REVIEW: THE DEFENDERS

CAST

Charlie Cox (Stardust)
Krysten Ritter (Veronica Mars)
Mike Colter (Zero Dark thirty)
Finn Jones (Game of Thrones)
Élodie Yung (Gods of Egypt)
Sigourney Weaver (Avatar)
Rachael Taylor (The Loft)
Eka Darville (Power Rangers RPM)
Elden Henson (The Hunger Games: Mockingjay)
Deborah Ann Woll (Ruby Sparks)
Jessica Henwick (Game of Thrones)
Ramón Rodríguez (The Taking of Pelham 123)
Rosario Dawson (Sin City)
Scott Glenn (The Silence of The Lambs)
Simone Missick (K-Town)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Wai Ching Ho (Cadillac Man)
Carrie-Anne Moss (Chuck)
Peter McRobbie (16 Blocks)
Rob Morgan (Stranger Things)
Marko Zaror (Machete Kills)

 

The Defenders is Marvel’s best Netflix show, hands down.  While the crossover between Daredevil, Jessica Jones, Iron Fist, and Luke Cage can occasionally veer into a fragmented set of mini-episodes early on, the awesome foursome eventually unites to form a show greater than the sum of its parts. The street-level superheroes provide a fantastic eight-episode run with high stakes, a frenzied pace and, most importantly, effortless chemistry.Things don’t start off that way, though. The opening pair of episodes read almost as a greatest hits collection of each hero’s respective shows before the narrative eventually relents and shoehorns the plot in a comically convenient way for the four to come together. The lack of instant gratification can be grating, but this is easily relieved by the fun interaction between fan-favourites that leads up to the team-up. Misty Knight and Jessica Jones’ brief scenes are worth the price of admission alone and there are a few, shall we say interesting, crossovers you won’t see coming. Without giving too much away, a cataclysmic event is unleashed upon New York and The Defenders, each following their own leads, stumble into each other’s paths in the same building. And then things get good. Really, really good. Unsurprisingly, The Hand are the villains of the season and are led by Sigourney Weaver’s Alexandra. Her performance is tempered by an unidentified terminal illness which spurs her character on and at least drives her away from the realms of cartoonish MCU villain as  she has an actual character arc rather than the bland go there, be evil trope of prior bad guys. When the show does focus on The Defenders (and, in fairness, that’s 90% of the time) the show is a rollercoaster of wisecracks, quips and, yup, Jessica Jones’ side-eye. It’s glorious fun and, for my money, feels like a much bigger event than The Avengers ever was. There’s a spine-tingling moment, complete with an inspirational score bubbling up in the background, where the four heroes unite to take on a foe at the midway point which ranks as an all-time great Marvel moment.Yes, The Defenders run is short, but those thinking a mere eight episodes won’t cut it can have their fears put to rest. Coupled with Game of Thrones season 7’s clipped seven-episode run, it feels like we’re reaching a watershed point in television where shows don’t need to be chained to a long episode run anymore. Barely a second is wasted in The Defenders: Every quiet character moment is poignant and fleshes out something or someone; every action sequence leads to something bigger, better, and more shocking; and every one-liner and on-the-nose dig at Iron Fist will make you laugh. Nothing outstays its welcome.

 

 

 

 

 

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REVIEW: MEN IN BLACK 3

 

CAST

Will Smith (Suicide Squad)
Tommy Lee Jones (Batman Forever)
Josh Brolin (Gangster Squad)
Jemaine Clement (Legion)
Michael Stuhlbarg (Hugo)
Emma Thompson (Junior)
Mike Colter (Luke Cage)
Nicole Scherzinger (Dirty Dancing 2017)
Michael Chernus (Captain Phillips)
David Rasche (Ugly Betty)
Keone Young (Dude, Where’s My Car?)
Bill Hader (Power Rangers)
Alice Eve (Star Trek Into Darkness)
Lenny Venito  (The Neighbors)
Justin Bieber (Zoolander 2)
Lady Gaga (Sin City 2)
Will Arnett (The Lego Batman Movie)

