REVIEW: LETHAL WEAPON 3

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Starring

Mel Gibson (Mad Max)
Danny Glover (Jumanji: The Next Level)
Joe Pesci (Home Alone)
Rene Russo (Thor)
Stuart Wilson (Mask of Zorro)
Darlene Love (Holiday Rush)
Steve Kahan (16 Blocks)
Ebonie Smith (Xena: WP)
Nick Chinlund (Close Range)
Alan Scarfe (Andromeda)
Mary Ellen Trainor (Roswell)
Mark Pellegrino (Lost)
Sven-Ole Thorsen (Mallrats)
Jack McGee (Gangster Squad)

Mel Gibson and Danny Glover in Lethal Weapon 3 (1992)A week before his retirement, L.A.P.D. Sergeant Roger Murtaugh (Glover) and his partner Martin Riggs (Gibson) are demoted to uniform duties after trying to defuse a bomb before the bomb squad arrived, causing the destruction of an otherwise empty office building. While on street patrol they witness the theft of an armored car, and help to thwart the crime assisted by armored car driver Delores (Delores Hall). One of the two thieves gets away, but the other is taken into police custody. The suspect is found to be a known associate of Jack Travis (Wilson), a former LAPD lieutenant who is believed to be running an arms smuggling ring in Los Angeles. The department is further concerned that the thieves were using armor-piercing bullets, informally referred to as “cop killers”. Riggs and Murtaugh are re-promoted and assigned to work with Sergeant Lorna Cole (Russo) from internal affairs to track down Travis.Mel Gibson and Rene Russo in Lethal Weapon 3 (1992)Travis is currently negotiating with mobster Tyrone (Millar) regarding his arms deal. The armored car thief that escaped is brought to Travis, who subsequently kills him in front of Tyrone for putting the police on his trail. Travis then uses his old (but still valid) police credentials to enter the interrogation room and kill the suspect in custody before he can be interviewed. Travis is unaware that closed-circuit cameras have been installed in the station, and Cole is able to affirm Travis’ identity. While the three are reviewing the footage, their good friend Leo Getz (Pesci) – who has been helping Murtaugh sell his house – arrives and immediately recognizes Travis from several prior business deals and his love of ice hockey. Riggs and Murtaugh narrowly miss capturing Travis at a hockey match that afternoon, but Getz has provided them with information of a warehouse Travis owns, which they suspect is where he has stored his arms shipments.Mel Gibson in Lethal Weapon 3 (1992)Riggs and Murtaugh contact Cole for backup before they raid the warehouse, and then stop to get something to eat while they wait for her. As they wait for their food, they witness a drug deal which they step in to stop. A gun fight breaks out, and Murtaugh kills one of those involved who had fired back at them, while the rest escape. Murtaugh is shocked to find the dead man is Darryl, a close friend of his son Nick. With Murtaugh emotionally distraught, Riggs goes with Cole to the warehouse, where they successfully overpower Travis’ guards and secure his next arms shipment delivery. That night, Riggs and Cole find they have feelings for each other and sleep together. Riggs later finds Murtaugh drunk in his boat, still overwhelmed with guilt, and helps to counsel him in time for Darryl’s funeral. There, Darryl’s father passionately insists that Murtaugh find the person responsible for giving Darryl the gun.Cole finds that Darryl’s gun, the armor-piercing bullets, and the arms they recovered were originally in police custody, meant to be destroyed, and were likely stolen by Travis; they assure that his credentials are completely revoked from the system. They further tie the guns to Tyrone and interrogate him. Tyrone quickly reveals what he knows of Travis’ plans, including an auto garage where many of his henchmen work from. Riggs, Murtaugh, and Cole are able to take several of the men into custody there. Meanwhile, Travis finds he cannot use his credentials anymore, and has one of his men hack into the computer system to find another arms storage area. He then forces Captain Murphy (Steve Kahan) under gunpoint to take him to this new facility so he can steal the guns using Murphy’s credentials. Cole finds the evidence of hacking and Murphy’s absence, and the three, along with a rookie cop who looks up to Riggs and Murtaugh, go to intercept Travis. They are able to rescue Murphy and stop Travis and his men before he can take the weapons, but the rookie is killed as they give chase, and Riggs and Murtaugh vow to stop Travis.Mel Gibson and Danny Glover in Lethal Weapon 3 (1992)Getz provides information on a housing development under construction by a company owned by Travis. Getz tries to join them but they shoot his tires out to stop him from coming. Riggs and Murtaugh instead bring Cole along to infiltrate the site at night, and find themselves met by Travis and his men who have been waiting for them. A large-scale gunfight breaks out, in which Riggs sets the construction site on fire and most of Travis’ men are killed. Cole appears to be shot by Travis and falls, inciting Riggs. When Travis uses a bulldozer to chase down Riggs, using its blade as a bullet shield, Murtaugh tosses Daryl’s gun, now loaded with the armor-piercing bullets, to Riggs, who then shoots and kills Travis through the blade. Cole is found to be alive and safe, having worn two protective vests. Riggs admits his love for her as she is taken away in a chopper. The next day, Murtaugh’s family are celebrating his retirement, when Murtaugh reveals to Getz that he has decided to not sell the house and stay with the force, preserving his partnership with Riggs. As the film ends, Riggs announces to Murtaugh that he and Cole are in a relationship.Mel Gibson, Danny Glover, and Rene Russo in Lethal Weapon 3 (1992)Lethal Weapon 3 again showcases the immense talent of its two irreplacable leads. This sequel packs a lethal punch and delivers first-class entertainment from start to finish.

