REVIEW: FOR ALL MANKIND – SEASON 1

For All Mankind (2019)

Starring

Joel Kinnaman (Suicide Squad)
Michael Dorman (The Invisible Man)
Wrenn Schmidt (Our Idiot Brother)
Sarah Jones (Alcatraz)
Shantel VanSanten (The Flash)
Jodi Balfour (True Detective)

Joel Kinnaman in For All Mankind (2019)

Recurring / Notable Guest Stars

Chris Agos (Chicago Fire)
Matt Battaglia (Thor)
Chris Bauer (The Devil’s Advocate)
Jeff Branson (All My Children)
Colm Feore (The Amazing Spider-Man 2)
Ryan Kennedy (Tin Star)
Eric Ladin (American Sniper)
Rebecca Wisocky (Devious Minds)
Arturo Del Puerto (Ride Along 2)
Noah Harpster (Transparent)
Sonya Walger (Lost)
Wallace Langham (CSI)
Nate Corddry (Ghostbusters)
Lenny Jacobson (Bumblebee)
Spencer Garrett (Yes Man)
Saul Rubinek (Hunters)
Krys Marshall (Supergirl)
Brian Stepanek (Young Sheldon)
Meghan Leathers (American Waste)
Edwin Hodge (The Purge)
James Urbaniak (American Splendor)
Megan Dodds (CSI: NY)
Olivia Trujillo (The Toy Box)
Leonora Pitts (Manson Family Vacation)
John Rubinstein (Chilling Adventures of Sabrina)

Mark Ivanir, Michael Dorman, Wrenn Schmidt, Krys Marshall, Jodi Balfour, Meghan Leathers, and Olivia Trujillo in For All Mankind (2019)Battlestar Galactica and Outlander creator Ronald D Moore heads back into space and back into the past again, with one of Apple TV+’s make-or-break launch dramas, For All Mankind. But rather than robot invaders or time travelling romantics, the fantasy here is restricted to an alternative history, asking what would have happened if the Russians had beaten the Americans to landing the first man on the moon. In Moore and co-creators Ben Nedivi and Matt Wolpert’s version of 1969, the US – driven by the utterly self-serving President Nixon (no need for fantasy there) – refuses to take the defeat lying down and the space race rapidly escalates into a Battle To Control the Moon.For All Mankind (2019)But while that may sound like the title of a sci-fi B-movie, For All Mankind is ostensibly a period drama – with the drama in question alternating between the immaculate suburban houses of the astronauts and their partners, the NASA Mission Control room, the bar where NASA personnel go to blow off steam (if they really did this much drinking, it’s a wonder they ever made it off the launch pad) and, of course, the Moon.For All Mankind (2019)The family politics that arise from hard-drinking, occasionally womanising men waiting to blast off into space are dealt with well, but can drag a little, and as you’d expect, the real moments of tension take place when launch time approaches, in front of not only the controls of lunar modules, but also the TV screens where the astronauts’ wives gather to watch their husbands’ latest nail-biting manoeuvres broadcast live. Whether NASA would really choose to televise in real time so many situations that could quite easily end in the failure of their missions or the deaths of their astronauts is questionable but it’s certainly a good technique for evoking the stresses and strains of having a partner whose job is being shot into space on top of several hundred thousand pounds of rocket fuel.Even the first episode – which has a lot of work to do simply in terms of scene-setting – offers up a couple of great cliffhanger moments. But once we reach the Moon, there are opportunities to really ratchet up the tension, mostly driven by NASA and the astronauts’ questionable willingness to throw the rule book out of the window in their desperation to secure a lunar first over the Russians. Of course, Nasa in 1969 was a very male-oriented world but in formulating the show it’s clear that Moore and co thought have thought hard about how they can put women at the heart of the space-based action too.Dave Power, Sonya Walger, and Joel Kinnaman in For All Mankind (2019)In reality, NASA didn’t begin an astronaut programme for women until 1978 and to this day a woman has still not set foot on the moon (NASA’s current target for that is 2024), but here circumstances dictate that the women’s programme starts much sooner, giving us a second, female-focused, strand to the space race story with at least as much drama as the men’s event and far more emotional impact. Performances are good across the board. The ever enigmatic Joel Kinnaman is well cast as tightly-wound yet soul-searching astronaut Edward Baldwin. Shantel VanSanten plays his equally focused wife Karen, balancing her duties as one of the matriarchs of the astronauts’ wives club with her deeply buried fears about the danger that her husband’s job puts him in.Sonya Walger, Sarah Jones, Cass Buggé, Krys Marshall, and Jodi Balfour in For All Mankind (2019)Sarah Jones is a stand-out as fellow astro-wife Tracey Stevens, overwrought by the infidelities of her husband Gordo (Michael Dorman) but with the possibility of glory of her own on the horizon. And Wrenn Schmidt plays pioneering Margo Madison, a mission control engineer striving to make a name for herself in a man’s world – also the position that the brilliantly laconic Sonya Walger finds herself in as aspiring astronaut Molly Cobb. Aside from Margo, the NASA control room is largely populated by real-life characters (a depressed Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and John Glenn even hang out in the background after their failed attempt to make it to the lunar surface). Colm Feore plays Wernher von Braun – the German scientist who headed up the US space programme – as warm and principled, which may surprise those who know how von Braun’s skills were utilised during the Second World War.Joel Kinnaman in For All Mankind (2019)Eric Ladin as Chief Flight Director Gene Kranz gets to perform a couple of spine-tingling inspirational speeches ahead of some heart-in-mouth moments, and Chris Bauer is great as firm-but-fair Director of Flight Crew Operations Deke Slayton, the man who makes astronaut selections and who must spar with Nixon’s cronies as they attempt to push his mercurial agenda on NASA. And, well, it’s probably best if I stop listing names at this point… Because despite this initial over-abundance of personnel, and some slower moments in the earlier episodes, For All Mankind has a lot going for it – some winning characters and great performances; easy-on-the-eye sets and moonscapes; gripping scenes and uplifting moments – and not least the fact that it’s for all Womankind, too.

