REVIEW: BATMAN: THE ANIMATED SERIES – VOLUME 1

Starring

Kevin Conroy (Justice League Doom)
Loren Lester (Red Eye)
Bob Hastings (General Hospital)
Robert Costanzo (Total Recall)
Efrem Zimbalist Jr. (Hot Shots)

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Recurring / Notable Guest Cast

Richard Moll (Scary Movie 2)
Lloyd Bochner (Point Beak)
Clive Revill (Transformers: The Movie)
Marc Singer (Arrow)
Rene Auberjonois (Star Trek: DS9)
Meredith MacRae (The Rockford Files)
Mark Hamill (Star Wars)
Mari Devon (Digimon)
Henry Polic II (Mork & Mindy)
Pat Fraley (Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles)
Diane Pershing (Gotham Girls)
Ingrid Oliu (Real Women Have Curves)
Michael Pataki (Halloween 4)
Ron Perlman (Hellboy)
Dorian Harewood (Space Jam)
George Murdock (Star Trek V)
Jim Cummings (Aladdin)
Justin Shenkarow (Spider-Man: Into The Spider-Verse)
Robert DoQui (Robocop)
Murphy Cross (Taxi)
John Vernon (Dirty Harry)
Linda Gary (He-Man)
Townsend Coleman (The Tick)
Jeff Doucette (Bedazzled)
Peter Jason (They Live)
Josh Keaton (Voltron)
Eugene Roche (Soap)
Lndsay Crouse (Buffy: TVS)
Paul Williams (Adventure Time)
Rob Paulsen (Animaniacs)
Michael Ansara (The Message)
Michael Bell (Transformers: The Movie)
Adrienne Barbeau (Argo)
Kate Mulgrew (Star Trek: Voyager)
Mary McDonald-Lewis (Grimm)
Neil Ross (An Americal Tail)
Frank Welker (Transformers)
Michael Gross (Tremors)
Elisabeth Moss (The Handmaid’s Tale)
Jean Smart (Garden State)
Brock Peters (Star Trek IV)
Adam West (60’s Batman)
Edward Asner (Elf)
Ed Begley Jr. (Better Call Saul)
Dick Gautier (Get Smart)
Arleen Sorkin (Days of Our Lives)
Aron Kincaid (Transformers)
Alan Rachins (Showgirls)
Jeff Bennett (Johnny Bravo)
Diana Muldaur (Star Trek: TNG)
Jeffrey Tambor (The Hangover)
Roddy McDowall (Planet of The Apes)
Kimmy Robertson (Speed 2)
Loretta Swit (M*A*S*H)
Takayo Fischer (Moneyball)