In 2012, an alien criminal, Boris the Animal, a Boglodite, escapes from a maximum-security prison on the moon and arrives on Earth, bent on taking revenge on Agent K, who shot off his left arm and captured him in 1969. He confronts K, who is with his partner Agent J, telling him he is “already dead”. J then discovers that K was responsible not only for capturing Boris, but for deploying the “ArcNet”, a shield that prevented the Boglodites from conquering Earth and caused their extinction.Boris travels back in time to kill the young Agent K. With history altered so that K is long-dead, J finds that only his memory has been unaffected, and no one from the Agency understands his obsession with K until Agent O, the new Chief, deduces that there has been a fracture in the space-time continuum. With K out of the picture, the ArcNet was never deployed, and there is nothing to protect the present-day Earth from the Boglodite invasion, so J must travel back in time to stop Boris and save K. Back in 1969, he travels to Coney Island, knowing from the Agency’s records that, in 1969, Boris will commit a murder there.He finds Boris, but is discovered and arrested by 1969 K, who prepares to wipe his memory, but decides at the last minute to investigate J’s claims. K and J follow clues, leading them to a bowling alley, and then to The Factory, where they come across an alien named Griffin, who is in possession of the ArcNet. Griffin, who can see all possible future timelines and outcomes, senses Boris is coming and escapes, but Boris later captures him. J and K pursue and rescue Griffin, acquiring the ArcNet. 1969 Boris escapes and 2012 Boris arrives, and they team up.Upon learning that they must go to Cape Canaveral, Florida and attach the ArcNet to the Apollo 11 rocket so it can be deployed in space, J reveals the real purpose of his mission to K, who initially takes the news badly. The three fly there using jetpacks, and are stopped by military police. Griffin shows a skeptical colonel the future, convincing him of the importance of their mission, and the officer then assists them in reaching the launch site. As the agents climb up the rocket’s launch tower, they are attacked by both 1969 Boris and 2012 Boris.Using his time-travel device, J evades an attack by 2012 Boris and knocks him off one of the launch tower bridges. K shoots off 1969 Boris’s left arm (which restores the timeline), knocking him off the tower as well. The ArcNet is attached and deploys successfully when the rocket launches, with 2012 Boris being incinerated by the rocket’s exhaust. 1969 Boris then attacks K on the beach, but the colonel pushes K down and out of the way, taking the hit himself instead. K then kills Boris (which 2012 K had regretted not doing) instead of arresting him as he originally did. The colonel’s young son inquires about his father, but rather than tell him the truth, K wipes his memory and tells him only that his father is a hero. Observing from afar, J realizes that the young boy is himself, the colonel was his father, that K has actually been watching over him all his life, and was there when the timeline changed, thus explaining why he was the only one who remembered K in the alternate 2012.His mission complete, J returns to 2012, where he thanks K for being his surrogate father. Meanwhile, Griffin observes the moment and is briefly terrified when K almost forgets to tip a waitress, which he knows only occurs in timelines where an asteroid is on a collision course with Earth. However, K remembers and leaves a tip and the asteroid hits a satellite and is destroyed.Men in Black 3 is a great adventure of this franchise, with a wonderful story and magnificent special effects. I had low expectations with movie, but I was favorably surprised with a great film.

REVIEW: HALO: NIGHTFALL

CAST

Mike Colter (Luke Cage)
Steve Waddington (The Imitation Game)
Christian Contreras (Zero Dark Thirty)
Alex Bhat (War & Peace)
Luke Neal (Jupiter Ascending)
Christina Chong (Johnny English Reborn)
Jennie Gruner (The Habit of Beauty)
Eric Kofi-Abrefa (Snowden)
Alexis Rodney (Guardians of The Galaxy)

In the 26th Century, the prolonged war between humanity and the fanatical alien alliance the Covenant has ended with a tenuous treaty. Despite the ceasefire, Earth’s outer colonies remain vulnerable to the Covenant’s covert intrusions. The ONI – Office of Naval Intelligence has been tasked with counterintelligence to beat the Covenant. In Planet Sedra, Commander Jameson Locke and his team witness a Covenant’s spacecraft and a Zealot Elite warrior disembarks with a bomb. They unsuccessfully try to stop the alien that explodes the bomb in a mall. They realize that it is a biological attack with an element fatal to humans. Sedran Commander Aiken captures the middleman Axl that tells that the element is obtained from Alpha Halo, where the day longs 16 h and the temperature in the sunlight reaches 482o C. Aiken, Locke and his team head to Halo in the spacecraft Condor with pilot Macer carrying a Havoc weapon to destroy the place. On the arrival, they find two terrorists but are trapped in Halo by weird worms that are attracted by technology. And in five hours the sun will rise. Halo: Nightfall is a good and underrated sci-fi adventure. The story was released edited on Blu-ray as a feature and it works. I have glanced at the negative reviews and apparently they belong to fans of a video game that are not satisfied with the movie. However, for those like me that do not play the game, this movie is highly entertaining.

REVIEW: LUKE CAGE – SEASON 1

CAST

Mike Colter (Ringer)
Mahershala Ali (The Hunger Games: Mockingjay)
Simone Missick (A Taste of Romance)
Theo Rossi (Cloverfield)
Alfre Woodard (Star Trek: First Contact)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Rosario Dawson (Sin City)
Frank Whaley (Broken Arrow)
Sônia Braga (Alias)
Frankie Faison (The Silence of The Lambs)
Rob Morgan (Stranger Things)
Sean Ringgold (American Gangster)
Parisa Fitz-Henley (Even Money)
Karen Pittman (The Ameircans)
Erik LaRay Harvey (Twister)
Ron Cephas Jones (Mr. Robot)
Sonja Sohn (The Originals)
Rachael Taylor (Jessica Jones)

Netflix’s latest drama may not be a great superhero series, but it’s searingly relevant and entertaining. Premiering on Friday, Sept. 30, Luke Cage is vital and alive and of-the-moment. It sings with the rhythms and swagger of Harlem and it’s a genre show that wears its intellectual curiosities like a badge. It’s so satisfying as badass street poetry and muscular urban renewal parable that after watching the seven episodes made available for critics, I barely cared that as a superhero show, Luke Cage is often repetitive and a little underwhelming. It’s the logical extension of Marvel’s niche-y approach to its Netflix offerings, a specificity that has yielded shows that are far more provocative, but far less universally accessible than the company’s blockbuster movies.The Marvel movies try to tick every box, but staying true to Netflix’s general business model, their comic book shows have just gone after one or two boxes aggressively. Jessica Jones used a snarky heroine and a mind-controlling bad guy to craft a story about consent and the power of sisterhood. Daredevil was using blindness and the darkness of Hell’s Kitchen as a platform for a story of Catholic guilt and challenged faith. Run by Cheo Hodari Coker, Luke Cage is the Harlem Renaissance intersecting with the comic book renaissance, a confrontational act of all-too-real wish fulfillment imagining a young black male as bulletproof.

