REVIEW: SLEEPY HOLLOW – SEASON 3

MAIN CAST

Tom Mison (One Day)
Nicole Beharie (Jacob’s Ladder)
Lyndie Greenwood (Nikita)
Nikki reed (Thirteen)
Shannyn Sossamon (Sinister 2)
Zach Appelman (Beauty and The Beast 2012)
Lance Gross (The Finder)
Jessica Camacho (The Flash)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

C. Thomas Howell (The Amazing Spider-Man)
Maya Kazan (Night Stalker)
Charlene Amoia (How I Met Yoru Mother)
Nicholas Guest (Big Hero 6)
David Boreanaz (Bones)
Emily Deschanel (Bones)
Bill Irwin (Interstellar)
Peter Mensah (Spartacus)
James McDaniel (Malcolm X)
Clancy Brown (Highlander)

Months have passed since the tragic events where Ichabod Crane (Tom Mison) lost his wife and son, as they both turned to the dark side. While averting the apocalypse, the loss of his family caused Ichabod to need some time for himself to process all that has transpired. When he finds himself locked in a prison cell for trying to import undocumented relics, he calls Abbie (Nicole Beharie) to come bail him out. Abbie has also moved on from the events, as she traded her job at the local law enforcement for a more exciting job at the FBI. Even though she misses the bond she had with Crane, she hopes she can leave the past behind her, as she has seen more than enough monsters for an entire lifetime. Sadly, Ichabod has not been sitting by idly, and has discovered that their role as ‘witnesses’, did not stop when they stopped the spawn of hell, Moloch.
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As expected, there’s a new demonic presence lurking in the shadows, namely Pandora (Shannyn Sossamon), who we know from Pandora’s box, the box that contains all the evil of the world. She indeed follows the main concept of this legendary tale, and has a box, which contains the world’s most vile demons, who she then slowly starts to unleash upon Sleepy Hollow. The horrible incidents that unfolds may involve the witnesses, but in reality Pandora is trying to revive her love, an omnipotent god named ‘The Hidden One’ (Peter Mensah), a deity that was known for its cruel behavior. Fending off demons is one thing, tampering with the divine will prove to be a different task altogether.
The series follows the typical formula like the first two seasons, where one red thread runs through all episodes, while the witnesses and their allies tackle cases which are usually cracked in the course of one episode. In many ways this means you’ll get to see a new monster per episode, which is often based on legendary figures or demons we have seen for the umpteenth time, with an original Sleepy Hollow twist added to them.960
Overall the cast hasn’t gone through any considerable changes, thus you can expect more of the same, guaranteeing you a qualitative experience. Tom and Nicole still play the perfect counterparts, with enough natural chemistry between them to make you wish they would just let their characters come to terms with their feelings. This season has a few new faces, namely Shannyn Sossamon, who plays Pandora, and Peter Mensah, who plays ‘The Hidden One’. Both play their supernatural roles quite good, and play out the role as the new nemeses of the forces of good perfectly.  Sleepy Hollow: Season 3 will still be a delight for fans of the first two seasons. The finale is still shokcing to fans and will bring about major changes when Season 4 arrives on our screens. Seepy Hollow is still a fun show and recommend this to fans of the first two seasons.

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REVIEW: BONES – SEASON 11

MAIN CAST

Emily Deschanel (Easy)
David Boreanaz (Angel)
Michaela Conlin (Enchanted)
T.J. Thyne (Ghost World)
Tamara Taylor (Serenity)
John Boyd (Lady In The Water)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Patricia Belcher (Jeeprs Creepers)
Pej Vahdat (Lie To Me)
Roger Cross (Arrow)
Dilshad Vadsaria (Second Chance)
Kim Raver (24)
Matthew Holmes (Blue Heelers)
Dan Hildebrand (Game of Thrones)
Michael Grant Terry (Grimm)
Gil Darnell (Reign)
Betty White (The Proposal)
Brian Klugman (Cloverfield)
Erin Chaill (Power Rangers Time Force)
Paul Johansson (Van Helsing)
Tom Lenk (Buffy: The Vampire Slayer)
Tom Mison (Sleepy Hollow)
Nicole Beharie (Sleepy Hollow)
Sean Patrick Thomas (Ringer)
Malcolm David Kelley (Lost)
Laura Spencer (The Big Bang Theory)
Brenda Strong (Supergirl)
Nicholas Gonzales (The Flash)
Eugene Byrd (Arrow)
Kevin Fonteyne (Melissa & Joey)
Ignacio Serricchio  (The Wedding Ringer)
Callard Harris (The Originals)
Rachel Melvin (Zombeavers)
Lochlyn Munro (Scary Movie)
Gavin MacIntosh (The FOsters)
Carla Gallo (Superbad)
Sara Lafleur (Ugly Betty)
Michael Reilly Burke (The Vampire Diaries)
Andy Milder (Seven Pounds)
Skyler Vallo (The A-List)
Eddie Shin (That 80s Show)
Sara Rue (Mom)
Alyssa Diaz (Army Wives)
Joel David Moore (Julia X)
Nishi Munshi (The Originals)
Jack McGee (The Fighter)
Brooke Lyons (2 Broke Girls)
Lou Ferrigno Jr. (How I Met Your Mother)
John Shea (Mutant X)
Jim Pirri (Lois & Clark)
Bridgett Newton (Man of Steel)
Nicole Bilderback (Dark Angel)
Sebastian Roche (The Originals)
Gilles Marini (2 Broke Girls)
Tim Guinee (Iron Man)
Eric Millegan (On_Line)

