REVIEW: WHEN THE PARTY’S OVER

CAST

Sandra Bullock (The Heat)
Rae Dawn Chong (Commando)
Kris Kamm (Coach)
Elizabeth Berridge (The Funhouse)
Brian McNamara (Army Wives)
Paul Johansson (Van Helsing)
Michael Landes (Final Destination 2)
Raymond Cruz (Breaking Bad)
Fisher Stevens (Short Circuit)
Willie Garson (Stargate SG.1)

hqdefaultFrankie (Elizabeth Berridge), Amanda (Sandra Bullock), MJ (Rae Dawn Chong, and Banks (Kris Kamm) are housemates, who are fresh out of college. Frankie is a social worker, who is dating Taylor, a lawyer (Brian McNamara). Amanda, an artist, meets and falls in love with Alexander Midnight, a performance artist (Fisher Stevens). She is also trying to guide her younger brother, Willie (Michael Landes), with wisdom, patience, and compassion, after the death of their mother.jPeC9NbFKDLtZBMlzEc7RLwnQoTThe third roommate, MJ, is a stockbroker, who is actually very promiscuous and has a pension for drinking. She even sleeps with Taylor, thus betraying Frankie.The final housemate, Banks, is an actor who is gay, and who is also best friends with Amanda. This movie touches on a group of twentysomethings in California, circa the early 1990s, highlighting the social issues of that time period, like teenage drinking, homosexuality, rape, infidelity, and problems with trust, amongst many other themes.Sandra-Bullock_The-Vanishing_1993The story builds slowly, and doesn’t go where you expect it to or hope it will, but rewards those who are patient and observant.

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REVIEW: BONES – SEASON 11

MAIN CAST

Emily Deschanel (Easy)
David Boreanaz (Angel)
Michaela Conlin (Enchanted)
T.J. Thyne (Ghost World)
Tamara Taylor (Serenity)
John Boyd (Lady In The Water)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Patricia Belcher (Jeeprs Creepers)
Pej Vahdat (Lie To Me)
Roger Cross (Arrow)
Dilshad Vadsaria (Second Chance)
Kim Raver (24)
Matthew Holmes (Blue Heelers)
Dan Hildebrand (Game of Thrones)
Michael Grant Terry (Grimm)
Gil Darnell (Reign)
Betty White (The Proposal)
Brian Klugman (Cloverfield)
Erin Chaill (Power Rangers Time Force)
Paul Johansson (Van Helsing)
Tom Lenk (Buffy: The Vampire Slayer)
Tom Mison (Sleepy Hollow)
Nicole Beharie (Sleepy Hollow)
Sean Patrick Thomas (Ringer)
Malcolm David Kelley (Lost)
Laura Spencer (The Big Bang Theory)
Brenda Strong (Supergirl)
Nicholas Gonzales (The Flash)
Eugene Byrd (Arrow)
Kevin Fonteyne (Melissa & Joey)
Ignacio Serricchio  (The Wedding Ringer)
Callard Harris (The Originals)
Rachel Melvin (Zombeavers)
Lochlyn Munro (Scary Movie)
Gavin MacIntosh (The FOsters)
Carla Gallo (Superbad)
Sara Lafleur (Ugly Betty)
Michael Reilly Burke (The Vampire Diaries)
Andy Milder (Seven Pounds)
Skyler Vallo (The A-List)
Eddie Shin (That 80s Show)
Sara Rue (Mom)
Alyssa Diaz (Army Wives)
Joel David Moore (Julia X)
Nishi Munshi (The Originals)
Jack McGee (The Fighter)
Brooke Lyons (2 Broke Girls)
Lou Ferrigno Jr. (How I Met Your Mother)
John Shea (Mutant X)
Jim Pirri (Lois & Clark)
Bridgett Newton (Man of Steel)
Nicole Bilderback (Dark Angel)
Sebastian Roche (The Originals)
Gilles Marini (2 Broke Girls)
Tim Guinee (Iron Man)
Eric Millegan (On_Line)

At the end of season 10, Bones (Emily Deschanel) and Booth (David Boreanaz) both decided to quit their jobs at the Jeffersonian and the FBI respectively. Now, six months later, their daughter Christine (Sunnie Pelant) has a little baby brother, and Booth is training new FBI recruits for a living. They seem to be happy in their new situation, and today seems like no other when Booth takes off to work. Meanwhile at the Jeffersonian, Cam (Tamara Taylor), Angela (Michaela Conlin) and Hodgins (T.J. Thyne) are called out to a crime scene, where they find a body in a burnt car. The team fear the worst when they find out that the gun that was found with the victim belongs to Booth. Also the initial examination of the bones makes it appear that he is the victim. Dr. Brennan decides to come to the Jeffersonian herself, as the situation is driving her crazy, and she eventually finds out that the remains aren’t Booth’s, but his brother’s, Jared. The question remains where Booth is, and how his brother ended up dead.

Eventually, everything turns back to normal by episode three, and Bones and Booth are back at their old jobs, just like they used to be. Murders keep on happening, and Booth and Aubrey (John Boyd) work closely together with the team of the Jeffersonian to bring the killers to justice. While the season focuses foremost on the cases themselves, there are some developments in the personal lives of the characters as well.006-1-m
Each episode has a good flow to it, where many suspects are considered along the way, and the outcome is often unpredictable. The format remains the same as in the previous seasons, namely a focus on the cases, where reexamining the bones over and over will eventually prove to be vital in finding the murderer.
While the flow of the individual cases is quite enjoyable, the personal story of the characters gets to the background quite a lot. Every now and then you will find out more about Cam’s love life, Angela and Hodgins’ marriage or Aubrey’s new crush, but nothing major steps out until halfway the season. There have been no major changes to the cast since last season, and it’s safe to say that the current team of actors all did well.

Bones has been one of my all time favourite series and season 11 is no exception! with a great cliffhanger leaving you hanging for Season 12 (the final season) .

