REVIEW: GAME OF THRONES – SEASON 1

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MAIN CAST

Sean Bean (Lord of The Rings)
Mark Addy (The Full Monty)
Nikolaj Coster-Waldau (Oblivion)
Michelle Fairley (The Lizzie Borden Chronicles)
Lena Headey (Dredd)
Emilia Clarke (Terminator Genisys)
Iain Glen (Tomb Raider)
Aidan Gillen (The Dark Knight Rises)
Kit Harringron (Pompeii)
Sophie Turner (X-Men: Apocalypse)
Maisie Williams (Cyberbully)
Alfie Allen (John Wick)
Richard Madden (Cinderella)
Isaac Hempstead Wright (The Awakening)
Jack Gleeson (Batman Begins)
Rory McCann (Hot Fuzz)
Peter Dinklage (Elf)
Jason Momoa (Conan The Barbarian)
Harry Lloyd (The Theory of Everything)
NOTABLE / RECURRING GUEST CAST
James Cosmo (Highlander)
Peter Vaughn (Brazil)
Brian Fortune (Savage)
Joseph Mawle (Ripper Street)
Francis Magee (Layer Cake)
Owen Teale (The Last Legion)
John Bradley (Borgia)
Josef Altin (Les Miserables)
Mark Stanley (Star Wars – Episode VII)
Bronson Webb (The Dark Knight)
Art Parkinson (Dracula Untold)
Clive Mantle (Alien 3)
Donald Sumpter (The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo)
Ronald Donachie (Titanic)
Jamie Sives (Rush)
Susdan Brown (The Iron Lady)
Kristian Nairn (The Four Warriors)
Natalie Tena (Harry Potter)
Charles Dance (Last Action Hero)
Lino Facioli (Get Him to The Greek)
David Bradley (Captain America: The First Avenger)
Katie Dickie (Prometheus)
Ian Gelder (Pope Joan)
Conan Stevens (The Hobbit)
Jerome Flynn (Loving Vincent)
Sibel Kekilli (When We Leave)
Julian Glover (Troy)
Gethin Anthony (Aquarius)
Conleth Hill (Whatever Works)
Joe Dempsie (Monsters: Dark Continent)
Esme Bianco (The Scorpion King 4)
Finn Jones (The Last Showing)
Ben Hawkey (Ra.One)
Roxanne McKee (Wrong Turn 5)
Elys Gabel (Warld War Z)
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If you have read the books then you will have the added advantage of going into this series with some serious background knowledge, which, given the expanse of Martin’s literature, can only be a good thing. It is good to see the characters portrayed on screen by, what can only be described as, an excellent cast. My personal favourites are Sean Bean  who plays Lord Eddard Stark, the proud, strong and brave Lord of Winterfell, the icy kingdom of the north. And, Peter Dinklage, who gives, as ever, a wonderful performance as Tyrion of House Lannister, a noble-born dwarf cursed by the hatred of his proud father but blessed with an unmatchable wit and intelligence.

Martin’s fantasy literature is about believability and realism; it is completely unlike Tolkien in that way. Whereas Tolkien favoured Orcs, Goblins, castles and wizards, Martin prefers the medieval touch, dealing with knights, lords and priests. One good thing is that Martin had a very close hand in the production of this series which means very little tinkering has been done. If you compare it to The Pillars of the Earth for example, parts of the tv series didn’t even come close to representing what happened in the book leaving hardcore fans a little bewildered, and not a little irritated. Martin’s books though are so jam-packed with plot and character building that there really isn’t much room for artistic license for the directors. They have a lot of story to get through, and only 10 episodes to do it in!!

If you have never read Martin before then, what can you expect? Well, it is fantasy first and foremost . Without spoiling or giving anything away the main plot is basically this: the continent of Westeros, ruled by king Robert Baratheon, falls into turmoil amidst a hungry power struggle between the realms nobles and knights. Expect a lot of plot twists and cliffhangers at the end of each episode. I would highly recommend people to take the time to see this series and get into the number 1 fantasy series of the modern era.

REVIEW: THE BOURNE IDENTITY (1988)

CAST

Richard Chamberlain (Shogun)
Jaclyn Smith (Charlies Angels)
Anthony Quayle (Lawrence of Arabia)
Donald Moffat  (The Thing)
Peter Vaughn (Game of Thrones)
Denholm Elliott (Raiders of The Lost Ark)
James Faulkner (Atomic Blonde)

The Bourne Identity (1988)While movie-goers are probably more familiar with the newer, Matt Damon, version of The Bourne Identity, Robert Ludlum’s novel was also the basis for a two-part TV miniseries during 1988, also titled The Bourne Identity. As many did , I too saw The Bourne Identity film having no knowledge of the earlier miniseries.

I found that it worked it is much closer to the original source material. Richard Chamberlain (Jason Bourne) and Jaclyn Smith (Marie) star, with Anthony Quayle (General Villiers), Donald Moffat (David), Yorgo Voyagis (Carlos), Peter Vaughan (Koening), and Denholm Elliot (Washburn) in supporting roles. A man washes ashore in France with no memory of who he is and several gunshot wounds. Nursed back to health by a doctor, the only clue he has to his past is a Swiss bank account number surgically implanted in his hip. At the bank in Zurich, he discovers his name – Jason Bourne – and that he possesses a large sum of money. When he tries to leave the bank, however, assassins attempt to kill him. In order to escape, he takes Marie, an economist, hostage. In tracing the few clues and recalled memories he uncovers, he realizes that much of his past matches that of Carlos, a European assassin. With numerous agencies after him, Jason Bourne must uncover his true identity and why he’s wanted…before he ends up dead.

The Bourne Identity is a very competent thriller that mainly escapes the TV miniseries ‘feel.’ Though running a tad over three hours in length, it is, for the most part, well paced and interesting. However, some of the film does move a bit too slowly, especially much of the second hour. Some of the story is overly complicated as well. In my mind, though, there is only one main problem with The Bourne Identity, and that is Richard Chamberlain. Chamberlain is overly stiff and displays little in the way of facial expressions throughout, making the character rather bland. The chemistry between he and Smith is decent, though nothing special.

The Bourne Identity TV miniseries from 1988 is easy to recommend to those intrigued with the theatrical release.