Mike Colter’s Luke Cage was introduced in Jessica Jones as a haunted love interest for the main character, where we learned about his powers, basically being super-strong and impervious to bullets (or pretty much anything that might pierce/penetrate/crush his skin). We pick up with Luke sweeping the floors at the neighborhood barbershop run by Frankie Faison’s Pop. It’s the sort of community institution where people sit around all day debating the coaching styles of Pat Riley and Phil Jackson or whether Easy Rawlins or Kenyatta was the better urban fiction hero. By night, he works as a dishwasher at Harlem’s Paradise, a nightclub with a tremendous talent booker and operated by mobster Cornell “Cottonmouth” Stokes (Mahershala Ali), cousin of local politician Mariah Dillard (Alfre Woodard). Immediately, we see a harsh contrast between the greedy capitalist renewal espoused by Cottonmouth and Dillard and the grassroots Harlem that Luke Cage wants to be a part of and wants to elevate. Naturally, conflict is a-brewing between the two Harlems.Like Wilson Fisk in Daredevil, Cottonmouth is a vicious, remorseless killer, but he’s also got a somewhat noble sense of how what he’s doing is good for the borough he grew up in. Cottonmouth’s ties are to family and also to the idea of legacy and the protection of a renowned family name, key details that Coker and his writers hit hard.The Marvel movies rely on outsized special effects to capture their heightened take on reality, but the Netflix shows don’t have the budget for that, so they opt for outsized thematics instead. Like Jessica Jones before it, Luke Cage is aggressively unsubtle, but it’s also aggressively smart. Sure, having Luke Cage wandering around, wearing a hoodie as an act of defiance, reading Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man feels a bit on the nose, but once you throw in the references to Walter Mosley and Donald Goines and Ta-Nehisi Coates, it becomes clear that this show doubles as a superlative summer reading list, which has value beyond computer-generated scenes of mass destruction or a really cool mocap villain.The early episodes are so charmingly brainy and move with such a light step — Paul McGuigan of Sherlock and Scandal knows his way around a flashy pilot — and the cinematography is so stylish — not surprisingly, everybody loves photographing Mike Colter — that you only sometimes realize that the things you expect to get out of a superhero show are largely missing. Luke Cage is, to his great detriment, initially much too powerful, and while he’s certainly a reluctant hero, when he actually goes to work on the bad guys, it’s pointless to try stopping him. The “Ruckus” set piece in the third episode stands out because nothing else even comes close in scope or action execution. Of the seven episodes, the one that was least successful for me, and by a wide margin, was the most comic book-y, an origin-story fourth episode that hews reasonably closely to Luke’s ’70s Marvel origins. It’s fitting that Luke would want to debate pulp and elevated pulp-fiction African-American heroes, because that’s the tradition Luke Cage operates best in, which is great if that’s what you’re looking for the show to be.Ali makes great use of a classic villain cackle, and he gives Cottonmouth a coiled, psychotic rage and disarming glimpses of reasonableness. Woodard’s Mariah is Cottonmouth’s opposite, all superficial gentility and then undercurrents of something unhinged that become more frequent. Faison and Ron Cephas Jones, as a barbershop chess wiz named (or nicknamed) Bobby Fish, offer grounded decency, and I’m enjoying what Theo Rossi is doing, skulking around the edges, as a criminal intermediary dubbed Shades. Simone Missick’s Misty Knight and Rosario Dawson’s Claire Temple are there half as proactive female leads, half as potential love interests for Luke, but sometimes are confusing reminders that Luke was mighty hung up on a deceased ex — and then on Jessica Jones — just one TV show ago and they feel like they ought to be mentioned.Just as Colter moves with purpose, Luke Cage moves with purpose, even if that purpose isn’t the same as what Civil War or Age of Ultron have led audiences to anticipate from Marvel. It’s a series infused by the conversations we’re having about race and gender and the American urban space in 2016, and it’s a series built to inspire additional conversations about black masculinity and representations of heroism in an age in which the news is too often focused on the tragic disposability of black masculinity. Luke Cage is another great staple for Marvel and its Cinematic Universe.

