REVIEW: THE GOOD PLACE – SEASON 4

Ted Danson, Kristen Bell, Marc Evan Jackson, William Jackson Harper, Manny Jacinto, Jameela Jamil, and D'Arcy Carden in The Good Place (2016)

Starring

Kristen Bell (Veronica Mars)
William Jackson Harper (All Good Things)
Jameela Jamil (Ducktales)
D’Arcy Carden (Barry)
Manny Jacinto (Top Gun: Maverick)
Ted Danson (The Orville)

Ted Danson, Kristen Bell, Manny Jacinto, Jameela Jamil, and D'Arcy Carden in The Good Place (2016)

Recurring / Notable Guest Cast

Marc Evan Jackson (Jumanji: Welcme To The Jungle)
Jason Mantzoukas (The Dictator)
Mike O’Malley (My Name Is Earl)
Brandon Scott Jones (Hexed)
Kirby Howell-Baptiste (Veronica Mars)
Benjamin Koldyke (How I met Your Mother)
Maribeth Monroe (The Back-up Plan)
Tiya Sircar (Supergirl)
Patrick Cox (2 Broke Girls)
Maya Rudolph (Happytime Murders)
Timothy Olyphant (Santa Clarita Diet)
Rebecca Hazlewood (Equals)
Ajay Mehta (Spide-Man)
Anna Khaja (Yes Man)
Lisa Kudrow (Friends)
Leslie Grossman (Popular)
Nick Offerman (We’re the Millers)
Mary Steenburgen (Last Vegas)

Kristen Bell in A Girl from Arizona Part 2 (2019)After four seasons and four years on air, it’s fitting that Michael Schur’s The Good Place should conclude with a disquisition on the merits of eternity. Is paradise unending really all that it’s cracked up to be? If bliss is granted with the snap of our fingers, if our hearts’ desires are so easily achieved, and if we have all the time in the afterlife to indulge them without worrying about dying before we get around to each and every one of them, then maybe Heaven is actually Hell. At the very least, it’s kind of a bummer. When everything is possible, nothing matters, and when nothing matters, minds go to seed. Even Hypatia of Alexandria can’t endure such conditions without turning into a total “smooth brain.”Ted Danson, Kristen Bell, and Manny Jacinto in Chillaxing (2019)The Good Place’s Eleanor (Kristen Bell), Chidi (William Jackson Harper), Tahani (Jameela Jamil), and Jason (Manny Jacinto) have an elegant solution: An after-afterlife, kept behind a green door. Step right through, and be at peace forever. Heaven’s great, but good times have to end eventually. I suppose the same is true of television. We’re past the point where “golden age” is an adequate descriptor for the days of peak TV. Frankly, even “peak TV” has outlived its usefulness for characterizing the 2010s, and now the 2020s, where there’s just too damn much TV to watch and series tend to go on, and on, and on, whether they deserve to or not.Ted Danson, Kristen Bell, Manny Jacinto, Jameela Jamil, and D'Arcy Carden in Tinker, Tailor, Demon, Spy (2019)Consider that there’s still a camera crew documenting the lives of the extended Dunphy family, that new crises unfold and steamy romances still heat up in the halls of Grey Sloan Memorial Hospital, and that Bart, Lisa, and Maggie haven’t aged a day since 1989; think about the stranglehold that Game of Thrones has maintained over pop culture for the last decade, and that with a successor series on the way for 2022, its grips will slacken only briefly before choking out entertainment sites afresh.Ted Danson, Manny Jacinto, and D'Arcy Carden in Employee of the Bearimy (2019)Too much of a good thing is a problem. Mercifully, and not a little ironically, The Good Place understands that problem despite being set in the sweet hereafter — and the sour hereafter, and the second-rate hereafter. There isn’t a corner of the great beyond Schur, his writers, and the series’ cast haven’t explored over the course of its lifespan: the Good Place, which is actually the Bad Place, plus the Medium place, plus the real Good Place, including its filing offices, where good souls