VAN HELSING (2016) – SEASON 1

CAST

Kelly Overton (Beauty and The Beast)
Jonathan Scarfe (Into The West)
Christopher Heyerdahl (Sanctuary)
David Cubitt (Arrow)
Vincent Gale (Battlestar Galactica)
Rukiya Bernard (Colossal)
Trezzo Mahoro (Izombie)
Hilary Jardine (Camera Shy)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Tim Guinee (Iron Man)
Hannah Cheramy (Summer Love)
Anne Openshaw (American Mary)
Paul Johansson (Highlander: The Raven)
Marci T. House (Godzilla)
Alison Wandzura (Mistresses)
Aleks Paunovic (Kindergarten Cop 2)
John DeSantis (The 13th Warrior)
Laura Mennell (Alphas)
Avery Konrad (The Killing)
Terry Chen (Bates Motel)
Sarah Desjardins (Wayward Pines)
Naika Toussaint (Deadpool)
Ben Cotton (Stargate: Atlantis)
Jennifer Copping (Slither)
Chris Ippolito (The Revenant)
Ryan Robbins (Sanctuary)
Gwynyth Wlash (Star Trek Generations)
Christopher Russell (Land of Teh Dead)
Tom Cavanagh (The Flash)

One thing becomes abundantly clear three minutes into the pilot of SyFy’s latest genre offering Van Helsing; this is not your teenaged daughter’s vampire story. Gone is the inherent sexiness we’ve come to associate with the highly attractive creatures of the night, and in its place a gritty, grimy, visceral appearance that articulates the reality of an existence that revolves solely around securing basic human needs in the face of post-apocalyptic obstacles. Bloodthirsty vampires attempting to storm Seattle Valley General Hospital give 21st century viewers a unique re-imagining with all the prerequisite details: buckets of blood, ravaged body parts, frequent bouts of terror, and above all, characters that inspire concern.It’s 2019 as the series opens; “Three years since The Rising began. Civilization has fallen. Vampires rule the streets. Only whispers of a human savior have given mankind hope.” Let’s get this out of the way right now. Comparisons to The Walking Dead are unavoidable, and it remains to be seen what will set Van Helsing apart from being just another horror series with an attractive woman wearing black and kicking ass as she fights back against beings that have lost their humanity. Though we don’t see Vanessa Helsing in action until midway through the episode, Kelly Overton (True Blood) plays a young woman who wakes from a coma having missed the volcanic eruption that led to the vampire pandemic. We’re immediately struck by the strength of her performance as Overton dominates every scene she’s in. Disoriented and confused after being roused from her repose by a feral bite to the neck, she immediately springs into action revealing that she is not a woman to be trifled with. And in the first of LaBute’s plot twists, we learn that biting Vanessa not only fails to turn her into a creature, but produces the unexpected consequence of returning a vampire to a human state. However, we are also left to ponder whether she lay dead or merely comatose on the hospital table leading up to her resurrection.Axel (Jonathan Scarfe, Hell on Wheels) has been ordered to guard Vanessa without knowing why, and his stoic response to this situation embodies everything we expect from a U. S. Marine. Referring to Vanessa as Sleeping Beauty, it’s clear he’s developed an attraction to her, and now that she’s awake and determined to find her daughter, it seems rather obvious that they’ll be leaving the relative safety of the hospital. The friction between the two provides a perfect launch of the relationship these two will undoubtedly have as she searches not only for her daughter, but an understanding of what makes her inherently special.LaBute and director Michael Nankin (Defiance, Hell on Wheels) employ some character tropes, but these are used judiciously to establish how members of the small group react to self-serving motives along the way. It’s understandable that one man who’s narrowly made it inside the compound wants leave to find his wife from whom he’s been separated, but these are dire times when the well-being of the group takes precedence over the needs of the one. Like The Walking Dead, we have a group of individuals thrown together in a life or death situation, but Vanessa’s “magic bullet” status raises the game’s stakes.All pilots face the same hurdle; can the writers lead viewers to care enough about the characters to return on a weekly basis? Are the stakes facing them high enough, and how can the writing team avoid simply presenting Vanessa on a quest to bring the world back from the brink of disaster one bite at at time? Interestingly, many pilots rely too heavily on narrative exposition and voiceover, but here, not only does the violent and oft times gruesome action demand the viewer’s attention, it forces the individuals to take sides in the approaching storm and provides viewers some necessary character motivation. One who does emerge as a potential dark horse is Sam (Christopher Heyerdahl, Sanctuary), a deaf man who steps forward as things begin spiralling out of control, lending a hand to Axel as the team leader faces a potential mutiny. Thou as the series progresses he hides a dark secret and could become a menacing threat.debuted on SyFy on September 23, the pilot showed a great unveiling reveals a show with a wealth of potential and a strong genre pedigree including Continuum’s Simon Barry and Jonathan Lloyd Walker. On the surface Van Helsing may appear to be just another post-apocalyptic survival tale, but as the series progresses through its first season it begins to raise questions about  Vanessa Helsing and her role as mankind’s savior to compel viewers to return and watch this reluctant messiah cope physically and emotionally with a role she didn’t ask for and doesn’t want. with season coming to an end I can’t wait for the second season. This first season has had me hooked and knowing early on not to get too attached to characters along way as this is a real no hold bards vampire series where anyone can be killed at anytime.

REVIEW: HIGHLANDER: THE RAVEN

 

MAIN CAST

Elizabeth Gracen (Marked For Death)
Paul Johansson (Van Helsing)
Patricia Gage (American Psycho)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Torri Higginson (Stargate: Atlantis)
Julian Richings (Man of Steel)
Carlo Rota (Stargate Universe)
James Kidnie (Arrow)
Carolyn dunn (Sweating Bullets)
Alan Van Sprang (Reign)
Hannes Jaenicke (Tatort)
Lawrence Dane (Bride of Chucky)
John Ralston (Bitten)
Philip Akin (Mutant X)
Shary Guthrie (Earth: Final Conflict)
Andrew Jackson (Smallville)
Michael Copeman (The Fly)
Anne Marie Deluise (Goosebumps)
Noam Jenkins (John Q)
Geordie Johnson (reign)
Peter Mensah (Spartacus)
Valentine Pelka (8mm 2)
Jim Byrnes (Andromeda)
Michelle Gomez (Gotham)
Ronan Vibert (Hex)
Robert Cavanah (Sahara)
Stephen Moyer (True Blood)

With Highlander: The Raven, it became quickly obvious that this show wasn’t as good as the predecessor. The writing wasn’t as good, and some episodes were clearly not well done. That much I’m in agreement with everyone else here. But I would ask other viewers to also try to see the positive aspects that H:TR had. For starters, the chemistry between Amanda and detective Wolf was great.

