REVIEW: BONES – SEASON 5

Starring

Emily Deschanel (Boogeyman)
David Boreanaz (Angel)
Michaela Conlin (Yellowstone)
Tamara Taylor (Lost)
T. J. Thyne (Ghost World)
John Francis Daley (Game Night)

David Boreanaz and Emily Deschanel in Bones (2005)

Recurring / Notable Guest Cast

Cyndi Lauper (Here and There)
Patricia Belcher (Jeepers Creepers)
Michael Grant Terry (Grimm)
Christopher B. Duncan (Veronica Mars)
Michael Arden (Bride Wars)
Riki Lindhome (The Muppets)
Eugene Byrd (Arrow)
Tiffany Hines (Nikita)
Michael B. Jordan (Black Panther)
Kaitlin Doubleday (Empire)
Pej Vahdat (Shameless)
Leonardo Nam (Westworld)
Reggie Austin (Agent Carter)
Billy Gardell (Mike & Molly)
Cheryl White (Major Crimes)
Paula Newsome (Guess Who)
Josie Davis (The Hot Seat)
Amy Gumenick (Arrow)
Carla Gallo (Superbad)
Diedrich Bader (American Housewife)
Andy Umberger (Buffy: TVS)
Tracy Middendorf (Scream: The Series)
Joel David Moore (Avatar)
Stephen Fry (V For Vendetta)
Ryan Cartwright (Alphas)
Dan Castellaneta (The Simpsons)
Debbie Lee Carrington (Total Recall)
Wynn Everett (Agent Carter)
Martin Klebba (Scrubs)
Sarah Rafferty (Suits)
Lindsay Hollister (Get Smart)
Ralph Waite (The Waltons)
Nakia Burrise (Power Rangers Zeo)
Mickey Jones (Total Recall)
Zooey Deschanel (New Girl)
Ryan O’Neal (Love Story)
Dorian Missick (The Cape)
Dale Dickey (Iron Man 3)
Penny Johnson Jerald (The Orville)
Richard T. Jones (Terminator: TSCC)
Brendan Fehr (Roswell)
Dilshad Vadsaria (The Oath)
Fay Masterson (Eyes Wide Shut)
Robert Gant (Supergirl)
Joshua Malina (The Big Bang Theory)
Henri Lubatti (Angel)
Amanda Schull (Pretty Little Liars)
Rusty Schwimmer (Highlander 2)
Clea DuVall (Better Call Saul)
Eric Millegan (Phobic)
Megan Hilty (Smash)
Jenica Bergere (Rat Race)
Victor Webster (Mutant X)
Ben Falcone (New Girl)
Suzy Nakamura (Dead To Me)
Robert Englund (A Nightmare On Elm Street)
Ravil Isyanov (Transformers: Dark of The Moon)
Rena Sofer (Heroes)
Michael Des Barres (Poison Ivy 3)
Kate Vernon (Battlestar Galactica)
William Stanford Davis (A Lot Like Love)
Deirdre Lovejoy (The Blacklist)
Billy Gibbons (Two and a Half Men)

