REVIEW: THE SIMPSONS – SEASON 30

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CAST

Dan Castellaneta (Super 8)
Julie Kavner (Dr. Dolittle)
Yeardley Smith (Dead Like Me)
Nancy Cartwright (Kim Possible)
Hank Azaria (The Smurfs)
Harry Shearer (This Is Spinal Tap)
Pamela Hayden (Recess)
Tress MacNeille (Futurama)
Russi Taylor (Babe)

The Simpsons (1989)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Emily Deschanel (Bones)
Gal Gadot (Wonder Woman)
Kevin Michael Richardson (The Cleveland Show)
Rhys Darby (Yes Man)
George Segal (2012)
H. Jon Benjamin (Wet Hot Ameircan Summer)
Jon Lovitz (Happiness)
Kristen Schaal (Gravity Falls)
Tracy Morgan (Cop Out)
Maggie Roswell (Pretty In Pink)
Ksenia Solo (Lost Girl)
RuPaul (But I’m a Cheerleader)
Scott Thompson (The Kids In The Hall)
Peter Serafinowicz (The Tick)
J.K. Simmons (Justice League)
Jane Lynch (Glee)
Bryan Batt (Scream: The Series)
Patti LuPone (Witness)
Guillermo del Toro (The Shape of The Water)
Wallace Shawn (Young Sheldon)
Ken Jeong (The Hangover)
Natasha Lyonne (American Pie)
Awkwafina (Ocean’s 8)
Nicole Byer (Tuca & Bertie)
Chelsea Peretti (Game Night)
John Lithgow (3rd Rock From The Sun)
Josh Groban (The Crazy Ones)
Will Forte (The Lego Movie)
Jackie Mason (The Jerk)
Liev Schreiber (The 5th Wave)
Illeana Douglas (Ghost World)
Jenny Slate (The Secrets Life of Pets)
Werner Herzog (Jack Reacher)

The Simpsons (1989)It’s hilarious comedy, funny, and one of my all time favorite T.V shows .. The series is a satirical depiction of a middle class American lifestyle epitomized by the Simpson family, which consists of Homer, Marge, Bart, Lisa, and Maggie. The show is set in the fictional town of Springfield and parodies American culture, society, television, and many aspects of the human condition. Modern Simpsons episodes are often both overstuffed and under-imagined, resulting in two indifferent, inadequately realized stories. Even though the show has dropped in creativity and in the joke department, it’s still worthy.Nancy Cartwright, Pamela Hayden, and Tress MacNeille in The Simpsons (1989)

Season 30 Highlights are…

The Simpsons (1989)

Bart’s Not Dead

Bart ends up in the hospital after taking a dare and lies about going to heaven to cover it up, but is forced to confess after Homer takes a deal with Christian producers to make a movie about the whole thing.

Julie Kavner, Nancy Cartwright, Dan Castellaneta, and Yeardley Smith in The Simpsons (1989)

Heartbreak Hotel

Marge and Homer travel to a tropical island and go on Marge’s favorite reality competition program to win a million dollars.

Yeardley Smith in The Simpsons (1989)

My Way or The Highway to Heaven

While God and St. Peter discuss who will get into heaven, the citizens of Springfield recall divine encounters.

Julie Kavner and Dan Castellaneta in The Simpsons (1989)

Baby You Can’t Drive My Car

A self-driving car company comes to Springfield, poaching all of the power plant employees with their fun work environment.

Julie Kavner and RuPaul in The Simpsons (1989)

Werking Mom

In search of a job, Marge gets one selling plastic food storage containers – as a drag queen; Lisa tries to make the world better.

The Simpsons (1989)

Mad About The Toy

Motivated by a PTSD episode Grampa had while babysitting the kids, the Simpsons take a journey to Grampa’s past as a post-WW2 toy model for plastic army men, and Abe finally faces his on confused sexuality.

The Simpsons (1989)

The Girl On The Bus

Lisa tries to live a double life when she makes a new friend and gets a taste of what it would be like to live with a more cultured family.

Hank Azaria, Julie Kavner, Dan Castellaneta, and Yeardley Smith in The Simpsons (1989)

I’m Dancing as Fat as I Can

Homer tries to make amends for binging his and Marge’s favorite show without her; Bart prepares for “Krusty’s Holiday Trample”

Wallace Shawn and Dan Castellaneta in The Simpsons (1989)

I Want You (She’s So Heavy)

When a romantic night ends in injury for Homer and Marge, Lisa turns to an unlikely source to fix their strained relationship.)

The Simpsons (1989)

E My Sports

Homer discovers a passion for coaching Bart in video game competitions; Lisa’s plan to bring Homer back to reality creates chaos.