At the end of season 10, Bones (Emily Deschanel) and Booth (David Boreanaz) both decided to quit their jobs at the Jeffersonian and the FBI respectively. Now, six months later, their daughter Christine (Sunnie Pelant) has a little baby brother, and Booth is training new FBI recruits for a living. They seem to be happy in their new situation, and today seems like no other when Booth takes off to work. Meanwhile at the Jeffersonian, Cam (Tamara Taylor), Angela (Michaela Conlin) and Hodgins (T.J. Thyne) are called out to a crime scene, where they find a body in a burnt car. The team fear the worst when they find out that the gun that was found with the victim belongs to Booth. Also the initial examination of the bones makes it appear that he is the victim. Dr. Brennan decides to come to the Jeffersonian herself, as the situation is driving her crazy, and she eventually finds out that the remains aren’t Booth’s, but his brother’s, Jared. The question remains where Booth is, and how his brother ended up dead.

Eventually, everything turns back to normal by episode three, and Bones and Booth are back at their old jobs, just like they used to be. Murders keep on happening, and Booth and Aubrey (John Boyd) work closely together with the team of the Jeffersonian to bring the killers to justice. While the season focuses foremost on the cases themselves, there are some developments in the personal lives of the characters as well.006-1-m
Each episode has a good flow to it, where many suspects are considered along the way, and the outcome is often unpredictable. The format remains the same as in the previous seasons, namely a focus on the cases, where reexamining the bones over and over will eventually prove to be vital in finding the murderer.
While the flow of the individual cases is quite enjoyable, the personal story of the characters gets to the background quite a lot. Every now and then you will find out more about Cam’s love life, Angela and Hodgins’ marriage or Aubrey’s new crush, but nothing major steps out until halfway the season. There have been no major changes to the cast since last season, and it’s safe to say that the current team of actors all did well.

Bones has been one of my all time favourite series and season 11 is no exception! with a great cliffhanger leaving you hanging for Season 12 (the final season) .

12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS REVIEW: SLEEPY HOLLOW – THE GOLEM

CAST

Tom Mison (venus)
Nicole Beharie (The Good Wife)
Orlando Jones (Bedazzled)
Katia Winter (Arena)

GUEST CAST

John Noble (Lord of The Rings)
Jill Marie Jones (Ash vs Evil Dead)

“The Golem” had some deeply unsettling moments, a running undercurrent of humor, answers to vital questions and some straight-ahead scares.   All these disparate elements mixed together comfortably, as they have since the pilot, and it looks so simple.  But the fact of the matter is that what Sleepy Hollow has been able to pull off in this first season is remarkable, as it has kept its high-degree-of-difficulty tone while never losing sight of the characters that make us come back each week.  As if there were any doubt, it began and ended with the most important relationship on the show, as Abbie and Ichabod worked through his emotions about having a son and shared the anxiety about Moloch coming for them.   The groundwork that the writers and actors have done made these two characters seem naturally close as they get to know one another better with every week.  The wonderful opening scene (and Crane’s explanation of the origins of eggnog) served as a lovely reminder that even as their team might expand it’s all about the two of them.

Of course, in between those bookends we had the marvelous John Noble returning as Henry the Sin Eater.  You would think that Noble showing up to guest star would overwhelm the proceedings and be desperately missed when he’s gone, but instead he fits right in with this show.  Here we found out that Henry isn’t just a one-trick pony, as his talents extend to sensing sin and providing valuable exposition on the miserable childhood of Ichabod and Katrina’s son.  Still, the coolest bit for me was his making the librarian with ease: “Lying is a sin. I can sense a sin a mile away.”