Michaela Conlin, Emily Deschanel, Tamara Taylor, and T.J. Thyne in Bones (2005)At the beginning of the fifth season of the wildly popular forensic drama “Bones,” many viewers tuned in trepidatiously after the spectacularly strange fourth season finale. Thankfully, all fears were allayed and relieved when the fifth season kicked into high gear in the very first episode and maintained that pace throughout the season; “Bones”‘ fifth season is perhaps its greatest yet.David Boreanaz, Emily Deschanel, and Randy Oglesby in Bones (2005)The one thing that has always set “Bones” apart from the countless other procedurals on the airwaves right now is the focus on the characters solving the crimes rather than the crimes themselves, and the strength of this approach shines through brilliantly in every episode of this season.David Boreanaz and Emily Deschanel in Bones (2005)David Boreanaz and Emily Deschanel return to the roles of Booth and Bones and deliver their strongest performances yet as each character is shaken to their core. As Booth struggles to regain his sense of self, he has to confront the knowledge of his feelings for his partner, while Bones herself goes through a whirlwind of emotion as the emotional barriers she has erected around her heart begin to crumble down, leaving her questioning not only herself but her relationship with Booth as well as her work at the Jeffersonian itself. The tension between the two has never been more delicious or more addictive, and both lead actors knock their roles absolutely out of the park.David Boreanaz and Emily Deschanel in Bones (2005)But while the relationship between Booth and Brennan becomes increasingly more complex, the wonderful supporting cast of engaging characters at the Jeffersonian keep the show moving along briskly and lightly. Cam (Tamara Taylor) must run the lab while dealing with the challenge of being a good mother, guiding the team effectively toward each conclusion; Sweets (John Francis Daley) continues to provide invaluable insight into the minds of the team; Angela (Michaela Conlin) remains the emotional heart and soul of the team as she opens her heart to love’s possibilities; and Hodgins (TJ Thyne) struggles with his feelings for Angela as he returns to his abrasive, loveable self.David Boreanaz, Dan Castellaneta, and Emily Deschanel in Bones (2005)The cases themselves have regained a fascinating light as the mysteries the team confronts become more complex, and the special effects department has outdone themselves in the gore and goop department this year as Booth and Bones investigate some of the most gruesome crime scenes in history, all moved along by the brisk black humor the show excels at; the team investigates a possible secret agent locked in a truck for days, a would-be rocker torn to pieces by an industrial washer/dryer, a gamer literally melted in a vat of fast-food grease, and a dozen more cheerfully disgusting cases where the outcomes of the mysteries hold the power to shock and surprise the audience; the writers have once again caught the perfect balance between the whodunnit and the drama to craft a truly unique show.David Boreanaz and Ralph Waite in Bones (2005)But it’s not merely the cases that hold the viewers’ attention this season; season five is full of true powerhouse episodes: heartbreaking cases like “The Plain in the Prodigy”; darkly comical shows like “The Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood”; truly shocking mysteries like “The Proof in the Pudding,”; and even a historically fascinating case written by the author of the original Temperance Brennan novels Kathy Reichs herself (“The Witch in the Wardrobe”) — however, all of these merely lead up to the three knockout moments of the season:David Boreanaz and Emily Deschanel in Bones (2005)In the fifth season, “Bones” reaches its 100th episode, “The Parts in the Sum of the Whole.” Likely the most beloved and most contested episode in the show’s history, the 100th episode completely redefined Booth and Brennan’s relationship as it showed the viewers the pair’s first meeting, something never before revealed, and circles around to one of the most hearbreaking and yet most powerfully hopeful moments of the series. “Parts” was also directed by David Boreanaz, one of the series’ leads, and the sheer emotion wrung out of Boreanaz and Deschanel by the end speaks volumes to the talent of the show’s leads.David Boreanaz and Emily Deschanel in Bones (2005)As the series continues, however, the characters were shocked to their cores as they were forced to come face-to-face with their most terrifying adversary yet: the cunningly frightening sociopath dubbed The Gravedigger, in “The Boy with the Answer,” a nail-bitingly tense hour of television that had viewers’ hearts pounding as Heather Taffet, the Gravedigger, proved that her true arena was the courtroom, tearing apart her victims and throwing the entire future of Brennan’s life into question.David Boreanaz and Emily Deschanel in Bones (2005)This only segues into the season’s amazingly dramatic finale, “The Beginning in the End.” As the team investigates the home of a hoarder, Bones questions what she truly wants to do with her life, Booth’s past comes calling, and Angela’s father blows back into town, all leading to a truly shocking season ender, a masterful finale that not only redefined the very foundations of the show and the characters but also continued to set the show on a rising point, ensuring that every faithful viewer of “Bones” will be frantically waiting for the sixth season to premiere in the fall.

REVIEW: THE OMEN (2006)

 

CAST

Julia Stiles (Jason Bourne)
Liev Schreiber (The 5th Wave)
Mia Farrow (Rosemary’s Baby)
Seamus Davey-Fitzpatrick (Before Midnight)
David Thewlis (Dragonheart)
Pete Postlethwaite (Solomon Kane)
Michael Gambon (Harry Potter)
Giovanni Lombardo Radice (The Hideout)
Reggie Austin (Agent Carter)
Harvey Spencer Stephens (Gauguin The Savage)

