Heroes)
Kevin Michael Richardson (The Clevleand Show)
Stephen McHattie (300)
Courtney Ford (True Blood)

Somewhere around the beginning of the 21st century, sports like football, baseball, hockey and basketball have fallen in decline as competitive play was replaced by an ever-growing corporative play, to the point where teams could change cities, stars were easily traded like ‘hired guns of the Old West’, stadiums became huge outdoors and even prison inmates were chosen to integrate sports teams. All of this, combined with unchecked violence and no genuine game, alienated true loving sports fans whom abandoned sport loving, which yearned for a hope at revival that would soon come in the most unexpected way possible.tumblr_n4vhtiyjB11qfj07wo3_1280Coop (Trey Parker) and Remer (Matt Stone) are 23 and unemployed. They arrive uninvited at a party hosted by a former high school classmate. After finding that their classmates have matured, Coop and Remer find themselves outside drinking beer and shooting hoops. Two former classmates challenge them to a game. The two see that their opponents are very good at basketball, so they say they will only play a new game they picked up while secretly inventing the rules (based on basketball as well as baseball) as they go along and winning the new game, which also includes psyche-outs – ways to disrupt the game without being considered cheating. While the game isn’t taken seriously, it slowly grows in popularity while Coop and Remer adopt Kenny ‘Squeak’ Scolari (Dian Bachar), a former gas company employee whom isn’t taken as seriously as the other two.Screenshot_image1-BASEketball-1998-720p-free-movie-downloadSix months later, Businessman Ted Denslow (Ernest Borgnine), enticed by the game itself, shows up to propose the creation of the National BASEketball League (NBL), with numerous rules in place to prevent this sport from deteriorating as the other sports had done: teams cannot switch cities, players cannot be traded, and individuals cannot make money via corporate sponsorship deals. It’s also completely open to all publics, with Denslow stating ‘anyone can be a sports’ hero’. Coop hesitates, but comes to accept, realizing the opportunity in hand. Five years after creation of the league, the NBL is in full swing with stadiums, teams, fans, cheerleaders (most half-naked) and a major championship, the Denslow Cup. They even have a major network television contract (though it is never made clear which network it is) with Al Michaels and Bob Costas as the announcers. During the 1997 championship, Denslow, who is the owner of the Milwaukee Beers (in reference to real-life baseball team, Milwaukee Brewers[3]) for whom Coop and Remer both play, dies choking on his hot dog, which causes Coop to miss his shot and the Beers to lose the finals. Denslow’s will grants Coop ownership of the Beers for one year – if they do not win the next Denslow Cup, ownership reverts to Denslow’s widow Yvette (Jenny McCarthy). Meanwhile, Coop and Remer meet (and eventually fight over) Jenna Reed (Yasmine Bleeth), who is head of the children’s Dream Come True Foundation. They also get an opportunity to approach her through one of her children, Joey (Trevor Einhorn), who’s an avid fan of BASEketball.big_1473912748_imageThe greedy owner of the Dallas Felons, Baxter Cain (Robert Vaughn), wants to change the rules to allow corporate dealing, teams to move cities and players to switch teams, but could not accomplish this while Denslow was alive. Yvette, shown to be easily swayable, would’ve complied had she been given ownership of the team, but Coop refuses to accept any changes. Cain and Yvette work to make sure the Beers will lose the next Denslow Cup and Yvette will win ownership of the team. Cain starts with slowly convincing Remer to make a deal, which has the rest of the team start alienating from Coop, thinking his traditionalist management is denying the Beers their opportunities.maxresdefaultAfterwards, Cain, realising Coop’s relationship with Jenna, cuts the funds to her foundation, forcing Coop and Remer to ask Cain for help. Cain suggests creating a clothing line but Coop is entirely against it, but Remer, as part team owner, immediately agrees, and becomes so obsessed with his newfound fame that he alienates Coop. After they win the league semifinals, Cain informs Coop and Remer through photos that their clothing line has been produced through child labor in Calcutta. If the public finds out the team and Jenna’s foundation will be ruined. Cain threatens to release the photos unless Coop and Remer lose or forfeit the Denslow Cup game, effectively losing the Beers ownership. Jenna learns about the child labor scandal and breaks it off with Coop. Coop blames Remer for the mess, while Remer blames Coop for saying no to Cain’s proposals in the first place. They fall out, and Coop goes to Calcutta to resolve the situation.baseketball4-620x349Coop replaces all the child workers in the factory with adults and makes it back just as the fifth annual Denslow Cup begins. The Beers start with an abysmal performance, failing to make one hit in six innings. At the seventh-inning stretch, the Beers are down 16-0, and Coop and Remer continue to blame each other and fight. Having had enough, especially after a ceremonial play, Squeak gives both a pep talk, reminding them of where they came from, what they did that changed their and everyone else’s lives and what they were risking losing. Squeak’s speech is so moving that Coop and Remer reconcile their differences and Yvette breaks off her alliance with Cain. Coop, Remer, and Squeak finally get back into the game and start scoring. In the bottom of the ninth, Remer is on second, Squeak is on third, and Coop is up when his custom-made BASEketball (La-Z-Boy) pops. Joey brings Coop a new custom-made BASEketball made from a Barcalounger. Coop misses, but successfully completes the conversion, which is considered a home run for the win and the Denslow Cup. Coop and Jenna reunite while Remer hooks up with Yvette, as the team happily carries Squeak on the Denslow Cup.tumblr_inline_o3kzbgWoSW1t1d8nx_1280After the credits have rolled, Al Michaels and Bob Costas repeat the Coop and Remer “Dude” argument from earlier in the film and the movie ends as they draw the curtain and are seemingly about to kiss.BaseketballFeatI just got to say that this is one of  the best comedies i have seen in a long time! this film is so funny, as the game that they play is a cross between baseball and basketball. they have all the rules of the two games and a few of there own like, you can put off your opponent with any means possible!and the things they do are so funny, I really recommend this to any one that love humour!

