REVIEW: THE HEAT

CAST

Sandra Bullock (Speed)
Melissa McCarthy (Spy)
Damian Bichir (Che)
Marlon Wayans (Scary Movie)
Michael Rapaport (The 6th Day)
Jane Curtin (3rd Rock From The Sun)
Taran Killam (How I Met Your Mother)
Michael McDonald (The Boss)
John Ross Bowie (The Big Bang Theory)
Tony Hale (Chuck)
Nate Corddry (Mom)
Jessica Chaffin (New Girl)
Ben Falcone (Tammy)
Paul Feig (Sabrina: TTW)

FBI agent Sarah Ashburn (Sandra Bullock) is an expert and effective investigator in New York City, but is despised by her allied agents for her egotistical & vicious personality. When her manager assigns her to a mission Boston, she meets a detective named Shannon Mullins (Melissa McCarthy), a skilled but loudmouthed, bloodthirsty, sadistic, hot headed, & merciless cop who is part of the Boston Police Department. Ashburn’s ruthless philosophy clashes with Mullins’nefarious style of law work, proved during their attempt to interrogate local drug dealer Rojas (Spoken Reasons) who was captured by Mullins. Under pressure from Hale (Demián Bichir), her employer, Ashburn reluctantly agrees to work with Mullins as her ally.
Ashburn and Mullins tail a local nightclub manager named Hank LeSoire (Adam Ray) to his place of business known as Club Ekko and successfully place a bug on his cell phone in an effort to get information on a drug lord, Simon Larkin. As they leave the club, Ashburn and Mullins are confronted by DEA agents Craig (Dan Bakkedahl) and Adam (Taran Killam), who have been working the Larkin case for several months and are worried that their case will be compromised. Ashburn and Mullins discover a surveillance video in the DEA agents’ van showing Mullins’ brother, Jason (Michael Rapaport), apparently connected to Larkin’s organization. Jason was recently released from prison, having been put there by Mullins to keep him off the streets and out of trouble.
Ashburn convinces Mullins to go to her parents’ home to ask Jason for information on Larkin. On their arrival at the home, it becomes apparent that Mullins’ parents (Michael B. Tucci and Jane Curtin) (particularly her mother) and three other brothers, Peter (Joey McIntyre), Mark (Bill Burr) and Michael (Nathan Corddry) (two of whom have girlfriends, Gina (Jessica Chaffin) and Beth (Jamie Denbo) still resent Mullins for her involvement in Jason’s incarceration. However, Jason does not have any ill feelings toward his sister, and tips her off about the body of a murdered drug dealer by the name of Sal Netalie in an abandoned car. Chemicals on the victim’s shoes lead Ashburn and Mullins to an abandoned paint factory, where they witness a drug dealer being murdered by Julian Vincent (Michael McDonald), vicious criminal and second-in-command of Larkin’s organization. They apprehend Julian but are unable to extract any substantial information regarding Larkin’s whereabouts, even with Mullins going so far as to play Russian Roulette with Julian’s testicles.
The pair spend the evening bonding in a bar, where a drunk Ashburn reveals that her foster child past may be partly to blame for her attitude. After a night of raucous drinking and partying, Ashburn wakes up the following morning to discover that, in her drunkenness, she has given her car keys to Wayne (Steve Bannos), one of the bar patrons. After unsuccessfully pleading for the keys, Ashburn and Mullins watch as the patron starts the car and is killed by a bomb. They discover that Julian has escaped from custody and means to harm Mullins’ family, so Mullins moves her family into a motel. Jason leaves, intending to join the Larkin organization in an attempt to help Mullins solve the case. Jason gives her a tip about a drug shipment coming into Boston Harbor. Despite Mullins’ reluctance, Ashburn gets the FBI to take down the shipment. The FBI finds that the ship is actually an innocent pleasure cruise ship. Jason was being tested by Larkin, who shoots Jason for informing the FBI about the supposed drug shipment. Jason escapes death but falls into a coma. A falling out occurs between Mullins and Ashburn, with Mullins vowing to bring her brother’s attacker to justice. They then reconcile when they arrest several drug dealers as a way of gaining leads to Larkin’s whereabouts, including Rojas.
Ashburn and Mullins go to equip themselves with assault weapons from Mullins’ extensive personal arsenal, and infiltrate one of Larkin’s warehouses. Despite taking out several of Larkin’s men with a hand grenade, the two officers are captured and bound. Julian is about to torture them with knives when he gets called away by Larkin. Before Julian leaves, he stabs Ashburn in the leg and leaves the knife in the wound. Mullins removes the knife from Ashburn’s leg and uses it to cut the rope binding her hands. Before she can finish freeing herself and Ashburn, they are discovered by Craig and Adam. Craig begins to untie the two women, but is shot and killed by Adam. Ashburn and Mullins learn that Adam is actually Larkin, who has been working his own case from inside the DEA for several months. Julian returns and Larkin orders him to kill Ashburn and Mullins while he goes to the hospital to kill Jason. After Larkin leaves, Mullins manages to finish freeing herself and Ashburn incapacitates Julian with a head butt, after Mullins had stabbed him in the leg. Mullins and Ashburn race to the hospital to save Jason.
Upon their arrival, Mullins rushes to find Jason. Ashburn, hindered by the stab wound in her leg, lags behind, unable to move quickly. Mullins learns that, due to the foul language she and her family exhibit, the doctor moved Jason to another room in the hospital; she finds Jason’s room, only to be disarmed by Larkin. He is about to kill Jason when Ashburn, having had to crawl to the room, subdues Larkin by shooting him in the genitals (much to Mullins’ surprise, as she would never actually do so; scaring Julian earlier was only a way of making him talk). With Larkin captured, Ashburn requests to stay in the FBI’s Boston field office, having developed a strong friendship with Mullins. Jason is shown having fully recovered from his coma. The film ends with Mullins receiving a commendation from the Boston Police Department. Members of her family are present and they cheer Mullins, now having reconciled with her. Ashburn later gets a call from Mullins to look in her year book. Mullins had signed the back of Ashburn’s yearbook with the words, “Foster kid, now you have a sister”, showing the strong friendship that Mullins felt for a previously unpopular Ashburn.
As a surprise, Mullins brings to Ashburn the cat that she had found in Ashburn’s neighbor’s house, believing it was hers. Earlier, when Mullins saw a photo of Ashburn with the neighbor’s cat, Ashburn had lied and said it was her cat which had gone missing in New York. Mullins quickly deduces that the cat is not Ashburn’s; Ashburn confesses and the cat is boxed to be shipped back, ending the film.This is some of Melissa McCarthy’s best work. She is a funny lady, she simply does not have to do what she does in most things to get the laughs. Bullock is an understated yet pleasant surprise and the chemistry between the two clicks immediately and effectively.