REVIEW: 13 REASONS WHY – SEASON 3

Dylan Minnette in 13 Reasons Why (2017)

MAIN CAST

Dylan Minnette (Don’t Breathe)
Christian Navarro (Bushwick)
Alisha Boe (Paranormal Activity 4)
Brandon Flynn (BrainDead)
Justin Prentice (Izombie)
Miles Heizer (Rails & Ties)
Ross Butler (Shazam)
Devin Druid (Louder Than Bombs)
Amy Hargreaves (Wonderstruck)
Grace Saif (Doctors)
Brenda Strong (Supergirl)
Timothy Granaderos (Runaways)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Anne Winters (Mom and Dad)
Chelsea Alden (Unfriended: Dark Web)
Tyler Barnhardt (Tales From The Loop)
Benito Martinez (Sons of Anarchy)
Mark Pellegrino (Lost)
Kate Walsh (After The Sunset)
Steven Weber (2 broke Girls)
Michele Selene Ang (Elementary)
Wilson Cruz (Star Trek: Discovery)
Bex Taylor-Klaus (Arrow)
Parminder Nagra (God Friended Me)
Raymond J. Barry (Alias)
Mason Guccione (Jumanji: Welcome To The Jungle)
Derek Luke (Glory Road)

freepressjournal_2019-08_7de0229f-0b42-4203-b9cb-20cb73cfefb8_13Netflix’s popular series 13 Reasons Why has returned with its third season. The show has now shifted its focus from Hanna Baker and Jessica Davis’ rape to their abuser, Bryce Walker. The showrunners have tried hard to stay away from the controversies they stirred up with the first and second season. However, they do not deviate from highlighting bullying in schools and its consequences. While Season 1 makes you reflect upon your actions, Season 2 established that there’s another side to every story. Season 3 tries to explain that nothing’s black and white.Screenshot-2019-08-23-at-08.09.26-2The new season picks up right after the events of Liberty High Spring Fling when a gunned Tyler Down came in school premises to hurt his abusers. Since then, things have not changed much. These students are damaged as before but are trying to recover. But before they could recuperate completely, they are struck with the news of Bryce Walker’s death after a big Homecoming game. Everyone has a reason to kill the bad guy of Liberty, but you aren’t really sure who did it. The entire season is built on solving Bryce’s murder. During the course of the investigation, you realize nobody’s clean. They all have something they lied about. The trial and the revelations in season 1 and 2 have impacted these students a lot, especially Bryce Walker.cuka1jql6m5rndkuwaovFor a long time, we have seen that Bryce bullied students and he raped Hanna Baker, Jessica Davis and many other girls. He is convicted for sexually assaulting women but gets only 3 months of probation. In a way, we are habitual of seeing him in a certain way. Season three shakes that up and we finally see the other side of him. The good side of Bryce. The new season also progresses on Jessica front screening her journey from being a victim to a survivor. The girl who couldn’t gather enough courage to speak up until the end of season 2, leads the voices of survivors. Justin Prentice and Alisha Boe as Bryce and Jessica, offer intriguing, emotionally complex and layered performances. Prentice’s breakdown as Bryce will make you grieve for him despite all that he’s done in the past. Boe, on the other hand, stuns with her transformation. Her confidence is both rattling and inspiring.13rw-e1566448279569Season 3 also introduces new character Ani (Grace Saif), who’s kind of a replacement of Hanna Baker (Katherine Langford) to lead the plot. She does her job fairly well, to say the least. Apart from Bryce and Jessica, nobody is seen in a different light that you haven’t seen before. Clay Jenson (Dylan Minnette) is the same caring friend we have been watching since two seasons and Christian Navarro as Tony Padilla is also the same good looking tough guy with mysteries. The showmakers have made the transitions between timelines smoother than ever. Music wise, season three gets a remarkable soundtrack like its previous seasons and some of them will definitely make it to your playlist. If you have followed the show, 13 Reasons Why season 3 is likable. With lesser violence and more voice, it gives us some pondering moments. The new season is definitely better than the second one, however, the makers do not entirely reach the benchmark they had set with the first season.

