REVIEW: TRAINWRECK

CAST

Amy Schumer (Snatched)
Bill Hader (Power Rangers)
Brie Larson (Kong: Skull Island)
Colin Quinn (Grown Ups 2)
John Cena (12 Rounds)
Vanessa Bayer (Office Christmas Party)
Mike Birbiglia (Cedar Rapids)
Ezra Miller (Suicide Squad)
Tilda Swinton (Doctor Strange)
Daniel Radcliffe (The Woman In Black)
Marisa Tomei (The Guru)
Matthew Broderick (Election)
Leslie Jones (Ghostbusters)
Josh Segarra (Arrow)
Tim Meadows (Son of Zorn)
Randall Park (The Interview)
Ajay Mehta (Spider-Man)

Gordon Townsend (Colin Quinn) tells his two young daughters Amy (Devin Fabry) and Kim (Carla Oudin) that he and their mother are divorcing because monogamy is not realistic, repeating it like a mantra. Twenty-three years later, Amy (Amy Schumer) is a party girl who drinks too much and sleeps around while writing for a men’s magazine. She is in a casual relationship with a gay gym-addict named Steven (John Cena), who was attracted to her because he first thought she ‘looked like a dude’. Her cold-hearted English boss, Dianna (Tilda Swinton), assigns her to write an article about a sports doctor named Aaron Conners (Bill Hader).
While Amy is interviewing Aaron, she receives a text from Kim (Brie Larson) insisting they move Gordon to a cheaper facility. Amy starts to hyperventilate, but Aaron calms her down and suggests they get food. Over dinner, he compliments her writing and she learns about his family. After some drinks, they go to his place and have sex together. Amy stays the night, which is a departure from her rule of never sleeping over with a man she’s had sex with.
The next day, Aaron calls to ask if they can see each other again. Amy panics and tells him they will talk about it at the interview. She and her friend Nikki decide she has to end it. Meanwhile, Aaron’s friend, LeBron James, is excited for him since Aaron has not dated anyone in six years. Amy goes to watch Aaron perform surgery to “Uptown Girl”, his favorite song. Afterwards, she tries to break things off. He insists they like each other and should date. Amy then gets a phone call that her dad had a fall. Aaron drives her to the home where he tends to her dad.
Aaron and Amy begin dating and fall for each other. Amy is worried she is going to mess up the relationship, but Kim tells her she is just doing what everyone else does. Gordon avoids taking his medication and dies. At his funeral, Aaron tells her, for the first time, that he loves her. She tells him that it was the wrong time for him to start saying that to her.
Aaron receives a prestigious award at a luncheon and brings Amy. While making his speech, Amy gets a call from her boss Dianna, who threatens to fire her if she does not answer. She chooses to take the call and leaves during his speech. Afterwards, Aaron is upset and they start arguing. They return to her apartment, but Aaron thinks they should not go to bed angry, so Amy rants all night. The next day Aaron tells Amy that they need to take a break. Hurt, Amy reacts by telling him that it is fine.
Amy goes out drinking with her co-workers, including an intern, who invites her back to his place; their bizarre sexual encounter is interrupted when his mom enters and reveals that he is only 16. The next day, Dianna fires Amy for the incident. Aaron is moping in his apartment until LeBron calls, claiming he has been injured. Aaron rushes over to find an intervention for him consisting of LeBron, Matthew Broderick, Chris Evert, and Marv Albert. They tell him he has always been afraid of opening up and needs to make things right with Amy, but Aaron insists things with Amy are over.
Amy visits Kim and tells her everything that has happened; Kim tells her that it’s time to change. Amy clears out all the alcohol from her apartment. She takes her Aaron story to Vanity Fair, where it ends up getting published, and sends it to Aaron. He attends a game and after, Aaron is called back to the court, where the Knicks City Dancers perform with Amy front and center. She tells him she wants to make their relationship work. They confess their love for each other and kiss.This movie has the kind of very fast humor I do like, this movie has terrific performances not only from Amy Schumer and Bill Hader but from the entire cas.  I recommend this I very much to those who like to laugh.