are sifted from bad souls, which means that, in accordance with the Good Place’s absurd requirements for entry, nobody ends up in the Good Place at all and gets tortured by chainsaw bears forever instead.Ted Danson and D'Arcy Carden in A Chip Driver Mystery (2019)Bless The Good Place for ending. As fun as it is watching the gang puzzle over new existential predicaments every week, drawing out their path toward enlightenment after shuffling off their mortal coils defeats the purpose of the show as the contemporary roadmap for goodness we all need, whether we realize it or not, at a moment where goodness is in short supply and badness trickles down from the very top of American society. We are in an era of casual cruelty: Anyone, at any given moment, has the power to taunt, bully, and abuse strangers from hundreds of miles away for such sins as liking The Last Jedi. We’re talking about badness in its pettiest form (though even petty badnesses can have meaningful consequences in the real world); it’s workaday badness, the kind of badness otherwise good people are guilty of and would end up in the Bad Place for. (Badness in its worst forms, a’la hate crimes and high crimes, comprise a separate category. Most of us won’t punch our tickets to the Inferno by shooting up Synagogues or extorting a foreign country.)Ted Danson and Kristen Bell in Help Is Other People (2019)Being good takes a lot of work. In The Good Place, as in life, goodness comes naturally to nobody: Not Eleanor, selfish and caustic, not Jason, impulsive and dim, not Tahani, haughty and proud, not Chidi, indecisive and trying. Goodness is relative, too. Tahani’s philanthropic endeavors afford her the veneer of goodness, but beneath the veneer lies arrogance and jealousy. Chidi’s brilliance, meanwhile, makes him a thorn in the side of his friends and family. He’s a man incapable of taking action, whether trivial or urgent, to the detriment of every sucker caught in his orbit.Television is rarely revolutionary, but Schur’s big idea for The Good Place — to massage the contradictions of goodness into a sitcom mold — qualifies. Being good is overrated. The architects of the Good Place, simpering goodie goodies dressed like L.L. Bean rejects, hoodwink Michael (Ted Danson), erstwhile Bad Place architect and reformed career demon, into assuming ownership of the Good Place after rebuilding it; it’s a slightly better Good Place, except that perpetual joy and happiness turn inhabitants into mindless zombies. They don’t know how to fix the problem, so they dump it on Michael, and, reformed or no, leaving Heaven in the hands of a demon is decidedly not good. If the Good Place architects are paragons of what it is to be good, there would appear to be little hope left for the rest of us — except, of course, for Eleanor, Chidi, Tahani, and Jason, and even Michael and Janet (D’Arcy Carden).Kristen Bell and William Jackson Harper in The Answer (2019)Goodness ultimately isn’t about how good you are, but how good you strive to be. That’s the legacy of The Good Place, where angels are squirrelly traitors and demons believe in rehabilitation. The show is a testament to goodness as an ongoing spiritual enterprise, the work that people do to be better today than they were yesterday. Anybody can be good if they are willing to put in the effort. The Good Place demonstrates what “effort” looks like, and what goodness takes: Learning, vulnerability, struggle, failure, and most of all, perhaps, the help of a few good friends. Goodness is a journey. Having educated its audience on goodness’ labors from 2016 to now, The Good Place has gently arrived at the end of its own, stepping beyond the big green door to its final rest.