REVIEW: LOST – SEASON 6

Starring

Matthew Fox (Alex Cross)
Jorge Garcia (How I Met Your Mother)
Evangeline Lilly (Ant-Man and The Wasp)
Terry O’Quinn (The Rocketeer)
Josh Holloway (Colony)
Naveen Andrews (The Brave One)
Michael Emerson (Arrow)
Daniel Dae Kim (Insurgent)
Yunjin Kim (Shiri)
Henry Ian Cusick (Hitman)
Ken Leung (Inhumans)
Emilie de Ravin (Roswell)
Jeff Fahey (Texas Rising)
Nestor Carbonell (Bates Motel)
Zuleikha Robinson (Homeland)

Josh Holloway and Elizabeth Mitchell in Lost (2004)

Recurring / Notable Guest Cast

Sam Anderson (Angel)
L. Scott Caldwell (Chilling Adventures of Sabrina)
Brad William Henke (Bright)
Kimberly Joseph (Hercules: TLJ)
Fredric Lehne (Amityville 4)
Elizabeth Mitchell (V)
Dominic Monaghan (Flashforward)
Mark Pellegrino (13 Reasons Why)
Daniel Roebuck (Final Destination)
Ian Somerhalder (The Vampire Diaries)
Sean Whalen (Twister)
Greg Grunberg (Alias)
John Hawkes (Winter’s Bone)
David H. Lawrence XVII (Heores)
Hiroyuki Sanada (Westworld)
William Mapother (Anotehr Earth)
Jeff Kober (New Girl)
Katey Sagal (Futurama)
Veronica Hamel (Cannonball)
Dylan Minnette (13 Reasons Why)
Andrea Gabriel (2 Broke Girls)
Kevin Durand (Swamp Thing)
Anthony Azizi (Eagle Eye)
Rob McElhenney (Wonder Boys)
William Atherton (Ghostbusters)
Alan Dale (Ugly Betty)
Jon Gries(Taken)
Tania Raymonde (Texas Chainsaw)
Neil Hopkins (The Net 2.0)
Rebecca Mader (Iron Man 3)
Jodi Lyn O’Keefe (The Vampire Diaries)
Titus Welliver (The Town)
Andrew Divoff (Wishmaster)
Chad Donella (Smallville)
Jeremy Davies (Hannibal)
Fionnula Flanagan (The Others)
Sonya Walger (Flashforward)
Fisher Stevens (Hackers)
Harold Perrineau (Constantine)
Cynthia Watros (Titus)
François Chau (The Tick)
Kevin Tighe (My Bloody Valentine)
Allison Janney (Mom)
Mira Furlan (Babylon 5)
Michelle Rodriguez (The Fast and The Furious)
Maggie Grace (The Fog)
John Terry (Full Metal Jacket)
John Pyper-Ferguson (Caprica)

Nestor Carbonell and Terry O'Quinn in Lost (2004)Season 6 of Lost is quite possibly the most scrutinized season of television in history. With both longtime fans of the series and curious outsiders wondering if this season would deliver both on answers and a satisfying conclusion, series show runners DamonLindelof and Carlton Cuse had an incredible task on their hands. With an edge-of-your-seat conclusion to Season 5, the small band of survivors we’ve grown to love set out on their final journey against a villainous shape shifter on an island of mystery.