I’m not sure why exactly, but these two were just perfect together, in both dialogue, thought processes and acting. I think that the writers here were trying to bring the world of immortals to deal with the point of view of a mortal, ie, Wolf, thus where we saw a mortal protagonist taking the heads of two immortals in the only season that this show was alive, the first by shooting at glass that decapitated his foe and the second (a very well-done episode) where Wolf used a sword to decapitate the immortal who was killing people for their organs.

That was basically the act of allowing a mortal to interact with immortals as their equal for the first time, instead of always running to a friendly immortal to do his bidding when another immortal was a villain who needed to be dealt with (ala Joe Dawson with Duncan). Here, a mortal took charge. There were other episodes that were truly gems to watch, the best being the one where Amanda had robbed a soldier during WW1 and inadvertently caused the deaths of 120 of his `brothers’, as that character stated in such a charming way. The one with father Liam and his doubts about his centuries-long faith in the priesthood was also a very good one, with Amanda baiting him to place himself between her sword and the woman journalist she pretended to wish to kill.

The very first episode where Wolf’s former partner had placed herself in between Amanda and a bullet, whereas basically leaving Amanda’s facial expression almost screaming out `WHAT DID YOU DO?!’ because she knew it was a sacrifice done for nothing, also leading her to possibly reconsider her values because someone who was dedicated to stopping her when she was a thief was still placing herself in harm’s way to protect her life. And, last but not least, the last episode where we found out that Wolf himself was an immortal now, and the science of immortality was clearly explained, at least to me, when he confronted Amanda about it. Just too bad we never got to see a second season to this cool show, thus allowing detective Wolf to be an immortal himself. But this will always be one of my favorite shows. Not as good as the great Highlander: The Series , but definitely one that was a joy to see every Saturday afternoon.

REVIEW: WISHMASTER 2: EVIL NEVER DIES

CAST
Andrew Divoff (Indiana Jones 4)
Holly Fields (Interceptor Force)
Chris Weber (Watchmen)
Vyto Ruginis (The Fast and The Furious)
Paul Johansson (Highlander: The Raven)
Robert Lasardo (Nip/Tuck)
Tommy Lister Jr (The Dark Knight)
Llia Volok (Power Rangers Wild Force)
Bokeem Woodbine (Total Recall)
During an attempted robbery of a museum, the fire opal that contains the Djinn is accidentally released by a stray gunshot. One of the burglars, a beautiful young woman named Morgana Truscott (Holly Fields), steals the gem and is forced to abandon her partner during the escape. The Djinn escapes and kills the remaining burglar when he accidentally wishes he’d never been born. As the police enter the museum, the demon finishes forming into full size, revealing the Djinn (Andrew Divoff). The Djinn surrenders to the police and is led away.
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That evening, Morgana is shown sleeping very restlessly, her left arm dangling over the edge of the bed. In the meantime, Demarest is in a holding cell waiting to be transferred to prison, where he kills a fellow prisoner. In her dreams, she sees glimpses of the Djinn in his true form. The next day, Morgana goes to Church to visit the priest tending the church, a man named Gregory (Paul Johannson) – a former lover of Morgana’s before he found God and joined the priesthood. In prison, Demarest continues to kill prisoners and other personnel through purposely misconstrued wishes, and is confronted by Butz (Rhino Michaels) and his two henchmen, the Tiger brothers (James Kim and Simon Kim). Butz runs all “underground business” at the prison and gives Demarest a “friendly” warning that he is going to be watching him. Morgana is up at dawn, screaming out to her unseen tormentor, demanding to know who he is. She goes to her computer and does an internet search on Persian Mythology.
A voice-over from Morgana recites the contents of a web site she is reading on the Persian deity Ahura Mazda. He was known as a deity of both light and dark, symbolizing the duality of good and evil. He was also known as the keeper of the Stone of the Sacred Fire. Gregory arrives at her loft, he says that Father Dimitri from the church noted that she had passed by, and she seemed unwell. Morgana opens up just a little, telling Gregory she hasn’t been sleeping well, and experiencing confusing nightmares about a voice telling her to “fulfill the prophecy” and confesses to the robbery and the murder of the guard.
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Morgana goes to the prison to visit Demarest. She demands to know why he confessed to the robbery, and he says it was so she wouldn’t have to, and admits to not having to be in prison long, before showing his true form, driving Morgana away. Morgana is at home, doing more research on the internet on Persian mythos. She finds references to the Djinn, a powerful being that laid waste to the Persian court before the King’s alchemist created the Stone of the Sacred Fire and imprisoned the Djinn inside it. The Persian deity Ahura Mazda was enlisted to keep the Djinn imprisoned in the “space between worlds” so that he cannot escape and bring about world-wide apocalypse. Morgana is startled as her window is abruptly blown open by a sharp gust of wind, papers flying everywhere. Morgana goes to see Gregory the next day to tell him about her findings. Gregory rides to the prison with Morgana and confronts Demarest, demanding he leave Morgana alone. Demarest knows exactly who Gregory is, and about his past relationship with Morgana. He even perfectly duplicates Morgana’s voice, speaking seductively to Gregory. Later that evening, Morgana, alone in her loft, begins undergoing a number of rituals aimed at purifying her soul, as only someone pure of heart can banish the Djinn back into his prison.  Back at the prison, Demarest kills the prison warden and escapes the prison when one of the prisoners wishes to be released.
Osip brings Demarest to Pushkin and tells him that Demarest is a Wishmaster who can give Pushkin anything he wants. But Pushkin brushes them off, saying he already has great wealth and power, and he doesn’t need or desire fame. As he is leaving, Demarest asks if Pushkin has any enemies he would like to see eliminated, and Osip quickly pounces. Pushkin’s greatest enemy is a rival crime boss named Moustafa. The mere mention of Moustafa’s name sends Pushkin into a rage. Demarest assures Pushkin that he can do what Pushkin himself might not be able to, like take care of Moustafa. Carelessly, fueled by his anger, Pushkin wishes to have Moustafa’s head.
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Just then, Morgana rushes into the club room, shooting Demarest twice in the chest with her gun. Both she and Osip freeze in horror as the attack only causes the Djinn to assume his true form. He laughs at Morgana’s foolishly thinking she could kill him. Gregory finds Morgana praying feverishly at the church altar, and sobbing inconsolably. She confesses to Gregory that she tried to kill Demarest and then saw the Djinn’s true face. She laments that her guilt, the blood of the innocent man she killed at the art gallery heist, can never be washed away, and so she can never hope to fight the Djinn. Gregory patiently counsels her, promising that God can cleanse any and all burden she carries if only she allows Him to, and that while the Djinn might be too powerful for they to fight, God can win the battle using them as His instruments. During this, they find Morgana is invulnerable when she attempts suicide so the Djinn can not grant her the three necessary wishes.
Morgana and Gregory are preparing for the trip in pursuit of the Djinn. Gregory has compiled more notes, including the incantation used by the alchemist who imprisoned the Djinn; “As was prophesied, the alchemist took the stone into his hand as a woman pure of heart takes the light of God unto her soul, and spoke the words, Nib Sugaroth Baheim”. Morgana points out that unlike the two of them, the alchemist knew what he was doing. But as Gregory points out, these notes are the only solid plan they have on how to defeat the Djinn. Morgana begins to kiss Gregory, and despite his initial reticence, she makes love to him. In Vegas, the Djinn begins granting wishes to the casino patrons in order to collect the remaining required souls. As Morgana and Gregory ride a cab through Las Vegas to the casino Demarest is operating out of, the Djinn stands in his office in his true form. Holding up the fire opal, he intones a deep growl and calls in all the debts owed him—he claims the souls everyone gave up through their wishes.
Noting that Demarest has left the fire opal on his desk, Gregory quietly inches toward it while Demarest is speaking to Morgana. Rushing forward, he grabs it and recites the incantation used by the alchemist. Demarest merely smiles again, noting the two of them have studied the legends well, before gesturing, and the fire opal vanishes from Gregory’s hand into Demarest’s. He warns them about playing with forces they don’t understand. After Morgana accidentally wishes for the Djinn to go to hell, they’re transported inside the fire opal, and Gregory is killed after she wishes for him to be released. But Morgana has forgotten that death is often a release. She screams in grief at the Djinn, angrily wishing for a world free of evil. But the Djinn reminds her that evil is but half of a perfect sphere—without it, good cannot exist. He warns her that he is losing his patience with her. Morgana tries desperately to resist the Djinn’s will. Morgana’s fears suddenly quiet and she asks the Djinn the meaning of fulfilling the prophecy. She reminds him that he himself told her that she would know when the time was right. The Djinn impatiently recites the prophecy to her, that the one who wakes the Djinn shall have three wishes; upon the granting of all three, the race of Djinn will reign over the Earth. Due to a slip of the tongue, Morgana realizes the meaning of the prophecy, and wishes for the guard she killed to be alive again. After receiving a vision of the guard alive and well, she takes the Djinn’s fire opal and intones the alchemist’s chant, “Nib Sugaroth Baheim”. The Djinn is again banished and all the victims returned to life.
The franchise is as low-profile as it can be, but it hit its height with Wishmaster 2, which improves upon the original in terms of story, but is restricted by a lower budget.