REVIEW: MILLION DOLLAR BABY

CAST
Hilary Swank (The Reaping)
Clint Eastwood (Gran Torino)
Morgan Freeman (The Dark Knight)
Jay Baruchel (Robocop 2014)
Mike Colter (Jessica Jones)
Brian F. O’Byrne (Flashforward)
Anthony Mackie (Ant-Man)
Margo Martindale (Mike & Molly)
Riki Lindhome (The Muppets)
Michael Pena (American Hustle)
Margaret “Maggie” Fitzgerald, a waitress from a Missouri town in the Ozarks, shows up in the Hit Pit, a run-down Los Angeles gym owned and operated by Frankie Dunn, an old, cantankerous boxing trainer. Maggie asks Frankie to train her, but he initially refuses. Maggie works out tirelessly each day in his gym, even after Frankie tells her she’s “too old” to begin a boxing career at her age. Eddie “Scrap-Iron” Dupris, Frankie’s friend and employee (as well as the film’s narrator), encourages and helps her.
Frankie’s prize prospect, “Big” Willie Little, signs with successful manager Mickey Mack after becoming impatient with Dunn’s rejecting offers for a championship bout. With prodding from Scrap and impressed with her persistence, Frankie reluctantly agrees to train Maggie. He warns her that he will teach her only the basics and then find her a manager. Other than Maggie and his employees, the only person Frankie has contact with is a local pastor, with whom he spars verbally at daily Mass.
Before her first fight, Frankie leaves Maggie with a random manager in his gym, much to her dismay; upon being told by Scrap that said manager deliberately put her up against his best girl (coaching the novice to lose) to give her an easy win, Frankie rejoins Maggie in the middle of the bout and coaches her instead to an unforeseen victory. A natural, she fights her way up in the women’s amateur boxing division with Frankie’s coaching, winning many of her lightweight bouts with first-round knockouts. Earning a reputation for her KOs, Frankie must resort to bribery to get other managers to put their trainee fighters up against her.
Eventually, Frankie risks putting her in the junior welterweight class, where her nose is broken in her first match. Frankie comes to establish a paternal bond with Maggie, who substitutes for his estranged daughter. Scrap, concerned when Frankie rejects several offers for big fights, arranges a meeting for her with Mickey Mack at a diner on her 33rd birthday. Out of loyalty, she declines. Frankie begrudgingly accepts a fight for her against a top-ranked opponent in the UK, where he bestows a Gaelic nickname on her. The two travel Europe as she continues to win; Maggie eventually saves up enough of her winnings to buy her mother a house, but she berates Maggie for endangering her government aid, claiming that everyone back home is laughing at her.
Frankie is finally willing to arrange a title fight. He secures Maggie a $1 million match in Las Vegas, Nevada against the WBA women’s welterweight champion, Billie “The Blue Bear”, a German ex-prostitute who has a reputation as a dirty fighter. Overcoming a shaky start, Maggie begins to dominate the fight, but after a round has ended, Billie knocks her out with an illegal sucker punch from behind after the bell has sounded to indicate the end of the round. Before Frankie can pull the corner stool out of the way which was inappropriately placed on its side by Frankie’s assistant, Maggie lands hard on it, breaking her neck and leaving her a ventilator-dependent quadriplegic.
Frankie is shown experiencing the first three of the five stages of grief: first seeking multiple doctors’ opinions in denial, then blaming Scrap in anger and later trying to bargain with God through prayer. In a medical rehabilitation facility, Maggie looks forward to a visit from her family, but they arrive accompanied by an attorney and only after having first visited Disneyland and Universal Studios Hollywood; their only concern is to transfer Maggie’s assets to them. She orders them to leave, threatening to sell the house and inform the IRS of her mother’s welfare fraud if they ever show their faces again.
As the days pass, however, Maggie develops bedsores and undergoes an amputation for an infected leg. She asks a favor of Frankie: to help her die, declaring that she got everything she wanted out of life. A horrified Frankie refuses, and Maggie later bites her tongue repeatedly in an attempt to bleed to death, but the medical staff saves her and takes measures to prevent further suicide attempts. The pastor Frankie has harassed for 23 years, Father Horvak, warns him that he would never find himself again if he were to go through with Maggie’s wishes.
Frankie sneaks in one night, unaware that Scrap is watching from the shadows. Just before administering a fatal injection of adrenaline, he finally tells Maggie the meaning of a nickname he gave her, Mo Chuisle (spelled incorrectly in the film as “mo cuishle”): Irish for “my darling, and my blood” (literally, “my pulse”). He never returns to the gym. Scrap’s narration is revealed to be a letter to Frankie’s daughter, informing her of her father’s true character. The last shot of the film shows Frankie sitting at the counter of a diner where Maggie once took him.
The ending was haunting but incredibly poignant. This film was impressive, excellently crafted and definately worthwhile seeing, not least for the excellent performances of the cast