MV5BYTcwYzdlOTctNmRmMS00ODkxLThjZDgtNDRiMzMwNTgzZWFhXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNTAyODkwOQ@@._V1_In 1992, Warner decided to revive Batman for TV as an animated series. Luckily, they had a couple of talented individuals already working on Tiny Toons – animator Bruce Timm and background artist Eric Radomski, who were keen to take a stab at the character. They created a pilot film involving Batman and a Gotham City that was at the same time modern and a throwback to the pre-50’s styleMV5BNGQzNzZmNTgtYmJkZS00MzFlLTk0Y2YtOWUxZTg5M2FiMWM5XkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNTQ0NjQzNTE@._V1_It’s fitting that this set is called ‘Volume One’ and not ‘Season One,’ as the episodes were aired completely out of order, with a few episodes of this set not reaching airwaves until the second year. However, you get the first 28 shows to see production, which arguably contain the best of the series’ four-year run as well. As this series is a reinterpretation of the world created in the comics, most of the episodes here are origins of the villains, and for the most part the episodes work very well. What allowed this series to age so well (in fact, I think I can appreciate it even more now than when I was twelve) is that the writing is top notch. Each episode feels like a self-contained short film, and the writers have at once managed to give every character a great deal of humanity and individuality to underscore the directness of the visuals.MV5BODY0MmZlYmEtOWExMC00ZGFhLWEyZmEtZjFlZGE1ZjBjZTY5XkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNTQ0NjQzNTE@._V1_Paul Dini had been writing for television a decade prior to this, but Batman was where he finally got his chance to shine, and the episodes he crafted, particularly Heart of Ice are some of the most effective of the series. Timm, Dini and Radomski were able to create a world that was iconic without being one-sided or silly. The idea of a guy who runs around in a cape essentially beating enemies into submission can’t be presented effectively at face value, and the creators of this series were more than willing to delve into the psychological aspects of their characters. Batman is never entirely good, nor are most of his enemies entirely evil. Rather the show focuses on people who have been emotionally scarred in life, and deal with those scars by either seeking to help other people, or harm them. What drives Batman isn’t too different from what drives his villains. It’s not uncommon to feel more sympathy for one of the show’s villains than the hero himself, because more often than not the villain isn’t even entirely sure what they’re doing or why they’re doing it.MV5BNjBlMjNmMWUtMjczYy00YWU5LTg5MzEtNzIwM2I3MDQwMWMwXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNTQ0NjQzNTE@._V1_The Two-Face episodes are a prime example of the quality of storytelling in the series, because the character, who is such a silly concept (a two-faced man flipping a two-headed coin to decide evil deeds) is handled very subtly, with the emphasis placed on childhood trauma and emotional repression. Not every episode shines, however. The two part introduction to Catwoman, The Cat and the Claw, is plagued with generic characters and situations, and plays too heavily on the environmental card. And there are a few other stinkers, although you can generally tell which episodes are going to be good by who’s writing each. MV5BN2MxNWJkZDktN2U5YS00OTc5LWI2NjMtODI5YjViYTJjMmEzXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNTQ0NjQzNTE@._V1_Casting is absolutely perfect. As vocal director Andrea Romano discusses in the extras, rather than hire trained vocal artists to develop new characters, the producers instead sought out actors with specific character already in their voices. Mark Hamill has the performance of his career as the Joker, with just the right mix of menace and hilarity. Hellboy’s Ron Perlman shows up as Clayface for a few episodes, ’70s bombshell Adrienne Barbeau is sultry as Catwoman and Edward Asner features as a prominent crime boss. The cast list is an absolute who’s-who for any film buff.MV5BNTIxOTc5MDQtMGIxMi00ODgzLWFlMmMtOWI4ZmExMDc0NDAwXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNTQ0NjQzNTE@._V1_But it’s episodes like “Beware of the Gray Ghost” where the casting really shines. Batman teams up with a former television hero who’s down on his luck. In an inspired decision the producers cast former Batman Adam West for the role, who brings such humanity and poignancy to the part that it ends up one of the best episodes in the series.MV5BOWIyOTg5ZTYtMjM4NC00MzMxLWFiMmItOGEzYTA3ZTNlYzQ5XkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNTQ0NjQzNTE@._V1_All minor quibbling aside however, you’ll be hard-pressed to find another collection with writing, acting and visuals this stellar from the early 90’s. The impact of “Batman: The Animated Series” was overwhelming to television, with a noticeable shift from the slapstick “Animaniacs / Tiny Toons” style to markedly darker action fare, many of the shows still being overseen today by Timm, Radomski and Dini themselves. “Batman: The Animated Series” changed what American TV animation could be, and this set is a fantastic glimpse into the origin of that.

 

REVIEW: HALLOWEEN IV: THE RETURN OF MICHAEL MYERS

CAST

Donald Pleasence (The Great Escape)
Danielle Harris (Left For Dead)
Ellie Cornell (Free Enterprise)
George P. Wilbur (A Nightmare on Elm Street 5)
Beau Starr (Goodfellas)
Sasha Jenson (Teen Angel)
Michael Pataki (Aiport ’77)
Kathleen Kinmont (CIA)


Michael Myers has been in a coma for ten years since the explosion at Haddonfield Memorial Hospital and is being transferred to Smith’s Grove Sanitarium by ambulance. Upon hearing that he has a niece, Michael awakens, kills the paramedics, and makes his way to Haddonfield to look for her. Dr. Sam Loomis (Donald Pleasence), Michael’s former psychiatrist, who also survived the explosion, learns of Michael’s escape and gives chase. He follows Michael to a small gas station and eatery, where Loomis finds Michael has killed a mechanic for his clothes, along with a clerk. Michael then escapes in a tow truck and causes an explosion, destroying Loomis’s car in the process. Loomis is forced to catch a ride to Haddonfield to renew his search for Michael.