Meanwhile, Frank went back to the city to visit his daughter.  It might be that his story seems drab compared to the wild stuff going on elsewhere, but at the moment his ex-wife and daughter feel more like plot devices than actual characters.  It’s not something I’m all that concerned about, given this show’s brief track record, but tonight they were simply time-fillers to get us to that super creepy vendor in the park.  That last “we have one, too” delivered by the possessed woman might have been the freakiest thing in an episode that also featured a gigantic killer doll. As for the doll itself, they did a great job showing the violence he was capable of, and tying it into Jeremy’s rage made it all the more disturbing.


This was a Sleepy Hollow episode that covered a lot of ground and also managed to be alternately creepy, disturbing, scary and funny.

REVIEW: SLEEPY HOLLOW – SEASON 1 & 2

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MAIN CAST

Tom Mison (One Day)
Nicole Beharie (American Violet)
Orlando Jones (Evolution)
Katia Winter (Arena)
Lyndie Greenwood (Nikita)
John Noble (Fringe)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

John Cho (American Pie)
Clancy Brown (Highlander)
Nicholas Gonzalez (The Flash)
Monique Ganderton (Mutant X)
Carsten Norgaard (The Three Musketeers)
James Frain (Gotham)
Craig Parker (Reign)
Neil Jackson (Blade: The Series)
Erin Cahill (Power Rangers Time Force)
Jill Marie Jones (Ash Vs Evil Dead)
Laura Spencer (Bones)
Sakina Jaffrey (House of Cards)
Matt Barr (7 Below)
Zach Appelman (Beaut yand The Beast)
Cynthia Stevenson (Dead Like Me)
Aunjanue Ellis (The Help)
Michelle Trachtenberg (Buffy: The Vampire Slayer)
Jaime Murray (The Finder)
Steven Weber (Izombie)
Shelby Steel (Powers)

To say that I was skeptical about Sleepy Hollow as a series would be an understatement. After all, how could Ichabod Crane vs. the Headless Horseman get dragged out far enough to fill all those hours and remain watchable? But in the most delightful surprise of the fall season, Sleepy Hollow quickly proved to be more than up to the task. With a perfectly matched pair of leads, the show hit the ground running and never looked back.
From their first scene together Nicole Beharie and Tom Mison displayed an easy chemistry that only grew stronger as the weeks went by, aided immensely by sharp writing that understood these two were the most essential ingredient for Sleepy Hollow’s success. In the first half of the season the small supporting cast suffered in comparison, as it took time for characters like Jenny and Frank to be brought into the fold and have us get to know them. But by the finale all the time spent with Abbie and Ichabod paid off beautifully in scenes where the emotions ran deep without having to spell everything out to the audience. By the time they had to dive into Purgatory together and eventually part ways all the decisions they made were believable since they were character-based and not simply the writers forcing them in directions for the sake of the plot.
 This attention to character was particularly impressive, since the show trades in some wild plots: Headless Horseman, George Washington’s secret war, Crane’s witch wife in Purgatory, etc. The creative team behind Sleepy Hollow seems to have an instinctive understanding that if the audience doesn’t care about these people, it doesn’t matter how cool it might be to see the Horseman with an automatic weapon. That being said, it is really cool to see the Headless Horseman blazing away, and when he showed up it was always a show-stopper. The season also had more than its share of other great effects as well, whether it was whatever was happening to poor Andy (head knocked backwards, cocooned and turned into a slithery bald dude) or some of Moloch’s freaky, fast-moving minions.
With all of the insanity going on it would have been easy to fall into the trap of letting the humor undercut the stakes, but Sleepy Hollow’s very difficult tone was maintained throughout the season. Oddly enough for a show about a British Revolutionary War soldier who wakes up in 2013 and partners up with an overqualified police lieutenant to fight a war against evil, the key to maintaining that tone has been restraint. Nothing overstayed its welcome on Sleepy Hollow. The Headless Horseman was a remarkably intimidating physical presence who immediately gave a jolt to any episode he rode into – he’s an ace in the hole that could have become all too familiar very quickly. But aside from the brief time that our heroes imprisoned him we rarely got a glimpse of him. His absence, sometimes for weeks, made his appearances carry far more weight and dread than if we had gotten a weekly dose of him riding around the forest.
The same goes for the show’s keen sense of humor. The comedic opportunities presented by Crane waking up in the 21st century are a rich vein, one that they’ve managed to tap each week without being repetitive or overwhelming. Instead it came in bite-sized portions while informing the character – Mison’s bemused reactions from everything from OnStar agents to dry cleaning were wonderfully understated and telling as Ichabod became more accustomed to life in the modern age. By the end of the season he was complaining about his apps failing to load in the middle of the forest, which was both hysterical and showed how much he had changed.
This attention to detail when it comes to Abbie and Ichabod was marvelous, but it didn’t leave much room for anybody else. It took awhile, but Frank and Jenny were eventually brought up to speed with their troubled histories and joined the team. Unfortunately Katrina remained in limbo in every sense – Ichabod longed for her (it’s a credit to Mison that this was always believable) but she never registered as anything other than a plot device/exposition delivery system. And while the Horseman and Moloch were scary, larger-than-life enemies they couldn’t do much more than occasionally show up and threaten everybody. There were few real, flesh-and-blood villains here and when there were it was usually because somebody has been possessed or otherwise coerced. The Hessians were a potentially far-reaching group that could provide all kinds of problems for our heroes, but they were largely forgotten in the stretch run of the season- hopefully they’ll return next year. Happily, the last 15 minutes or so of the finale signaled a change in all this, as Katrina was freed ( and a fantastic bad guy was introduced… …or was unmasked, to be more accurate. John Noble dropped by enough for me to stop questioning what secrets he might have – he had simply become loveable Henry, always welcome and able to help our heroes out of a jam. So when he finally revealed himself to be Ichabod’s son Jeremy and the Second friggin’ Horseman, it landed like a thunderclap. It was the rarest of things in today’s television landscape: a well-earned plot twist. It also doesn’t hurt that Noble seems to be able to do anything.
In addition to Noble, the guest star MVPs were Clancy Brown and John Cho. While their characters couldn’t have been more different, both had parallels in their relationship to Abbie. Brown was wonderful in his role as Abbie’s mentor and every time he showed up, whether it was a flashback or archival footage or a dream, his loss was felt. His quick exit was both disappointing and perfect, since his absence leaves Abbie without a safety net, personally and professionally. And Andy was the polar opposite: a weak-willed servant of Moloch who never stopped pining for her.