REVIEW: THE GOOD PLACE – SEASON 3

Ted Danson, Kristen Bell, William Jackson Harper, Manny Jacinto, Jameela Jamil, and D'Arcy Carden in The Good Place (2016)

Starring

Kristen Bell (Veronica Mars)
William Jackson Harper (All Good Things)
Jameela Jamil (Ducktales)
D’Arcy Carden (Barry)
Manny Jacinto (Top Gun: Maverick)
Ted Danson (The Orville)

Kristen Bell and William Jackson Harper in The Good Place (2016)

Recurring / Notable Guest Cast

Maya Rudolph (Bridesmaids)
Adam Scott (Krampus)
Mike O’Malley (My Name Is Earl)
Marc Evan Jackson (Kong: Skull Island)
Eugene Cordero (The Mule)
Kirby Howell-Baptiste (Barry)
Ben Lawson (No Strings Attached)
Ben Geurens (Reign)
Leslie Grossman (Popular)
Anna Khaja (Quantico)
Ajay Mehta (Anger Managment)
Tiya Sircar (The Internship)
Michael McKean (This Is Spinal Tap)
Jama Williamson (School of Rock)
Stephen Merchant (Logan)
Jason Mantzoukas (The Dictator)
Maribeth Monroe (Downsizing)

Adam Scott and Kristen Bell in The Good Place (2016)After their down right incredible second season I was more than a little curious about how this season would turn out. The real joy of The Good Place is how every season is drastically different in content while still staying true to the shows sense of humor, core characters and themes of moral philosophy.Ted Danson and D'Arcy Carden in The Good Place (2016)Season 3 opts to explore the usual ideas of morality while on Earth, giving more great moments of the core group of humans interacting and learning together without so much of the original gimmick.Kristen Bell and Jameela Jamil in The Good Place (2016)The biggest positive of this show is how well written the interactions between the main cast are managing to be very funny while offering actual incite into the underlying philosophy of the show. By taking the characters out of the crazy afterlife setting for a large part of the season forces the writers to focus on this element and allows the actors to show of their comedic sensibilities. However I would be lying if I said that the later half of the season, where more of the absurd elements the show rose to prominence for came back into play more, wasn’t the more interesting part. I have to give props to the writers for trying something different though and I can’t wait to see where they take this concept next.Ted Danson and Kristen Bell in The Good Place (2016)This season is where the cast got to show off more. The character of Jason became far more realised, fleshed out and funny when he had more mundane concepts to deal with. Kristen Bell and William Jackson Harper got to flex their dramatic mussels for larger sections and D’arcy Carden absolutely crushes it in every episode, especially in episode 9 “Janet(s)”.Ted Danson and Kristen Bell in The Good Place (2016)With it’s emphasis on name-drooping actual philosophers and general upbeat and absurd tone, The Good Place continues to separate itself for most of it’s competition.

REVIEW: THE GOOD PLACE – SEASON 1


MAIN CAST

Kristen Bell (Veronica Mars)
William Jackson Harper (Paterson)
Jameela Jamil (T4 on The Beach)
D’Arcy Carden (Other People)
Manny Jacinto (The Romeo Selection)
Ted Danson (Cheers)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Adam Scott (Krampus)
Tiya Sircar (The Vampire Diaries)
Marc Evan Jackson (22 Jump Street)
Ajay Mehta (Anger Management)
Leslie Grossman (Nip/Tuck)
Seth Morris (Veep)
Anna Khaja (Yes Man)
Ajay Mehta (Anger Management)
Rebecca Hazlewood (Equals)
Dominic Burgess (Santa Clarita Diet)
Keston John (She-Ra and the Princesses of Power)
Maribeth Monroe (Bob Hearts Abishola)

Michael Schur is not the first writer to create a comedy about the afterlife. Dante Alighieri, for one, beat him by about 700 years. But Dante’s “The Divine Comedy” had the advantage of drawing on theology widely accepted by his audience and not having to deal with network notes. (“Beatrice: Relatable enough?”) So in “The Good Place,” an ingenious metaphysical sitcom, Mr. Schur (the co-creator of “Parks and Recreation” and “Brooklyn Nine-Nine”) has a couple of challenges. First, how to invent a Great Beyond that amuses viewers of many faiths (or none). Second, how to introduce conflict — the engine of narrative and laughs — into a perfect world.

The second first: It turns out this heaven has a few bugs in it. The biggest is Eleanor Shellstrop (Kristen Bell), a self-centered heel who awakens after a fatal accident in what looks like a college admissions office. She’s greeted by Michael (Ted Danson), the bow-tied “architect” who designed the bespoke subdivision in which she will spend eternity.

The Good Place, as Michael calls this higher plane, is like heaven if it were run by Whole Foods. It’s a pristine, nonsectarian afterlife where arrivals are greeted by a sign reassuring them, “Everything is fine!” in the cheerful green letters of an organic cereal box.There’s no mention of any supreme beings, though, Michael says, “Every religion guessed about 5 percent” right. The residents are mostly young and attractive, by the demographic standards of the dead, and there is a ton of frozen yogurt.

Entrance into this hyperselective moral Harvard is determined by a complex algorithm in which one’s every act on earth is added or subtracted from a point score. Plus: “Plant baobab tree in Madagascar,” “Hug sad friend.” Minus: “Disturb coral reef with flipper,” “Tell a woman to ‘smile.’” Only a few souls make the cut. Everyone else goes to the Bad Place, including Christopher Columbus, every dead president except Lincoln and every deceased member of the Portland Trail Blazers. Mr. Schur, like Dante, realizes the most fun part of creating hell is getting to put people in it.

So how in the Bad Place did Eleanor get here? Mistaken identity: The management believes she’s a do-gooder who spent her life helping the unfortunate. But after she gets the grand tour and is assigned an eternal soul mate — Chidi (William Jackson Harper), an earnest philosophy professor from Senegal — she decides to fake it. This throws off the community’s cosmic balance, with disastrous and surreally C.G.I.-enhanced results.Like many high-concept sitcom pilots, “The Good Place,”  at first seems more like a movie idea  But the series  holds up.