25 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS REVIEW: THAT 70s SHOW – THE CHRISTMAS EPISODES

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MAIN CAST
Topher Grace (Spider-Man 3)
Mila Kunis (Ted)
Ashton Kutcher (The Butterfly Effect)
Danny Masterson (Yes Man)
Laura Prepon (Karla)
Wilmer Valderrama (Minority Report)
Debra Jo Rupp (Big)
Kurtwood Smith (Robocop)
Tanya Roberts (The Beastmaster)
Don Stark (John Carter)
Lisa Robin Kelly (The Net: The Series)
Tommy Chong (Evil Bong)
Josh Meyers (Bruno)

THE BEST CHRISTMAS EVER

GUEST CAST
Marion Ross (Anger Management)
The episode begins with  the gang hanging out in the basement watching The Grinch Who Stole Christmas. Later, Eric asks if he can have a Christmas party in the basement, and surprisingly, Red says yes. when Eric asks for money for the party (for beer, actually) Red gives him $40 for the Christmas tree and says he can keep what money’s left over. However, the gang decides to chop down a tree at the side of the road in order to spend all the money on beer. At work, Bob asks Red if he’ll stay and work at the store on Christmas Eve. Bob says that since all the other stores are closed, some last-last-minute shoppers might swing by. To Red’s dismay, Kelso ends up being the only one to show up, and he buys a set of hot rollers for Jackie and plays few rounds of Pong with Red, who ends up purchasing that game for himself. Back at the house, a jealous Laurie pours rum in the punch Kitty made for Eric’s party. However, no one drinks it except for Jackie and three of her friends. Upstairs, two state troopers barge in to the party to inform Red and Kitty that their Christmas tree is a stolen one. Red then stops the party downstairs and takes Jackie and her friends home, and kicks everyone else out. Hyde then gives Donna her gift, a picture of the two in 5th grade. A jealous Eric then proceeds to give Donna White Shoulders perfume, the gift Hyde wanted to buy her but couldn’t afford.
A first Christmas for That 70s Show and a classic Eric trying to throw a party using the money he would of spent on a Tree. Laurie spikeing the punch making all the girls drunk and trying to seduce Fez is great.
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HYDE’S CHRISTMAS RAGER