Of course it all comes down to Abbie and Ichabod in the end. Their relationship was so carefully constructed by the writers and actors over the course of the year that by the end they were able to have whole conversations with just a couple of looks. This can be one of the craziest shows on TV and it’s such a blast when it is, and yet when I look back on the season as a whole I keep coming back to their quiet scenes in the cabin, teasing each other about plastic or finding hidden messages from George Washington. All of this has added up to a thoroughly entertaining show which is, after all, the whole point. Sleepy Hollow’s freshman season set the bar high with the expected scares, unexpected humor, and impressive lead performances. And a Headless Horseman wielding automatic weapons, which is always nice.
Making the balance between humor, horror and action look easy, season 1 of Sleepy Hollow set the bar high. An expanded season 2 (jumping to 18 episodes from 13) more than met that standard in the first half, throttling though the high-stakes plot of Moloch trying to escape Purgatory and the Witnesses gaining more allies. And while the series struggled to find itself after that story came to end—likely due to the network-mandated order to become less serialized—the show always remained worthwhile and very enjoyable due to the solid characters and relationships that had been established.
 This season felt inspired from the start, with the terrific premiere episode “This is War” displaying sly storytelling as Abbie and Ichabod struggled to escape Purgatory. The later introduction of Benjamin Franklin (in flashbacks), more revelations about the Mills family history and the remarkable episodes leading up to the midseason finale all made for a rollicking first half. Despite meandering with the back half standalone episodes, the finale more than made up for any aimlessness by giving us what we watch for in the first place: Abbie and Ichabod, BFFs.
With Abbie and Ichabod already firmly entrenched as partners in the war against evil, the show was able to widen its focus to other characters. The best results were with Jenny, who became better-rounded and an integral part of the team. But Abraham/Headless benefitted from more attention as well, as we got to know his motivations. Even the risky addition of Hawley paid off better than expected, and by the time he got his send-off episode his connection to Jenny and the Witnesses felt earned and real. Irving also wound up being a bit shortchanged, as the show had written him into the corner of the psych ward for murdering cops. When he was tricked into signing over his soul to Henry it looked like a rich storyline in the making but nothing much ever came of it and everything involving him seemed made up on the fly, almost as an afterthought (for instance, the cloudy reason behind him being released but not exonerated—I’ll admit I glided past that as a viewer, but the more you pay attention to his story over the season, the shakier it gets). Despite this I was glad to see him get some terrific moments, both big and small—his sacrifice (which wound up being temporary) in the midseason finale and his intimate scenes with Jenny towards the end.
 John Noble continued to be a tremendous presence whenever he appeared. The reveal at the end of season 1 that he was the Crane’s son gave him plenty to dig into this year and Noble made Henry’s bitterness and hurt come through with intensity. Once he dispatched Moloch, though, the show didn’t seem to know what to do with him and his death wound up being pretty anticlimactic, even it did serve to set off the season endgame for the marvelous “Tempus Fugit”. More problematic was the character of Katrina. She simply never worked. Not as a damsel in distress, not as the third wheel and not as an abruptly-turned villain. It certainly wasn’t for lack of trying, as the writers tried to integrate her into Team Witness several times with lukewarm results. I didn’t buy her sudden shift from ally to enemy, but it was a quick and painless way to give her character a good exit in service of the story. The trouble was that Beharie and Mison had established such rare buddy chemistry that Ichabod finally getting his lost love out of Purgatory threw a wrench into it. Even at her best, as in “Pittura Infamante”, it wasn’t enough to match any given scene between Abbie and Ichabod. That pretty much left the show with few options; either relegate her to the sidelines or kill her off.
But the biggest stumbling block this season came down from on high: FOX wanted to series to become less serialized, and Sleepy Hollow tried hard to accommodate the order. The result was an awkward stop-and-start second half, with several scenes of Abbie and Ichabod wondering out loud what their purpose was now that Moloch had been defeated. I had no problem with the death of Moloch, since he wasn’t much of a bad guy, but the absence of a Big Bad was immediately felt. Knowing full well that this might have been it for the series, the show rallied and came up with a very satisfying ending that conclusively wrapped up loose ends while leaving the door wide open for a possible return. Sleepy Hollow’s best hours have been the ones dealing with ongoing stories while the self-contained episodes were much more hit-and-miss, but this is a creative team that’s proven it knows how to put together a great show I’m hopeful that they get a chance to find that balance because when this series is in a groove it’s a joy to watch. Despite any problems Sleepy Hollow ran into, though, Nicole Beharie and Tom Mison were the rocks at the center the show. Their extraordinary chemistry has been the single greatest asset of an awfully good series from the start, able to shift gracefully from easygoing humor to partners in lockstep to dear friends dealing with life and death stakes in a single hour. They’re a microcosm of the show itself, one that at its best could deliver laughs and thrills side by side with terrific characters we cared about throughout.
Despite difficulty adjusting to less-serialized storytelling in the back half, season 2 of Sleepy Hollow started and ended strong enough to measure up well with its stellar first year.

