REVIEW: CHATROOM

 

CAST

Aaron Taylor-Johnson (Godzilla)
Imogen Poots (V For Vendetta)
Matthew Beard (An Education)
Hannah Murray (Game of Thrones)
Daniel Kaluuya (Kick-Ass 2)
Meagan Dodds (Ever After)
Michaelle Fairley (Game of Thrones)
Opheila Lovibond (Gurdians of The Galaxy)
Richard Madden (Cinderella)
Jacob Anderson (Game of Thrones)

maxresdefault (1)Hideo Nakata takes a very simple idea, that of online interaction between people and turns it into something sinister with this film and targeting the angst-ridden, emotionally-charged teens of London he manages to put together a well thought-out and compelling film which whilst not perfect was still an effective British thriller with plenty going for it. A Film 4  the small cast of 5 lead characters each have their own reasons for seeking solace online and we are given an insight into their lives whilst at the same time are witness to the Machiavellian behind-the-scenes manipulation by William brilliantly portrayed by Aaron Johnson.Matthew Beard, Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Imogen Poots, Daniel Kaluuya, and Hannah Murray in Chatroom (2010)Johnson is excellent in Chatroom it has to be said, he puts in a believable performance as William and commands your attention in the scenes he features. A sociopathic character seemingly without conscience he has his own reasons for being the way he is and time is spent getting to know him and his back-story. Whilst not a sympathetic character by any stretch of the imagination his offline persona and personal life do give an insight into why he acts the way he does and provides an explanation for how intelligent and manipulative he is to be able to wield such power over other people.Aaron Taylor-Johnson in Chatroom (2010)it’s an excellent and the film is well worth watching, the acting is terrific at times and I did like the concept and premise of the story.

 

REVIEW: THE LIZZIE BORDEN CHRONICLES

MAIN CAST
Christina Ricci (The Addams Family)
Clea DuVall (The Faculty)
Cole Hauser (2 Fast 2 Furiuous)
GUEST / RECURRING CAST
John Heard (Prison Break)
Andrew Howard (Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.)
Olivia Llewellyn (Penny Dreadful)
Jeff Wincott (S.W.A.T.)
Michael Ironside (Total Recall)
John Ralston (Bitten)
Bradley Stryker (Izombie)
Jessy Schram (Veronica Mars)
Jonathan Banks (Highlander: The Series)
Rhys Coiro (30 Days of Night: Dark Days)
Stephen McHattie (300)
Ronan Vibert (Hex)
Michelle Fairley (Game of Thrones)

What happens after Lizzie Borden takes an ax to her father and stepmother? Lifetime follows up its popular television movie from 2014 about the notorious accused murderess with an eight-episode miniseries sequel that becomes a guilty pleasure


Lizzie (Christina Ricci) has been cleared of all wrongdoing in those earlier killings, though the townspeople of Fall River, Mass. suspect that she’s gotten away with murder. Lizzie delights in her new infamy, taking all the shade-throwing stares in stride and scaring the local children as opportunity permits. Trouble comes quickly, however, when her father’s former business partner, William Almy (John Heard), makes claims on the Borden estate.  Suddenly, Lizzie and her sister, Emma (Clea DuVall), find themselves threatened with bankruptcy, which doesn’t please their deadbeat half brother, William (Andrew Howard), who has appeared out of the blue looking for a handout. As if that weren’t enough, there’s also the matter of the dogged Pinkerton agent Charlie Siringo (Cole Hauser), who has come to town with the express aim of proving Lizzie’s criminality. Even Better Call Saul’s Jonathan Banks shows up as a scarily temperamental gangster who does his best to intimidate Lizzie. What’s a girl to do in the face of all this threatening machismo but strengthen her resolve and sharpen ye ole hatchet? It’s not long into the first episode before Lizzie’s back to her murderous ways, bleeding men out with the well-placed stab of a hairpin or getting them drunk enough that they can more easily be pushed from high places with nooses around their necks.


The Lizzie Borden Chronicles best talent comes exclusively from Ricci and DuVall, who have a delectable rapport not too far removed from Bette Davis and Joan Crawford at their hag-horror peak in What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? Ricci’s porcelain-doll features make her seem even more alluringly alien now than she did as a child actress. There’s a winking self-consciousness to her portrayal of Lizzie that works to the character’s advantage; she’s like an out-of-time avenging angel, a feminist icon (before there were words to describe it) lashing out at patriarchy the only way she knows how. By contrast, DuVall is all plain-faced earnestness and the loving voice of reason that complements Lizzie’s lunacy, at least for now. It’s often tough to play the straight man to a more flashy companion, but DuVall does it exceptionally well.


The sisters’ relationship intrigues because it constantly seems on the point of implosion, and does come to a head by the end of the miniseries.