Meanwhile, eight-year-old Jamie Lloyd (Danielle Harris), the daughter of Laurie Strode and Michael’s niece, is living in Haddonfield with her foster family, Richard and Darlene Carruthers, and their teenage daughter, Rachel. It is Halloween and Jamie’s foster parents, Richard and Darlene, are heading out for the night and Rachel (Ellie Cornell) is left to babysit her, causing her to miss her date with her boyfriend Brady (Sasha Jenson). Jamie knows about her uncle Michael, but she is unaware he is the strange man she has been having nightmares about. After school, Rachel takes Jamie to buy ice cream and a Halloween costume. Michael has already arrived in Haddonfield, and almost attacks Jamie in the store. That night, Rachel takes Jamie trick-or-treating, and Michael goes to the electrical substation and murders a worker by throwing him into live high voltage parts, plunging the town into darkness. Dr. Loomis arrives in Haddonfield and warns Sheriff Ben Meeker (Beau Starr) that Michael has escaped from custody and returned to Haddonfield. Michael single-handedly takes down a police station and slaughters the police force. A lynch mob is formed by the town’s men with the agenda to take down Michael as they remembered the massacre ten years before.

Rachel discovers her boyfriend Brady cheating on her with the Sheriff’s daughter Kelly (Kathleen Kinmont), and loses Jamie. After being chased by Myers, Rachel reunites with Jamie. Sheriff Meeker and Dr. Loomis arrive and take the girls to Sheriff Meeker’s house with Kelly and Brady, and a deputy. They lock and board up the house, and Loomis departs to look for Michael. With Meeker in the basement awaiting the arrival of the state police, Michael enters the house quietly and undetected. He kills a deputy off-screen, and then murders Kelly by impaling her with a shotgun.

Rachel discovers the bodies and races upstairs to get Jamie, but she is gone. Brady and Rachel realize they are trapped in the house, and Rachel finds Jamie. Michael appears and struggles with Brady before crushing his skull, killing him. Michael then chases Rachel and Jamie up to the attic. They climb through a window onto the roof and Jamie is lowered down safely, but Michael attacks Rachel and knocks her off the roof. Being pursued by Michael, Jamie runs down the street, screaming for help and runs into Dr. Loomis. They take shelter in the school, but Michael appears and throws Loomis through a glass door before chasing Jamie through the school. Jamie trips and falls down a flight of stairs. Before Michael can kill his niece, Rachel appears, alive, and sprays him in the face with a fire extinguisher.

The lynch mob and the state police arrive at the school after hearing the alarm. Four men from the mob agree to take Jamie and Rachel over to the next town in a pick-up truck. Michael has hidden on the underside of the truck; he climbs into the bed of the truck and kills the men, including the driver. Rachel is forced to drive, continuously attempting to throw Michael off. She succeeds in doing so and saying “Die, you son of a bitch!”, rams him with the truck, sending him flying into a ditch near an abandoned mine. The police arrive and as Jamie approaches Michael and touches his hand, he rises. The police shoot Michael until he falls down the abandoned mine and is presumed dead.

Jamie and Rachel have been taken home, and Darlene and Richard-who have arrived home-console the girls. Darlene goes upstairs to run Jamie a bath. Jamie, overwhelmed by Michael’s essence, dons a clown mask and stabs her stepmother with a pair of scissors, though not fatally. It ends with Jamie standing at the top of the stairs, emotionless with the scissors in her hand and stained with blood, with Dr. Loomis screaming as Richard, Rachel and Sheriff Meeker stare in horror.

This movie does have good acting from Donald Pleasence, Ellie Cornell and Danielle Harris. A decent plot. I specifically enjoyed the trailer boys Earl and his crew that go around shooting in the bushes and killing someone they think is Michael Myers. That scene always gets me laughing. Pure comedy!