GUEST CAST
Robert Hays (Airplane)
Matt Battaglia (Mike & Molly)
Now Hyde has moved from the over-protective Forman home to his carefree dad, barman Bud, the basement boys look forward to a keg party there, too frat-type for the girls’ taste. Kitty nearly saw trough their ‘Christmas’ preparations aren’t innocent, so the unsupervised drinking games deliver Eric so drunk he pours unprecedented disrespect and vomit all over Red’s shoes. Kitty isn’t interested in punishment, she cares for the utter lack of educational guidance ‘her boy’ Steven gets from his dad, so Red is made against his convictions to go read Bud the parental responsibility riot act.
A Second Christmas for the and another great episode. Hyde trying to bond with his father  whilst being allowed to get away with anything. Red finding the best punishment for Eric is a great highlight. That 70s Show always does great Christmas episodes.

AN ERIC FORMAN CHRISTMAS

GUEST CAST
Kevin McDonald (Epic Movie)
Nick Bakay (Sabrina)
The gang grumbles Christmas isn’t real fun any more, like when they were little kids, except Kelso who looks forward to the traditional X-mas children’s specials, but Jackie won’t let him watch. Kitty gets them to volunteer for pastor Dave’s church pageant, with Eric as director, who has an all too hard time stopping everyone for modernizing their parts most un-biblically. When Dave tries to take over directing and the lead, he is irreverently tied up, enough for Leo to give the sacrilegers heaps. Meanwhile Red is so angry at Bob’s seasonal ‘noise’ that he hides his neighbors’ decorations.
This is one of my all time favorite episodes, the best part is seeing the end result of the church pageant which you get to see over the episodes ending credits.

CHRISTMAS

GUEST CAST
Shannon Elizabeth (American Pie)
Ashley Eckstein (Star Wars: The Clone Wars)
Shonda Farr (Crossroads)
Red is chosen to be Santa claus, instead of Bob who grudgingly accepts to assist as an elf with Kitty, who by signing up the kids for the same duty unknowingly convinced the boys to attend the school dance they had sworn never to join again. Donna is furious when she learns Eric hangs out there and is now popular with a few schoolgirls, so she turns up during her radio show. Fez fears the football team will again lock him up in a locker. Hyde only came for Jackie’s sake. Kelso only went to avoid going to the library as Brooke suggested
 It’s great to see the gang growing up seeing how much they have come along. Red as Santa is creepy and disturbing but that’s what makes it funny. Kelso has some lovely scenes especially when he realises he would rather spend Christmas with Brooke.

WINTER

GUEST CAST
Carolyn Hennesy (Click)
Kelso accidentally took the police department-donated gifts for needy kids, but Eric begs to keep some as Red never gave him any toys, just a rain coat and a hose-down to test it; opening ‘just one’ package leaves nothing unwrapped. The girls are flattered when Kitty invites them to help out the stuck-up ‘Ladies of Point Place’ (LOPPs) with their height of the year, the Christmas party, but angry because the boys couldn’t care less, Jackie is furious Hyde even reneges on his promise to attend in favor of boyish basement toy-games. Posh Patty Ryals marches in to take charge instead of Kitty because of an incident in 1963, ‘Santa’ Bob fondly remembers dating Patty. Red catches the boys playing, but with rare seasonal mildness lets them bring the toys to the community center, forcing him and the gang to stall Kitty.
Kelso stealing the toys is hilarious with out realising they were meant for the needy kids, Red showing surprising Christmas spirit in not turning the kids in.  Poor Eric getting tricked into going down the chimney and landing in a cake shop. Thankfully Donna rescues him.