31 DAYS OF HORROR REVIEW: CARNIVAL OF SOULS (1998)

CAST

Bobbie Phillips (Two Guys and A Girl)
Shawnee Smith (Anger Management)
Larry Miller (10 Things I Hate ABout You)
Paul Johansson (Highlander: The Series)
Robert LaSardo (Nip/Tuck)

A young girl witnesses the brutal rape and murder of her mother by a circus clown and begins to have nightmares when the carnival comes back to town when she is an adult.Carnival of Souls 1998 apparently wasn’t well received or liked, and I really can’t understand why. The only reason I can determine for this is that Wes Craven’s name is attached to this film. Usually this great director’s name would be a positive force for a film. In this case, however, it may have been misleading. Others probably rented Carnival of Souls expecting unrelenting fear. However, this film is not in that category.

Carnival Of Souls 1998 is much more than that. It’s an absorbing, well-timed, thought provoking story about a troubled woman’s fear of death, and her resulting fear of life. Haunted throughout her life by witnessing her mother’s murder, she’s likewise haunted by the possible release of her mother’s murderer. She fears that he return for revenge, and she fears for herself and even more for her younger sister.Bobbie Phillips plays Alex, the troubled woman. She’s brilliant, and conveys her fear with such eloquence you feel her fear and confusion as if it were something concrete. Shawnee Smith plays Sandra, her younger sister.  Watch this film with an open mind. Forget about Wes Craven’s name on the box and credits. You may be in for a pleasant surprise.

REVIEW: ANDROMEDA – SEASON 1-5

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MAIN CAST

Kevin Sorbo (Hercules: TLJ)
Lisa Ryder (Jason X)
Keith Hamilton Cobb (Noah’s Arc)
Laura Bertram (50/50)
Brent Stait (Blade: The Series)
Gordon MIchael Woolvett (Bride of Chucky)
Lexa Doig (Continuum)
Steve Bacic (Flash Gordon 2007)
Brandy Ledford (Baywatch)

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RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

