REVIEW: VAN HELSING – SEASON 2

CAST

Kelly Overton (Beauty and The Beast)
Jonathan Scarfe (Into The West)
Christopher Heyerdahl (Sanctuary)
David Cubitt (Arrow)
Vincent Gale (Battlestar Galactica)
Rukiya Bernard (Colossal)
Trezzo Mahoro (Izombie)
Paul Johansson (Highlander: The Raven)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Laura Mennell (Watchmen)
Aleks Paunovic (Kindergarten Cop 2)
Gia Crovatin (Billy & Billie)
Andrea Ware (Zoo)
Hannah Cheramy (The Hollow Child)
Ryan Robbins (Arrow)
Duncan Ollerenshaw (Hell on Wheels)
Caroline Cave (Power Rangers)
Michael Kopsa (Dark Angel)
Phil Burke (This Is 40)
Shane Symons (The 100)
Bzhaun Rhoden (Dragged Across Concrete)
Donny Lucas (Wayward Pines)
John DeSantis (Thirteen Ghosts)
Panou (Caprica)
Missy Peregrym (Reaper)
John Reardon (Scary Movie 4)
Hilary Jadine (Somewhere Between)
Ona Grauer (V)
Macie Juiles (Finding Father Christmas)
Tom McBeath (Stargate SG.1)
Nels Lennarson (War)
Colleen Winston (Big Eyes)
Emily Haine (Deadpool)
Michael Adamthwaite (War For The Planet of The Apes)
Jessie Fraer (Zoo)
Andee Frizzell (Stargate Atlantis)

 

Never underestimate a mother in pursuit of her child. In one of the most poignant and frightening season-ending cliffhangers, last year’s finale of SyFy’s Van Helsing finds Vanessa standing face to face with the daughter she’s devoted every waking hour to finding amidst the chaos raining down on the Pacific Northwest. Unfortunately, for Vanessa, as one journey ends, another more arduous one begins.The season two premiere of Neil LaBute and Simon Barry’s reimagining of the traditional vampire tale, opens with a brief yet necessary scene that reminds us the fight waged by Vanessa (Kelly Overton), Flesh, and Mohamad represents the human race’s tenacity for survival even in the darkest of times. Of course, vampires can likely read so the wisdom of sending out balloons with maps to a human safe haven can be questioned, but more importantly, the visual of this retreat nestled atop a scenic mountain pass presents a tangible goal for our hero to attain. One of the most fascinating qualities of this series lies in the knowledge that while innumerable horrific acts routinely take place in the background, it’s the relentless emotional horror Vanessa faces that provides the true drama. Finally reunited, Dylan (Hannah Cheramy) reminds her mother that she abandoned her, paving the way for Rebecca to assume the role of surrogate parent. The season one fight scene featuring Vanessa and Rebecca remains one of my favorite encounters, and throughout its run, Van Helsing has deftly handled action sequences in a way that we don’t feel bombarded by the histrionics of the scene to the point that the deeper meaning is lost.There’s a lot going on this season which adds alot more to the mythos of the show. Vanessa’s physical transformation becomes apparent after her introduction to the benefits of blood consumption. There’s a certain unmistakable poetry that takes over when these two go toe to toe, and even though Vanessa begins the fight overmatched, she quickly adapts to her nascent power. Ironically, the bloodlust here is all Vanessa. But there’s a lot of subtext to be considered, and as often happens in real life, the child gets caught in the middle and reacts in a not totally unexpected way. Viewing the situation through Dylan’s eyes, yes, Vanessa has a lot to atone for, but we know there’s much more to the story.This season brings many reunions and man ysad fates of beloved characters, we get many new ones includeing Scarlet, Vanessas Sisster. With Kelly OVerton away for a few episodes due to preganancyit’s nice to see Missy Peregrym take the reigns in Vanessas absence. Scarlet is a great addition and here’s hopeing she gets bumped up to regular for season 3. Season 2 is bigger and better than season 1, the women kick ass, the stories are more in depth, it leaves you hooked episode after episode and leaves your in anticipation for Season 3 later in the year.