Robert Thorn (Liev Schreiber), an American diplomat stationed in Italy, is told that his son died during birth. Unknown to his unconscious wife, Katherine (Julia Stiles), Robert adopts an orphaned newborn at the suggestion of the hospital’s Catholic priest, Father Spiletto (Giovanni Lombardo Radice). Naming him Damien (Seamus Davey-Fitzpatrick), Robert and Katherine raise the boy. Robert’s career ascends over the course of the next five years. He is named Deputy Ambassador to the Court of St. James in the United Kingdom. Following the death of the previous ambassador, Robert assumes his position and settles in a large estate just outside London. However, disturbing events begin to occur, including the suicide of Damien’s nanny at his birthday party.Robert is approached by Father Brennan (Pete Postlethwaite), who claims to have been involved with events surrounding Damien’s birth. Meanwhile, photographer Keith Jennings (David Thewlis) finds that several of his photographs contain mysterious omens, including premonitions of people’s deaths. A new nanny, Mrs. Baylock (Mia Farrow), is hired. Tension rises when Mrs. Baylock starts to make decisions without the consent of the Thorns, including adopting a Rottweiler for Damien’s protection.Following an incident near a chapel in which Damien attacks Katherine, she begins experiencing vivid dreams about her son, one of these involving a red-hooded jackal skeleton. When the Thorns visit a zoo, the animals react violently at the sight of Damien. Katherine begins to wonder if there is something wrong with Damien. Father Brennan confronts Robert, telling him that Damien’s mother was a jackal, and that the boy is the Antichrist. He explains that Damien must die and a man called Bugenhagen (Michael Gambon), located in Megiddo, can assist. After being rebuked, Father Brennan is killed during a lightning storm.
Katherine discovers she is pregnant and is determined to get an abortion, in fear of having a child similar to Damien. Soon afterward, Damien causes an accident in which Katherine is severely injured, resulting in her miscarriage. While recovering in the hospital, Katherine confides in Robert her suspicions that Damien is evil. Robert decides to rendezvous with Jennings and search for Damien’s biological mother. The pair discovers the hospital where Damien was delivered has since been demolished after a fire. They travel to Subiaco and meet Father Spiletto, who directs them to a graveyard. There they find the grave of Damien’s mother, who is revealed to indeed have been a jackal. In the neighboring tomb, Robert discovers the corpse of his murdered biological son. He and Jennings are attacked by a pack of dogs and barely escape.Mrs. Baylock visits Katherine in the hospital and causes her to have an air embolism, killing Katherine. Learning of Katherine’s death, Robert goes to Megiddo, meets Bugenhagen, and receives instructions on him to kill Damien on consecrated ground with seven sacrificial daggers. Bugenhagen tells Robert to examine Damien for a birthmark in the shape of three sixes (“666”). However, Robert refuses to kill his son, and throws the daggers on the ground. While reaching down to pick up the daggers, Jennings is suddenly decapitated by a falling sign. Robert arrives home and is attacked by Mrs. Baylock’s Rottweiler, which he subdues. In Damien’s room, he finds the 666 birthmark. Mrs. Baylock attacks Robert, but he fends her off; after running her over with his car, he escapes. Pursued by the police, Robert flees to a church to kill Damien, but is found before he can. During his escape, Robert is killed by a Diplomatic Protection officer. As the Pope simultaneously dies, Robert’s funeral is attended by the President of the United States, who holds Damien’s hand. Damien then looks at the audience and smiles as the credits roll.The new film attempted to update the film, linking recent political events with the prophecies involved, which verged on tacky in places, but the fact that the setting is so much more modern makes it an easier film to watch. It remained fairly true to the book, without being a straightforward copy of the original; indeed, it does deserve to be considered an individual film in its own right. This film is a must-see to any true fans of the story, and definitely a wonderful film to watch for any horror fan who hasn’t seen the original and enjoys a strong storyline with a well-built-up atmosphere.

REVIEW: AGENT CARTER – SEASON 2

 

CAST

Hayley Atwell (Cinderella)
James D’Arcy (Master and Commander)
Chad Michael Murray (Freaky Friday)
Enver Gjokaj (Dollhouse)

Image result for AGENT CARTER THE LADY IN THE LAKE

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Bridget Regan (Beauty and The Beast)
Lesley Boone (Grey’s Antamomy)
Sean O’Bryan (Vantage Point)
Wynn Everett (The Heist)
Chris Browning (Bright)
Sarah Bolger (The Lazarus Effect)
Reggie Austin (Desperate Housewives)
Currie Graham (Weeds)
Lotte Verbeek (Outlander)
Kurtwood Smith (That 70sm Show)
Ken Marino (Veronica Mars)
Ray Wise (Swamp Thing)
Dominic Cooper (Dracula Untold)
Lyndsy Fonseca (Kick-Ass)
Hope Lauren (The Valley)
Casey Sander (The Ranch)

Image result for AGENT CARTER THE LADY IN THE LAKEAgent Carter season 2 would be it’s last. As Agents of SHIELD delves into more and more straight up superhero storylines  and the Netflix/Marvel series bring the MCU into some much darker corners than any other content they create, Agent Carter once more provided a very different source of entertainment. From its period setting, to its focus on heroes without any sort of superpowers, to its tone, Agent Carter continued to bring something different and appreciated to the Marvel TV landscape and the MCU in general.