In Season 4, “The Constant” established Lost as a science fiction series when it introduced time travel into the equation. From that point forward, until the conclusion of Season 5, the series maintained and expanded on that concept by sending the survivors hurtling through time until they eventually landed in 1974 (or 1977, for those on Ajira 316). Season 6 drops the time travel story completely and introduces a different sci-fi concept: alternate realities. It appears that the detonation of Jughead in “The Incident” created a parallel universe in which events played out slightly different and Oceanic Flight 815 never crashed.Much like flash-backs and flash-forwards, we experience this parallel universe through a series of “centric” flash-sideways featuring the lives of these characters as if the crash had never happened. This gives Lindelof and Cuse a unique opportunity to reexamine the lives of these characters from a completely different perspective.Josh Holloway in Lost (2004)The flash-sideways giving us incredibly important character moments and an intriguing new story that’s both surprising and engaging. With each “centric” flash-sideways story, parallels are drawn to the character’s plight while they are on the island. This relationship between timelines establishes a key connection between both storylines that give the flash-sideways an importance outside of simply being a different perspective on how things could have ultimately played out.Jeff Fahey, Michael Emerson, Yunjin Kim, and Zuleikha Robinson in Lost (2004)Connections between the two universes are explored more thoroughly as the series progresses and we do ultimately get a resolution to the flash-sideways storyline. How satisfying that resolution is will ultimately be based on a number of factors that stem from your own expectations. In other words, it’s a polarizing conclusion to a very unique story and you’re probably either going to love it or hate it. I loved the way the flash-sideways story ended because it satisfied the need for closure.Josh Holloway and Elizabeth Mitchell in Lost (2004)“Happily Ever After” stands out as the episode that had the most impact on both universes. Living, breathing Desmond David Hume (Henry Ian Cusick) has his consciousness transported into what we now know to be the afterlife and acts as the genesis for everything that happens in the “flash-sideways” realm after his departure. Desmond is also the catalyst for most events that occur leading up to and including the finale.Matthew Fox and Jorge Garcia in Lost (2004)He’s seen as nothing more than a tool by those around him; a means to an end. However, Desmond is infused with his own sense of purpose. With the events he experienced in the other universe infecting his mind, Desmond sets out to free those remaining on the island from their pain and suffering and take them to a better place. It’s funny how both Desmonds are essentially driven by the same goal, with only one succeeding. But Desmond’s error on the island gives Jack and Kate (Evangeline Lilly) the window they need to stop the Man in Black.untitledTerry O’Quinn, who spent most of the past five seasons playing John Locke, slips into his new role as the embodiment of dark temptation with ease. We actually saw him as the Man in Black last season, but even O’Quinn didn’t realize that he was technically playing a different character until close to the finale.Terry O'Quinn in Lost (2004)Here he’s allowed to truly enjoy portraying a villain and it’s obvious he’s having a hell of a lot of fun in the role.Josh Holloway in Lost (2004)The Man in Black tests the survivors like never before. Offering them freedom, survival and even answers to some of the island’s more pressing mysteries. The way that the survivors respond to this temptation ultimately defines who they truly are, even if it takes them some time to make the right decision. Again, just like the flash-sideways, this gives us yet another fascinating new perspective on these characters. We see them at both their weakest and their strongest this season. )Season 6 does a good job of explaining some mysteries while others are left up to the viewer to dissect for years to come. Lost: Season 6 is a strong conclusion to what has been an extraordinary series.Naveen Andrews and Hiroyuki Sanada in Lost (2004)All the elements that made the past five seasons so great are here, with the added bonus of this being the final season and the stakes being raised for all the characters. Whether or not the answers provided are satisfying or cover enough ground will vary drastically for different viewers, but ultimately, Lost: Season 6 delivers closure on a story that has captivated us for so long.

REVIEW: LOST – SEASON 5

Starring

Matthew Fox (Alex Cross)
Jorge Garcia (How I Met Your Mother)
Elizabeth Mitchell (V)
Evangeline Lilly (Ant-Man and The Wasp)
Jeremy Davies (Hannibal)
Terry O’Quinn (The Rocketeer)
Josh Holloway (Colony)
Naveen Andrews (The Brave One)
Michael Emerson (Arrow)
Rebecca Mader (Iron Man 3)
Daniel Dae Kim (Insurgent)
Yunjin Kim (Shiri)
Henry Ian Cusick (Hitman)
Ken Leung (Inhumans)

Naveen Andrews in Lost (2004)