WHO NEEDS YOU

GUEST CAST
Jud Tylor (Andromeda)
Jim Rash (The Descendants)
Fez almost loses his apartment when Jackie floods it. He’s ready to say “Good day!” to their co-habitation, but Jackie manages to salvage things by bonding with Fenton, the landlord, over shopping, and convincing him to let them stay. Red and Kitty are concerned over the number of arguments that Hyde and Samantha are having. But when they learn the reason for all the fights, it causes some sparks to fly in their own relationship. Donna tries to raise money for charity through her radio show and ends up having to resort to less than considerable ideas to do it.
Not much of a Christmas episode with the exception of Santa showing up at the end but still a great episode in the shows final year

REVIEW: THOR

CAST

Chris Hemsworth (The Huntsman: Winter’s War)
Anthony Hopkins (The Silence of The Lambs)
Natalie Portman (Black Swan)
Tom Hiddleston (Crimson Peak)
Stellan Skarsgard (The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo)
Kat Dennings (2 Broke Girls)
Clark Gregg (Agents of Shield)
Colm Feore (Gotham)
Idris Elba (Pacific Rim)
Ray Stevenson (Punisher: Warzone)
Tadanobu Asano (Mongul)
Josh Dallas (Red Tails)
Jaimie Alexander (The Last Stand)
Rene Russo (Get Shorty)
Stan Lee (Avengers Assemble)
Matt Battaglia (Mike & Molly)
Samuel L. Jackson (Snakes On A Plane)
Jeremy Renner (The Bourne Legacy)
Maximiliano Hernández (Ringer)

MV5BMTMxNDU2NDYxNF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwMzc4MjIwNQ@@._V1_SX1777_CR0,0,1777,756_AL_As the film opens, Thor (Chris Hemsworth) is moments away from ascending to the throne of Asgard. The coronation is cut short by invading frost giants seeking to reclaim what was once the source of their power. Odin (Anthony Hopkins) — the omniscient ruler of the Norse gods as well as the father of Thor — had long ago taken precautions to stave off those sorts of threats, and the small invading force is almost immediately vanquished. Still, Thor is incensed: ancient enemies of the Asgardians having actually stepped foot inside the palace…the untold havoc they could have wrought. The only rational response, to his mind, is to wage war on the frost giants’ realm of Jotunheim — to exterminate those savage beasts once and for all. Thor mistakenly believes a swift, merciless retaliation would be following in his father’s footsteps. The difference is that Odin knows all too well the heavy price of war; Thor does not. Despite an express command from Odin, who yet still reigns as king, Thor enlists the help of his brother Loki (Tom Hiddleston),Sif (Jaimie Alexander), and the Warriors Three (Ray Stevenson, Tadanobu Asano, and Josh Dallas) to strike back. With the unyielding might of Mjolnir at his side, Thor mercilessly slaughters dozens — perhaps hundreds — of the greatest warriors under the command of King Laufey (Colm Feore). Thor’s thirst for vengeance threatens to consume the entire frostbitten realm — not to mention the lives of his closest allies — but the battle is cut short. Odin storms in to restore the uneasy peace between Asgard and Jotunheim that, until now, had lasted for millenia. Just as Laufey had suffered heavy losses, so too must Odin. An enchantment is cast upon Mjolnir that only one who is worthy can lift it. Thor is stripped of his armor and his title. Then, Thor too is cast aside, forever exiled to the realm of Midgard…or, as the creatures inhabiting that oversized ball of mud call it, “Earth”.Trapped in an unfamiliar world. Powerless. Alone. Well, “alone” doesn’t last all that long. The atmospheric effects of Bifrost — the opening of the rainbow bridge to Earth — had already attracted the attention of Jane Foster (Natalie Portman), who’s been doing some post-grad physics research in this sleepy, remote stretch of desert in New Mexico with colleague Erik Selvig (Stellan Skarsgård) and snarky assistant Darcy (Kat Dennings). With the occasionally reluctant help of his newfound friends, Thor tries to adjust to what he’s certain will be a brief derailment on Midgard, and he does what he can to prepare for his return home. Still a seasoned warrior despite a lack of mystical armament, Thor even battles his way through a government stronghold in an attempt to reclaim Mjolnir. Triumph is snatched away from him when Thor discovers the hammer’s enchantment has deemed him unworthy, and his sorrow only grows upon receiving a message from his brother Loki…that the toll this ordeal has taken on their father was greater than even the mighty Allfather could bear…that Thor is doomed to live among the mortals forever. Being cutoff from his homeland means that Thor has no idea what sorts of machinations have wrapped their fingers around the throat of Asgard, and the havoc that results soon spills over onto Earth..Kat Dennings shoulders a lot of the comic relief, and she manages to connect every single time she steps up to the plate. The fish-out-of-water humor — a god trapped in a backwater New Mexico town that seems content to live as if it’s still 1954 — is more inspired than usual. There’s even a running gag with Jane plowing into Thor with her SUV, and, yeah, the good-ol’-boys in town react to a magical hammer falling from the sky by throwing a big-ass barbecue. It’s fun but never dumb or overly cartoonish, and Branagh walks that delicate line flawlessly.Having an accomplished actor like Kenneth Branagh in the director’s chair clearly brought out the best of all the actors.  Thor explores what heroism is in a way that resonates so much more truly and more deeply that most comic book adaptations. The film delivers the visual spectacle and awe-inspiring action you’d hope to see in a summer tentpole without losing sight of its smartly crafted screenplay or impressively rich characterization.