Image result for AGENT CARTER A VIEW IN THE DARKHayley Atwell once more was as captivating and excellent as ever as Peggy Carter, a character she’s come to completely embody over the years. Peggy came into Season 2 with some of the burdens she had in Season 1 off her shoulders – she’d moved past her initial grief over losing Steve Rogers and didn’t have to deal with quite as much oppressive sexism at the SSR. But soon enough she found herself dealing with a formidable opponent in Whitney Frost – one whose Darkforce (or “Zero Matter”) supplied powers turned her into a true supervillain.141059-0084-900x600-165720-167339Wynn Everett was terrific as Whitney, someone who felt compelled to hide and underplay her incredible intelligence thanks to the era she lived in. The episode “Smoke & Mirrors” evocatively showed us moments that defined both Peggy and Whitney as they grew up, forging them into the very different, but equally strong-willed women they were in 1947.HAYLEY ATWELLAnother great addition was Lotte Verbeek as Ana Jarvis, Edwin Jarvis’ oft-mentioned, never-seen wife in Season 1. I was wary of them introducing Ana at all after the way she was an off-camera presence last year, but she was so likeable and open – and Verbeek did such a great job showing her kindness and spunk – she easily became an endearing part of the show. Jarvis himself was an interesting element in Season 2. Peggy and Jarvis’ partnership was wonderfully depicted in Season 1 and understandably became a fan favorite element. Season 2 continued that in a big way, and Atwell and James D’Arcy were as amazingly charismatic together as ever.Image result for AGENT CARTER SMOKE & MIRRORSAna being shot resulted in some very strong moments for Ana herself, Jarvis and the two together – and one hell of a scene for Jarvis and Peggy as well, as the two had a pretty brutal argument, with the two close friends each getting in some cruel jabs in the heat of the moment. D’Arcy rose to the occasion showing “Dark Jarvis,” and I was glad to see some more nuance and layers added to the character.Image result for agent carter the atomic jobReggie Austin was likable as Dr. Jason Wilkes and he and Atwell had a nice rapport as the two enjoyed some early flirtation, though ultimately, the character felt a bit bland – even as he had his own struggle with Dark Matter and his battle to stay corporeal. His would-be romance with Peggy really went nowhere, though the two had a nice scene in the season finale, with a melancholy “what could have been” beat included.Image result for agent carter life of the partyEnver Gjokaj was still easy to root for as Daniel Sousa, and tough I feel bad for his poor fiancé-for-a-second, Violet (a charming Sarah Bolger), it was hard not to be happy for Sousa and Peggy finally getting together in the finale.Chad Michael Murray continued to bring the appropriate smarm as Thompson and while it was frustrating to see him revert so much to not trusting Peggy’s instincts early on – and at times it felt murky whether he was just a straight up villain now or not – the final episodes managed to really pull together an intriguing look at a guy who was such an opportunist and so often hard to like, but ultimately did have noble intentions, albeit often coupled with horrible tactics.Image result for agent carter the edge of mysteryCurrie Graham (as Whitney’s in over his head politician husband, Chadwick), Kurtwood Smith (as Thompson’s nasty mentor, Vernon), Ken Marino (as gangster Joseph Manfredi) and the returning Ray Wise (as Roxxon Oil head Hugh Jones) all added to the proceedings as characters who came into Peggy’s orbit, while Dominic Cooper was as fun and entertaining as ever in his two appearances as Howard Stark. And a special nod has to go to Bridget Regan, who was oh-so dynamic and engaging as the badass – and Peggy-obsessed — Dottie, Season 1’s surprise Black Widow, who ended up being reluctantly recruited by an injured Peggy.maxresdefaultAgent Carter: Season 2 was tightly-constructed as was Season 1 and had a great tone to it. It was another fun season filled with compelling characters – including a strong villain – and 1940s, Marvel-flavored spy heroics, which benefitted from the new visuals the Los Angeles setting gave it. And most of all, it still boasted Peggy Carter herself, who was as awesome as ever. With this being the last season hopefully we will see her show up in other Marvel Projects