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REVIEW: KNOCKED UP

 

CAST

Seth Rogen (Bad neighbours)
Katherine Heigl (27 Dresses)
Paul Rudd (Ant-Man)
Leslie Mann (17 Again)
Jason Segel (How I Met Your Mother)
Jay Baruchel (This Is The End)
Jonah Hill (Cyrus)
Martin Starr (Veronica Mars)
Charlyne Yi (Cloverfield)
Harold Ramis (Year One)
Alan Tudyk (Firefly)
Kristen Wiig (Zoolander 2)
Bill Hader (Superbad)
Ken Leong (The Hangover)
Craig Robinson (Zack and Miri Make a Porno)
Adam Scott (Krampus)
K.P. Manoux (Birds of Prey)
Paul Feig (Spy)
Jessica Alba (Machete)
Steve Carell (Evan Almighty)
Andy Dick (Dude, Where’s My Car?)
James Franco (Spider-Man)
Eva Mendes (2 Fast 2 Furious)
Dax Shepard (Hit and Run)

The 40 Year Old Virgin took more than two hours to get its main character laid. In Knocked Up…? Fifteen minutes flat. It’s not that Ben Stone (Seth Rogen) was on the prowl or anything; fate just kinda got hammered and passed out in his lap. See, Alison Scott (Katherine Heigl) landed a gig as on-air talent at E!, and after celebrating a bit too hard, she wakes up the next morning to Ben’s hairy, pasty, bare ass poking out of her bedsheets. Ali groans to her sister (Leslie Mann) about making such a shameful mistake, while Ben darts home to brag to his stoner roommates as they slowly get their topless celebrity database off the ground.