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REVIEW: WHEN THE PARTY’S OVER

CAST

Sandra Bullock (The Heat)
Rae Dawn Chong (Commando)
Kris Kamm (Coach)
Elizabeth Berridge (The Funhouse)
Brian McNamara (Army Wives)
Paul Johansson (Van Helsing)
Michael Landes (Final Destination 2)
Raymond Cruz (Breaking Bad)
Fisher Stevens (Short Circuit)
Willie Garson (Stargate SG.1)

hqdefaultFrankie (Elizabeth Berridge), Amanda (Sandra Bullock), MJ (Rae Dawn Chong, and Banks (Kris Kamm) are housemates, who are fresh out of college. Frankie is a social worker, who is dating Taylor, a lawyer (Brian McNamara). Amanda, an artist, meets and falls in love with Alexander Midnight, a performance artist (Fisher Stevens). She is also trying to guide her younger brother, Willie (Michael Landes), with wisdom, patience, and compassion, after the death of their mother.jPeC9NbFKDLtZBMlzEc7RLwnQoTThe third roommate, MJ, is a stockbroker, who is actually very promiscuous and has a pension for drinking. She even sleeps with Taylor, thus betraying Frankie.The final housemate, Banks, is an actor who is gay, and who is also best friends with Amanda. This movie touches on a group of twentysomethings in California, circa the early 1990s, highlighting the social issues of that time period, like teenage drinking, homosexuality, rape, infidelity, and problems with trust, amongst many other themes.Sandra-Bullock_The-Vanishing_1993The story builds slowly, and doesn’t go where you expect it to or hope it will, but rewards those who are patient and observant.

REVIEW: BONES – SEASON 11

MAIN CAST

Emily Deschanel (Easy)
David Boreanaz (Angel)
Michaela Conlin (Enchanted)
T.J. Thyne (Ghost World)
Tamara Taylor (Serenity)
John Boyd (Lady In The Water)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Patricia Belcher (Jeeprs Creepers)
Pej Vahdat (Lie To Me)
Roger Cross (Arrow)
Dilshad Vadsaria (Second Chance)
Kim Raver (24)
Matthew Holmes (Blue Heelers)
Dan Hildebrand (Game of Thrones)
Michael Grant Terry (Grimm)
Gil Darnell (Reign)
Betty White (The Proposal)
Brian Klugman (Cloverfield)
Erin Chaill (Power Rangers Time Force)
Paul Johansson (Van Helsing)
Tom Lenk (Buffy: The Vampire Slayer)
Tom Mison (Sleepy Hollow)
Nicole Beharie (Sleepy Hollow)
Sean Patrick Thomas (Ringer)
Malcolm David Kelley (Lost)
Laura Spencer (The Big Bang Theory)
Brenda Strong (Supergirl)
Nicholas Gonzales (The Flash)
Eugene Byrd (Arrow)
Kevin Fonteyne (Melissa & Joey)
Ignacio Serricchio  (The Wedding Ringer)
Callard Harris (The Originals)
Rachel Melvin (Zombeavers)
Lochlyn Munro (Scary Movie)
Gavin MacIntosh (The FOsters)
Carla Gallo (Superbad)
Sara Lafleur (Ugly Betty)
Michael Reilly Burke (The Vampire Diaries)
Andy Milder (Seven Pounds)
Skyler Vallo (The A-List)
Eddie Shin (That 80s Show)
Sara Rue (Mom)
Alyssa Diaz (Army Wives)
Joel David Moore (Julia X)
Nishi Munshi (The Originals)
Jack McGee (The Fighter)
Brooke Lyons (2 Broke Girls)
Lou Ferrigno Jr. (How I Met Your Mother)
John Shea (Mutant X)
Jim Pirri (Lois & Clark)
Bridgett Newton (Man of Steel)
Nicole Bilderback (Dark Angel)
Sebastian Roche (The Originals)
Gilles Marini (2 Broke Girls)
Tim Guinee (Iron Man)
Eric Millegan (On_Line)