John Tench (Shooter)
Emy Aneke (Star Trek Beyond)
Elizabeth THai (Saved)
Amber Rothwell (Battlestar Galactica)
Paul Johansson (Highlander:The Raven)
Dylan Bierk (Beastmaster)
Marion Eisman (Hit ‘n Strum)
Cameron Daddo (Packed To The Rafters)
Brian George (The Big Bang Theory)
Sam Sorbo (Hercules: TLJ)
Claudette Mink (Children of The Corn 7)
Kimberley Warnat (Freddy vs Jason)
Malcolm Stewart (Jumanji)
John de Lancie (Star Trek: TNG)
Ty Olsson (Izombie)
Monika Schnarre (Dead Fire)
Douglas O’Keeffe (Sanctuary)
Nathaniel DeVeaux (Antitrust)
Noel Fisher (Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles)
Ralf Moeller (Conan The Adventurer)
Mackenzie Gray (Man of Steel)
Chapelle Jaffe (The Dead Zone)
Rachel Hayward (Jingle All The Way 2)
David Palffy (Stargate SG.1)
Kimberly Huie (G-Spot)
Michael Shanks (Stargate SG.1)
Gerard Plunkett (Sucker Punch)
Anthony Lemke (Robocop: Primce Directives)
William B. Davis (The X-Files)
Anna Marie Deluise (Smallville)
Enuka Okuma (House of The Dead)
Roger Cross (Arrow)
Kendall Cross (Caprica)
Francois Yip (Smallville)
James Marsters (Buffy)
Jud Tyler (That 70s Show)
Steven Grayhm (White Chicks)
Timothy Webber (Cypher)
Kevin McNulty (Elektra)
Mark Hildreth (V)
Kristin Lehman (Hemoglobin)
Costas Mandylor (Saw V)
Heather Hanson (The Hosue Next Door)
Dean Wray (Horns)
Ingrid Torrance (Flight 93)
Brendan Beiser (The X-FIles)
Cynthia Preston (Carrie 2013)
Meredith McGeachie (Punch)
Sonya Salomaa (Watchmen)
Michael Hurst (Hercules: TLJ)
Andee Frizzell (Stargate Atlantis)
Christopher Judge (Stargate SG.1)
Ellie Harvie (The New Addams Family)
Winston Rekert (The Blue Man)
Lawrence Bayne (Dog Pound)
Krista Rae (Dawn Anna)
Kristen Robek (Cats & Dogs)
Tony Todd (The Flash)
Venus Terzo (Arrow)
Sara Deakins (Tru Calling)
Michael Hogan (Battlestar Galactica)
William Katt (Carrie)
Geordie Johnson (Reign)
leila Johnson (School of Life)
Jayne Heitmeyer (Earth: Final Conflict)
Peter Shinkoda (Daredevil)
Adam Harrington (The Secret Circle)
Peter Bryant (Dark Angel)
Chris Potter (Heartland)
Jody Thompson (Flash Gordon 2007)
Helene Joy (Desolation Sound)
Aleks Paunovic (Mortal Kombat Legacy)
Christopher Heyerdahl (Sanctuary)
Krista Allen (Mutant X)
Michael Ironside (Total Recall)
JR Bourne (Stargate SG.1)
Sarah-Jane Redmond (V)
Nigel Bennett (Cypher)
John Reardon (Tru Calling)
Maury Chaykin (Entrapment)
Chelah Horsdal (Hell on Wheels)
Carmen Moore (Artic Air)
Michelle Harrison (The Flash)
Nicholas Lea (Arrow)
Colin cunningham (Elektra)
Andrew Jackson (Earth: FInal Conflict)
Ona Grauer (V)
Ivar Brogger (Bones)
Sebastian Spence (First Wave)
Grace Park (Battlestar Galactica)
Martin Cummins (Bates Motel)
Jim Byrnes (Highlander: The Series)
Christina Cox (Arrow)
Apollonia Vanova (Watchmen)
Nia Peeples (Half Past Dead)
Peter Wingfield (Caprica)
Kandyse McClure (Battlestar Galactica)
Gary Jones (Stargate SG.1)
Emily Holmes (Dark Angel)
Peter Delusie (21 Jump Street)
Erica Durance (Smallville)
Aaron Douglas (Battlestar Galactica)
Missy Peregrym (Heroes)
Marjorie Monaghan (Babylon 5)
Blu Mankuma (Tin Man)
Alan Scarfe (Seven Days)
Kyle Cassie (Deadpool)
Ken Tremblett (Caitlin’s Way)
Don S. Davis (Stargate SG.1)
Natassia Malthe (DOA)
Matthew Bennett (Battlestar Galactica)
Lochlyn Munro (Scary Movie)
Kevin Durand (Dark Angel)
Hiro Kanagawa (Heroes Reborn)
Francoise Yip (Smallville)
Emmanuelle Vaugier (Two and a Half Men)
Cobie Smulders (How I Met Your Mother)

The first season begins with a two-part story “Under the Night” and “An Affirming Flame” about the formation of Dylan and his new crew. Gerentex, a nightsider, hires the crew of the Eureka Maru: Beka, Harper, Trance, and Rev. Gerentex wants them to do a salvage operation and find the fabled Andromeda Ascendant. The ship is worth a lot of money. After a long effort by the crew, they find the Andromeda and tow it from the black hole singularity.When Beka, Harper, Trace, and Rev board the ship, they find Dylan on board. Gerentex sends a secret assault team, led by Tyr, to kill Dylan. Suddenly, the mission changes and Beka’s crew have a change of heart. They want to leave the ship to Dylan, because it is his ship after all. Gerentex does not react happy to the news and he only leaves the ship when it is sucked back into the singularity. Of course, he leaves Beka’s crew and the assault team to perish. Dylan inspires the crew to work together to get out of the situation. He saves them, and later reveals to them his desire to rebuild the Commonwealth. Reluctantly, everyone joins him. Not because they believe in his cause, but because it is better than smuggling.The two-part story is a pretty exciting introduction to the series. Some of the characters’ performances are a bit over-the-top and their ability to instantaneously adapt to using the Andromeda’s advanced computer systems and having security codes to launch the massive nova bombs (think nukes in space) is little on the unreasonable side. But, if you do not take the show too seriously, the introductory two-part story is quite fun. Another part I enjoyed about it was the mysterious hints about Trance. She was shot and killed, but miraculously recovered without any medical attention. While she seems like an innocent character with a small part, the writers have some big plans for her as the series progresses.

The  grander plot happening with the Andromeda crew tends to be a lot better than the standalone episodes. There are episodes that tie in a super duper bad guy called the Abyss. In “Harper 2.0”, the Abyss sends an assassin into the known world to erase its existence. In the season finale “It’s Hour Come ‘Round at Last”, the crew run into a huge ship filled with millions of Magogs. It becomes a very interesting story.

There are also some interesting stories with detailed background into the characters like “Angel Dark, Demon Bright”, where the Andromeda accidentally travels back in time to a major turning point in the battle against the Commonwealth and Nietzscheans. Dylan is in a position to change the future forever, but decides against toying with fate. Then there is “The Banks of the Lethe”, which puts Dylan back his fiance Sara (Sam Jenkins). Episodes like theses offer insight to the characters, their backgrounds and personalities, and the relationships they have with each other. These developments become a fairly intriguing part of season one . For instance, Tyr is a Nietzschean and cares more about his wellbeing than those he serves with. In several instances, his loyalty and duty to the crew is questionable. Like in the episode “Double Helix”.

Overall, the first season of Andromeda offers viewers a decent science-fiction series filled with action, some corny dialogue, over-the-top performances, decent stories, and a cast of likeable characters.