REVIEW: JESSICA JONES – SEASON 1

MAIN CAST
Krysten Ritter (Veronica Mars)
Mike Colter (Ringer)
Rachael Taylor (Transformers)
Erin Moriarty (The Watch)
Eka Darville (Power Rangers RPM)
Carrie-Anne Moss (The Matrix)
Wil Traval (Once Upon a Time)
David Tennant (Doctor Who)
RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST
Susie Abromeit (Sex Drive)
Robin Weigert (Lost)
Kieran Mulcare (The Following)
Clarke Peters (John Wick)
Colby Minifie (Nurse Jackie)
Rebecca De Mornay (The Hand That Rocks The Cradle)
Thomas Kopache (Stigmata)
Michael Siberry (Highlander: The Series)
Rosario Dawson (Daredevil TV)
jessica jones poster
Marvel’s Jessica Jones announces its noir intentions from the get-go. From the slinky music and impressionistic animation of the opening credits, there’s no doubt what kind of series this is going to be, and the (naturally) hard-boiled narration of series star Krysten Ritter sets the stage for the dark, sardonic world she occupies. Thankfully, the narration can best be described as “unobtrusive.” It’s there because that’s how noir works, but the show is otherwise self-aware enough not to cling to the expectations of its genre. Sure, Jessica works behind a glass door with “Alias Investigations” typewritten across it, but this also the type of noir in which Jessica asks someone why they thinks she lives alone, and their response is, “Because people don’t like you?”
Created by Melissa Rosenberg (who put in time on shows as varied as Dexter, Birds Of Prey, and Party Of Five in addition to writing all five Twilight movies), Jessica Jones avoids a villain-of-the-week structure by having Jessica essentially work on the same case for the duration of the first season. There’s no onslaught of new superpowered (or “gifted,” in the parlance of the show) opponents for the heroine to face each episode; in fact, despite her super strength and impressive vertical leap, Jessica would strongly object to being called a heroine at all. Her brief attempt to use her powers for good resulted in her being taken under the sway of Kilgrave (David Tennant), whose mind control tactics caused her to commit a terrible crime that the show slowly teases out.
It’s his apparent return that kick-starts the action on the show. A missing college co-ed case turns out to be more complicated than Jessica initially assumes, and forces her to reconsider her distaste for heroism. Reasonably content to drink her way through her PTSD and take PI cases from high-powered attorney Jeryn Hogarth (played with admirable steely ferocity by Carrie-Anne Moss, long marooned after the Matrix movies), Jessica is soon faced with the prospect of her own responsibility for taking care of Kilgrave.
Along her ambivalent path towards heroism, she looks out for her junkie neighbor (Eka Darville), flirts with the handsome Luke Cage (Mike Colter), and slowly reconnects with her foster sister, Trish (Rachael Taylor). The show really starts to cook once Jessica and Trish start working together on the Kilgrave case. Trish, a former child star and current celebrity radio show host, is the only one who knows everything that happened to Jessica. Initially introduced as the disapproving straight arrow friend, she’s quickly revealed to be something much more interesting, despite her lack of superpowers. She’s also positioned as the moral center of the show, which proves to be vital for Jessica, who’s unsurprisingly given to a bleak pessimism.
It should be said: Jessica Jones is a deeply feminist show, all the way down to its depiction of sex, which is pointedly empowering for the women. More than that, its central conflict is its lead character struggling to maintain her agency against an abusive man. All the people in positions of power (minus Kilgrave) are women, and the story of the missing co-ed extends beyond the mystery of her disappearance. Trish is by no means content to sit on the sidelines of the action, and Hogarth seems to spend all of her time conducting important business meetings in impeccably tailored dresses and confidently seducing her assistant. Moss has a way with a withering putdown, though Ritter gets her fair share, even if the show doesn’t take full advantage of her comedic side. She’s compelling as Jessica. The slow build toward a confrontation between Kilgrave and Jessica is tensely effective, hanging over everything else she does. Tennant’s face is barely seen on camera for the first couple of episodes, but rather than make his absence seem pointed, the tactic works as a way to build up Jessica’s dread about his return.
While the series clearly takes place in the same universe as Daredevil, complete with brutal violence and punches that really land, the fight scenes themselves have a very different feel. Jessica’s too strong to lose fistfights, and she partakes in them with a weary sense of resignation that people are wasting her time trying to resolve problems this way. All of this adds up to a show that is very certain of its voice and tone. Streets are always covered with a foot of grimy snow, Jessica doesn’t own a garment that doesn’t have a hole or three in it, and every drawer or cabinet contains a bottle of booze or a pistol. A Must See

REVIEW: RINGER

CAST

Sarah Michelle Gellar (Cruel Intentions)
Kristoffer Polaha (Dollhouse)
Ioan Gruffudd (King Arthur)
Nestor Carbonell (Bates Motel)
Mike Colter (Luke Cage)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Zoey Deutch (Beautiful Creatures)
Jason Dohring (Veronica mars)
Justin Bruening (Knight Rider 2008)
Tara Summers (Hitchcock)
Zahn McClarnon (Longmire)
Billy Miller (American Sniper)
Jaime Murray (Spartacus: Gods of The Arena)
Andrea Roth (Robocop: The Series)
Gage Golightly (Cabin Fever 2016)
Sean Patrick Thomas (Halloween 8)
Nikki DeLoach (The Trial)
Gregory Harrison (One Tree Hill)
Matthew Del Negro (Teen Wolf)
Jonathan Banks (The Lizzie Bordan Chronicles)
Loren Lester (Batman: TAS)
Drew Powell (Gotham)
Nicole Gale Anderson (Beauty and The Beast)
Amber Benson (Buffy)
Brian Hallisay (Hostel: Part III)
Dylan Neal (Arrow)

What is the problem with CW that they took this off the air after one season? Yes, season 1 was tied up for the most part, but you knew from the end that there were lots of exciting plots for season 2. The characters were left in limbo.

Sarah Michelle Gellar stars as twins, Siobhan and Bridget. Bridget is a drug user and prostitute who witnessed a murder and right before she is supposed to testify against the killer, who is a monster, she becomes frightened and takes off for parts unknown. She runs to New York city and to her estranged sister, Siobhan. Siobhan married money, but she’s a piece of work, as you will see.

The Episodes

1) “Pilot”

Bridget Kelly (Sarah Michelle Gellar), a recovering drug addict, witnesses a murder committed by Bodaway Macawi and several members of his gang. FBI agent Victor Machado (Nestor Carbonell) assures her of her safety, but she escapes from her hometown, Wyoming, and takes refuge in New York City with her estranged twin sister Siobhan Martin (Gellar). After the mysterious disappearance of Siobhan on a boat outing, Bridget–believing her sister committed suicide–assumes her sister’s identity, to hide from the FBI and the mob. In the midst of renovation of Siobhan’s loft, Bridget is attacked by an unidentified man; she eventually kills her attacker in self defense.