At the end of season 10, Bones (Emily Deschanel) and Booth (David Boreanaz) both decided to quit their jobs at the Jeffersonian and the FBI respectively. Now, six months later, their daughter Christine (Sunnie Pelant) has a little baby brother, and Booth is training new FBI recruits for a living. They seem to be happy in their new situation, and today seems like no other when Booth takes off to work. Meanwhile at the Jeffersonian, Cam (Tamara Taylor), Angela (Michaela Conlin) and Hodgins (T.J. Thyne) are called out to a crime scene, where they find a body in a burnt car. The team fear the worst when they find out that the gun that was found with the victim belongs to Booth. Also the initial examination of the bones makes it appear that he is the victim. Dr. Brennan decides to come to the Jeffersonian herself, as the situation is driving her crazy, and she eventually finds out that the remains aren’t Booth’s, but his brother’s, Jared. The question remains where Booth is, and how his brother ended up dead.

Eventually, everything turns back to normal by episode three, and Bones and Booth are back at their old jobs, just like they used to be. Murders keep on happening, and Booth and Aubrey (John Boyd) work closely together with the team of the Jeffersonian to bring the killers to justice. While the season focuses foremost on the cases themselves, there are some developments in the personal lives of the characters as well.006-1-m
Each episode has a good flow to it, where many suspects are considered along the way, and the outcome is often unpredictable. The format remains the same as in the previous seasons, namely a focus on the cases, where reexamining the bones over and over will eventually prove to be vital in finding the murderer.
While the flow of the individual cases is quite enjoyable, the personal story of the characters gets to the background quite a lot. Every now and then you will find out more about Cam’s love life, Angela and Hodgins’ marriage or Aubrey’s new crush, but nothing major steps out until halfway the season. There have been no major changes to the cast since last season, and it’s safe to say that the current team of actors all did well.

Bones has been one of my all time favourite series and season 11 is no exception! with a great cliffhanger leaving you hanging for Season 12 (the final season) .

VAN HELSING (2016) – SEASON 1

CAST

Kelly Overton (Beauty and The Beast)
Jonathan Scarfe (Into The West)
Christopher Heyerdahl (Sanctuary)
David Cubitt (Arrow)
Vincent Gale (Battlestar Galactica)
Rukiya Bernard (Colossal)
Trezzo Mahoro (Izombie)
Hilary Jardine (Camera Shy)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Tim Guinee (Iron Man)
Hannah Cheramy (Summer Love)
Anne Openshaw (American Mary)
Paul Johansson (Highlander: The Raven)
Marci T. House (Godzilla)
Alison Wandzura (Mistresses)
Aleks Paunovic (Kindergarten Cop 2)
John DeSantis (The 13th Warrior)
Laura Mennell (Alphas)
Avery Konrad (The Killing)
Terry Chen (Bates Motel)
Sarah Desjardins (Wayward Pines)
Naika Toussaint (Deadpool)
Ben Cotton (Stargate: Atlantis)
Jennifer Copping (Slither)
Chris Ippolito (The Revenant)
Ryan Robbins (Sanctuary)
Gwynyth Wlash (Star Trek Generations)
Christopher Russell (Land of Teh Dead)
Tom Cavanagh (The Flash)