REVIEW: CYRUS

CAST

John C.Reilly (Guardians of the Galaxy)
Jonah Hill (Get Him to The Greek)
Marisa Tomei (The Wrestler)
Catherine Keener (Simone)
Matt Walsh (Due Date)
Tim Guinee (Lie to Me)
Elisa Gabrielli (Bride Wars)
The film opens as Jamie (Catherine Keener) walks in on her ex-husband John (John C. Reilly) as he is masturbating. She had come to his house to tell him that she is getting married. Even though they have been apart for seven years, the news still devastates John, who is already in a depression. Jamie insists that John accompany her to a party the following night and try to cheer up. At the party, John tries various conversational tactics with different women, failing to spark a connection each time. He gets progressively drunker until he ends up urinating in the bushes, where Molly (Marisa Tomei) compliments him on his penis and strikes up a conversation. Molly goes back to John’s house and leaves during the night, after they have had sex.
Molly returns for a second date the next night, and once again, she leaves after they have had sex. John follows her to her house and falls asleep in his car. The next morning, he warily approaches the house, where he is surprised to meet Molly’s son Cyrus (Jonah Hill). Cyrus invites John inside and makes friendly conversation with him. Molly is startled to see John in her house when she returns, but the trio have dinner together. John is slightly unnerved by evidence that Molly and Cyrus are closer than normal for a mother and son.
The next morning, John cannot find his shoes, which he had left in the living room. As the day wears on, he is increasingly disturbed by their disappearance and starts to worry that Cyrus has been messing with him the whole time. He ropes Jamie into meeting Molly and Cyrus, in order to appraise his paranoia. Jamie finds Cyrus sweet, if a little overly intimate with his mother. Relieved, John returns for another night at Molly’s home. As they begin to have sex for the first time in her house, Cyrus screams in his room, and Molly runs to comfort him. She does not return to John, who goes out looking for her in the middle of the night. Instead, he encounters Cyrus who is holding a large kitchen knife. Cyrus explains that he had a night terror, and that Molly has gone to sleep. He then counsels John to back off on the relationship, because he is scaring off Molly. John leaves a note for her and returns home.
In the morning, Cyrus sits Molly down and tells her that John had confessed to him that she was coming on too strong. When she presses Cyrus for more information, he explodes in a tantrum and storms off, checking through the window to make sure he has upset his mother. Molly calls John and begs him to come over, while she waits for Cyrus to return. When Cyrus finally comes home, he explains that he has rented a room and will be moving out. After a few days alone together, John decides that he wants to move in with Molly.
After one date, they return home and begin to have sex, while Cyrus sits in the darkened kitchen. He surprises them both and explains that he has had another panic attack and wants to return home. In private, John finally confronts Cyrus about everything, and Cyrus admits that he has been deliberately sabotaging his mother’s relationship. He moves back home, and John remains wary of him. The night before Jamie’s wedding, he warns Cyrus not to screw up the day, because it means a lot to him. At the wedding, however, Cyrus is hurt when he sees how the event stirs romantic feelings between John and his mother. He confronts John in the bathroom and attacks him, yelling that John will not take his mother away from him. As John defends himself, the two spill out of the bathroom, into the view of the other guests. Cyrus makes it look like John attacked him. John advises Molly to open her eyes, then he storms off, furious at Cyrus.
Later, Molly believes John’s explanation, but John will not consider continuing the relationship, convinced that Cyrus will only continue to sabotage it and that he will end up alone again in a few years. He moves into a dumpy apartment. Meanwhile, Molly confronts Cyrus about his behavior, and she explains that she is deeply unhappy at the loss of her relationship. Cyrus reconsiders his position and visits John, begging him to come back. John insists that he will not, despite his love for Molly. He is certain that Cyrus will only ruin things again. Unsure if Cyrus has left, John opens the door to see him sitting on the steps with tears in his eyes. They exchange some dialogue that denotes a truce between them. Cyrus then asks if he can get a ride home. John inquires as to whether or not Molly is home and Cyrus says that she is not. Once home, Cyrus and John hug to show that the truce is genuine. Once Cyrus goes into the house, Molly comes out alluding to the prospects of Cyrus now using his manipulative power to keep their relationship together instead of trying to rip it apart. John and Molly lock eyes and it looks like the relationship is back on track. The movie ends with John starting to get out of the car.
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Although billed as a comedy and wrapped in a comedic sheen of one liners, Cyrus is weighted heavily towards the dramatic. There’s nothing intrinsically funny about the situation, and it’s to the directors credit that they didn’t try to force too much comedy out of the film as it would probably have failed miserably. Much of the dialogue is improvised which probably helped to keep the film true to it’s dark centre. All three of the leads are excellent. Very enjoyable.