2) “She’s Ruining Everything”

Machado chooses to stay in New York City to thorough his research about Siobhan. Bridget, while trying to hide the body of her attacker, confides in her Narcotics Anonymous sponsor Malcolm Ward (Mike Colter); together they develop a getaway plan for her. Siobhan’s best friend Gemma (Tara Summers) and her husband Henry’s (Kristoffer Polaha) fighting escalates and Bridget unexpectedly bonds with her rebellious stepdaughter Juliet (Zoey Deutch). Siobhan is hiding out in Paris with an unknown agenda.

3)  “If You Ever Want a French Lesson”

Bridget is getting closer to finding Siobhan’s killer by tracing his phone back. But someone is after her, and she will soon discover compromising information about Andrew. Meanwhile, Agent Machado is still in New York City, hunting Bridget, unaware that Bridget is Siobhan. Henry and Gemma have another crisis, but this time regarding their investment in Andrew’s hedge fund. In Wyoming, Malcolm is abducted by the sadistic gangster Bodaway Macawi, who tortures Malcolm in order to locate Bridget’s whereabouts. Elsewhere, Siobhan continues living her solitary life in Paris and basking in her freedom from her old life in which she encounters Tyler (Justin Bruening), a charming banker who is working for one of Andrew’s European branches.ringer_s1e17_andrewSMG

4)  “It’s Gonna Kill Me, But I’ll Do It”

Bridget, Andrew, Gemma, and Henry head to the Hamptons to celebrate Siobhan’s birthday, where Bridget reflects the rough past she and her sister experienced. In Paris, Siobhan uses her feminine charm to continue to lure Tyler closer to benefit her hidden motives for Bridget and Andrew. While Agent Machado uncovers crucial pieces of information, Bridget’s situation worsens when secrets of her own are revealed, leaving the consequences of her lies unknown and in the hands of Gemma.

5) “A Whole New Kind of Bitch”

After Bridget confides her secret in Gemma, she asks Bridget a tricky favor. Henry’s writing career is swaying while Andrew and Juliet’s relationship is not getting any better. Bridget, on the other hand, is meeting another NA sponsor, Charlie (Billy Miller), in a desperate attempt to stay sober. Meanwhile, the captive Malcolm is put in a position that tests his sobriety after Bodaway forces heroin into him, in another attempt to get him to talk on where Bridget is. Gemma disappears and blood is seen all over the wall and floor in Henry and Gemma’s house.

6) “The Poor Kids Do It Everyday”

Agent Machado focuses his attention on Bodaway Macawi as he investigates Malcolm’s disappearance. In New York, Bridget and Henry are placed in a sticky situation, trying to find out who murdered Gemma. Juliet runs into trouble with a bully, Tessa (Gage Golightly), at her new school but is helped out by her teacher Mr. Carpenter (Jason Dohring).

 

7)  “Oh Gawd, There’s Two of Them?”

Bridget is forced to reveal that she has a twin to Andrew and Henry as the police begin questioning them about Gemma’s disappearance. She also asks Charlie for his help in finding Gemma. Unknown to Bridget, Charlie is revealed to be Siobhan’s contact and Gemma’s attacker. Meanwhile, Malcolm escapes from Bodaway’s thugs and heads to New York. After Bridget sees him she collapses and whilst in hospital the doctors want to check on the baby. After Juliet is in a car accident with her friend, Monica (Nicole Gale Anderson), Andrew cuts off her $10 million trust fund in punishment.

8)  “Maybe We Can Get a Dog Instead”

Bridget lies to Andrew about having had a miscarriage when the nurse reveals that there is no baby. After Juliet flirts with Mr. Carpenter, he transfers her out of his class. Malcolm arrives in New York and is confronted by Agent Machado. Tyler comes to New York and meets Bridget, who he believes is Siobhan/Cora. Siobhan tells Tyler that she is married to Andrew and that she was having marriage problems, even though it was Bridget that Tyler saw in New York.

9)  “Shut Up and Eat Your Bologna”

Bridget realizes she’s growing fond of Andrew. Henry and Andrew’s business partner bond; Malcolm has doubts about Bridget’s new NA sponsor; and Bridget decides to meet Siobhan’s therapist, Dr. Anabel Morris (Merle Dandridge), in order to gain insight into her sister’s life and learns that Siobhan sometimes went by the alias Cora Farell. Elsewhere, Gemma is being held captive by Charlie in his basement.

10)  “That’s What You Get for Trying to Kill Me”

In New York, Bridget and Malcolm discover and inform the police that Charlie is holding Gemma. Upon realizing he is close to being caught, he tells Siobhan he wants double his pay, otherwise he will kill Gemma. Bridget and Andrew get even closer, while Juliet continues to dangerously flirt with her teacher Mr. Carpenter. She also claims that he raped her to new friend Andrea (Chelsea Tavares). While in Paris, Siobhan is trying to fix things with Tyler. In Wyoming, thanks to an informant (Amber Benson), Agent Machado discovers someone on the force is passing information to Bodaway. Charlie kills Gemma even though Siobhan told him not to, and Siobhan travels to New York to stop Charlie from killing Gemma. When she finds out it is too late, she shoots Charlie because he killed Gemma, and to make sure he doesn’t hurt anyone else.