One thing becomes abundantly clear three minutes into the pilot of SyFy’s latest genre offering Van Helsing; this is not your teenaged daughter’s vampire story. Gone is the inherent sexiness we’ve come to associate with the highly attractive creatures of the night, and in its place a gritty, grimy, visceral appearance that articulates the reality of an existence that revolves solely around securing basic human needs in the face of post-apocalyptic obstacles. Bloodthirsty vampires attempting to storm Seattle Valley General Hospital give 21st century viewers a unique re-imagining with all the prerequisite details: buckets of blood, ravaged body parts, frequent bouts of terror, and above all, characters that inspire concern.It’s 2019 as the series opens; “Three years since The Rising began. Civilization has fallen. Vampires rule the streets. Only whispers of a human savior have given mankind hope.” Let’s get this out of the way right now. Comparisons to The Walking Dead are unavoidable, and it remains to be seen what will set Van Helsing apart from being just another horror series with an attractive woman wearing black and kicking ass as she fights back against beings that have lost their humanity. Though we don’t see Vanessa Helsing in action until midway through the episode, Kelly Overton (True Blood) plays a young woman who wakes from a coma having missed the volcanic eruption that led to the vampire pandemic. We’re immediately struck by the strength of her performance as Overton dominates every scene she’s in. Disoriented and confused after being roused from her repose by a feral bite to the neck, she immediately springs into action revealing that she is not a woman to be trifled with. And in the first of LaBute’s plot twists, we learn that biting Vanessa not only fails to turn her into a creature, but produces the unexpected consequence of returning a vampire to a human state. However, we are also left to ponder whether she lay dead or merely comatose on the hospital table leading up to her resurrection.Axel (Jonathan Scarfe, Hell on Wheels) has been ordered to guard Vanessa without knowing why, and his stoic response to this situation embodies everything we expect from a U. S. Marine. Referring to Vanessa as Sleeping Beauty, it’s clear he’s developed an attraction to her, and now that she’s awake and determined to find her daughter, it seems rather obvious that they’ll be leaving the relative safety of the hospital. The friction between the two provides a perfect launch of the relationship these two will undoubtedly have as she searches not only for her daughter, but an understanding of what makes her inherently special.LaBute and director Michael Nankin (Defiance, Hell on Wheels) employ some character tropes, but these are used judiciously to establish how members of the small group react to self-serving motives along the way. It’s understandable that one man who’s narrowly made it inside the compound wants leave to find his wife from whom he’s been separated, but these are dire times when the well-being of the group takes precedence over the needs of the one. Like The Walking Dead, we have a group of individuals thrown together in a life or death situation, but Vanessa’s “magic bullet” status raises the game’s stakes.All pilots face the same hurdle; can the writers lead viewers to care enough about the characters to return on a weekly basis? Are the stakes facing them high enough, and how can the writing team avoid simply presenting Vanessa on a quest to bring the world back from the brink of disaster one bite at at time? Interestingly, many pilots rely too heavily on narrative exposition and voiceover, but here, not only does the violent and oft times gruesome action demand the viewer’s attention, it forces the individuals to take sides in the approaching storm and provides viewers some necessary character motivation. One who does emerge as a potential dark horse is Sam (Christopher Heyerdahl, Sanctuary), a deaf man who steps forward as things begin spiralling out of control, lending a hand to Axel as the team leader faces a potential mutiny. Thou as the series progresses he hides a dark secret and could become a menacing threat.debuted on SyFy on September 23, the pilot showed a great unveiling reveals a show with a wealth of potential and a strong genre pedigree including Continuum’s Simon Barry and Jonathan Lloyd Walker. On the surface Van Helsing may appear to be just another post-apocalyptic survival tale, but as the series progresses through its first season it begins to raise questions about  Vanessa Helsing and her role as mankind’s savior to compel viewers to return and watch this reluctant messiah cope physically and emotionally with a role she didn’t ask for and doesn’t want. with season coming to an end I can’t wait for the second season. This first season has had me hooked and knowing early on not to get too attached to characters along way as this is a real no hold bards vampire series where anyone can be killed at anytime.