The series expands its world and delves into back stories like a sitcom variation on “Lost.” (It begins, like that drama, with a tight shot of the protagonist’s eyes opening.) Supporting actors include Jameela Jamil as an upper-crust British humanitarian and D’Arcy Carden as Janet, sort of a Siri in human form. There’s more in this undiscovered country than first appears, and each episode ends on a twist or revelation that sparks the next. The performances help ground this cloud-nine soufflé. Ms. Bell, who could turn a nimble line in “Veronica Mars,” makes a natural sitcom lead, and Mr. Danson makes a fine, fastidious bureaucrat. But the show’s big find is Mr. Harper, whose line readings make Chidi’s moral nausea palpable as he tries to teach Eleanor to be a good person, or at least fake it. More important, Mr. Schur seems to have found a deeper idea behind the show’s premise: Is acting good the same as being good? Through Chidi’s tutorials, he even manages to work in a tidy primer of ethical philosophy (John Stuart Mill alert!).

And it’s hard not to be won over when Eleanor challenges the very idea of a snooty, meritocratic paradise that excludes 99.99 percent (give or take) of imperfect humanity. “I was a medium person!” she tells Chidi. “I should get to spend eternity in a medium place, like Cincinnati!” She may not belong in heaven, but it’s fun to watch her give it hell.

REVIEW: CONVICTION (2016)

MAIN CAST

Hayley Atwell (Agent Carter)
Eddie Cahill (CSI: NY)
Shawn Ashmore (Smallville)
Merrin Dungey (alias)
Emily Kinney (The Flash)
Manny Montana (Graceland)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Daniel Franzese (Mean Girl)
Bess Armstrong (Jaws 3D)
Cassandra Freeman (Inside Man)
Mike Doyle (Green Lantern)
Teri Polo (Meet The Parents)
Tim Guinee (Stargate SG.1)
Susan Hayward (Powers)
Carlo Rota (Stargate Universe)
Matthew Bennett (Battlestar Galactica)
Richard Thomas (IT)
Jordan Hayes (Helix)
Shawn Parsons (Containment)
Martin Donovan (Ant-Man)
Rob Stewart (Painkiller Jane)
Mark Moses (Platoon)
JoNell Kennedy (Dreamgirls)
Anna Khaja (The Good Place)
Patrick Breen (A Series of Unfortunate Events)
Von Flores (Earth: Final Conflict)
Karan Oberoi (Roswell, New Mexico)
Tammy Isbell (Bitten)
Sadie LeBlanc (Gossip)

In Conviction Hayley Atwell plays Hayes Morrison, a complex character with obvious flaws. She is the daughter of an ex-President and a politician running for Senator. First an attorney, then a law professor, she was always a rebel and a liability for her parents due to her “extremely controversial lifestyle” and run-ins with the law. She is blackmailed into heading the CIU, a new department in the DA’s office dedicated to investigating possibly wrongful convictions. She has all of the necessary tools, including a dedicated staff, but she lacks the Conviction.The pilot moves quickly, allowing Hayes to experience many emotions. You will not see a finer job of acting in a pilot. Atwell is remarkable. Her character is uncaring, self-indulgent and the product of years of political posturing (by her family) and being in the spotlight. She knows how to paint on a smile, but she shows us so many levels beneath it. Her character might seem unlikable and this might look like just another crime solving drama, but the writers have given the viewer plenty of hints at how this show might develop, along with the characters in it.
The supporting actors are also excellent, including Shawn Ashmore, Merrin Dungey,  Emily Kinney, Eddie Cahill, and Manny Montana. Her team of investigators have diverse backgrounds and very different perspectives.
The twist is that they only have five days to investigate each case–a factor that sounds contrived but it fits the story. In the first episode, they investigate an 8-year old conviction and Hayes has a crisis of conscience, proving she has one. Other Episode Highlights are(2) Bridge and Tunnel Vision

Hayes decides to go after one of Wallace’s career-making cases, the Prospect 3. They were three boys charged with raping and assaulting a woman, Zadie Daniels, on her way from work. Zadie was hit in the head by a brick, so she does not remember the attack, but the media called her a hero. None of the members of the group—Mike, Brian, and Seamus—was a DNA match for the semen in the rape kit, but they confessed after exhaustive interrogations, each one blaming the others. After learning that the timelines did not match up, the CIU discovered that Zadie had sex with a married man the night of the assault, the source of the semen. They also learn that Brian had previously attacked other females, including his foster sister, which is why Wallace was sure that the three boys were the culprits. Hayes gets Brian to admit that he was the only person responsible for the assault, freeing Mike and Seamus. Although she proves two people innocent, Hayes feels depressed, as Zadie’s reputation is now ruined.