11) “It Just Got Normal”

While the relationship between Bridget and Andrew grows more intimate, Bridget learns about the alleged rape of Juliet, leading to a confrontation between her and Mr. Carpenter. Since the murders of Gemma and Charlie, Siobhan has decided to remain in New York for a while and tries to learn more information about Bridget and her former life with a little help from an unsuspecting Tyler. Back in Wyoming, Agent Machado interrogates Jimmy and learns some new information, putting Bridget’s cover as Siobhan at risk, and uncovers some news about Malcolm. Back in New York, Bridget offers to host a fundraiser that her friend Greer (Mädchen Amick) is holding for Juliet’s school and discovers that Greer knew one of Siobhan’s deep dark secrets. Meanwhile, Malcolm decides to work for Andrew at Martin/Charles in order to keep an eye on him, and Henry mourns the death of his wife. Siobhan discovers that Bridget has settled into her former life more easily than Siobhan expected and she is determined to change that by interacting with everyone to turn them against her… and being careful not to run into Bridget, who still does not know that she is still alive nor of her evil agenda.

12) “What Are You Doing Here, Ho-Bag?”

Juliet’s mother, Catherine (Andrea Roth), is back in town in order to support her daughter during her lawsuit, but she is messing with the whole family, causing all kinds of trouble. The real Siobhan is coping with Henry and Tyler while selling Bridget’s engagement ring to buy a fake passport. Meanwhile, Detective Machado is trying to get information from Jimmy. Bridget investigates the Pivoine Hotel mystery and ends up hearing about some guy named Solomon. Henry is on to Siobhan who he thinks is in reality Bridget. Juliet’s rape story is put into question when a tape is discovered showing her hitting on Mr. Carpenter. In prison, Jimmy is making a pact with Bodaway to get out, revealing where Bridget is while Bridget finds out that Siobhan went to Wyoming before she reached out for help. Against all odds, Tessa shows up at the Martins, claiming she was also raped by Mr. Carpenter. Siobhan finally shows Henry the truth that Bridget is the one living the lie with Andrew and that she is still pregnant with his child.

13) “It’s Easy to Cry When This Much Cash Is Involved”

Bridget decides to enlist Solomon’s (Sean Patrick Thomas) help in order to retrace Siobhan’s last steps and discovers her connection to John/Charlie. Meanwhile, Juliet’s trial against Mr. Carpenter is dismissed when Tessa admits she lied about him attacking her, and after he attempts to sue Andrew he is given a substantial amount of money to settle out of court. It is then revealed this was the plan all along set up between Mr. Carpenter, Juliet, and Tessa to get at Andrew’s money. Elsewhere, Henry is blackmailed by Olivia to bring Gemma’s wealthy lawyer father on as a client at Martin/Charles. On the other hand, Siobhan struggles to keep everything together as Henry and Tyler become suspicious that she is using both of them and Bridget continues to inadvertently ruin her, as yet, unclear plans.

14) “Whores Don’t Make That Much”

Following her investigations from the last episode, Bridget takes Malcolm to Siobhan’s secret office only to find it empty. Back in the Martin’s apartment, Bridget gets a call that causes her to remember what drove her apart from her sister. Flashbacks from seven years ago reveal Siobhan’s troubled relationship with Dylan (Misha Collins), an ex-boyfriend who dumped her after she got pregnant, but after a few years wants to prove that he was a changed man. Bridget, who is babysitting Siobhan’s son, Sean, allows Dylan to take Sean out just for one day despite Siobhan forbidding it. On their way home, Dylan asks Bridget if she can support him when he files to be Sean’s legal guardian, and a car hits them in the middle of the road, killing Sean in the process. Back in the present day, Bridget, as Siobhan, forgives Dylan after understanding that what happened was an accident, and not necessarily their fault. In the meantime, after finding out that Henry has got the key to Siobhan’s Safe deposit box, Malcolm, who’s helping Bridget to find out who’s chasing her, decides to keep an eye on Henry. Juliet’s scheme takes a dark path when Tessa is brutally attacked after buying a car with Andrew’s money, which causes Juliet to believe Mr. Carpenter did it. She then tells her father that she is willing to live with her mother in Miami for a “change of scenery”. That leads to the revelation that Catherine was the one who had the idea for the scheme.

15) “P.S. You’re an Idiot”

Andrew asks Bridget (thinking she is Siobhan) to renew their vows and they begin planning a wedding ceremony, with Juliet as the Maid of honor. Siobhan, visiting an OB/GYN in Paris, learns she is having twins but doesn’t tell Henry that the conception date means the baby may be Andrew’s. Malcolm is fired when he is caught stealing information from Olivia’s computer, and later tells Bridget that Andrew’s company is running a Ponzi scheme. Catherine is romantically involved with Mr. Carpenter but then steals his money and blackmails him into leaving Juliet alone. It is also revealed that Andrew came up with the Ponzi scheme and that Catherine paid someone to attack Tessa, but to roughen her up, not beat her severely.


16) “You’re Way Too Pretty to Go to Jail”

Andrew confides in Bridget (who he thinks is Siobhan) about running a giant Ponzi scheme, which fills her with doubt and fear as she debates on what to do. Meanwhile, it is revealed that Agent Machado’s past relationship with his informant, the murder victim/stripper Shaylene Briggs (Nikki DeLoach), was more than professional. Siobhan deceives Malcolm when she pretends to be Bridget in order to remove him from the scene. In Paris, Tyler takes something from Siobhan that is a key piece of evidence in her plot for revenge against Andrew. Andrew tells Olivia that Bridget (who is acting as Siobhan) is aware of their Ponzi scheme and she suggests they take action to keep Malcolm, Bridget (acting as Siobhan) and Tyler quiet. Also, Henry realizes Bridget knows more than she should and has to follow Siobhan’s orders to keep Bridget from interfering with their plans.