REVIEW: HIGHLANDER: THE RAVEN

 

MAIN CAST

Elizabeth Gracen (Marked For Death)
Paul Johansson (Van Helsing)
Patricia Gage (American Psycho)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Torri Higginson (Stargate: Atlantis)
Julian Richings (Man of Steel)
Carlo Rota (Stargate Universe)
James Kidnie (Arrow)
Carolyn dunn (Sweating Bullets)
Alan Van Sprang (Reign)
Hannes Jaenicke (Tatort)
Lawrence Dane (Bride of Chucky)
John Ralston (Bitten)
Philip Akin (Mutant X)
Shary Guthrie (Earth: Final Conflict)
Andrew Jackson (Smallville)
Michael Copeman (The Fly)
Anne Marie Deluise (Goosebumps)
Noam Jenkins (John Q)
Geordie Johnson (reign)
Peter Mensah (Spartacus)
Valentine Pelka (8mm 2)
Jim Byrnes (Andromeda)
Michelle Gomez (Gotham)
Ronan Vibert (Hex)
Robert Cavanah (Sahara)
Stephen Moyer (True Blood)

With Highlander: The Raven, it became quickly obvious that this show wasn’t as good as the predecessor. The writing wasn’t as good, and some episodes were clearly not well done. That much I’m in agreement with everyone else here. But I would ask other viewers to also try to see the positive aspects that H:TR had. For starters, the chemistry between Amanda and detective Wolf was great.

I’m not sure why exactly, but these two were just perfect together, in both dialogue, thought processes and acting. I think that the writers here were trying to bring the world of immortals to deal with the point of view of a mortal, ie, Wolf, thus where we saw a mortal protagonist taking the heads of two immortals in the only season that this show was alive, the first by shooting at glass that decapitated his foe and the second (a very well-done episode) where Wolf used a sword to decapitate the immortal who was killing people for their organs.

That was basically the act of allowing a mortal to interact with immortals as their equal for the first time, instead of always running to a friendly immortal to do his bidding when another immortal was a villain who needed to be dealt with (ala Joe Dawson with Duncan). Here, a mortal took charge. There were other episodes that were truly gems to watch, the best being the one where Amanda had robbed a soldier during WW1 and inadvertently caused the deaths of 120 of his `brothers’, as that character stated in such a charming way. The one with father Liam and his doubts about his centuries-long faith in the priesthood was also a very good one, with Amanda baiting him to place himself between her sword and the woman journalist she pretended to wish to kill.

The very first episode where Wolf’s former partner had placed herself in between Amanda and a bullet, whereas basically leaving Amanda’s facial expression almost screaming out `WHAT DID YOU DO?!’ because she knew it was a sacrifice done for nothing, also leading her to possibly reconsider her values because someone who was dedicated to stopping her when she was a thief was still placing herself in harm’s way to protect her life. And, last but not least, the last episode where we found out that Wolf himself was an immortal now, and the science of immortality was clearly explained, at least to me, when he confronted Amanda about it. Just too bad we never got to see a second season to this cool show, thus allowing detective Wolf to be an immortal himself. But this will always be one of my favorite shows. Not as good as the great Highlander: The Series , but definitely one that was a joy to see every Saturday afternoon.