J.K. Simmons and Yeardley Smith in The Simpsons (1989)

Girl’s in the Band

Homer works extra shifts at the plant so Lisa can play in the Capitol City Youth Philharmonic.

The Simpsons (1989)

I’m Just a Girl Who Can’t Say D’oh

Marge becomes Director of Springfield’s local theater, armed with Lisa’s script resembling “Hamilton”; Homer joins a baby class with Maggie, and takes a liking to supervisor Chloe.

Julie Kavner, Nancy Cartwright, Dan Castellaneta, Yeardley Smith, and Awkwafina in The Simpsons (1989)

D’oh Canada

Lisa is mistakenly given political asylum in Canada during a family trip to Niagara Falls.

Julie Kavner, Nancy Cartwright, Dan Castellaneta, and Yeardley Smith in The Simpsons (1989)

Crystal Blue-Haired Persuasion

Marge starts a business selling healing crystals and other New Age products to the naive mothers of Springfield when Homer’s work cuts children’s health-care benefits, leading Marge to use the crystals as a cheaper solution for Bart’s ADD.

REVIEW: BATMAN: THE ANIMATED SERIES – VOLUME 4

Starring

Kevin Conroy (Justice League Doom)
Mathew Valencia (Lawnmower Man 2)
Tara Strong (Batman: The Killing Joke)
Loren Lester (Red Eye)
Efrem Zimbalist Jr. (Hot Shots)
Bob Hastings (McHale’s Navy)
Robert Costanzo (Total Recall)

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Recurring / Notable Guest Cast

Mark Hamill (Star Wars)
Ron Perlman (Hellboy)
Arleen Sorkin (Days of Our Lives)
Diane Pershing (Gotham Girls)
Marilu Henner (Taxi)
Liane Schirmer (Dark Wolf Gang)
Tress MacNeille (Futurama)
Corey Burton (Transformers: The Movie)
Peter Jason (Mortal Kombat)
Richard Moll (Scary Movie 2)
Lloyd Bochner (Point Blank)
Jeff Bennett (Johnny Bravo)
Michael Ansara (The Message)
Lauren Tom (Bad Santa)
Cree Summer (Voltron)
Jeffrey Combs (The Frighteners)
Pamela Adlon (Better Things)
Adrienne Barbeau (Swamp Thing)
Townsend Coleman (Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles)
Billy Barty (Masters of The Universe)
Earl Boen (The Terminator)
George Dzundza (Basic Instinct)
Mel Winkler (Coach Carter)
Paul Williams (Battle for TPOTA)
Allan Rich (Serpico)
Sam McMurray (Raising Arizona)
Tippi Hedren (The Birds)
Barry Bostwick (Spy Hard)
Sela Ward (Gone Girl)
Bumper Robinson (Sabrina: TTW)
Dennis Haysbert (Heat)
Billy Zane (Titanic)
Roddy McDowall (Planet of The Apes)
Henry Silva (Aove The Law)
Mark Rolston (Aliens)
Thomas F. Wilson (Legends of Tomorrow)
Brooks Gardner (Raw Deal)
Buster Jones (Transformers)
Laraine Newman (Coneheads)
Dorian Harewood (Terminator: TSCC)
Jim Piddock (Mascots)
Ian Buchanan (Stargate SG.1)
Pamela Hayden (The Simpsons)
Neil Ross (Transformers: Ther Movie)
Gary Owens (That 70s Show)
Michael McKean (This Is Spinal Tap)
Michael Ironside (Highlander 2)
Kevin Michael Richardson (The Cleveland Show)
Nicholle Tom (Gotham)
Lori Petty (Tank Girl)
Linda Hamilton (The Terminator)
Tim Matheson (Animal House)
Malachi Throne (Star Trek)
John Glover (Smallville)
Steven Weber (2 Broke Girls)
Billy West (Futurama)