17) “What We Have Is Worth the Pain”

Bridget fears that something has happened to Malcolm when she cannot get in touch with him. In an effort to find him, Bridget, with Solomon in tow, visits the hotel where Malcolm was staying and discovers on security footage that Andrew was the last person to see Malcolm before he disappeared. She suspects that Andrew may have killed Tyler as well as Malcolm. Solomon also reveals to Bridget that he has known all along that she was impersonating Siobhan. Meanwhile, Juliet discovers that her mother played a part in the attack on Tessa after Juliet meets a young man with a distinctive tattoo on his right arm by which Tessa identifies him as her assailant. Siobhan travels back to New York where she admits to Henry the truth about why she faked her own death and that Andrew and Olivia are in fact the ones behind the attempts on her life. Elsewhere, Agent Machado arrives back in New York to look for Malcolm and begins to suspect that Andrew may have had a hand in his disappearance.

18)  “That Woman’s Never Been a Victim Her Entire Life”

After an attempt made on Bridget’s life results in Andrew being shot, Agent Machado is more determined than ever to find out who was responsible and what Bridget (still impersonating Siobhan) knows about it. Henry accuses Siobhan of putting a hit out on Bridget, which Siobhan denies, while Bridget thinks the missing Olivia was behind it as well as the murder of Tyler. Meanwhile, Andrew admits to asking Malcolm to leave town and Juliet tells Bridget the truth about her mother.

19) “Let’s Kill Bridget!”

Henry grows impatient with Siobhan’s plan and tells her she needs to let go of her murderous revenge plot against both Andrew and Bridget or they cannot be together. Bridget decides that the only way she will feel safe is if she gives up her charade of impersonating Siobhan and returns to Wyoming to testify against the sadistic Bodaway Macawi. Agent Machado gets suspended from the FBI after he beats up a suspect in full view of witnesses. Later, he gets an idea to make Bodaway Macawi think Bridget’s dead, since that’s what he wants. The plan ends up going down terribly wrong and reveals that Catherine wants Siobhan dead.

20 “If You’re Just an Evil Bitch Then Get Over It” Roger Kumble Cathryn Humphris
Still posing as Siobhan, Bridget admits to Agent Machado that someone tried to kill her months earlier and she thought it was Andrew. Bridget goes to Henry’s apartment, where the very pregnant Siobhan overhears Bridget accuse Henry of Tyler’s murder. At the same time, Henry learns that his father-in-law is responsible for his arrest for Tyler’s murder and also has an agenda to use the flash drive to work for him. Meanwhile, Catherine goes to desperate extremes to kill Siobhan by attempting suicide to play on Juliet’s sympathies.

21) “It’s Called Improvising, Bitch!”

Andrew catches Catherine trying to fake Bridget’s suicide, so she holds them both hostage along with Juliet. Running out of options, Catherine calls Olivia, who is revealed to be her lover. Olivia tells Catherine to bring Bridget to her house, so they can run away together. When Catherine and Bridget arrive, Agent Machado arrests Catherine, having heard the conversation at the apartment after Bridget secretly calls him. Meanwhile, the main witness against Henry dies of a drug overdose and Siobhan gives birth to twin girls. Henry asks the nurse for a paternity test, showing his doubts about Siobhan.

22) “I’m the Good Twin”

As the vow renewal nears, Bridget realizes she needs to tell Andrew the truth about who she really is, but worries about losing everything. Jimmy has escaped from prison and demands that Bridget (who he believes is Siobhan) give him part of the cash for scaring Bridget away where she finally learns that Siobhan and Charlie hired him to scare her into fleeing Wyoming. Afterwards, Bodaway demands Jimmy reveal where Bridget is, and after getting an answer, he kills Jimmy with a knife in cold blood. Agent Machado is deported back to Colorado where he is ordered to stay off the Bodaway case. Back in New York, Tim Arbogast, Gemma’s father, believing that Siobhan was responsible for Gemma’s death, becomes the new owner of Martin/Charles Inc. and tells Andrew that Siobhan has been having an affair with Henry over the past year. Andrew is furious and cancels their vow renewal and announces that he and Siobhan are getting divorced. Now forced to do so, Bridget finally tells Andrew and Juliet the truth about who she really is. Unfortunately, they both take the news very badly, with Juliet calling Bridget worse than her own mother. Andrew and Juliet take a leave to the Hamptons after Andrew tells Bridget that she now has one month to move out. Meanwhile, Henry steals Siobhan’s money (that she stole from Andrew) and kicks her out of his house after he begins to mistrust her, including finding out that he’s not the biological father of her twins. Siobhan returns to her old apartment to steal all the jewelry that once was hers. Bodaway then attacks her believing she’s Bridget, and the real Bridget then shows up and after a brief struggle she kills him, thinking he was attacking Juliet. Agent Machado arrives after getting Bridget’s call and reassures her that Andrew and Juliet are safe in the Hamptons. At the hospital, Siobhan, now broke and homeless, tries to think of a way to get her old life back. Later, Solomon shows Bridget security footage that shows Siobhan was alive on the day of her “suicide” talking with Charlie. Bridget angrily confronts Henry, who after being punched by Andrew earlier, finally tells Bridget the truth about her sister. A horrified Bridget then says: “Siobhan wanted me dead?”

This show was a great suspense show and really needed closure, sadly that was not meant to be, we didn’t even get a dvd release.