Recurring / Notable Guest Cast

Sam Anderson (Angel)
L. Scott Caldwell (Chilling Adventures of Sabrina)
Alan Dale (Ugly Betty)
William Mapother (The Mentalist)
Sonya Walger (Termiantor: TSCC)
Sean Whalen (Twister)
François Chau (The Tick)
Michelle Rodriguez (The Fast and The Furious)
Jeff Fahey (Texas Rising)
Cheech Marin (Machete)
Fionnula Flanagan (The Others)
Nestor Carbonell (Bates Motel)
Alexandra Krosney (Last Man Standing)
John Terry (Full Metal Jacket)
Raymond J. Barry (The Gifted)
Zuleikha Robinson (Homeland)
Saïd Taghmaoui (Wonder Woman)
Malcolm David Kelley (You Got Served)
Lance Reddick (Bosch)
Reiko Aylesworth (24)
Patrick Fischler (Happy!)
Doug Hutchison (Punisher: War Zone)
Sterling Beaumon (The Killing)
Brad William Henke (Bright)
Eric Lange (Narcos)
Jon Gries (Taken)
Tania Raymonde (Texas Chainsaw)
William Sanderson (Blade Runner)
Kim Dickens (Hollow Man)
Dean Norris (Breaking Bad)
Marsha Thomason (The Haunted Mansion)
Alice Evans (The Vampire Diaries)
Andrea Gabriel (2 Broke Girls)
Mark Pellegrino (13 Reasons Why)
Titus Welliver (Argo)

Jeremy Davies and Nestor Carbonell in Lost (2004)Last season, Lost successfully made the transition into the realm of science fiction with classic episodes like “The Constant” and of course, making the island literally disappear in “There’s no Place Like Home.” Season 5 dives head first into weighty science fiction concepts with time travel playing a major role in the narrative for the entire year. There are inherent risks with introducing time travel into a story that is already as complex as the one Lost has become over the past few years. For the most part, the writers do a good job of keeping the time travel aspect of the story from becoming too complicated, but there is no dispute that it is the driving force of the season’s narrative.The first half of the season is comprised of two very distinct storylines.Jeremy Davies, Ken Leung, and Rebecca Mader in Lost (2004)One of those being Jack Shephard’s desperate attempt to reunite the Oceanic Six in order to return to the island and the other being the journey of those left behind as they find themselves inexplicably traveling through time. The Oceanic Six storyline is definitely the weaker of the two. The story of the Six, hours before they return to the island was weakened by a slow start with the somewhat Hurley-centric “The Lie.” This is an episode that featured a little too much of Hugo Reyes’ wacky exploits as he transports an unconscious Sayid around Los Angeles. The rest of the Oceanic Six story is essentially a waiting game as we watch the pieces fall into place so that these characters can return to where we really want them to be – on the island. In fact, their return to the island in “316” feels rushed, almost as if the writers realized that the best place for these characters is back on the island.The aptly named “The Life and Death of Jeremy Bentham” is the best episode that takes place almost entirely off the island.Terry O'Quinn and Rebecca Mader in Lost (2004)The story chronicles John Locke’s attempt to convince the Oceanic Six that they need to return to the island in order to save those left behind. It’s a tragic story for John Locke who has spent the last four seasons in the belief that the survivors of Flight 815 are tied by a single destiny but only in death does he finally make people believe. It’s a well-scripted story and wonderfully acted by Terry O’Quinn who does a great job of portraying an interesting transition for Locke on screen.Locke isn’t the only one who goes through a transition this season as Benjamin Linus is forced into a situation that is quite surprising for the character.Daniel Dae Kim and Melissa Farman in Lost (2004)Without delving into too much detail, the dynamic between Locke and Ben changes quite a bit but the great chemistry between O’Quinn and Michael Emerson is still as exceptional as it has always been. Linus fans should not be disappointed by some of the great developments for the character this season. On the island, Sawyer and the rest of the survivors left behind are forced to cope with the fact that they are constantly flashing through time, either to the past or the future. The approach taken here is straightforward and clearly laid out in the first episode of the season; you cannot change events in the past – whatever happened, happened and couldn’t of happened any other way. Faraday acts as the mouth piece for much of the technobabble in the early part of the season with Sawyer playing the part of the ‘everyman’ who constantly questions why things are happening the way they are. This allows the writers an opportunity to ease the audience into this shift of events without making things too complex to follow. There is plenty of exposition,Matthew Fox in Lost (2004)but with Sawyer’s classic charm to offset Faraday’s jargon, it makes it a lot easier to swallow.Time travel is utilized to its fullest here to reveal some of the island’s back-story over the last 50 years. Sawyer and co. pay a visit to the Others of the 1950s and are introduced to past leaders of the mysterious group. We also see some much-needed loose ends tied up as we finally learn more about Rousseau and her research team and we also discover why Richard Alpert visited a young Locke just one season ago. As secrets are revealed and key puzzle pieces are slid into place it’s surprising to see just how well everything fits together. Some of this is certainly due to the asset of knowing how many episodes you have left to tell your story in, but I’m hard pressed to find many plot holes in any of the explanations given. Cuse and Lindelof deserve credit for maintaining a watertight narrative throughout most of the season.