REVIEW: BONES – SEASON 1

Starring

Emily Deschanel (Boogeyman)
David Boreanaz (Angel)
Michaela Conlin (Yellowstone)
Eric Millegan (The Phobic)
T. J. Thyne (Ghost World)
Jonathan Adams (Justice League: Crisis on Two Earths)

David Boreanaz and Emily Deschanel in Bones (2005)

Recurring / Notable Guest Cast

Sam Trammell (The order)
Chris Conner (Altered Carbon)
Larry Poindexter (17 Again)
Tyrees Allen (Robocop)
Bonita Friedericy (Chuck)
José Zúñiga (Next)
Anne Dudek (Mad Men)
Heavy D (The Cider House Rules)
Alex Carter (Out of Time)
Toby Hemingway (The Covenant)
Marguerite MacIntyre (The Vampire Diaries)
Tom Kiesche (Breaking Bad)
Morris Chestnut (Kick-Ass 2)
Bokeem Woodbine (Spider-Man: Homecoming)
Laz Alonso (Avatar)
Robert Gossett (The Net)
Rachelle Lefevre (Twilight)
Heath Freeman (Raising The Bar)
Michael Rothhaar (Eli Stone)
Josh Hopkins (Cold Case)
Alicia Coppola (Another World)
Leonard Roberts (Heroes)
Rachel Miner (Bully)
Jim Ortlieb (Roswell)
Claire Coffee (Grimm)
Billy Gibbons (Two and a Half Men)
Ty Panitz (Because I Said So)
Harry Groener (Buffy: TVS)
Claire Coffee (Grimm)
Michael B. Silver (Legally Blonde)
Penny Marshall (The Simpsons)
Zeljko Ivanek (Heroes)
Suzanne Cryer (Two Guys and a Girl)
Lawrence Pressman (Dark Angel)
Jaime Ray Newman (The Punisher)
John M. Jackson (NCIS: Los Angeles)
Judith Hoag (Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles)
Ivar Brogger (Andromeda)
Aaron Pearl (Breaking Bad)
Josh Keaton (Avengers Assemble)
Adriana DeMeo (Killer Movie)
Matt Barr (Sleepy Hollow)
Robert LaSardo (Nip/Tuck)
Jose Pablo Cantillo (Crank)
Emilio Rivera (Venom)
Michael Bowen (Kill Bill)
Adam Baldwin (Chuck)
David Denman (Power Rangers)
Brian Gross (2 Broke Girls)
James Parks (The Hateful Eight)
Clayton Rohner (Ozark)
Mercedes Colon (The Fosters)
Robert Foxworth (Transformers)
Rodney Rowland (Legacies)
Simon Baker (The Mentalist)
Cullen Douglas (Pure Genius)
Fredric Lehne (Lost)
Michael Chieffo (Disclosure)
Michelle Hurd (Ash vs Evil Dead)
Scott Lawrence (Star Trek Into Darkness)
Patricia Belcher (Flatliners)
Giancarlo Esposito (Breaking Bad)
Mark Harelik (Trumbo)
Alexandra Krosney (Last Man Standing)
Sumalee Montano (Veep)
Aldis Hodge (Hidden Figures)
Matt Battaglia (Thor)
Kirk B.R. Woller (Hulk)
Loren Dean (Space Cowboys)
Pat Skipper (Halloween)

