REVIEW: WATCHMEN: THE MOTION COMIC

CAST (VOICES)

Tom Stechschulte (The Clairvoyant)

A re-examination of superheroes, done with a bleaker, more realistic point of view, Watchmen was revolutionary when it was released in 1985, and it remains as relevant as ever, despite some dated elements (which are mitigated by the fact that the story is told in an alternate world in a specific time frame.) The Crimebusters were a group of costumed crime fighters in the 1960s, but as the world became more complicated, they became less relevant, and they disbanded, and superheroes were outlawed by the government, leaving only a few government-sponsored adventurers, including the ultra-violent patriot The Comedian and the super-powered Dr. Manhattan, who gained command over reality when he was torn down to molecules by an atomic accident.The main story is a mystery, as the psychotic Rorschach, whose mask is an ever-changing ink blot, attempts to discover who killed the Comedian, who was found dead in his civilian identity. Thinking someone is out to kill the former superheroes, he uses his own brand of ruthless violence, driven by an insane, right-wing mindset, to figure out just what’s going on, drawing in his former teammates, as the truth becomes more twisted and complicated as the story plays out. In the end, the plot is intensely deep, focusing on the choices and mistakes made in life, the meaning of existence, the value of an innocent life and the lengths one will go to in order to achieve their goals, while the story is told using intricate storytelling techniques, interwoven supplemental material and smart literary devices that make it more intelligent and engaging than most novels. That it’s told about guys wearing tights just adds a layer of accessibility and absurdity.This version of Watchmen, which was released episodically on iTunes and elsewhere, is somewhat like an audiobook version, but enhanced with animation that’s built off the actually art from the graphic novel. Now, this was done way back when with some Marvel cartoons, and it was terrible, and has become a bit better recently, but these Watchmen episodes are the best yet. Taking Dave Gibbons’ original art, panel by panel, and doing slight animation effects (and some impressive lighting and special effects work,) Warner Premier allows you to watch the graphic novel, complete with dialogue, music and sound effects.The dialogue, provided entirely by Tom Stechschulte, is really quite good, especially when voicing Dr. Manhattan, though there are a few major exceptions, namely the fact that he also provides the voices for the female characters. Though he thankfully didn’t attempt to imitate a woman’s voice, which would have yanked you right out of the story, it’s highly creepy to hear him seductively purr as Silk Spectre, especially when he’s doing it up against his own voice.You’re never going to see a more faithful “movie” than this presentation, which offers up the 12 chapters of Alan Moore’s story, including the ending that fanboys nationwide were hoping to see on the big screen  Even if you’ve read the book many, many times, it’s a new experience and an entertaining one at that.

REVIEW: THOR & LOKI: BLOOD BROTHERS

CAST (VOICES)

Daniel Thorn (Technobabylon)
Jennifer Spriggs  (The One I Love)
Roger Clark (Perfect Disasters)

thor_loki_bloodbrothers_preview_01Loki has become the ruler of Asgard. However, he doesn’t have dominion over Hela, the goddess of death. Loki is demanding fealty from everyone in Asgard. Hela asks Loki for the soul of Thor for her “legions in Nifelheim”. Lady god Sif is imprisoned at the ending of the first segment. Karnilla, the queen god of Nornheim meets Loki in the second segment. She pleads for the release of Balder from imprisonment. In the third segment, Loki orders the destruction of the Rainbow Bridge. In a flashback, Odin defeats Laufey in battle. In the final segment, Loki refuses to execute Thor and spurns Hela.cbr-thorlokibloodbrothersclip118-1024x577To say this is “inspired by” the four-issue Loki graphic novel series of 2004 is a little misleading. The scripting, story and artwork are identical, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing. The animation is a more than a little stifled, mostly relying on computer technology to manipulate a single static image rather than produce extra frames. I find this adaptation to be fascinating. The transfer from graphic novel to albeit limited animated feature showcases the original artwork in an incredible way, adding a vibrancy to the work. The addition of the more traditional elements of Norse mythology and it’s clever integration is a very nice touch. If you liked the original source material then this you will love. thor_loki_bloodbrothers_preview_03