Writer/director Judd Apatow doesn’t use Knocked Up as an excuse to toss in whatever dick jokes he’d been stockpiling for the past couple of years. He genuinely likes and respects these characters, and so much of what happens is drawn from his own experiences as a father-to-be that as hysterical as the movie often is, it also feels surprisingly real and sincere. Knocked Up treats pregnancy with quite a bit of gravity, and the way its characters fight — particularly between on-screen husband and wife Paul Rudd and Leslie Mann — can be unflinchingly cruel. Most filmmakers would water down the less glamorous side of love, romance, and parenthood or use them as a springboard for cheap, easy laughs, but Apatow is sharp enough to deftly balance the comedy with the drama.

The movie is perfectly cast. Katherine Heigl is a buxotic Amazon cut from the Russ Meyer cloth, sure, but she’s also sweet, somehow sympathetic no matter how much her character’s hormones may be raging, and sharp enough to hold her own with the rest of the cast. Seth Rogen joins a small army of Apatow regulars — name just about any project the prolific producer has shepherded over the past decade and chances are at least six people from it are in here somewhere — and it’s a breakout role for him. Ben is slovenly but kind of endearing at the same time, enough so that I could almost buy someone with Heigl’s good looks succumbing to his charms. His jaunt into adulthood feels natural and believable too, not just something in a montage penned by a screenwriter collecting a seven figure payday. There’s something about the fact that Ben’s roommates are played by actors who are all friends in real life that gives their loose, improvisational energy that much more spark.

Knocked Up didn’t strike me as the sort of instant classic so many people heralded it as, but I did enjoy it, and I’m kind of left with the impression that the movie will grow on me more and more its viewed.

REVIEW: SABRINA: THE TEENAGE WITCH – SEASON 1-7

MAIN CAST

Melissa Joan Hart (Melissa & Joey)
Nick Bakay (That 70s Show)
Caroline Rhea (2 Broke Girls)
Beth Broderick (Lost)
Nate Richert (Gamebox 1.0)
Jenna Leigh Green (Hard Sell)
Michelle Beaudoin (Ginger Snaps 2)
Paul Feig (Spy)
Penn Jillette (Hackers)
Martin Mull (Two and a Half Men)
Lindsay Sloane (Bring It On)
Alimi Ballard (Dark Angel)
David Lascher (Blossom)
Jon Huertas (Slash House)
China Shavers (Not Another Teen Movie)
Soleil Moon Frye (Punky Brewster)
Elisa Donovan (Clueless)
Trevor Lissauer (Roswell)
Diana-Maria Riva (17 Again)
Andrew Walker (Laserhawk)
John Ducey (How I Met Your Mother)
Bumper Robinson (Enemy Mine)