REVIEW: THE GURU

CAST

Jim Mistry (Blood Diamond)
Marisa Tomei(The Wrestler)
Heather Graham (Killing Me Softly(
Michael McKean (This Is Spinal Tap)
Dash Mihok (The Day after Tomorrow)
Christine Baranski (The Big Bang Theory)
Dwight Ewell (Chasing Amy)
Bobby Cannavale (Ant-Man)
Ajay Naidu (Bad Santa)
Sakina Jaffrey (Mr. Robot)
Ajay Mehta (Anger Management)
Rizwan Manji (The Dictator)

Ramu Gupta (Jimi Mistry), a dance teacher, leaves his native city Delhi, India, to seek his fortune in the United States. He is lured by the exaggerations of his cousin, Vijay, who has already moved to New York City. Vijay’s deception is the first of several that drive the plot.

Seeking work as an actor, the naïve Ramu unknowingly lands a role in a pornographic film. That evening he accompanies Vijay and his roommates on a catering job at a society birthday party. When the Indian swami hired to address the party falls into drunken oblivion, Ramu takes his place. Lacking a real philosophy, he improvises by repeating advice he had been given by Sharonna (Heather Graham), an adult film actress he met earlier.
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Lexi (Marisa Tomei), the birthday girl, is so impressed that she promotes him as a New Age sex guru to her friends. Ramu hires Sharonna, ostensibly for advice on how to be an actor in adult films, though what he really wants is more ideas he could use in his new role as the guru of sex. A personal relationship develops between the two, though Sharonna is engaged to a firefighter who thinks she’s a school teacher. Complications ensue from these and other deceptions.
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A very funny & intelligent movie that spoofs all stereotypes, American as well as Asian. A real good hearted, feel good movie with some wise insights into peoples’ foibles

REVIEW: ANGER MANAGEMENT

CAST

Adam Sandler (Jack & Jill)
Jack Nicholson (Batman)
Marisa Tomei (Captain America: Civil War)
Luis Guzman (Waiting..)
Jonathan Loughran (50 First Dates)
Kurt Fuller (Scary Movie)
Krista Allen (The Final Destination)
January Jones (X-MenL: First Class)
John Turturro (Transformers)
Woody Harrelson (The Hunger Games)
Kevin Nealson (Weeds)
Allen Covert (Big Daddy)
John C. Reilly (Cyrus)
Harry Dean Stanton (Avengers Assemble)
Lori Heuring (Wicked Little Things)
Heather Graham (The Hangover)