REVIEW: WISHMASTER 2: EVIL NEVER DIES

CAST
Andrew Divoff (Indiana Jones 4)
Holly Fields (Interceptor Force)
Chris Weber (Watchmen)
Vyto Ruginis (The Fast and The Furious)
Paul Johansson (Highlander: The Raven)
Robert Lasardo (Nip/Tuck)
Tommy Lister Jr (The Dark Knight)
Llia Volok (Power Rangers Wild Force)
Bokeem Woodbine (Total Recall)
During an attempted robbery of a museum, the fire opal that contains the Djinn is accidentally released by a stray gunshot. One of the burglars, a beautiful young woman named Morgana Truscott (Holly Fields), steals the gem and is forced to abandon her partner during the escape. The Djinn escapes and kills the remaining burglar when he accidentally wishes he’d never been born. As the police enter the museum, the demon finishes forming into full size, revealing the Djinn (Andrew Divoff). The Djinn surrenders to the police and is led away.
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That evening, Morgana is shown sleeping very restlessly, her left arm dangling over the edge of the bed. In the meantime, Demarest is in a holding cell waiting to be transferred to prison, where he kills a fellow prisoner. In her dreams, she sees glimpses of the Djinn in his true form. The next day, Morgana goes to Church to visit the priest tending the church, a man named Gregory (Paul Johannson) – a former lover of Morgana’s before he found God and joined the priesthood. In prison, Demarest continues to kill prisoners and other personnel through purposely misconstrued wishes, and is confronted by Butz (Rhino Michaels) and his two henchmen, the Tiger brothers (James Kim and Simon Kim). Butz runs all “underground business” at the prison and gives Demarest a “friendly” warning that he is going to be watching him. Morgana is up at dawn, screaming out to her unseen tormentor, demanding to know who he is. She goes to her computer and does an internet search on Persian Mythology.
A voice-over from Morgana recites the contents of a web site she is reading on the Persian deity Ahura Mazda. He was known as a deity of both light and dark, symbolizing the duality of good and evil. He was also known as the keeper of the Stone of the Sacred Fire. Gregory arrives at her loft, he says that Father Dimitri from the church noted that she had passed by, and she seemed unwell. Morgana opens up just a little, telling Gregory she hasn’t been sleeping well, and experiencing confusing nightmares about a voice telling her to “fulfill the prophecy” and confesses to the robbery and the murder of the guard.
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Morgana goes to the prison to visit Demarest. She demands to know why he confessed to the robbery, and he says it was so she wouldn’t have to, and admits to not having to be in prison long, before showing his true form, driving Morgana away. Morgana is at home, doing more research on the internet on Persian mythos. She finds references to the Djinn, a powerful being that laid waste to the Persian court before the King’s alchemist created the Stone of the Sacred Fire and imprisoned the Djinn inside it. The Persian deity Ahura Mazda was enlisted to keep the Djinn imprisoned in the “space between worlds” so that he cannot escape and bring about world-wide apocalypse. Morgana is startled as her window is abruptly blown open by a sharp gust of wind, papers flying everywhere. Morgana goes to see Gregory the next day to tell him about her findings. Gregory rides to the prison with Morgana and confronts Demarest, demanding he leave Morgana alone. Demarest knows exactly who Gregory is, and about his past relationship with Morgana. He even perfectly duplicates Morgana’s voice, speaking seductively to Gregory. Later that evening, Morgana, alone in her loft, begins undergoing a number of rituals aimed at purifying her soul, as only someone pure of heart can banish the Djinn back into his prison.  Back at the prison, Demarest kills the prison warden and escapes the prison when one of the prisoners wishes to be released.
Osip brings Demarest to Pushkin and tells him that Demarest is a Wishmaster who can give Pushkin anything he wants. But Pushkin brushes them off, saying he already has great wealth and power, and he doesn’t need or desire fame. As he is leaving, Demarest asks if Pushkin has any enemies he would like to see eliminated, and Osip quickly pounces. Pushkin’s greatest enemy is a rival crime boss named Moustafa. The mere mention of Moustafa’s name sends Pushkin into a rage. Demarest assures Pushkin that he can do what Pushkin himself might not be able to, like take care of Moustafa. Carelessly, fueled by his anger, Pushkin wishes to have Moustafa’s head.
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Just then, Morgana rushes into the club room, shooting Demarest twice in the chest with her gun. Both she and Osip freeze in horror as the attack only causes the Djinn to assume his true form. He laughs at Morgana’s foolishly thinking she could kill him. Gregory finds Morgana praying feverishly at the church altar, and sobbing inconsolably. She confesses to Gregory that she tried to kill Demarest and then saw the Djinn’s true face. She laments that her guilt, the blood of the innocent man she killed at the art gallery heist, can never be washed away, and so she can never hope to fight the Djinn. Gregory patiently counsels her, promising that God can cleanse any and all burden she carries if only she allows Him to, and that while the Djinn might be too powerful for they to fight, God can win the battle using them as His instruments. During this, they find Morgana is invulnerable when she attempts suicide so the Djinn can not grant her the three necessary wishes.
Morgana and Gregory are preparing for the trip in pursuit of the Djinn. Gregory has compiled more notes, including the incantation used by the alchemist who imprisoned the Djinn; “As was prophesied, the alchemist took the stone into his hand as a woman pure of heart takes the light of God unto her soul, and spoke the words, Nib Sugaroth Baheim”. Morgana points out that unlike the two of them, the alchemist knew what he was doing. But as Gregory points out, these notes are the only solid plan they have on how to defeat the Djinn. Morgana begins to kiss Gregory, and despite his initial reticence, she makes love to him. In Vegas, the Djinn begins granting wishes to the casino patrons in order to collect the remaining required souls. As Morgana and Gregory ride a cab through Las Vegas to the casino Demarest is operating out of, the Djinn stands in his office in his true form. Holding up the fire opal, he intones a deep growl and calls in all the debts owed him—he claims the souls everyone gave up through their wishes.
Noting that Demarest has left the fire opal on his desk, Gregory quietly inches toward it while Demarest is speaking to Morgana. Rushing forward, he grabs it and recites the incantation used by the alchemist. Demarest merely smiles again, noting the two of them have studied the legends well, before gesturing, and the fire opal vanishes from Gregory’s hand into Demarest’s. He warns them about playing with forces they don’t understand. After Morgana accidentally wishes for the Djinn to go to hell, they’re transported inside the fire opal, and Gregory is killed after she wishes for him to be released. But Morgana has forgotten that death is often a release. She screams in grief at the Djinn, angrily wishing for a world free of evil. But the Djinn reminds her that evil is but half of a perfect sphere—without it, good cannot exist. He warns her that he is losing his patience with her. Morgana tries desperately to resist the Djinn’s will. Morgana’s fears suddenly quiet and she asks the Djinn the meaning of fulfilling the prophecy. She reminds him that he himself told her that she would know when the time was right. The Djinn impatiently recites the prophecy to her, that the one who wakes the Djinn shall have three wishes; upon the granting of all three, the race of Djinn will reign over the Earth. Due to a slip of the tongue, Morgana realizes the meaning of the prophecy, and wishes for the guard she killed to be alive again. After receiving a vision of the guard alive and well, she takes the Djinn’s fire opal and intones the alchemist’s chant, “Nib Sugaroth Baheim”. The Djinn is again banished and all the victims returned to life.
The franchise is as low-profile as it can be, but it hit its height with Wishmaster 2, which improves upon the original in terms of story, but is restricted by a lower budget.