31 DAYS OF HORROR REVIEW: SLEEPY HOLLOW: DEAD MEN TELL NO TALES

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MAIN CAST

Tom Mison (Venus)
Nicole Beharie (Shame)
Lyndie Greenwood (Nikita)
Nikki Reed (Twilight)
Zach Appleman (Kil Your Darlings)
Lance Gross (House of Payne)
Shannyn Sossamon (A Kngiht’s Tale)

GUEST CAST

Emily Deschanel (Bones)
David Boreanaz (Bones)
Jessica Camacho (Longmire)
Nicholas Guest (Frozen)

DEAD MEN TELL NO TALES

Pandora reanimated the body of General Howe and unleashed him and his troops on Sleepy Hollow. They didn’t exactly call the General and his men zombies, but that’s what they were. I couldn’t really tell whether the men became zombies after they joined the General’s command or whether these were simply the men that were under his command at the time he died. Whatever the case, Pandora sent General Howe and his zombies to wreak havoc on Sleepy Hollow. They didn’t really get the chance to do much damage though. Howe’s personal grudge against Ichabod proved to be his undoing though, since Ichabod and Abbie were ultimately able to use it to lure him into their trap.

While Ichabod and Abbie were working the zombie case, Jenny and Joe were tracking some guy named Nivens. Apparently, Nivens is the guy who wanted to procure the Shard of Anubis. It also turns out that Sheriff Corbin and Nivens were in the army together. Joe immediately jumped to the conclusion that Sheriff Corbin was somehow helping Nivens in his criminal activities, but I’m not sure why he jumped to that conclusion. Yes, Sheriff Corbin kept a lot of things a secret, but I can’t say I blame him. If he had shared his theories with other people, they would’ve locked him away in the crazy house and thrown away the key. Joe knows that Sheriff Corbin had knowledge of the war against evil, and a lot of what he’d done was in preparation for fighting that war.