REVIEW: THE LOST WORLD: JURASSIC PARK

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CAST

Jeff Goldblum (The Fly)
Julianne Moore (Hannibal)
Pete Postlethwaite (Solomon Kane)
Vince Vaughn (Swingers)
Arliss Howard (Full Metal Jacket)
Richard Attenborough (Doctor Dolittle)
Peter Stormare (22 Jump Street)
Richard Schiff (The West Wing)
Joseph Mazzello (The Social Network)
Ariana Richards (Timescape)
Camilla Belle (When A Stranger Calls)
Robin Sachs (Buffy)
Marjean Holden (Vampire)
Michael Milhoan (That 70s Show)
Mark Pellegrino (Lost)

Four years after Jurassic Park was overrun by cloned dinosaurs on the Central American island of Isla Nublar, a young girl named Cathy Bowman wanders around on nearby Isla Sorna during a family vacation, and survives an attack by a swarm of Compsognathus. Her parents file a lawsuit against the genetics company InGen, now headed by John Hammond’s nephew, Peter Ludlow, who plans to use Isla Sorna to relieve the company of financial losses. Mathematician Dr. Ian Malcolm meets Hammond at his mansion. Hammond explains that Isla Sorna, abandoned years earlier during a hurricane, is where InGen created their dinosaurs before moving them to Jurassic Park on Isla Nublar. Hammond hopes to stop InGen by sending a team to Isla Sorna to document the dinosaurs, to help rally public support against human interference on the island. After learning that his girlfriend, paleontologist Dr. Sarah Harding, is part of the team and is already on the island, Ian agrees to go to Isla Sorna, but only to retrieve her.

Ian meets his teammates, Eddie Carr, an equipment specialist and engineer, and Nick Van Owen, a video documentarian. After arriving on the island, they locate Sarah and discover that Ian’s daughter, Kelly, had stowed away in a trailer being used as a mobile base. They then watch as an InGen team of mercenaries, hunters and paleontologists led by Ludlow arrive to capture several dinosaurs. Meanwhile, team leader Roland Tembo hopes to capture a male Tyrannosaurus by luring it to the cries of its injured infant. That night, Ian’s team sneak into the InGen camp and learn the captured dinosaurs will be brought to a newly proposed theme park in San Diego. This prompts Nick and Sarah to free the caged dinosaurs, wreaking havoc upon the camp.

Nick also frees the infant T. rex and takes it to the trailer to mend its broken leg. After securing Kelly with Eddie, Ian realizes the infant’s parents are searching for it and rushes to the trailer. As soon as Ian arrives, the infant’s parents emerge on both sides of the trailer. The infant is released to the adult T. rexes, which then attack the trailer, pushing it over the edge of a nearby cliff. Eddie soon arrives, but as he tries to pull the trailer back over the edge with an SUV, the adult T. rexes return and devour him. The trailer and the SUV both plummet off the cliff. Ian, Sarah, and Nick are rescued by the InGen team, along with Kelly. With both groups’ communications equipment and vehicles destroyed, they team up to reach the old InGen compound’s radio station on foot.

The next night, the two adult T. rexes find the group’s camp. The female T. rex chases the group to a waterfall cave, while Roland tranquilizes the male. Much of the remaining InGen team is killed by Velociraptors while fleeing through a tall grass savannah. Nick runs ahead to the communications center at the InGen Worker’s Village to call for rescue. When Ian, Sarah and Kelly arrive, they are attacked by the raptors. They evade the raptors until a helicopter arrives and transports them off the island.