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The  this fourth boxed set Batman: The Animated Series is finally available on DVD in its entirety. For anyone that grew up loving this ’90s legend, that’s a very good thing indeed. Technically the show “ended” with the third volume, but when the producers moved on to Superman: The Animated Series, they were asked to bring back a Batman cartoon, and they did – making a few changes in the process.MV5BMzIwOTM3ZDYtMWVhMi00NDhlLWI1ZmItM2JlODc1NTgyYmE4XkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNTQ0NjQzNTE@._V1_SY1000_CR0,0,1342,1000_AL_Any fan can tell you that the new series, dubbed Gotham Knights and airing as the part of the double-feature The New Batman/Superman Adventures, wasn’t as good as what had come before. Even so, if you’re a fan then it’s certainly worth checking out as it serves as a nice precursor to what we’d get with the Justice League series. Plus, there are some great episodes here that any Bat-fan shouldn’t miss. An animated segment from Frank Miller’s Dark Knight Returns? Yes, please! While the show is essentially the same as the previous version, there are some differences. For one, the episodes here take place two years after the events in the original show. The Bat family has been expanded to include Batgirl and Nightwing, and the first thing you will notice is the abundance of new character designs.MV5BZTA4ZjYzNzAtM2FkYS00Y2E2LTgxYTYtNjA3ODkwOWMzM2QwXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNTQ0NjQzNTE@._V1_SY1000_CR0,0,1333,1000_AL_When coming up with a fresh take on the aging series, producer Bruce Timm decided that sprucing up the characters would give the show more punch. For the most part, he was right. Some of the characters got slight touch-ups while others were totally redesigned. For example, the new Joker looks more menacing, but the lack of red lips to surround his wicked grin takes away from the impact of the character. On the other hand you’ve got the new Scarecrow, with demented eyes staring out at Batman through a terrifying burlap mask, which is far creepier than the old design.MV5BZjg2OGFkMmUtYmQwNC00ZjIyLWFkMGEtNjJkNzA3YWY2YjY4XkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNTQ0NjQzNTE@._V1_SY1000_CR0,0,1340,1000_AL_Batman himself suffered some changes too; the costume loses the yellow around the Bat-insignia and the chin is longer, giving Bats’ head a more rectangular shape. Overall, the changes are welcome and they add more than they take away. While the cosmetic upgrades are easy to spot, they are not the most important change; after a few episodes you’ll see exactly what it is. The show just isn’t as good as it used to be. That isn’t to say that it’s bad – it’s still one of the better animated series out there, but the atmosphere and maturity of the earlier episodes is missing. The greater reliance on secondary characters (Robin, Batgirl) and gadgets (glider jetpack) injects the show with a more playful tone than it had in the past. You’ve got less character, but more characters. At first I saw this as a shortcoming, but I quickly came to see it as something different – an opportunity.MV5BYTI0Nzg2MmQtNTBiNC00NzBjLWE5NDItZTFmODRjYzZiN2EzXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNTQ0NjQzNTE@._V1_You’ve already got three boxes worth of classic, wonderfully moody Batman material. If the showrunners want to take the show to hipper, more action-oriented place, I say let them. After all, as far as experimentation goes, there’s some great stuff here. There are a number of gimmicky episodes, but don’t count that out as a bad thing. There’s still a lot of fun to be had. Meanwhile, other DC Universe characters are brought in, making the show feel more connected to what would follow (Superman, Justice League). The Demon Within brings in the mystic characters of Etrigan/Jason Blood and Klarion the Witch Boy (talk about timely). Girl’s Nite Out sees Batgirl and guest Supergirl team up to take down Live Wire (from the Superman show), Poison Ivy, and Harley Quinn.MV5BMTUwMzU0OTUzMF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwODE4OTQ1MjE@._V1_But, hand’s down, the standout episode of the box, and one of the coolest of the series, is Legends of the Dark Knight. A group of kids get together and swap stories of what they think Batman is “really” like. One kid tells the story of a campy, golden age interpretation of Batman… and we get to see it animated! It’s a classic story where Batman and Robin battle the Joker in a giant musical instrument museum (?!). The voices and music are hilarious and lovingly done in the ’50s Dick Sprang style; there is no sarcasm here. Seeing the Joker tie our heroes to giant piano strings and then jump on piano keys (in an attempt to squash them) is very amusing for its innocence and simplicity. Next, we have the second kid’s story: she thinks Batman is an old, stoic avenger. In other words, the interpretation that Frank Miller used to catapult Batman into the serious mainstream. We are then treated to a great segment from Miller’s classic The Dark Knight Returns book as it is brought to life.MV5BMjU3OWFhMWYtYzdlZS00NzRmLWFkMWMtZWZmMjYxMTk3YTg1XkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNTQ0NjQzNTE@._V1_SY1000_CR0,0,1333,1000_AL_Watching Batman take down the mutant leader in a mud-pit, set against grungy ’80s music, is a real treat. What you get with these two segments over the comics is the great voice acting and an additional storytelling layer by way of background music. The voices and music add a wonderful texture to these classic tales and the idea of juxtaposing bright and goofy with dark and serious makes for a very satisfying episode. While these action-focused and gimmicky episodes are not the show at its best, they are a great diversion and a fun reinterpretation of an aging show. It’s not as good as it used to be, but it’s still Batman: The Animated Series. And that makes it worth your time.