Sleepy Hollow

I’m still not sure what Pandora’s end game is. It seems like everything she’s unleashed thus far has been to bring up Ichabod and Abbie’s worst fears. At least that’s what it sounded like she said about the blossom at the end of the episode. I’m wondering whether she knew that Ichabod and Abbie were going to triumph over all of the monsters she’s unleashed thus far, and maybe that was the point. Maybe none of the blossoms could bloom if the monster wasn’t defeated first. Maybe her plan all along has been to send these less powerful creatures after The Witnesses to see how they work and figure out what kind of resources they have. I say that because she hasn’t looked disappointed at the outcome of any of these confrontations. If that’s the case, then she’s been using all of these things as cannon fodder for something much worse. That doesn’t bode well for our heroes.

Jenny and Joe’s side investigation may now cause some friction for Abbie at work. Reynolds is apparently investigating Nivens as well, and now he’s giving Abbie heat over Jenny possibly being involved with Nivens. I don’t know what it’s going to take for them to realize that failing to keep each other apprised of their side projects is always going to cause them trouble. I don’t know what part Nivens has to play in everything, but I have a feeling there’s more to it meets the eye. It also looks like Ichabod and Zoe might take a few more steps in their relationship, but I don’t know how well that’s going to work out for Zoe. Ichabod doesn’t exactly have the best track record when it comes to women. A strange crossover with Bones, but it actually works.

31 DAYS OF HORROR REVIEW: BONES – THE HALLOWEEN EPISODES

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MAIN CAST

Emily Deschanel (Boogeyman)
David Boreanaz (Angel)
Michaela Conlin (The Lincoln Lawyer)
Eric Millegan (On_Line)
Tamara Taylor (Lost)
T.J. Thyne (Ghost World)
John Boyd (Argo)

GUEST CAST

Rider Strong (Cabin Fever)
Azura Skye (28 Days)
Nathan Anderson (Man Men)
Vince Grant (Dreamgirls)
Lynsey Bartilson (Grounded for Life)
Caitlyn Folley (Happy Endings)
Tom Mison (Sleepy Hollow)
Nicole Beharie (Sleepy Hollow)
Michael Grant Terry (Grimm)
Sean Patrick Thomas (Barbershop)
Malcolm David Kelley (Lost)