REVIEW: ASTONISHING X-MEN 1 & 2

Joss Whedon’s “Astonishing X-Men” run was just that, astonishing. Coming in to write the series at the height of the films’ popularity, Whedon took a unique approach and didn’t go to familiar villains, instead pitting the fractured group against themselves and a new villain, the mysterious Ord. Whedon’s 24 issue run consisted of four thematically connected story arcs, the first being “Gifted” a six-issue miniseries introducing Ord as well as the possibility of a permanent mutant cure. The motion comic has slowly but surely become a fixture in the lexicon surrounding superhero media.1202175761_1The most well known example would be the “Watchmen: Motion Comic” a nearly 6 hour production that was an interesting adaptation of Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’ epic masterpiece. The big issue with many fans was the lone narrator, who was forced to voice male and female characters as well as the sometimes gimmicky, limited animation. Marvel, not to let DC hold the limelight for long has taken the next step in motion comics with the help of Neal Adams, bringing John Cassaday’s artwork from “Astonishing X-Men” to a level of life not seen before in the motion comic realm, as well as enlisting a full voice cast to cover Whedon’s take on the characters.To be quite honest, the motion comic concept here isn’t the selling point. There are plenty of other story arcs or series’ Marvel could have tackled and a lesser story wouldn’t have been improved by this new animation technique. What sells “Gifted” is Whedon’s writing and the faithful adaptation and expansion of John Cassaday’s art. It’s really hard to describe how this motion comic looks. If you’ve seen something like the “Watchmen” motion comic you will be blown away. The technique here takes the original art and gives the characters some more lifelike  movement. Little touches like Beast’s ears wiggling to eye movement distance this from the rough animation given to other productions. Neal Adams’ advanced is motion comics deserves much credit, as the expansion of Cassaday’s 2D art is seamless, retaining the artist’s distinctive look, even when certain areas had to be expanded for the medium. Fortunately, Cassaday was a co-director on the project and was able to assist Adams in the task before them.astonishing-x-men-gifted-20100915105837328-000While, the motion comic technology still fails to top traditional animation in the action scenes, Whedon’s story and the more than competent voice cast, allow these hiccups to be overlooked. I have never been the biggest Kitty Pryde/Shadowcat fan, and was apprehensive back when I saw Whedon was making her a huge part of this take on the X-Men, but, sure enough, he makes her a compelling character. In fact, she, Emma Frost, and Beast are the most compelling characters in “Gifted,” overshadowing Cyclops, Wolverine, and the new, but underdeveloped villain, Ord. The story focuses on the relationship between the team as a whole, now significantly weakened; Jean Grey is dead, Professor X is gone, and other familiar characters like Storm, Nightcrawler, Rogue, and Iceman, are missing-in-action. While Cyclops may be the figurehead leader, it’s soon very obvious that Emma Frost is running the show and has many issues of her own, including a militant attitude towards humans that falls on the fence between Professor X’s tolerance and Magneto’s eugenics. Her attitude quickly rubs Kitty Pryde the wrong way, although as Emma sadly puts it as a fight between Wolverine and Cyclops on school grounds wraps up, “I still come in second to a corpse.”xmen“Gifted” is a fun experience to say the very least. It really takes the motion comic concept to the next level, surpassing even the classic animated series in terms of consistent storytelling. Whedon’s material is much more mature than the kid’s stuff of the early 90s and it all deserves to be adapted to this format. Purists to the source material may argue this is a gimmick, but here I would say, it’s not. This is merely the next evolution in adaptation. Marvel could have just had new animators animate a full adaptation and it might have been as good; voice acting wouldn’t have been an issue for sure, but the digital comic retains the original artist’s look and feel and with his own input taken into account, this is a much preferable animated adaptation. “Gifted” is the X-Men in top form, and the seven episodes go by, way too quickly (around 80 minutes), leaving you wanting much more.

Whedon’s story involves the Danger Room, a computerized, robotic holo-deck, if you will. That is, it’s a room designed to realistically and fully create any threat the X-Men might face, for training purposes only. But when an ex-mutant, not disgraced but despondent, meets his end in the room, the computer comes up with some creative ideas of its own to escape a life of servitude to the mutants.What follows is a bit of psycho-dramatic fun involving everyone’s favorite villains, the Sentinels, and a team of X-Men consisting of Cyclops, Wolverine, Colossus, Beast, Kitty Pryde, and some chick in white whom I don’t recall at the moment. Whedon’s plot and dialog are certainly above par when it comes to graphic fiction.Meanwhile, Cassaday’s artwork captures the X-Men in a way that expertly bridges the gap between the old-school look of Kirby and Cockrum, and more contemporary artists. The design of the Danger Room villain, in particular, brings to mind some mess you might see while tripping on the dance floor, while a minor twist makes Beast appear much more beastly. Of course any action involving the Sentinels is more than welcome, and Cassaday’s take, aided by Whedon’s weird vision, provides scares and thrills for true believers. if you fancy seeing your comics on a 55-inch screen instead of a tiny printed page,  motion comics are the way to go.