A freighter transports the male T. rex to the mainland, but crashes into the dock after the crew is killed by a creature of unknown species. A guard opens the cargo hold, accidentally releasing the T. rex, which escapes into San Diego and goes on a rampage. Ian and Sarah retrieve the infant T. rex from a secure InGen building and use it to lure the adult back to the ship. Ludlow tries to intervene but is trapped in the cargo hold by the adult T. rex and mauled by the infant. Before the adult can escape again, Sarah tranquilizes it while Ian closes the hold. The T. rexes are escorted back to Isla Sorna, and Hammond says that the American and Costa Rican governments have agreed to declare the island a nature preserve, affirming that “life will find a way”.

It’s by no way a cheap show, and there are plenty of fun moments. Vince Vaughn and Pete Postlethwaite have fairly interesting characters, even if the rest of the supporting cast is along just to be eaten alive.

REVIEW: DROWNING MONA

  CAST

Danny Devito (Batman Returns)
Bette Midler (Beaches)
Neve Campbell (Scream)
Jamie Lee Curtis (Scream Queens)
Casey Affleck (Gone Baby Gone)
William Fichtner (The Dark Knight)
Tracey Walter (Conan The Destroyer)
Will Ferrell (The Other Guys)
Mark Pellegrino (Chuck)
Melissa McCarthy (Mike & Molly)
Brian Doyle-Murray (Waynes World)
Paul Ben-Victor (Tombstone)
Yul Vazquez (Russian Doll)

Neve Campbell in Drowning Mona (2000)This typically barely seen dark, wonderfully tasteless, cynical and quirky comedy was one of the funniest movies of all in 2000. It’s a deliciously warped murder mystery, not without charm either, involving a roster of deliberately nitwit suspects so hilariously feeble-minded that they can’t help looking guilty…something expected when everyone learns just how hateful the much-loathed victim.Jamie Lee Curtis in Drowning Mona (2000)Great comedy players turn in gleefully wild performances when the situation call for it, but are intriguingly on edge in many scenes. So much for her death setting them free. To know Mona, as a nasty, bullying Bette Midler nails her so well, was to hate her, so naturally the question fast becomes not who would want to see her dead, but who wouldn’t?! It’s a shocking pleasure to see two slasher scream queens (Neve Campbell, Jamie Lee Curtis) in one film together.Jamie Lee Curtis appears as RonaThere’s fun casting all the way through-Casey Affleck, William Fichtner, Mark Pellegrino, Kathleen Wilholte-who does a very funny song regarding the dead woman, proving no one had respect for her, and look for an early hialrious role by Will Ferrell, owner of a funeral home-his comment that “people have been more upset losing change in a slot machine, than over this woman” is one of many classic lines from people in this, and a number where ad-libbed, especially by Casey Affleck, a gifted comedian who puts his brother utterly to shade. It is strange that De Vito’s sheriff really can’t understand anyone’s problem with Mona, nevermind anyone who’d want to kill her, but while he tries to uncover the truth, it seems more likely the town just wants to know who to thank.Promo PosterNote worthy is the fact Melissa McCarthy appears in the film.

REVIEW: 13 REASONS WHY – SEASON 2

Dylan Minnette in 13 Reasons Why (2017)

MAIN CAST

Dylan Minnette (Don’t Breathe)
Katherine Langford (The Misguided)
Christian Navarro (Bushwick)
Alisha Boe (Paranormal Activity 4)
Brandon Flynn (BrainDead)
Justin Prentice (Izombie)
Miles Heizer (Rails & Ties)
Ross Butler (Riverdale)
Devin Druid (Louder Than Bombs)
Amy Hargreaves (Wonderstruck)
Derek Luke (Biker Boyz)
Kate Walsh (After The Sunset)
Michele Selene Ang (Elementary)