In season two, Dylan’s quest becomes more of a reality. The Renewed Systems Commonwealth represents more than just the unity and peace Dylan envisions; it is, as Dylan hunt says, a necessity. In the season one finale “It’s Hour Come ‘Round at Last”, Harper took a look around inside Andromeda’s code and found a backup copy of Andromeda’s core. He accidentally restored the backup. Andromeda went out of control and took the crew on a top secret mission. To make matters worse, the mission takes the crew deep into Magog territory, where the Andromeda runs into a Magog Worldship. The Worldship is a transportable solar system, with multiple planets and an artificial sun. The Worldship houses trillions of Magog and gives them the power to destroy stars. The Magog are traveling towards the known worlds with plans of conquest and destruction. In the close of the episode, the Magog have overrun the Andromeda and the crew’s fate is desperate: Trance, Beka, and Dylan are unconscious and near death, Tyr and Harper are being held by the Magog, Rommie had a pike shoved in her stomach, Rev Bem is being converted to the Magog cause, and the Andromeda Ascendant is in critical condition.

The second season premiere episode “The Widening Gyre” continues where season one left off. Despite the direness of the situation, they overcome their individual situations and manage to free themselves of capture. The real excitement introduced in this story is the notion of the Magog and the Worldship. The Spirit of the Abyss, a being that acts as the Magog’s God, is leading the Magog on a quest of utter destruction. This threat becomes a staple for the Andromeda crew to fight off. A Renewed Systems Commonwealth is a necessity. Fortunately for the crew, they have some time until the Worldship reaches space of the known world–two or three years. In the fourth and fifth seasons, the Spirit of the Abyss and the Magog are a major port of the season story arcs. The Magog still are at the front of the stories and a key reason for the new Commonwealth. And Dylan works feverishly to recruit planets to his cause. In the episode “Home Fires”, Dylan receives a message from his long dead fiance. After the initial fall of the Commonwealth, a group sought refuge on a planet called Tarazed and for three hundred years, they have survived as the last remnants of the old way of life. Dylan learns that the people of Tarazed and goes to the planet to get them to join the new Commonwealth. They, however, do not. When he arrives at the planet, he finds a familiar face, that of his former first officer Gaheris. But it is a genetic clone named Telemachus Rhade. Dylan and Rhade are hesitant to trust each other. The story takes an interesting turn in the development of the relationship Dylan had with Gaheris, as well as introduces Rhade, who joins the cast in season four.

The episodes “Into the Labyrinth”, “Bunker Hill”, and “The Prince” are more episodes focused on the restoration of the Commonwealth with the cast in diplomatic missions, facing with spies, political corruption, and other such things. “Into the Labyrinth” sees a Nietzschean clan Saber-Jaguar joining the Commonwealth. In “Bunker Hill” the Saber-Jaguar clan invokes the Mutual Defense Pact, which requires the Andromeda join their side in combat against the Dragan clan. At the same time, Dylan sends Harper and Rommie to Earth to join the resistance movement to free human slaves under Dragan control. In “The Prince”, the crew travel to Ne’Holland to save what is left the royal family from being slaughtered. Dylan wants the planet to join the Commonwealth because it is in a key position to defend against the upcoming Magog onslaught. However, in order to get them to join, he has to save its leaders from its own people. But what Dylan did not know was that the royal family’s actions have not always been just.“Ouroboros” is a major episode in the series. It is the first major cast and crew changes. Rev Bem leaves the series as a regular cast member. He apparently went away to find himself. Stait, who plays Rev Bem, talks about the reason he left in his interview featurette. Another change deals with Trance. Harper builds a machine he hopes will help rid him of the Magog larvae that was implanted in him in the season premiere. The machine works, but it also does a little more and bends space and time. The crew is able to glimpse into future versions of themselves. Trance, in particular, meets her future self, who proclaims the future unfolded very badly. The present and future Trance’s switch places in hope future Trance can set the timeline in the right direction. The new Trance is physically different, without a tail and has golden skin. The other major change is in the crew. Robert Hewitt Wolfe was released because the direction he envisioned for the series was much different than wanted. In “Knight, Death, and the Devil”, the crew are on the verge of completing the first stage in restoring the Commonwealth. Beka and Harper negotiate with the fiftieth planetary world to join the cause. Dylan, Tyr, and Rommie also find a decommissioned high guard ship. When they interact with the ship’s AI Ryan (Michael Hurst), they find out there is a solar system with over fifty other relic ships in hiding. Dylan goes to the solar to convince the ships to rejoin the Commonwealth (remember some AI’s have emotions and they were abandoned long ago). Christopher Judge guest stars as one of the AI’s.

 

The season finale “Tunnel at the End of the Light” is a literally explosive episode. Representatives from fifty worlds come to the Andromeda to sign the Commonwealth charter. It is an exciting time to see the Commonwealth officially come back into power. Unfortunately, there are forces that would rather not see the chartered signed. Sabotage hits the Andromeda and the charter signing goes up in flames. It is up to the crew to make necessary sacrifices to see it through.

Overall, I was pretty happy with the second season of Andromeda. Like the first season.  In addition, the story arcs that span the episodes offer intriguing aspects with the formation of the Commonwealth, the Magog, and the Spirit of the Abyss. In the end, I think season two makes for a good watch if you enjoy science-fiction/fantasy oriented shows.

In the close of season two, the signing of the Commonwealth charter was under attack by mysterious alien forces. The disruption caused chaos and the crew had to make sacrifices to deal with the matter. In the third season premiere episode “If the Wheel is Fixed”, the story is concluded. Tyr and Beka were left trapped in another dimension. Dylan frets and considers a way to get them back. He takes the Eureka Maru to reconstruct the events that led to the crew members being sucked into the alternate dimension. He is successful and Tyr and Beka return. Unfortunately, the two are not who they seem to be. Many problems happen on the Andromeda and it eventually turns into a mysterious plot to kill them all–Tyr and Beka are being controlled by a force in the other dimension.

The unfortunate thing about this episode is the direction the story takes. In the end of season two, the story had a lot of promise with aliens from another dimension attacking. However, in the concluding half of the episode, the story gets pretty hokey. I suppose the aliens from another dimension were not the strongest approach itself, but I liked it in the first part. The subsequent episodes also fail to be as strong as they could. This is not to say they are terrible or anything, but rather that they could have been better. The story arcs that ran through the first two seasons start become less significant. The content is more episodic with the Andromeda crew out on missions that are wrapped up in an episode.