REVIEW: SUPERMAN: RED SON (MOTION COMIC)

CAST (VOICES)

David Lodge (Digimon)
Wendee Lee (Masked Rider)
Jim Meskimen (Frost/Nixon)
Cindy Robinson (Sonic Boom)
Kirk Thornton (Ninja Scroll)

In the 1950s, the Soviet Union reveals its newest asset to be Superman. The sudden revelation of a superpowered alien under Soviet control causes panic in the United States, shifting the focus of the Cold War arms race from nuclear weapons to superhumans. CIA agent James Olsen recruits Lex Luthor, a scientist employed by S.T.A.R. Labs, to destroy Superman. Luthor’s first act is to cause Sputnik 2 to plummet towards Metropolis. After Superman diverts the satellite away from the city, Luthor retrieves his genetic material and creates a monstrous clone of Superman whom Lex Luthor officially names Superman 2 when he is unveiled to Olsen.


Meanwhile, Superman meets Wonder Woman at a diplomatic party, and she becomes smitten by him. Pyotr Roslov, the head of the NKVD and Joseph Stalin’s illegitimate son, is angry that Superman has turned his father’s attention away from him and ended his chances of advancement within the Soviet regime. Pyotr shoots a dissident couple in front of their son for printing anti-Superman propaganda. Stalin dies from cyanide poisoning, and Superman initially refuses command of the Communist Party. However, a chance meeting with Lana Lazarenko, his childhood sweetheart, changes his mind. Superman chooses to use his powers for the greater good and turn his country into a utopia.

The U.S. government sends “Superman 2” to engage Superman, and their duel causes an accidental nuclear missile launch in Great Britain. The clone sacrifices itself to save millions. Luthor murders his research staff at S.T.A.R. Labs and founds LuthorCorp, dedicating his life to destroying Superman. By 1978, the United States is on the verge of social collapse whereas the prosperous Soviet Union has peacefully expanded its influence to nearly every corner of the globe. The cost of this progress is an increased infringement on individual liberties, with Superman fast becoming a Big Brother-like figure; a brain surgery technique that turns dissidents into obedient drones, or “Superman Robots”, is in use. Superman now works with Wonder Woman to save lives as well as govern the Soviet state. Wonder Woman has become enamored of Superman, but he considers her simply as a comrade, and is oblivious to her love for him.

Luthor plans to shrink Moscow, but this plan fails when Brainiac, his collaborator, shrinks Stalingrad instead. Superman intervenes and retrieves both Brainiac’s central processing unit and the tiny city, putting an end to the Brainiac-Luthor cooperation. He is unable to restore Stalingrad and its inhabitants to their proper size. This becomes his one failure and a source of great guilt.

Luthor’s third plan involves Batman, who was the boy orphaned by Pyotr. Batman joins forces with LuthorCorp and Pyotr, now head of the KGB. They capture Wonder Woman and use her as bait for Superman, hoping to sap his powers with rays that imitate the light of Superman’s home planet. The plan works, but Superman convinces Wonder Woman to break free of the lasso that she is tied up with and destroy the generators running the lamps emitting the solar rays of Superman’s home planet. She does, severely injuring herself in the process, but the lamps stop running and Superman’s powers return. Scared that Superman was going to lobotomize him and turn him into a robot, Batman kills himself as a martyr to his cause. Pyotr is turned into a Superman robot, and Wonder Woman no longer has feelings for Superman as he shows little to no regard for her injured condition.