David Boreanaz and Emily Deschanel in Bones (2005)Bones very quickly garnered rave reviews and amassed a loyal following. Bones is loosely inspired by real life forensic anthropologist and author Kathy Reichs. This funny, clever, sometimes gross, and totally addictive crime drama centers around forensic anthropologist Dr. Temperence Brennan (Emily Deschanel), who toils out of the Jeffersonian Institution and, on the side, writes mysteries starring her fictional heroine (and here’s the twist) Kathy Reichs. Because Brennan has an almost supernatural ability to generate accurate assumptions based on her examination of the corpse’s bones, she is often consulted by the FBI on difficult, seemingly unsolvable cases. She is frequently partnered by brash wiseacre FBI Special Agent Seely Booth (David Boreanaz), who seems to hold a bias against science and those who practice in that field. It’s Booth who breezily saddles Brennan with the nickname “Bones.” Naturally intuitive and freewheeling, Booth immediately is at odds with the clinically analytical Brennan. But, despite their personality clashes, and with the aid of Brennan’s gifted and quirky colleagues, the cases do get solved.David Boreanaz and Emily Deschanel in Bones (2005)It’s no great secret that the palpable chemistry between Deschanel and Boreanaz is what actually propels the show and is what separates it from the other, more formulaic, dispassionate crime dramas. Every week, fans tune in for the leads’ deliciously caustic banter more so than for the weekly dose of mystery. You see, the mystery jones can be fixed by viewing any other one of the gazillion forensic dramas so currently prevalent on the airwaves. So the mystery is basically the MacGuffin that drives the show forward. But the cantankerous chemistry – that palpable “something” between the two leads as they hilariously bicker and wrangle – is definitely unique to this show.
Emily Deschanel is a find. And David Boreanaz. Yeah, I found it difficult going, at first, watching him in a new role, seeing as how I’m a fan of Buffy and Angel. But it helps that Booth isn’t much like our vampire with a soul. This ex-Army Ranger Special Agent is breezy, personable, and outgoing, not brooding, tortured, and introspective like Angelus. So, the transition, while disconcerting for me, was ultimately smooth enough. Boreanaz brings such command, self-assurance and charm to his character that I bought into it soon enough. My favorite episodes are the pilot episode, where we are introduced to the cast; “The Man in the Fallout Shelter” – the team is quarantied together in the Jeffersonian during Christmas and we learn personal stuff about the characters; “Two Bodies in the Lab” – character development galore in this episode as Brennan dates on-line and is targeted while she works on two cases; “The Superhero in the Alley” – a decomposed body is found wearing a superhero costume; and “The Woman in Limbo” – a gripping, emotional season finale as Brennan discovers shocking facts about her parents.

REVIEW: MIKE & MOLLY – SEASON 3

MAIN CAST

Billy Gardell (Young Sheldon)
Melissa McCarthy (Spy)
Reno Wilson (Transformers)
Katy Mixon (American Housewife)
Nyambi Nyambi (The Good Fight)
Rondi Reed (The Astronaught’s Wife)
Cleo King (The Hangover)
Louis Mustillo (One For The Money)
Swoosie Kurtz (Pushing Daisies)
David Anthony Higgins (Big Time Rush)

Melissa McCarthy and Billy Gardell in The Honeymoon Is Over (2012)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Matt Battaglia (Thor)
Holly Robinson Peete (21 Jump Street)
Reginald VelJohnson (Die Hard)
Lamont Thompson (Evan Almighty)
Cheryl Hawker (My Name Is Earl)
Brendan Patrick Connor (Spider-Man 2)
Marianne Muellerleile (Norbit)
LaMonica Garrett (The Last Ship)
Elizabeth Sung (Death Ring)
Jon Polito (The Last Shot)
Tim Conway (Two and a Half Men)
Jim Beaver (Deadwood)
Gerald McRaney (House of Cards)
Ava Gaudet (Ugly Betty)
Judith Shekoni (Heroes Reborn)
Nosheen Phoenix (The Brink)