“The Unconquerable Man” is a pretty solid episode, but one you do not want to think too much about. The storyline is based on time travel and alternate realities. The episode begins with Harper moving Gaheris Rhade’s body and Dylan notices a mark on his hand he had never seen. Then the episode jumps into a point in time when a future Rhade had the opportunity to destroy the time machine Harper built in the season two episode “Ouroboros”. Trance is with Rhade and tries to convince him not to do so. Rhade reflects on his life (an alternate reality of the events thus far). In this reality, Rhade killed Dylan and survived for three hundred years in the black hole. He teamed up with Beka, Rev Bem, Trance, Harper, and Tyr to rebuild the Commonwealth. As the episode unfolds, Rhade comes to realize it is Dylan’s fate and not his. He sacrifices himself so that the original timeline is restored and Dylan is once again put in charge of the Andromeda.

“The Dark Backward” is an exciting episode because it explores Trance’s reality. There is a deadly intruder aboard the ship trying to kill the crew. The episode focuses on Trance and one her of mysterious talents. In past episodes, she has offered advice that could only be explained by foresight of some kind. She has the ability to play out situations in many different scenarios in mere seconds. Trance explores different ways to maximize the crew’s life and stopping the intruder. It is an interesting episode because it details more about how mysterious and special Trance is as a character.

Another strong episode this season is “What Happens to a Rev Deferred?”, where Rev Bem returns. While monitoring the evacuation of Empyrium, a world that is on the brink of destruction, the crew receives a communication from Rev Bem asking to be rescued. To complicate matters, a group of renegades are after Rev. Dylan and crew go to the planet’s surface to rescue Rev and witness a miracle. Rev under goes some spiritual phenomena when an unknown entity confronts Rev and he professes his sorrow for all his ill-natured acts as a savage Magog. He is given redemption and physical changed into a new being. Rev Bem has been an interesting character, with his struggles to be “civilized” over “savage”, and his ties into the Spirit of the Abyss make him an even more interesting character. It is too bad he is not investigated further. In the season finale “Shadows Cast by a Final Salute”, things take a turn for the worst for the Andromeda crew and the Commonwealth. The assistant minister of war informs Dylan that there is something afoot with the Nietzschean clans in the Commonwealth. There have been rumors going around that they are considering leaving the allied forces and forming their own united front. They are rumors no longer, but fact. Afterwards, Andromeda is put on high alert when an elite strike force of Dragans takes hostages and demands their lives for the bones of Drago Musevini. As the situation unfolds, it becomes evident Tyr’s hand had play in the situation. With his son, the genetic clone of Drago Musevini, he plans to unite his people and save the universe. At the end, Dylan and Tyr bid a final farewell to each other with no promise their next meeting will be peaceful. But the situation was more than just Dylan and Tyr, as a plot to stand against the Commonwealth became an important issue. The Nietzscheans and several other forces joined in a battle against the Commonwealth fleet, which ended with the fall of the Restored Systems Commonwealth.

Overall, I was not nearly as impressed with this season as I was with seasons one or two. The episodes were more episodic with Dylan and his crew going on this or that adventure. The overall story arc with the Commonwealth, the Spirit of the Abyss, the Magog, Trance’s past, and others were not addressed as they were in the past seasons. The focus was a lot different. While this is not an awful move, it just was not as good. The fortunate news is that the pace picks up again with the season three finale and it puts the entire universe of Andromeda in upheaval.

Life is not looking pretty for the Andromeda. In the season three finale, the Andromeda and the Commonwealth fleet were manipulated into a situation that resulted in the apparent downfall of the newly formed federation of planets. Dylan was betrayed by his friend Tyr for a cause that Tyr believes to be more righteous and important than anything else. In the season four premiere episode “Answers Given To Questions”, the story is revisited. With the destruction of the fleet, the Andromeda crew decides what to do next. While trying to figure out their situation, they take on an injured pilot who brings Dylan a communication. The message is from a man named Paroo. He tells Dylan that the Commonwealth is no more and that he is holding one of its leaders and will kill her in due time. Dylan responds by chasing after Paroo, who he finds out is the head of Commonwealth security and the real cause behind the massive battle. But Paroo has manipulated the situation so that everyone thinks Dylan is the bad guy. Dylan kills Paroo and shows he was an agent of the Abyss. He then becomes a hero. More good news follows as enough leaders survived that the Commonwealth continues on.

In the remainder of the season, the series story arc dealing with the Magog threat is revisited in full. The majority of the episodes deal with the Andromeda crew caught up in one situation or another that ties into the Magog, the Abyss, and the Nietzscheans. A new addition to the Abyss story arc in this season begins to define Dylan’s role in the overall scheme of things. Yes, he is the captain of the Andromeda and leading the cause, but there is more to it than just that. The truth about who and what Dylan is revealed and his role in stopping the Abyss is more important than any of the lives of his crew.

“Waking the Tyrant’s Device” is an episode that takes a look at the creator of the Magog Worldship. Nicholas Lea (The X-Files) guest stars as Tri-Lorn, who gives the Andromeda orders to visit a planet. When they arrive, they are attacked. Dylan questions Tri-Lorn why they were sent to such a dangerous place without being told. Tri-Lorn reveals the importance of the mission. They are to stop Kroton, a half man, half robot. Kroton is building a massive army of androids and it is up to Dylan and crew to stop him. The episode itself is not the strongest, but it is still interesting to focus on the creator of the Worldship.

“Soon the Nearing Vortex” and “The World Turns All Around Her” is the two part episode where Telemachus Rhade joins the Andromeda crew on a permanent basis. In the first part, the Andromeda comes to the aid of a Commonwealth transport ship that is under attack from Nietzchean. On the transport is Rhade, who is holding Tyr as a prisoner. The Andromeda fends off the attacking ships and save Rhade’s life, but not before Tyr escapes. When Dylan reports back to the Commonwealth headquarters, Tri-lorn demands Rhade be returned to Tarazed so he can be dealt with. Dylan decides not to take him back because he fears Tri-lorn is corrupt. The story continues with the crew facing corrupt politicians, a scheming Tyr, and the Route of Ages, a mystical slipstream that goes to the original Vedran home world.