RECURRING /NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Tom McGowan (Bad Santa)
Eddie Cibrian (The Cave)
Milo Ventimiglia (Heroes)
Emily Hart (Nine Dead)
Robin Riker (Big Love)
Brian Austin Green (Terminator: TSCC)
Nicole Bilderbck (Dark Angel)
Raquel Welch (Legally Blonde)
Andrew Keegan (O)
Donald Faison (Scrubs)
Curtis Andersen (That 70s Show)
Coolio (Dardevil)
Dana Gould (Gex)
Billy West (Futurama)
Kathy Ireland (Loaded Weapon 1)
Ed Begley Jr. (Veronica Mars)
Henry Gibson (Wedding Crashers)
Chris Elliott (How I Met Your Mother)
Dann Florek (Law & Order: SVU)
Beverly Johnson (Lois & Clark)
Mika Boorem (Blue Crush)
Phil Fondacaro (Willow)
Bryan Cranston (Godzilla)
Mary Gross (Jailbait)
Cee Cee Michaela (Gia)
Andrea Savage (Veep)
Patrick Thomas O’Brien (Catch Me If You Can)
Sarah Lancaster (Chuck)
Walter Jones (Mighty Morphin Power Rangers)
Loni Anderson (A Night at Roxbury)
Caroline Williams (TExas Chainsaw Massacre 2)
Bobcat Goldthwait (Blow)
Beth Grant (Wonderfalls)
John Ratzenberger (Cheers)
Cristine Rose (Heroes)
Shelley Long (The Money Pit)
Sherman Howard (Superboy)
Steve Allen (The Player)
Kel Mitchell (Mysten Men)
Kenan Thompson (Snakes on a Plane)
Fred Willard (Anchorman)
Carol Ann Susi (The Big Bang Theory)
Dom Deluise (Spaceballs)
Shannon welles (Inception)
Gary Owens (That 70s Show)
Jacon Witkin (Showgirls)
Edward Albert (Power Rangers Time Force)
Fred Stoller (Little Man )
Jason Schwartzman (I Heart Huckabees)
Daveigh Chase (S. Darko)
Sheryl Lee Ralph (Moesha)
Jerry Springer (Austin Powers 2)
Justin Timberlake (Friends with Beefits)
Hallie Todd (The Lizzie McGuire)
Glenn Shadix (Beeteljuice0
Alex Rocco (The Simpsons)
Britney Spears (Crossroads)
Jordan Belfi (Surrogates)
Shirley Jones (The Music Man)
Audrey Wasilewski (Pushing Daisies)
Paula Abdul (Bruno)
Ginger Williams (Cruel Intentions)
Tim Thomerson (Trancers)
Bebe Newuwirth (Jumanji)
George Wyner (American Pie 2)
Eric Jungman (Not Another Teen Movie)
Matt Battaglia (Mike & Molly)
Dick van Dyke (Mary Poppins)
Richard Riehle (Office Space)
Barry Livingston (Argo)
J.G. Hertzler (Star Trek: DS9)
Brian Gross (Red Tails)
Charles Shaughnessy (Stargate SG.1)
Kal Penn (Van Wilder)
Keri Lynn Pratt (Cruel Intentions 2)
Gedde Watanabe (Mulan)
Leslie Jordan (Ugly Betty)
David Starzyk (Veronica Mars)
Molly Cheek (American Pie)
Michael Trucco (Battlestar Galactica)
Estelle Harris (Stand and Deliver)
E.J. Callahan (Wild Wild West)
Richard Steven Horvitz (Mighty Moprhin Power Rangers)
Patricia Belcher (Bones)
Larry Poindexter (Blade: The Series)
Alan Blumenfeld (Heroes)
Nicole Scherzinger (Men In Black 3)
Sisqo (Get Over it)
Winston Story (Masked Rider)
Adrienne Barbeau (Swamp Thing)
D. Elliot Woods (Star Trek: Insurrection)
Carnie Wilson (Bridesmaids)
Usher (She’s All That)
Simon Helberg (The Big Bang Theory)
Conchata Ferrell (Krampus)
Brandy Norwood (I Still Know What You did Laster Summer)
Masi Oka (Heroes)
Chyna (3rd Rock From The Sun)
Lori Alan (Family Guy)
Sean Cw Johnson (Power Rangers Lightspeed Rescue)
Nakia Burrise (Power Rangers Zeo)
Ashanti (John Tucker Must Die)
J.P. Manoux (Birds of Prey)
Clare Kramer (Buffy)
Verne Troyer (Jack of All Trades)
Frankie Muniz (Malcolm in the Middle)
Sandra McCoy (POwer Rangers Wild Force)
Sally Struthers (Nine To five)
Dylan Neal (Arrow)
Christina Vidal (Freaky Friday)
Joel David Moore (Bones)
Robert Picardo (Stargate: Atlantis)
Faith Prince (Dave)

All seven seasons of the show are available on DVD (that’s 163 episodes!)It is best to watch the show from start to finish as you can follow Sabrina’s life and understand the story lines. She changes boyfriends a few times so you need to remember which one she’s dating.

Characters come and go in the seasons. It was a shame Libby & Valerie left the show in season 4 because they were excellent characters. I think Sabrina’s aunts and Salem were the best characters. They always had good story lines and Salem got up to some crazy schemes (often roping whoever he could in to get some magical help). I loved Nick Bakay as the voice of Salem as he is very comical yet evil. The Salem animatronic improves over the course of the show and is put to good use in the later seasons. Another character I enjoyed was Morgan. I loved Elisa Donovan in Clueless  and she was so good as Sabrina’s clueless and fashionable roommate.

The best season would have to be season 3. It has the best storyline of Sabrina trying to work out the family secret and a lot of the shows characters were given major roles in these episodes. Season 3 also features the best episodes such as when the aunts need to rehab a bunch of pirates they’ve left locked up for years and Sabrina can’t control her addiction to pancakes.