(3) Dropping Bombs

To spite Wallace after his comment about “the new Hayes Morrison,” Hayes digs up the case of bigoted activist Rodney Landon, convicted of planting a bomb in a mosque office and killing four men, including the Imam. The CIU team finds Landon was primarily a suspect because of an illegal search by the Counter-Terrorism Unit and that, although he didn’t plant the bomb, he was planning a far more deadly attack. Because the illegal search would throw out most of the evidence against Landon and get him released, Sam talks to a skinhead in prison. Hayes is notified that Landon was attacked due to rumors of his being a snitch and stabbed his attacker with a shiv. By committing a felony on camera, he will remain in prison. The actual bomber turns out to be the wife of the Imam, who was angry because of his multiple affairs. Hayes’ cocaine arrest becomes public when a video of her in jail is released to the media.(4) Mother’s Little Burden

The CIU works on the case of Penny Price, a stay-at-home mom who vlogged about taking care of her violent autistic son, Owen. Penny was charged with second degree murder via leaving a bottle of soy sauce outside, which Owen drank in its entirety. However, Frankie finds out from the case’s toxicologist that Owen did not die from a sodium overdose, but from a lack of sugar due to a deliberately administered insulin shot. They go to Penny’s husband, Greg Price, a pharmacist who was having an affair, as well as Owen’s caretaker, Eduardo, whose sister had dangerously low insulin levels on the day of Owen’s murder. Hayes realizes that the only person with means and motive was Penny’s daughter, Emily. Penny tells Emily to keep quiet and says that she will take the blame, telling Hayes that her daughter deserves a life. Meanwhile, Hayes must juggle solving the case and working with her brother, Jackson, to prepare for a “mea culpa” television interview. Jackson drills her on what to wear (the right suit and her mother’s pearls), what to say, and how to say it. During the interview, she uses her charm and the rehearsed responses, but eventually her lies and the pearls begin to choke her. She then candidly explains that she got her do-over and job as a result of her privilege and that she is now attempting to use some of it to free innocent people. Although this decision earns her immediate public approval, it severely hurts her mother’s campaign and throws Wallace under the bus. The night after solving the case, Hayes goes home to Jackson’s apartment, only to find that he has kicked her out.(6) #StayWoke

After a black teenager is killed by a cop which causes an argument among the team, Hayes decides to choose the case of Porscha Williams, a black activist who was convicted of the shooting murder of Sergeant Kelsey Blake during a protest. Maxine feels conflicted as she is both black with a son and an ex-cop. Meanwhile, Hayes meets with Naomi, Wallace’s lawyer, who flirts with Hayes. Tess tells Frankie about being an eyewitness to her aunt’s murder at age 12 and identifying the wrong man. The man, Matty Tan, was cleared by DNA after five years in prison and that she has been going to his coffee-cart frequently without him knowing her connection. The team finds that one eyewitness lied under oath and that other witnesses may have confused Porscha with another woman. Then they discover that the Medical Examiner’s van was near the scene longer than necessary, and that the entry and exit wounds may have been mixed up, meaning that Kelsey may have been shot from behind. Using the new angle, the team discovers that one of the other witnesses, George Stayner, was responsible. George, when confronted, says it was an accident and then commits suicide. After Porscha is released, Hayes finds Naomi and Wallace kissing each other.(7) A Simple Man

The CIU team investigates the case of a man with a low IQ, Leo Scarlata, who was convicted of setting a fire in his family’s restaurant. The fire killed one man and injured another. Wallace approves a documentary film crew who have been working on Scarlata’s case, to follow the team around. The investigation finds that the fire didn’t start the way previously believed and that, although Leo was responsible, he just “followed the rules”. Those “rules” had been deliberately altered to cause the fire for the insurance payout. Leo is released.bountykiller01(8) Bad Deals