REVIEW: CARNIVAL OF SOULS (1998)

CAST

Bobbie Phillips (Two Guys and A Girl)
Shawnee Smith (Anger Management)
Larry Miller (10 Things I Hate ABout You)
Paul Johansson (Highlander: The Series)
Robert LaSardo (Nip/Tuck)

A young girl witnesses the brutal rape and murder of her mother by a circus clown and begins to have nightmares when the carnival comes back to town when she is an adult.Carnival of Souls 1998 apparently wasn’t well received or liked, and I really can’t understand why. The only reason I can determine for this is that Wes Craven’s name is attached to this film. Usually this great director’s name would be a positive force for a film. In this case, however, it may have been misleading. Others probably rented Carnival of Souls expecting unrelenting fear. However, this film is not in that category.

Carnival Of Souls 1998 is much more than that. It’s an absorbing, well-timed, thought provoking story about a troubled woman’s fear of death, and her resulting fear of life. Haunted throughout her life by witnessing her mother’s murder, she’s likewise haunted by the possible release of her mother’s murderer. She fears that he return for revenge, and she fears for herself and even more for her younger sister.Bobbie Phillips plays Alex, the troubled woman. She’s brilliant, and conveys her fear with such eloquence you feel her fear and confusion as if it were something concrete. Shawnee Smith plays Sandra, her younger sister.  Watch this film with an open mind. Forget about Wes Craven’s name on the box and credits. You may be in for a pleasant surprise.