Luthor enacts his fourth plan when he finds a mysterious green lantern found in an alien ship that crashed at Roswell, New Mexico. Brainiac is reprogrammed into Superman’s aide, and the construction of a Fortress of Solitude, located in Siberia and referred to as “The Winter Palace”, begins. Superman’s reign continues with no crime, poverty, or unemployment, but with an ever-present state authority. Superman is committed to “winning the argument” with the U.S., and repeatedly refuses Brainiac’s suggestions of an invasion. Stalingrad remains his one failure, now contained within a protective glass “bottle”. The USA elects Luthor and Olsen as President and Vice President. Using his scientific expertise, massive economic capital and dictatorial powers, Luthor returns prosperity to his country. This is only a part of a more general plan to provoke Superman into invading the United States. Luthor shows Olsen two of his greatest discoveries: the Phantom Zone, a place that super-hearing cannot reach; and the Green Lantern Corps.

Luthor confronts Superman in the Winter Palace. Brainiac yanks Luthor deep into the recesses of the Fortress to be converted surgically into a Superman Robot, claiming that Lex would convince Superman to commit suicide in less than fourteen minutes. Superman agrees that his hand has been forced, and prepares to attack. First Lady Lois Luthor visits Paradise Island to forge an alliance with the Amazon empire, now ruled by an embittered and vengeful Wonder Woman. Superman attacks the East Coast, confronting and defeating the Green Lantern Marine Corps, which is led by Colonel Hal Jordan. The Amazon forces, commanded by Wonder Woman, attack Superman but are quickly defeated, along with a collection of “super-menaces” (including Atomic Skull, Parasite and Doomsday) that Luthor has put together over the years. Brainiac’s spaceship cuts the U.S. Pacific fleet to pieces, and the two superbeings meet at the White House.imagesThey are greeted by Lois Luthor with the last weapon, a small note written by Lex that reads, “Why don’t you just put the whole world in a bottle, Superman?” Realizing he has meddled in affairs that he had no place in, Superman orders Brainiac to end the invasion. Brainiac, however, reveals it has never been under Superman’s control, and instead attacks Superman with green kryptonite radiation. Brainiac is shut down from inside by Luthor, who evaded surgery. As the singularities powering Brainiac’s ship threaten to collapse, Superman rockets it into space, where it explodes. The Earth is saved, but Superman is apparently dead. The Soviet Union falls into chaos, but is soon brought back under control thanks to the Batmen (resistance members who began wearing the costume after Batman’s death). Lex Luthor integrates many of Superman’s and Brainiac’s ideas into the new philosophy of “Luthorism” and forms a “Global United States”. This becomes the defining moment for mankind’s future as it enters an unprecedented age of peace and stability. A benevolent world government is formed and maintained. Luthor presides over a string of scientific achievements, including the curing of all known disease, and colonization of the solar system. Luthor lives for over one thousand years.MV5BNTU0NjE3MjU2OV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwMjE4NjE2MjE@._V1_SX1500_CR0,0,1500,999_AL_At Luthor’s funeral, it is revealed that Superman survived the explosion of Brainiac’s ship and is apparently immortal. Superman attends the funeral wearing a business suit and thick glasses essentially identical to the appearance of Clark Kent, an identity he never adopted in this timeline. Luthor’s widow, Lois, sees this mysterious figure in the crowd and, other than an eerie sense of deja vu, suspects nothing. Superman walks quietly away from the ceremony, planning to live among humans rather than ruling over them.MV5BODc5MWVhODQtNDViNy00ZTVkLTlhZmItYjQ2ZTUzNzA5NmU5XkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyOTc5MDI5NjE@._V1_Billions of years in the future, Earth is being torn apart by tidal stresses from the sun, which has become a red giant. Luthor’s distant descendant, Jor-L, sends his infant son, Kal-L, rocketing back into the past. The final panels of the comic book depict the landing of Kal-L’s timeship in a Ukrainian collective in 1938, effectively causing a predestination paradox (and, thus, making Superman a descendant of Luthor).imagesSuperman Red Son is an animated version of Mark Millar’s graphic novel. The artwork is fantastic and the alternate tale of an infant Superman who crash lands on Earth 12 hours earlier in this Universe and therefore lands in Russia rather than America is just awsome. a Great Motion Comic for DC fans.

REVIEW: BATGIRL: YEAR ONE / MAD LOVE

BATGIRL: YEAR ONE

CAST (VOICES)

Kate Higgins (Sailor Moon Crystal)
Erin Fitzgerald (Sabrina: TAS)
Lex Lang (Batman: The Brave and the Bold)
Neil Ross (Centourions)

Batgirl: Year One is a motion comic series developed from DC Comics iconic Batgirlâ nine-part Batgirl: Year One series as we gain a deeper look at one of Barbara Gordons first turn as the caped crusader, learning just how hard it is to wear the mask while staying alive. Young, supremely intelligent, and determined, Barbara would do anything to take down criminals, though every route to that goal, either legally by becoming a cop like her dad, James Gordon, or illegally by becoming a masked vigilante, is dismissed.