I loved in season 4 when Hilda purchased the clock shop containing a magic time travelling clock. There is a hilarious scene when Hilda is trying to compete with the watch selling monkey outside her shop and she makes Salem do tricks whilst dressed up. Salem looked so cute in that little bell-hopper-style outfit! Caroline Rhea is so funny and I couldn’t image Aunt Hilda being played by anyone else. She had some of the best storylines and it was funny to watch what trouble she’d get herself into each episode.

The later seasons of the show get a bit bland and the story lines usually don’t revolve around magic. After leaving high school, Sabrina attends college where she lives with a bunch of mortals (Roxie, Morgan and Miles). In season 7, the aunts have left and Sabrina lives in the aunts house with Roxie, Morgan and Salem. Season 7 is not as bad as everyone  says, it may be the weaker season but is still good.

I was really happy when they brought Harvey back as a character. It made sense that his character left at the end of season 4, but the show didn’t feel the same without him. Nate Richert did a excellent job of playing Harvey and he was an important character in the show so he needed to come back. Harvey has some funny moments in the later seasons and it was great that he could interact with Salem cause he knew about Sabrina’s magic.

After watching this show since my childhood, Melissa Joan Hart is one of my favourite actresses. I love her expressions and she is quite funny. It’s really cute when she says Sabrina’s most common line “woo hoo!”. There was a short period where she had red hair in the show and I was so happy when she went back blonde.

Overall, I would recommend getting all seven seasons if you are a fan of the show. It is so much better when you watch it when you are older as it makes more sense and the jokes seem funnier. Plus you follow the storylines and remember which episodes are good or not. The sets are worth getting for any sitcom lover and once you start watching Sabrina’s crazy adventures, you won’t want to stop till you get to the end!

REVIEW: BRIDESMAIDS

CAST

Kristen Wiig (Zoolander 2)
Maya Rudolph (Gattaca)
Rose Byrne (Spy)
Melissa McCarthy (Tammy)
Wendi McLendon-Covey (Bewitched)
Ellie Kemper (The Office)
Chris O’Dowd (St. Vincent)
Jill Cayburgh (The Rockford Files)
Terry Crews (White Chicks)
Matt Lucas (Alice Through The Looking Glass)
Ben Falcone (The Nines)
Jessica St. Clair (the Dictator)
Jon Hamm (The A-Team)
Paul Feig (Sabrina: TTW)
Rebel Wilson (Grimsby)

Though Wiig has popped up recently in Whip It and Adventureland, to fine successes, Bridesmaids marks her first leading performance, and she’s found the right one to start with in Annie. A broke, cynical chef who’s recently closed her Milwaukee bakery, losing her boyfriend in the process, she now works in a jewelry store, sleeps with a handsome but asinine man-child (Jon Hamm) looking for a no-strings sex-buddy, and avoids her odd British brother-sister roommates. Annie’s sad-sap state makes for a near-perfect character in which Wiig can flaunt her ill-at-ease style, uncomfortable in her unerring self-created awkwardness. She’s a sad character, almost aggressively so, which might rub some the wrong way because of how resolutely she keeps herself at arm’s length from contentment. Yet there’s something relatable about her self-deprecation, especially once her childhood friend Lillian (Maya Rudolph) asks her to be the maid-of-honor at her wedding — and to do the planning and organizing that comes with the territory.

Naturally, Annie meets an eclectic group of Lillian’s friends and soon-to-be family who will fill out the rest of the wedding court: a sex-minded mom (Wendi McLendon-Covey, Reno 911) with a ton of kids and a biting attitude; a virginal mouse of a newlywed (Ellie Kempler, The Office); bullish sparkplug Meghan (Melissa McCarthy, Mike and Molly), the government-employed sister to the groom; and Helen (Rose Byrne, Get Him to the Greek), a well-to-do housewife trying to strong-arm her way into Annie’s spot as maid-of-honor. Feig realizes that these are all types, and he lets them run loose with their quirky mannerisms, but he doesn’t go too outlandish to make them feel like far-removed caricatures.