THE MUMMY IN THE MAZE

At a Halloween hay maze, an announcer tells a bunch of dressed-up kids whoever gets to the end first wins the grand prize. He starts the race, and one kid named Matty is shown getting lost in the maze. He runs into a mummy and freaks out and when a spider crawls out of the mummy’s eye and lands on Matty’s nose, he passes out. Booth and Bones arrive at the scene that night and work their way through the maze with a pediatrician/coroner to try to find the mummy. They get lost, and eventually Booth knocks through some bales of hay to get them to the mummy. Bones confirms that the mummy is indeed human remains.
Cam and Zack examine the body. They find out that the mummy was mummified quickly, which cannot be done under normal conditions. Cam tells Hodgins and Zack that everyone has to go to the Halloween party that’s coming up because donors and benefactors will be there. Zack says he’s going to be the back end of a cow, and Naomi from paleontology is going to be the front end. Hodgins says he’s going to be Edward John Smith, the captain of the Titanic. Cam continues examining the body, and says the victim is covered in lacquer. Hodgins says that the clothing is from a church thrift store, which confuses Zack because there’s no bug or slime evidence and he doesn’t know how Hodgins could have figured that out. Then Hodgins shows Zack the tag on the victim’s clothing to show he’s undoubtedly right.
Booth and Bones go to the church thrift store and talk to Pastor Jonas. He explains how the church does a “Hell House” for Halloween as “a positive celebration of Christian values.” They find that no one ever dresses up as a mummy there and that none of his kids have disappeared recently. Amber Kippler, a private investigator, tells Hodgins and Angela that she’s going to be doing all the footwork in their investigation of Angela’s husband. She proves her experience to Angela by revealing a very personal fact about her. Amber says that she found Grayson, Angela’s husband. She’s told that she should talk to him and try to get him to sign the divorce papers. In Booth’s car, Booth and Bones talk about their meeting with the pastor. Booth is surprised when Brennan says that science has to take a leap of faith. Cam calls and says that a couple is at the lab and thinks that the mummy in the maze is their daughter, then tells Booth and Bones to hurry back to talk to them. When Booth and Bones get to the lab they talk to the parents who reveal that their daughter Megan disappeared in a fun house recently, and that when they saw the mummy story, they were sure it was Megan. The mother says she’s sure Megan isn’t alive. They show the couple a picture Angela drew of the mummy victim, and the parents confirm that it’s not Megan. Cam then calls Bones and says another victim was found at Shoreline Amusement Park.
Booth and Bones arrive at the amusement park and find a woman being treated for panic or possibly asthma by an EMT. She says she saw an actual corpse in the fun house. They seem skeptical of her judgement, but she insists that, as a nurse, she knows a dead body when she sees one. Booth and Bones go into the “Dungeon of 1000 Corpses” to find the body, and Bones realizes that Booth is afraid of clowns based on his reaction to them in the maze. Cam calls and says that they identified the victim from the maze as Stella Higgins, who disappeared exactly a year ago from Shoreline Amusement Park. They get to the body and once again Bones confirms that it’s human remains. At the lab, Zack says the new victim isn’t Megan Shaw either. Cam says that it looks like the same person killed both victims, and gets mad at Zack when he says that she leaped to a conclusion. They also determine that the second victim looks like she was buried alive. Angela comes in with information that identifies the second victim as Judith Suzanne Evans. Hodgins comes in and says that Stella pulled out her own hair and that the lacquer found on the victims is generic. Cam finds lots of small punctures on one of the bodies.
Booth goes back to Shoreline Amusement Park and talks to the guy who runs the “Dungeon of 1000 Corpses,” who’s standing with all the employees of the dungeon. Booth recognizes one of the employees, Gregg Liscombe, from the maze the night before and questions him. Another girl named Lola butts in and tells Gregg not to tell Booth anything without a lawyer, which makes her a suspect along with Gregg. Back at the lab, Zack, Booth, and Cam figure out that Judith was buried alive. Hodgins says that Stella was bitten by tarantulas, which is what caused all the punctures on her body and probably caused her to pull out her own hair. Hodgins also found mysterious steel dust on Judith. Traces of drugs that would induce panic were also found on both victims, which causes Cam to think that the murderer literally caused the victims to be scared to death.
Booth talks to Judith’s older sister in his office. She says that she took her to the amusement park, but Judith was scared to go into the fun house. Her sister went without her, but when she got out Judith was gone. Her sister says that Gregg was at the fun house while they were there, and he told her that Judith walked away with some guy while her sister was in the fun house. Booth and Bones interrogate Gregg at the FBI building. Booth says that it’s quite suspicious that Gregg, a sex offender, was found at both places where the victims were found. Gregg keeps saying everything is a coincidence until Booth hits him then grabs him. Bones also smacks him, then Gregg says that Lola is the one who took away Judith, not some guy. He says that Lola likes when Gregg fools around with the younger girls, then she comes in and smacks them around, which gets her hot. He says she goes a little too far though sometimes. Amber returns from her trip to see Grayson and tells Angela and Hodgins that Grayson was very pleasant and smelled good. She says she smelled him because she was being thorough. She then says that Grayson doesn’t want a divorce. He remembers his marriage to Angela and built a house/shack for her on the beach. She says that Grayson really misses Angela a lot, and even had tears in his eyes when he talked about her. Hodgins says he and Angela don’t know what they want to do next and that they’ll tell Amber when they figure it out.
Booth is talking to Bones in the hall at the FBI building, telling her how he’s going to interview Lola, when another agent walks up to them. He says he found out that Megan has a fear of snakes and Booth tells him to find out who’s been buying a bunch of snakes at pet shops. Booth tells Bones he’s going to talk to Lola on his own. At the lab Hodgins is examining spores. Cam is in her costume – she’s Catwoman. Brennan and Cam argue about Catwoman being powerful, then Hodgins tells them that he figured out that the spores were from flowers found in Hawaii. This makes them think that the victims were mummified in Hawaii, which doesn’t really make much sense. Booth goes to find Lola at the fun house, and she’s once again uncooperative. Lola admits that she roughed up the victims, then Booth arrests her and takes her back with him. Back at the lab, Booth and Bones talk about how Booth got a profile of the killer from Dr. Sweets. Booth is now in his squint costume and Brennan is changing into hers on the other side of a door. When she comes out Booth says that she looks wonderful. When they walk over to Zack he says Angela and Hodgins have something to show them. Angela says that snakes were sold out at three pet shops over the last week, and that the last place just sold out an hour ago, which means Megan is still alive. It also means that Gregg and Lola aren’t the killers because they’re in custody.
Booth tells the squints to guess and figure out where Megan is being held, but it ends up in an argument. Brennan says she, Zack, and Hodgins can’t work with Booth, Angela, and Cam pressuring them to guess, so the latter three leave the room. After a bunch of calculations they figure out that the killer is at a subway station (based on the steel dust) which is under a flower shop (based on the Hawaiian flower spores).Booth and Brennan call for backup on the way to the crime scene, while also arguing about whether Brennan guessed about the location or not. Arriving at the scene they find a subway entrance. They go down into a tunnel and find a room with mummification chemicals in it. After finding other drugs in the room, Booth figures out that the murderer is someone who has access to drugs and an ambulance – the EMT who was treating the nurse at the amusement park fun house where they found the second mummified corpse.Leaving the room, they hear Megan screaming from a locked room. Bones tries to shoot the lock off the door but shoots Booth too, giving him a flesh wound. When they open the door they see a bunch of snakes, which Bones is scared of. She goes on Booth’s back as they enter the room. A man dressed as a clown comes to the door with a gun and Bones tries to shoot him, but she misses. Booth drops her and goes after the clown while he tells Bones to stay in the snake room and protect Megan.
Booth has an intense shoot-out with the clown, and eventually the clown notices that Booth only has one bullet left in his gun. Booth grabs a metal panel which he uses to protect himself from the clown’s bullets, but is knocked over after another bullet shot by the clown. The clown hides behind a wall, but Booth’s gun was powerful enough to shoot through it, killing him. Amber returns to the lab to tell Angela that she tried to seduce Grayson to see how in love he was with Angela. It didn’t work and she found out that Grayson is deeply in love with Angela. She suggests that Angela should go talk to Grayson, but she declines. As Angela leaves Amber runs into Hodgins. She says that most of the time in this type of case, the partners go back to their old husbands and wives, but in this case she doesn’t think Angela will, because she doesn’t have any interest in Grayson, despite Amber telling her of his attractiveness.  Booth and Bones finally arrive back at the lab and agree that they shouldn’t go to the party looking all dirty like they do. Booth says he’s sort of mad that Bones shot him, and then in a change of mood Bones says she’s sorry that Booth had to kill someone because she knows that Booth doesn’t like to be forced to kill people. They then decide to get something to eat and walk away, with Bones doing a Lynda Carter-esque Wonder Woman twist on the way out.