The CIU team takes on the case of Josh Fleck, a teacher convicted of kidnapping and murdering his high school student, Sierra Macy, ten years before. The reason for the case is because Sierra is alive and had just escaped from her basement prison only to find her captor dead. Sam was the prosecutor on the case and though the murder conviction will be dropped, he still insists that Fleck was involved in the kidnapping. The team finds that the waitress eyewitness lied, that the blood evidence could be explained away, and that Sierra was hauled away in a car trunk while Fleck drove a pickup. When Sam visits the waitress, Melissa, he hears the chimes that Sierra remembers. Melissa points a gun at him but the police burst in and rescue him. Fleck is released. The Justice Department drops its case against Wallace after Hayes provides information.bountykiller01(9) A Different Kind of Death

Wallace gives the CIU the case of Earl Slavitt (Richard Thomas), a death-row inmate who was convicted of the murder of Tom Simon, a federal prosecutor and Wallace’s friend. Earl was originally prosecuted by Tom for embezzling money from his job. After he was released from prison he made threats against Tom. Wallace asks Hayes to review the case, as Tom was against the death penalty and Earl is to be executed in five days. While the CIU reviews the case in New York, Hayes and Wallace go to Indiana to try and stop Earl’s execution. They have to deal with Bill Newton, the Assistant U.S. Attorney who was on the prosecution’s side for both cases and who gets in their way. The team finds that an ex-con was hired to kill Tom, and that Earl’s boss was the actual embezzler. Someone in the U.S. Attorney’s office was taking bribes. Hayes, after talking to Earl’s former co-worker, Nina, learns that Bill ordered the hit on Tom to cover his tracks. Hayes tries to contact Wallace to stop the execution but is too late. After hearing the news, Sam catches Maxine taking pain-killers.JORDAN HAYES, HAYLEY ATWELL(10) Not Okay

The team takes the case of Sophie Hausen, convicted of murdering Travis Carter, the college student whom she claimed raped her. Retesting the DNA on the murder weapon shows only a partial match and a recreation of the crime shows a potentially hazardous exit. While checking out other possible suspects the team finds out there were other victims who hadn’t reported the rapes because of Sophie’s treatment by officials. But they had all talked to a rape counselor, Elyse Salmon, who had decided to take matters into her own hands. Elyse confesses and Sophie is released. On a personal angle, Tess finally tells Matty about their connection and he doesn’t take it well. Plus Hayes, with a boost from Jackson, and Wallace decide to attempt their relationship againConviction - Series 01(11) Black Orchid

A current case ties back to an old one. A woman is found beaten to death. Her physical description, the manner of death, and the “Black Orchid” lipstick smeared on her mouth match the M.O. of a convicted serial killer, Clark Sims, from ten years before. The CIU team doesn’t know if Sims is innocent or if there is a copycat. They are able to explain away the fingerprint evidence against Sims. They also find that the man arrested for the recent murder couldn’t have done it. Figuring in the ten-year hiatus between crimes they speculate the killer was in prison. A search of inmates fitting the parameters locates a suspect, Donald Cutler, who was in the vicinity of the recent murder. Cutler goes after the woman who survived his attack years ago and she kills him. Sims is released.145458_5409_feat-770x433(13) Past, Prologue & What’s to Come

Hayes takes on the case of Gerald Harris, a man she unsuccessfully defended in Chicago nine years earlier against charges that he murdered his wife, Claire. Wallace prosecuted the case. As the team struggles to find a suspect who could have committed the murder, Hayes learns that Sam will be forced to testify during a trial for Rodney Landon, which will effectively discredit the CIU and subject all of its cases to review. Sam informs her that he intends to take the fifth, ending his career but keeping the CIU intact. Frankie eventually confirms that Claire died from a heart attack before she fell, the evidence of which was not found at her original autopsy. Although the subpoena against Sam is dropped, Wallace orders Hayes to fire him for going “rogue”. But she deliberately kisses Sam, committing sexual harassment in view of a witness, meaning he can’t be fired without her being forced to resign.EMILY KINNEY, EDDIE CAHILL, MANNY MONTANA, HAYLEY ATWELL, MERRIN DUNGEY, SHAWN ASHMORE

With all 13 episodes aired, this could be the end of the show, with the ratings not doing so hot, the show was not given a back order of episodes. It’s a shame as I really enjoyed the show, Hayley Atwell is as brilliant as ever and the cases were interesting, some were a little political but that was okay. It will certainly be missed if this is truly the end of the show.