Annie’s rattled by the duties and the feeling that her friend’s slipping away, not to mention her own monetary and relationship woes, which zigzags along the significant events in Bridesmaids that hallmark most pre-wedding lead-ups. Sure, if you want to boil it down to the least-common denominator, Feig’s picture can essentially be labeled a female iteration of The Hangover, where the ritual of strippers, alcohol, and wild partying in the groom’s rite of passage are replaced with luncheons, dress-fittings, and bridal showers. But this isn’t a frilly affair, nor is it simply a fantastical lampoon on idealized planning. Compliments of Wiig and Mumolo’s sharply-written script, Lillian’s path down the aisle turns into a stylized elevated-reality daze of misfortune, often due to her best-friend trying to cling onto what she finds familiar by her own means. But it’s got something else behind its gags: when it hits over-the-top notes that play to the dreamed-up fantasies of weddings and the gleeful pre-events, it also double-backs to Annie’s shambled life, lending genuineness to the missteps she makes.


Maybe it’s because the humor’s supported by a heartfelt backbone that it’s both effective and affective, extending beyond its gags into this clever, modest portrait of a woman in a growing stage that just so happens to be hysterically funny. Annie’s shown at her most desperate — sleeping with a slimeball, losing her penniless and destitute battle with the rich-and-beautiful Helen, and slowly but unsuccessfully building a relationship with an affable cop, Rhodes (Chris O’Dowd), who’s got a thing for carrots — and her state informs the hoopla that Wiig and Mumolo have written, always with some underlying purpose that ties back to the lowly baker trying to maintain a stranglehold on her old life. Bridesmaids might be out to prove that the girls are capable of playing just as dirty as the guys.

12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS REVIEW: BAD TEACHER

CAST

Cameron Diaz (Sex Tape)
Lucy Punch (into The Woods)
Jason Segal (How I Met Your Mother)
Justin Timberlake (Freinds With Benefits)
Phyllis Smith (The 40 YEar Old Virgin)
John Michael Higgins (Yes Man)
Eric Stonehnart (Modern Family)
Thomas Lennon (17 Again)
Nat Faxon (Tammy)
Alanna Ubach (Still Waiting…)
Paul Feig (Sabrina: The Teenage Witch)
Molly Shannon (Scary Movie 4)

Positioning itself as the academic answer to Bad Santa, Jake Kasdan’s Bad Teacher threatens a schoolyard tussle but refuses to hit below the belt. Screenwriters Gene Stupnitsky and Lee Eisenberg dish up shameless misbehavior but never approach the depravity of the earlier film — probably a smart choice for the movie’s box office prospects, which are solid, but one that places a certain tier of shock-hilarity out of reach.

Cameron Diaz comes to the picture ready to offend. Her eyes have never been harder, and on the rare occasion that the script offers her a line like “I’m gonna suck your dick like I’m mad at it,” she spits it out convincingly.

But for all her desk-stashed booze and inappropriately tight skirts, the movie offers Diaz a pretty bland badness. She plays Elizabeth Halsey, a teacher desperate to land a rich husband and quit her job; having decided that a fresh pair of breasts would help with that, she embarks on a series of petty moneymaking schemes to buy implants. She cajoles parents into paying her for “private tutoring,” pawns the contents of the lost & found and embezzles from a fundraising car wash made vastly more successful when she uses her cutoff-clad body as a chamois.

Justin Timberlake is amusingly ingenuous as the wealthy but dimwitted newcomer Elizabeth hopes to seduce, though (with the exception of one bizarre dry-humping gag) the movie doesn’t exploit his capacity for self-mockery as well as Saturday Night Live sometimes has. The purposeful tortoise to Timberlake’s peppy hare, Jason Segel steals scenes as the gym teacher who keeps flirting despite Elizabeth’s many rejections. The picture’s most entertainingly unhinged element, though, is Lucy Punch, whose overachieving social studies teacher seethes with a goody-goody neurosis that threatens to erupt as she watches her colleague get ahead despite treating students like animals. Happily showing more restraint than she did as the lustful stalker in Dinner for Schmucks, Punch makes a highlight out of what could have been a tiresome role.

Concocting the inevitable redemption for a character as intentionally unsympathetic as Elizabeth is a challenge, and the script doesn’t quite rise to it. It points in the right direction during a field-trip scene, where her contempt for a student’s romantic cluelessness convincingly motivates an act of kindness.

But there are a couple of steps missing between that moment and the relative maturity with which Elizabeth eventually weighs the contest between the milquetoast millionaire and Segel’s earthy schlub. Barely an hour and a half long, the film could have spared a few minutes to sell her turnaround.