This is a pretty interesting episode with a good mix of suspense and comedy.I would definitely recommend watching it if you get a chance to.

THE RESURRECTION IN THE REMAINS

It was Halloween on Bones Season 11 Episode 5, and all bets were off. From headless corpses to witchcraft, flatlining to pranking, there was plenty of spooky fun to go around. Not to mention Ichabod Crane dropping in for a visit that gave us both historical and supernatural moments. When you watch a show week in and week out, there are little things you forget, like the fact that The Jeffersonian was named after Thomas Jefferson or that its archives are filled with old documents, some of which were written by Ichabod himself.


Yes, this was the cross over episode with FOX’s Sleepy Hollow. Is handwriting really that precise a science? I thought Ichabod’s explanation about the matching handwriting was an adept way of handling the situation. As Brennan said, what other explanation could there be? Ichabod was obviously not a 200 year old man…or was he? But Brennan has never believed in the hereafter or the supernatural. She’s a women of science who requires proof. It’s nice to know that hasn’t changed, even if other things have. Leave it to Brennan to make a exact edible mold of a brain for her young daughter’s school party. It wasn’t all that many years ago that she couldn’t have pulled off that prank on Booth. I’m not sure she even would have tried, but being married and having kids have let her grow and have more fun. Hodgin’s demon contact lenses were startling. I can only imagine what Halloween is like in the Hodgins household. I wish we had seen what all of the kids were wearing.

Thankfully this installment had a lot of fun moments, such as…
• Booth comparing soy cheese to hell.
• Brennan encouraging Ichabod to explore the sexual side of he and Abbie’s relationship.
• Ichabod claiming that Benjamin Franklin named a drink Fondling the Forest.
• Hodgins saying he was a conspiracy theorist and not a supernatural nut and Cam looking at him like she wasn’t sure there was a difference.
It maybe odd to crossover these shows, but it actually worked and was a fun experience.