In the second part of the story, Dylan is ready to take on the Route of Ages. Tyr appears in a ship, with Beka in custody, demanding that Dylan give up the map for Beka’s life. Dylan comprises and allows Tyr to follow him on the journey. The Route of Ages is important because it is the key to stopping the Abyss. As the story unfolds, more intricate aspects of the plotline are uncovered, which include Trance revealing who and what she really is to Dylan, an avatar of the Vedran sun. The Abyss also makes a frightful appearance that puts the crew in a race for survival. This episode marks Tyr’s final appearance.

Other strong episodes in the season include “The Torment, the Release”, where the corrupt Tri-lorn demands Dylan hand over Rhade for prosecution, “The Warmth of an Invisible Light”, where Harper’s latest invention sends Dylan into an alternate reality, “Fear Burns Down to Ashes”, Rev Bem returns with a weapon to stop the Magog, “Lost in a Space that Isn’t There”, where Beka becomes an agent of the Abyss, and other episodes. For the most part, they all tie into the larger plot and tend to add to the excitement. The two-part season finale “The Dissonant Interval” is also an episode worthy of noting. The Andromeda goes to a space station called the Arkology when they learn the Magog Worldship is headed right for them. When the crew arrives at the station, they inform its leaders about the upcoming threat. The unfortunate part is that they are unwilling to listen. The people in the Arkology are of a peaceful nature and they believe they will be able to make peace with the Magog. But the Magog are not a peaceful people and they intend to kill everyone. The two-part story puts the crew in a battle with death-defying odds. And despite the odds, they put 110% into stopping the Magog. Unfortunately, as the episode ends, the situation is hopeless with death not far off from the horizon. Dylan is forced to abandon everyone and escape through the Route of Ages.

 

Overall, I enjoyed season four. The plotlines in the episodes tended to tie the material into a larger plot and it made for a much more intriguing watch. There were also several reoccurring characters like the devilish Nicholas Lea, the guy you love to hate, playing a questionable Commonwealth politician. The storylines touched upon the Abyss and the Magog, the Collectors, turncoat Tyr, and other exciting bad guys. Like seasons one and two, season four produces some exciting stories that are engaging and easy to get lost in.

In season five, the series takes a much different turn in events. At the end of the season four, there was some skepticism as to whether or not the show would continue into a fifth season. Well, the series was picked up for a fifth season, but with a smaller budget.The storylines lose the grandeur it once had with the epic space battles and massive story arcs. The series, stories, and character becomes more confined and lose a lot of the appeal found in previous seasons. In a nutshell, watching season five was more of a chore than fun. While there was some decent content, it does not compare to the quality of the past seasons.

In the close of season four, the Andromeda came to the space station Arkology to warn the inhabitants about their impending doom. The Magog Worldship was headed right for them and they need to get out of there. The inhabitants were a peaceful people and believed that they could make peace with the Magog. Dylan and the rest tried to tell them peace is not an option. Of course, they did not listen. When the Magog came, the Andromeda and its crew tried its best to stop the onslaught, but they failed miserably. In the close of the two-part season four finale, Dylan took the Route of Ages in a slipstream fighter and found himself transported into an alternative universe.

The two-part episode “The Weight” kicks off season five. In it, Dylan gets accustomed to his new life in the alternate universe on a planet called Seefra-1, which is one of nine barren wastelands. When Dylan tries to learn more about where he is, he finds little help. But when he meets a mysterious man named Flavin, he begins to get more clues about his situation. He is trapped in an isolated cluster of planets in another universe. Dylan explores Seefra-1 and later runs into a very disgruntled Rhade. Rhade and the others crew members (who Dylan runs into in later episodes) are unhappy with him for leaving them to die. It was through the efforts of Trance that the Andromeda (badly damaged) and her crew were brought into this alternate reality and not left to die at the hands of the Magog. They also blame him for being stuck on Seefra-1. Dylan returns to Flavin to get more information from him. Dylan learns his place is on Seefra-1; he must help the people in the coming days. Flavin also reveals the true nature of the Route of Ages.

After the not-so-exciting season premiere, “Phear Phactor Phenom” has the majority of the season four cast back together in some form or another, Dylan, Harper, Beka, Trance, and Rhade. We learn that Rommie was destroyed and Harper had been on Seefra-1 for over three years while the rest of the crew had only just recently arrived. During Harper’s time on the Seefra-1, he was able to rebuild a new android with portions of Rommie’s damaged core. The new character is Doyle, a blonde robot who was initially made to think she is human. The season five episodes proceed with the cast getting reacquainted with each other and Dylan trying to get the Andromeda up and running again. Some have changed with their new situation, most notably Trance who lost portions of her memory.

In the episode “Moonlight Becomes You”, Trance starts to remember who she is and the season starts to focus on the storyline hinted at in “The Weight”. The Seefra system is in jeopardy and the crew must work together to save the inhabitants of the nine wastelands over the next several episodes. But the story really ties into the power that is Trance. Trance is an avatar of the Vedran sun and the actual sun is approaching Seefra-1. When it arrives, the planets in the system (except for Seefra-1) will explode. The episodes “Past is Prolix”, “The Opposites of Attraction”, “Saving Light from a Black Sun”, “Quantum Tractate Delirium”, “One More Day’s Light”, and “Chaos and the Stillness of It” continue to focus on this storyline (uncovering more about Trance, the council of avatars she is a senior member of, and the crew trying to save the inhabitants), which is much more entertaining than the first portion of the season, but it still lacks the same punch the early seasons had.

In the two-part series finale “The Heart of the Journey”, the series come to a close by wrapping up the series story arc with the Abyss. While on Seefra-1, Harper receives a message transmission for Dylan. It is from Flavin, who had been killed by the Abyss, telling Dylan he is the last hope for the survival of the known worlds. The Council intends to destroy the galaxies of the known world in order to snuff out the Abyss. They, however, give Dylan and his crew the opportunity to return before their utter demise. Once back in their universe, they find only four days have passed since the Magog Worldship attacked. The Andromeda has to face the Nietzchseans and the Abyss. The situation that appeared dire ends with a happy ending and the destruction of the Abyss in a battle that is far from epic.

Overall, I really did not care for this season. The level of grandeur in the storylines was significantly diminished. The big flashy effects were part of what made the sci-fi series so much fun were gone. The show tended to have very isolated stories with limited character development. In the end, I did not see much in this season that made it worthwhile. Sure, there are some decent episodes, but they fail to compare to the past seasons. Despite my lack of enthusiasm, I give it a rent it recommendation on the pure basis that it concludes the series and there are a few decent episodes to follow.