In 1978, a young Dave Buznik is about to kiss the girl of his dreams, when a local bully, Arnie Shankman, pulls down his pants and underwear, embarrassing him in front of everybody. This leaves Dave with lasting trauma about public affection, as well as repressing his emotions. In the present day, Dave Buznik lives in New York, working as a secretary for Frank Head, an abusive boss who takes credit for Dave’s work. His problems also extend to his private life, his girlfriend Linda’s ex-boyfriend Andrew still being close friends with her and being condescending to Dave at work.
Adam Sandler in Anger Management (2003)
While flying to a business meeting, Dave sits next to a man named Buddy Rydell. After a series of annoyances cause Dave to lose his temper, a sky marshal tasers him, and Dave is arrested and sentenced to anger management therapy. The therapist happens to be Buddy. Buddy’s unorthodox techniques cause Dave to lose his temper, and Buddy tells Dave he recognizes his problem as passive-aggressive anger. After Dave gets into a bar fight caused by another of Buddy’s patients, Chuck, Dave is sent back to court and Buddy intervenes on his behalf, choosing to move in with Dave and shadow him in his life as part of more intensive therapy. Failure to comply will result in a year of jail time for Dave. Having Buddy as an unexpected and hovering roommate irritates Dave, which prompts Buddy to offer more therapeutic advice which, in turn, irritates Dave even more. Although Dave believes Andrew is doing nothing to ruin him at work, Buddy suspects otherwise and tells him that he needs to start fighting back or nothing will change. After receiving a phone call for Buddy informing him his mother is undergoing minor surgery, Dave jokes to him about its seriousness, prompting Buddy to warn he’ll get Dave back.
After seeing Buddy’s mother, the two stop at a restaurant on the way back to New York and after Buddy pressures him Dave flirts with, and goes home with, a young lady, but rejects her amorous advances out of loyalty to Linda. Later, Dave is devastated to learn that Buddy has told Linda about the woman, but Buddy explains the woman was a former patient of his, having set up the encounter to get revenge on Dave for the “dying mother” prank, and he will explain the truth to Linda. Buddy takes a detour to a Buddhist temple, so that Dave can confront a reformed Arnie, who has become a monk. While confronting his tormenter, Arnie expresses his sincerest apologies to Dave for bullying him all his life and asserts that Dave didn’t deserve the abuse. But Arnie laughs when Dave reminds him of the kiss incident and Dave attacks back. Dave and Buddy tease the monks into a rage are chased off the grounds, Dave feeling good on confronting his tormentor. Back in New York, Dave attempts to propose to Linda but loses his nerve, and Linda suggests that they take a break from their relationship. Soon after Buddy begins dating Linda, Dave (not aware this was the next step of his therapy) sees this as the last straw and loses his cool by attacking Buddy. Being called back into court, Dave is given a restraining order by the judge, who threatens to lock him up if Dave has another incident.
Called into work and yelled at by his boss, Dave finally snaps when he learns that his boss intentionally passed him and gave the promotion to Andrew. He immediately confronts both men for the way they’ve mistreated him in the past. Dave calls Andrew out for trying to interfere with both his promotion and relationship with Linda, revealing he wants Andrew out of their lives permanently. Andrew attempts to insult him about being too dependent on Buddy to back him up and admits he isn’t good enough for Linda. Taking Buddy’s advice, Dave debunks the claim and knocks him out cold. He proceeds to humiliate his boss by using a golf club to wreck his office and reminding him of all the years of his loyal services just to be denied of the promotion he wanted so much in favor of someone who didn’t deserve it. Dave then tells his boss that if he ever gets out of jail within three years, he expects his boss to do the right thing and give the promotion to him that Andrew presumably resigned from.
Jack Nicholson and Adam Sandler in Anger Management (2003)His boss agrees and before Dave leaves, he warns his boss to treat his cat, Meatball, with more respect because he is eating his crab cakes as revenge for the mistreatment he put him through. As Dave leaves, he intentionally steps on Andrew’s head as one last bit of revenge. Learning Buddy has taken Linda to a New York Yankees game, Dave assumes Buddy intends to steal his proposal idea and races to the stadium. Security captures him and begins to remove him from the stadium but Mayor Rudy Giuliani orders them to allow Dave to speak. After admitting that he does have an anger problem and is willing to change, Dave agrees to kiss Linda in front of the stadium in exchange for her marrying him. Linda and Buddy then reveal that the game was the final part of Dave’s therapy, and explain that the tormentors and aggravations he has been put through were Buddy’s doing to teach him how to unleash his anger in healthy doses to avoid it building up. The passenger, the Judge, the waitress and the flight attendant are Buddy’s friends. Dave then asks about the Sky Marshall who tased him if he was involved with Buddy and Linda admits he wasn’t. The marshall was just having a bad day (briefly shown to be angered over the fact he is in the middle of two sleeping obese people).
The three attend a picnic with Buddy’s other patients, where Dave plays a final joke on Buddy with a friend holding the group up with a water pistol, and the film ends as the friends sing “I Feel Pretty” from West Side Story together.
Jack Nicholson in Anger Management (2003)
Adam Sandler plays a good part but no where near as good as Jack Nicholson. Nicholson’s potrayal of the doctor who tries to cure Adam Sandler’s character is fantastic! Nicholson’s jokes are hilarious and his general manor and quotes are just brilliant!  It’s a must see for any Nicholson fan and a generally funny film.