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REVIEW: PRIVATE SESSIONS

 

 

CAST

Mike Farrell (Providence)
Kelly McGillis (Top Gun)
Maureen Stapleton (Cocoon)
Robert Vaughn (Superman III)
Denise Miller (Fish)
Kathryn Walker (Colonial House)
Tom Bosley (Happy Days)
Hope Lang (Blue Velvet)
Kim Hunter (Planet of The Apes)
Victor Garber (Legends of Tomorrow)
Elias Koteas (Crash)

 

This pilot produced as a possible television weekly series that did not come about, features a psychotherapist, Dr. Joe Braden (Mike Farrell), who becomes closely involved with his patients, away from his office, the plot blending two separate cases, an ostensibly compulsive nymphomaniac, performed by Kelly McGillis, and a cab driver (Tom Bosley) who is suffering from audio hallucinations; additionally, Braden’s associations with his former wife and with his daughter, along with a possible new romance for him fill the landscape of the scenario. Farrell gives an obviously well prepared and nicely nuanced reading as a therapist who cares deeply for his patients, while McGillis and Robert Vaughn also provide strong performances for a film that is ably directed, acted and photographed.

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However, other than brief dialogue concerning matters of A psychological theory between Braden and a Freudian psychoanalyst with whom he shares a medical suite, at issue are serious mental and emotional maladies that are partly solved within the script in cavalier fashion, reducing the believably potential of Braden who apparently, during a television series, would be obsessed with problems of his clientèle week after neurosis-saturated week. The DVD version offers no extra features, other than an inadequate scene index.

REVIEW: SUPERMAN III

CAST

Christopher Reeve (Rear Window)
Margot Kidder (The Amityville Horror)
Jackie Cooper (The Champ)
Marc McClure (Back To The Future)
Richard Pryor (The Three Muscatels)
Annette O’ Toole (Smallville)
Annie Ross (Pump Up The Volume)
Pamela Stephenson (Finders Keepers)
Robert Vaughn (Bullitt)
Gavan O’Herlihy (Willow)

For a sequel that takes place on such a grand scale, Richard Lester’s ”Superman III” is surprisingly offhand. It’s almost as though Superman, now that all the zap! and pow! and boom! are behind him, has shed his comic-book pizazz to become an ordinary fellow. He seems to spend much more time as Clark Kent in this installment, for one thing. For another, even when he does perform miracles – freezing a lake with his icy breath in one episode, then flying the instant glacier to the scene of a chemical fire – the action is somewhat lowkey.

This film’s Superman is a fellow who, while the fire blazes, will stand patiently in a laboratory listening to a scientist explain about the flash point at which certain volatile substances will explode. Not that Superman, who is once again played smashingly by Christopher Reeve, shouldn’t know his share of chemistry – it’s just that he began as a comic-book character, and he is one still, for all the extra color and vitality these films have given him. He’s a man of action, first and foremost, and there’s nothing wrong with a little cartoonish enthusiasm to accompany his adventures. Yet even the musical flourishes in ”Superman III” are unaccountably mild.

The film begins with a Rube Goldbergish chain of accidents that finally calls for the presence of you-know-who, whose arrival ought to be heralded with plenty of fanfare. Mr. Lester directs the mishaps with a charming ease, but he makes Superman’s entrance relatively nonchalant, too.

The screenplay, by David and Leslie Newman, divides itself between the activities of the hero and his new set of adversaries. But this time the villains have an edge: Richard Pryor. Mr. Pryor very appealingly plays a down-on-his-luck dishwasher (he’s first seen in a funny scene on an unemployment line) who discovers he has a great talent for computers and whose abilities are not lost on the ridiculously rich industrialist from whose company he has embezzled a little spending money. (He spends it on a hot new red convertible, which is how the industrialist catches him in the first place.) This wealthy villain, played nattily by Robert Vaughan, is so rich he’s never worn the same socks twice. He even has his own rooftop ski slope right in the middle of downtown Metropolis, which makes for one of the film’s more inspired sight gags.

The film divides itself, a little too strenuously, between the computer intrigue masterminded by Mr. Vaughan and some of Superman’s own story. As Clark Kent, Superman attends his high-school reunion in Smallville, takes up with an old flame, Lana Lang (Annette O’Toole), while Lois Lane is on vacation and has a personality crisis brought on by some quasi-Kryptonite Mr. Pryor has devised. As a part of this development, he turns up in a dirty maroon cape, guzzles beer, chases women and spitefully straightens the Leaning Tower of Pisa. These imaginative developments culminate in a nasty fight between Superman and Clark Kent, who like the good and bad sides of Darth Vader, must slug it out for dominance. Along with computer tricks, a number of which ‘Superman III also contains, split personalities seem to be big this summer.

Anyone who has been following the ”Superman” saga will find this installment enjoyable enough, but alot of the magic is missing. At its best, the series has relied on humor, enthusiasm, big, bold colors and the amazingly apt presence of Mr. Reeve. This time, there are Mr. Pryor and the Grand Canyon and a bit more psychological dimension, all of them worthwhile but none strictly necessary. His simplicity remains the Man of Steel’s greatest and most underrated superpower.