Melissa McCarthy and Billy Gardell in The Honeymoon Is Over (2012)The third season starts in Paris, where Mike and Molly are getting ready to leave their honeymoon and embark on their journey as a married couple. Adjusting to their new lives at home won’t be easy, since they will be living with Molly’s overindulgent sister, Victoria, and her smart-talking mother, Joyce. Sharing the already crowded house will prove challenging for the newlyweds, especially when they decide to start trying for a baby. Join Mike and Molly in their hilarious journey as they discover the ups and downs of this next chapter of their lives as newlyweds.Swoosie Kurtz, Louis Mustillo, and Katy Mixon in The Honeymoon Is Over (2012)Season 3 was once a gain a great season, dealing with trying to have kids and the hilarious ways they try, obviously the original ending for season was Molly being pregnant (and it aired in canada with that ending) It was decided to edit the ending to make it so she wasn’t pregnant, this was done to showcase Molly more in season 4 and have her do more outrageous and fun stuff.Melissa McCarthy and Billy Gardell in The Honeymoon Is Over (2012)

Season 3 Highlights are

Melissa McCarthy and Billy Gardell in The Honeymoon Is Over (2012)

The Honeymoon Is Over

After being initially against honeymooning in Paris, Mike has become so inspired by the city that he wants to change his life and travel the world. Meanwhile, Molly worries how the other members of her household fared while they were gone.

Reno Wilson and Billy Gardell in Mike & Molly (2010)

Mike Likes Cake

Christina tells Carl that she’s trying to reconcile with her ex-husband for the sake of their son, leaving Carl devastated. Molly is frustrated while putting together her wedding album, as Mike appears to have his eyes closed or is eating something in every photo. Molly asks Harry to edit their wedding video, but the first cut has way too many shots of Victoria’s cleavage

Melissa McCarthy and Billy Gardell in Mike & Molly (2010)

Molly In The Middle

Mike and Molly decide they want to start trying to have a child. Carl is upset to learn that Molly still wants to be friends with Christina. Molly is unsure how to handle the situation, until Christina has some very unkind words to say regarding Carl, causing Molly to end their friendship.

Rondi Reed in Mike & Molly (2010)

Mikes Boss

Mike’s boss, Captain Murphy (Gerald McRaney), offers him courtside basketball tickets, but only if Mike will set him up on a date with Peggy.Thanksgiving is Cancelled – With Mike sick, Molly is happy she doesn’t have to cook Thanksgiving dinner. But Vince insists on a home cooked meal when he learns his brother will be attending, and Joyce becomes furious with Vince for not discussing a wedding date after they have been engaged for more than a year. Meanwhile, Carl and Samuel attend a “singles” Thanksgiving meal at Carl’s church in hopes of meeting available women.Gerald McRaney and Billy Gardell in Mike & Molly (2010)

Karaoke Christmas

Dressed as Santa Claus and frustrated about Molly’s holiday spending, Mike cautions children about using credit cards to buy toys. Later, Molly’s family has their traditional Christmas at home, including fun with a karaoke machine, but Mike and Molly must spend Christmas Eve at church with his mother and boss.Billy Gardell in Mike & Molly (2010)

Molly’s Birthday

Mike plans to spoil Molly for her birthday, but soon after, Victoria’s drug dealer Tom arrives to stay at the Flynn’s house for a few days. This causes a rift between the sisters, especially after Mike eats some “special” gelato that Tom prepared.Billy Gardell in Mike & Molly (2010)

The Princess and The Troll

Molly wants to set up a Valentine’s Day date between Victoria and a lonely Harry. Mike is skeptical but goes along with the plan, and is surprised when Victoria agrees. Meanwhile Carl takes Samuel to a laundromat to pick up women.Katy Mixon in Mike & Molly (2010)

St. Patrick’s Day

Mike and Molly continue pregnancy attempts and almost miss Carl and Samuel’s St Patrick’s Day party. Also, Victoria kisses Harry after he helps her with a college assignment, but the kiss prompts a major announcement from Harry.Melissa McCarthy in Mike & Molly (2010)Season three was a great season, we got to see how they adjust to married life and there adventures in trying for a baby, although the season finale was originally intended to have Molly Pregnant at the end (in some countries it still aired that way), it’s still a nice episode just without that cliffhanger on the end.