REVIEW: THE IDES OF MARCH

CAST

George Clooney (Out of Sight)
Ryan Gosling (Gangster Squad)
Philip Seymour Hoffman (The Master)
Paul Giamatti (The Amazing Spider-Man 2)
Evan Rachel Wood (Thirteen)
Marisa Tomei (The Wrestler)
Jeffrey Wright (Source Code)
Max Minghella (The Internship)
Jennifer Ehle (Zero Dark Thirty)
Gregory Itzin (Adaptation.)
Michael Mantell (Secretary)

MV5BMTkxMTU3MTY4Nl5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwMTMwODQ3Ng@@._V1_SX1500_CR0,0,1500,999_AL_Clooney’s story  is set during the week of the Ohio primary race for the Democratic presidential candidate, which has basically come down to a two-man contest between Senator Ted Pullman (Michael Mantell), whose campaign is run by shrewd Tom Duffy (Paul Giamatti), and Governor Morris (Clooney). Morris’s campaign manager is longtime operative Paul Zara (Philip Seymour Hoffman); Stephen Meyers (Gosling) is his number two man. The decisive race in Ohio is close, which much riding on who will get the endorsement (and delegates) of Senator Franklin Thompson, who is angling for a cabinet post. In the midst of all of this, Stephen begins a campaign trail romance with intern Molly (Evan Rachel Wood), who turns out to be the daughter of the head of the DNC. And then things get complicated.The film’s early scenes are its best. The script talks plain and names names, throwing around smart political talk; Meyers and Duffy’s conversation about learning to how to play the game from Republicans is sharp and lucid, while Morris’s comments from the stump about taxation and “socialism” (as well as Zara’s crack that the Republicans “can’t find a nominee that’s not a world-class fuck-up”) are tartly timely. Though some of the details of the campaign stretch credibility (no candidate could proclaim himself as indifferent to religion as Morris does and actually survive a primary for either party), its portrayl of primary politics and their backstage byplay feel authentic;  Gosling and Wood’s two-scenes have a nice zing to them (reminsicent of the screwball comedy homages in his underrated Leatherheads), Clooney’s offhand sense of humor is disarming–see Hoffman and Gosling’s offstage compliments after the first debate, or the business with Wood and Gosling’s tie the morning after their first date–and he draws out some nice directorial flourishes, like the way he handles a late scene with Hoffman going into an SUV.Every member of the cast is utterly convincing. Clooney’s smooth persona has rarely been better employed–both his playful charm and his steely directness. Gosling gets a good, hard arc to play, and he wails on it; the speed which his idealism loop-the-loops into cynicism is dazzling . It’s a memorable turn, even if he calls up a wide-eyed, manic look that will make Drive viewers fear he’s about to break out the hammer. Hoffman gets a showcase scene in his hotel room, a footlights monologue that betrays the film’s stage roots, but he’s so compelling you don’t notice the scaffolding; the way he pivots from cool contempt to utter rage is what good screen acting is all about. Wright is underused, but Clooney juggles the rest of the ensemble cast with ease.