2

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Brian d’Arcy James (Smash)
Steven Weber (Izombie)
Wilson Cruz (Star Trek Discovery)
Sosie Bacon (Scream: The Series)
Tommy Dorfman (Fludity)
Allison Miller (17 Again)
Tom Everett Scott (Race To Witch Mountain)
Ben Lawson (No Strings Attached)
Robert Gant (Supergirl)
Chelsea Alden (Facd 2 Face)
Bryce Cass (Battle Los Angeles)
Brandon Butler (Ring of Silence)
Anne Winters (Mom and Dad)
Jackie Geary (NCIS)
Mason Guccione (Jumanji: Welcome To The Jungle)
Brenda Strong (Supergirl)
Anthony Raoo (Star Trek: Discovery)
Tommy Dorfman (Insatiable)
Meredith Monroe (Hart of Dixie)
Mark Pellegrino (Lost)
Jake Weber (Homeland)
Brandon Butler (Trinkets)
Ajiona Alexus (Runaways)
Josh Hamilton (Alive)
Sosie Bacon (Scream: The Series)
Andrea Roth (Cloak & Dagger)
Sean Blakemore (Bones)
Brandon Larracuente (Bright)
Steven Silver (Council of Dads)
Keiko Agena (Gilmore Girls
Parminder Nagra (God Friended Me)
Hank Greenspan (The Neighborhood)

“I know some people don’t want us to talk about what happened,” Tyler (Devin Druid) says in voiceover at the start of “13 Reasons Why’s” second season. “But if we don’t talk about it, it’s never going to change. So it’s important for everyone to understand how it all happened. The whole story.”  This is the very first thing viewers of the new season will hear — well, second, if you include the new trigger warning video featuring members of the cast that plays ahead of the premiere. But the warning and monologue are intertwined, because they’re ultimately about the same thing. The warning acknowledges that, while Netflix’s mega-hit series was well-received in its first season, it also drew plenty of controversy over how it treated its sensitive subject material: suicide, sexual assault, drug abuse, and so on.MV5BMThiMjMyMmUtMjcwMC00NjAxLWI0MDMtMmEwN2UzYTExNjIzXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMzUwMTgwMw@@._V1_SY1000_CR0,0,733,1000_AL_But Tyler’s monologue, which we soon learn is delivered from the witness stand, is a defense of season two’s very existence. Yes, the creators (including showrunners Brian Yorkey and Diana son) know of the criticisms. Yes, they know there are questions as to why a season two even needed to happen. But their argument is that the season is necessary — “important,” even. And considering how successful the show has been, the story we see in season two may not even be the end. The trial in question, which has compelled troubled gun aficionado Tyler’s testimony, is a lawsuit against Liberty High School by the parents of late student Hannah Baker (Katherine Langford). Hannah’s tapes explaining why she committed suicide provided the narrative arc of season one, with each tape focused on a different person in Hannah’s life. The trial serves the same function this season, with each episode centering on a particular witness’ testimony.13-reasons-why-season2The result is something of an inverse of the first season: instead of Hannah’s voice on the tapes, we hear the other students, teachers, and her parents. They open up parts of the story we didn’t hear in season one, though we’re left to to decide on our own if we trust them as our narrators. Reversing the narrative doesn’t do much to change the core of the series. Clay is the rock of “13 Reasons Why,” the anchor who keeps us chained to Hannah’s story. No matter whether we disagree with Hannah’s actions, get frustrated with the treatment of rapist baseball player Bryce Walker (Justin Prentice), or would perhaps rather follow the complex, challenging story of survivor Jessica Davis (Alisha Boe), Clay keeps us on track. This is about Hannah, the girl he loved but never got up the guts to tell. This is about his journey to make sure her suicide is avenged — whatever that personally means to him. And this is about his relationship to her and her memory, no matter how many forces of doubt come to challenge that.https _blueprint-api-production.s3.amazonaws.com_uploads_card_image_771242_269f95fd-56f8-4925-86ec-20d889c7690dMinnette is a marvel, turning in one of the most committed, insular, intense performances you’ll see anywhere on television. The 21-year-old actor reads as a blank slate when he’s still — maybe a hint of a perpetual grimace on his face, but ultimately inoffensive. As a result, Clay is often seen looking pensive, quiet, and expressionless. When he breaks, however, Minnette shines. Clay screams, cries, and generally loses his cool this season, and Minnette captures it all without missing a beat. Every bit of pain seems to leave an extra wrinkle or crag on Clay’s face. Minnette himself makes Clay feel heavier as the season goes on, like having to do any small thing would cause the young man to explode. Minnette plays Clay as a teen on the verge of a nervous breakdown, and you can’t take your eyes off him. A good deal of the cast is good this season — particularly Kate Walsh as Hannah’s grieving-but-furious mother Olivia — but Minnette stands above the pack. His is a tour-de-force performance that goes a long way to making “13 Reasons Why’s” second season feel worth the drama.