When the Killer Moth crashes the Million Dollar Masquerade Ball, Barbara puts to use her female Batman costume by taking down the creepy villain before Batman and Robin arrive. Initially dismissed by Batman and flirted with by Robin, Barbara works hard to prove that she has just as much right to become a superhero as the others, ultimately becoming Batgirl. Batgirl: Year One was adapted by the new graphic way of storytelling, holding onto the panel-by-panel style but with moving graphics, sounds, and explosive dynamics.

BATMAN ADVENTURES: MAD LOVE

CAST (VOICES)

Billy Davis
Cindy Airey
Paul St. Peter

After having his latest plan to kill Commissioner Gordon foiled by Batman, The Joker retreats to one of his hideouts to plan his next move, but is being annoyed by his lovestruck sidekick Harley Quinn and kicks her out of their hideout. As Harley sits outside, she remembers how she met Joker, back when she was the psychiatrist Dr. Harleen Quinzel and spending her internship at Arkham Asylum. Harleen interviewed Joker and learned that he was abused as a child by his alcoholic father. After more interviews, Harleen determined that Batman was the source of Joker’s anger, but also that she was falling in love with him. Harleen became Joker’s partner in escaping from the asylum in hopes that she could win his love.

Harley decides that the only way to make the Joker love her is to kill Batman, which she attempts to do by feeding him to a school of piranhas. Batman distracts her by telling her that the Joker had been using her from the start, and that Joker’s stories of an unhappy childhood were lies. When she tearfully insists that Joker really loves her, Batman convinces her to call Joker so that he will know she accomplished her goal (as the piranhas would leave no convincing evidence other than bones and a tattered costume which anyone can fabricate). When Joker arrives, however, he is infuriated that Harley would try to kill Batman herself and knocks her out a window, where she is found by nearby police officers. Joker then decides nonetheless to use the opportunity to finally kill Batman, which escalates into a wild chase ending atop a moving subway train. Batman taunts Joker by saying that Harley came closer to killing him than he ever did. Joker attacks him in rage, but Batman sends him lunging into a burning smokestack.

Back in Arkham Asylum, a severely injured Harley Quinn renounces The Joker forever, wanting nothing more than to heal and leave Arkham for good. A moment later, however, Harley finds flowers sent by her clownish beau with a “get well soon” card and falls in love with him again

Both are very entertaining and done in a unique style. This is definitely a must in a super hero collection.

REVIEW: BATMAN BLACK AND WHITE

 

CAST (VOICES)

Michael Dobson (Dreamcatcher)
Janyse Jaud (Hulk vs)
John Fitzgerald (Mon Ami)
Adam Fulton (Broken Saints)

Motion comics aren’t an itch many casual superhero buffs would take the time to scratch, but Batman: Black and White is an enticing collection that might sway some leery minds. I can understand the logic behind it: with one of the chief complaints about comic-to-film adaptations being a lack of faith to the source material, why not put those printed pages front and center? With a minimum of animation, motion comics can show classic heroes and their exploits in an interesting perspective, which Black and White does for the Caped Crusader with all the pitch-dark atmosphere you’d expect.

Twenty brief adventures set in the thick of Gotham’s seedy underworld are presented in Black and White. Bringing the work of writers like Bruce Timm and Alex Garland to life is striking art as provided by Dave Gibbons, Alex Ross, and others. There’s no shortage of the Dark Knight’s dynasty to cover, as we bear witness to stories ranging from macabre fantasy (“Monsters in the Closet”) to heartwarming and thoughtful (“Sunrise”). Batman combats street thugs, Nazis, mad scientists, and the most notorious members of his lengthy rogues gallery. A few of these villains even get their own turn in the spotlight, showing more than mere greed gnawing at their psyches. Fleeting as their lengths may be, these tales each do their part in shining a light on what’s made Batman’s crimefighting legacy endure for so long.

The DC Animated Universe has given fans some of the best superhero media in recent years — Wonder Woman and Justice League: Doom can stand toe to toe with Captain America or The Avengers, if you ask me. But what sets Batman: Black and White apart is that it’s not a linear narrative (or a single, connected story whatsoever). Every vignette is self-contained and lasts a few minutes at most, leaving next to no elbow room for grand, epic plotlines. This doesn’t always play out well, with some stories (“Hands,” especially) suffering abrupt anticlimaxes after a marathon of build-up. Black and White is staunchly economical and only so effective when its entirety is viewed in succession, but on their own, the bulk of the stories stand as distinct, eye-catching, and emotionally fulfilling. The wide range of art styles and environments each short incorporates (from a futuristic police state to a WWII-era Gotham) is impressive, as are the tones they adopt. We get some light-hearted escapades (as when Batman gets the jump on a trouble-making Harley Quinn), although most delve into its protagonist’s psychology to intriguing effect. It says a lot when a three-minute hostage crisis or quick encounter with a certain man of steel lingers in your mind as much as a grandiose Christopher Nolan opus.

Batman: Black and White might appeal most to those fans who’ve pledged complete allegiance to the cape and cowl, but there’s no reason outsiders shouldn’t find something to rile them up. With each scenario possessing a unique presentation and its own brand of derring-do, this omnibus has no trouble packing a collective punch.  Batman: Black and White does just right by Bob Kane’s legendary guardian of the night.

REVIEW: IRON MAN EXTREMIS

 

 

CAST

Jason Griffith (Yu-Gi-Ohi)
Ted Lewis (Pokemon)
Dan Green (Grave of The Fireflies)

The story was written by comic book legend Warren Ellis and for those expecting anything similar to the feature film adaptations may be very disappointed. “Extremis” is a much smaller feeling arc, with only two action set pieces, one midway through the program and one at the end; instead the story explores the characters of Tony Stark as well as some spots of insight into the mysterious villain, Mallen. Mallen, a conservative extremist, is the guinea pig for a strain of the Super Soldier Serum known as Extremis. Once the serum alters our crazed foe forever, he embarks on a wave of destruction against the government and innocent civilians alike, aided by his near supernatural powers including super strength and pyrokinesis. Initially Tony is called into investigate the theft of the serum by a scientist friend Maya Hansen.
Ellis’ story takes an almost leisurely pace before Mallen and Stark face off for the first time, allowing viewers a glimpse into the mind of Stark via two notable scenes. The first is an interview for a documentary by an ultra liberal filmmaker, who tries to eviscerate Stark on camera, accusing him of war profiteering, immediately following a very friendly introduction off-camera. Ellis’ political statements are very obvious, and Stark’s calm, collected verbal destruction of the filmmaker is very similar to the eventual final confrontation with Fallen. Stark represents the middle ground of political ideology in the story, demonstrating the faults of extremism on both sides of the fence; the Extremis strain itself though is a fly in the ointment that ultimately forces Iron Man to understand that unchecked extremism sometimes must be met with equal or greater retaliation.Amazon_women_07The second scene, taking place between Stark, Maya, and an older mentor figure. Here Ellis captures the strong distinction between Stark the man, and Stark the man behind Iron Man. The mentor brings Stark down a peg, pointing out how is flashy empire doesn’t benefit humanity nearly as much as the quiet, uncelebrated work of scientists such as Maya. The more Stark feels the burden of humanity from mentors as well as board members, the more he’s compelled to make his persona as Iron Man a legacy that will help mankind for as long as possible. When it comes time for Stark to don the suit though, “Extremis” isn’t nearly as exciting.maxresdefaultThe motion comic style is extremely effective for the character moments, but the uneven approach to action, namely the use of the 3D CGI models for various elements, cheapens the overall effectiveness of the motion comic format. Ultimately, “Iron Man Extremis” is an enjoyable but flawed story and motion comic presentation. Voice acting is generally solid, with the actor handling Mallen being the weakest link. There are a few overplayed moments, especially in the beginning, with the actress playing Maya sounding like she didn’t have a full grasp on her character. Fortunately, the voice actor handling Tony captures the cool, confident, and brilliant aspects of the character as well as the doubt and sometimes self-hatred. The actors all are best when they are given Ellis’ best material to work with: the dialogue driven moments, which are arguably the most fascinating and engaging aspects of the production, mixing a moderate ideology with some well-developed character study.