HALLOWEEN OF HORROR REVIEW: BONES – THE HALLOWEEN EPISODES

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MAIN CAST

Emily Deschanel (Boogeyman)
David Boreanaz (Angel)
Michaela Conlin (The Lincoln Lawyer)
Eric Millegan (On_Line)
Tamara Taylor (Lost)
T.J. Thyne (Ghost World)
John Boyd (Argo)

3rd-rock-from-the-sun-halloween

GUEST CAST

Rider Strong (Cabin Fever)
Azura Skye (28 Days)
Nathan Anderson (Man Men)
Vince Grant (Dreamgirls)
Lynsey Bartilson (Grounded for Life)
Caitlyn Folley (Happy Endings)
Tom Mison (Sleepy Hollow)
Nicole Beharie (Sleepy Hollow)
Michael Grant Terry (Grimm)
Sean Patrick Thomas (Barbershop)
Malcolm David Kelley (Lost)

THE MUMMY IN THE MAZE

At a Halloween hay maze, an announcer tells a bunch of dressed-up kids whoever gets to the end first wins the grand prize. He starts the race, and one kid named Matty is shown getting lost in the maze. He runs into a mummy and freaks out and when a spider crawls out of the mummy’s eye and lands on Matty’s nose, he passes out. Booth and Bones arrive at the scene that night and work their way through the maze with a pediatrician/coroner to try to find the mummy. They get lost, and eventually Booth knocks through some bales of hay to get them to the mummy. Bones confirms that the mummy is indeed human remains.
Cam and Zack examine the body. They find out that the mummy was mummified quickly, which cannot be done under normal conditions. Cam tells Hodgins and Zack that everyone has to go to the Halloween party that’s coming up because donors and benefactors will be there. Zack says he’s going to be the back end of a cow, and Naomi from paleontology is going to be the front end. Hodgins says he’s going to be Edward John Smith, the captain of the Titanic. Cam continues examining the body, and says the victim is covered in lacquer. Hodgins says that the clothing is from a church thrift store, which confuses Zack because there’s no bug or slime evidence and he doesn’t know how Hodgins could have figured that out. Then Hodgins shows Zack the tag on the victim’s clothing to show he’s undoubtedly right.
Booth and Bones go to the church thrift store and talk to Pastor Jonas. He explains how the church does a “Hell House” for Halloween as “a positive celebration of Christian values.” They find that no one ever dresses up as a mummy there and that none of his kids have disappeared recently. Amber Kippler, a private investigator, tells Hodgins and Angela that she’s going to be doing all the footwork in their investigation of Angela’s husband. She proves her experience to Angela by revealing a very personal fact about her. Amber says that she found Grayson, Angela’s husband. She’s told that she should talk to him and try to get him to sign the divorce papers. In Booth’s car, Booth and Bones talk about their meeting with the pastor. Booth is surprised when Brennan says that science has to take a leap of faith. Cam calls and says that a couple is at the lab and thinks that the mummy in the maze is their daughter, then tells Booth and Bones to hurry back to talk to them. When Booth and Bones get to the lab they talk to the parents who reveal that their daughter Megan disappeared in a fun house recently, and that when they saw the mummy story, they were sure it was Megan. The mother says she’s sure Megan isn’t alive. They show the couple a picture Angela drew of the mummy victim, and the parents confirm that it’s not Megan. Cam then calls Bones and says another victim was found at Shoreline Amusement Park.
Booth and Bones arrive at the amusement park and find a woman being treated for panic or possibly asthma by an EMT. She says she saw an actual corpse in the fun house. They seem skeptical of her judgement, but she insists that, as a nurse, she knows a dead body when she sees one. Booth and Bones go into the “Dungeon of 1000 Corpses” to find the body, and Bones realizes that Booth is afraid of clowns based on his reaction to them in the maze. Cam calls and says that they identified the victim from the maze as Stella Higgins, who disappeared exactly a year ago from Shoreline Amusement Park. They get to the body and once again Bones confirms that it’s human remains. At the lab, Zack says the new victim isn’t Megan Shaw either. Cam says that it looks like the same person killed both victims, and gets mad at Zack when he says that she leaped to a conclusion. They also determine that the second victim looks like she was buried alive. Angela comes in with information that identifies the second victim as Judith Suzanne Evans. Hodgins comes in and says that Stella pulled out her own hair and that the lacquer found on the victims is generic. Cam finds lots of small punctures on one of the bodies.
Booth goes back to Shoreline Amusement Park and talks to the guy who runs the “Dungeon of 1000 Corpses,” who’s standing with all the employees of the dungeon. Booth recognizes one of the employees, Gregg Liscombe, from the maze the night before and questions him. Another girl named Lola butts in and tells Gregg not to tell Booth anything without a lawyer, which makes her a suspect along with Gregg. Back at the lab, Zack, Booth, and Cam figure out that Judith was buried alive. Hodgins says that Stella was bitten by tarantulas, which is what caused all the punctures on her body and probably caused her to pull out her own hair. Hodgins also found mysterious steel dust on Judith. Traces of drugs that would induce panic were also found on both victims, which causes Cam to think that the murderer literally caused the victims to be scared to death.
Booth talks to Judith’s older sister in his office. She says that she took her to the amusement park, but Judith was scared to go into the fun house. Her sister went without her, but when she got out Judith was gone. Her sister says that Gregg was at the fun house while they were there, and he told her that Judith walked away with some guy while her sister was in the fun house. Booth and Bones interrogate Gregg at the FBI building. Booth says that it’s quite suspicious that Gregg, a sex offender, was found at both places where the victims were found. Gregg keeps saying everything is a coincidence until Booth hits him then grabs him. Bones also smacks him, then Gregg says that Lola is the one who took away Judith, not some guy. He says that Lola likes when Gregg fools around with the younger girls, then she comes in and smacks them around, which gets her hot. He says she goes a little too far though sometimes. Amber returns from her trip to see Grayson and tells Angela and Hodgins that Grayson was very pleasant and smelled good. She says she smelled him because she was being thorough. She then says that Grayson doesn’t want a divorce. He remembers his marriage to Angela and built a house/shack for her on the beach. She says that Grayson really misses Angela a lot, and even had tears in his eyes when he talked about her. Hodgins says he and Angela don’t know what they want to do next and that they’ll tell Amber when they figure it out.
Booth is talking to Bones in the hall at the FBI building, telling her how he’s going to interview Lola, when another agent walks up to them. He says he found out that Megan has a fear of snakes and Booth tells him to find out who’s been buying a bunch of snakes at pet shops. Booth tells Bones he’s going to talk to Lola on his own. At the lab Hodgins is examining spores. Cam is in her costume – she’s Catwoman. Brennan and Cam argue about Catwoman being powerful, then Hodgins tells them that he figured out that the spores were from flowers found in Hawaii. This makes them think that the victims were mummified in Hawaii, which doesn’t really make much sense. Booth goes to find Lola at the fun house, and she’s once again uncooperative. Lola admits that she roughed up the victims, then Booth arrests her and takes her back with him. Back at the lab, Booth and Bones talk about how Booth got a profile of the killer from Dr. Sweets. Booth is now in his squint costume and Brennan is changing into hers on the other side of a door. When she comes out Booth says that she looks wonderful. When they walk over to Zack he says Angela and Hodgins have something to show them. Angela says that snakes were sold out at three pet shops over the last week, and that the last place just sold out an hour ago, which means Megan is still alive. It also means that Gregg and Lola aren’t the killers because they’re in custody.
Booth tells the squints to guess and figure out where Megan is being held, but it ends up in an argument. Brennan says she, Zack, and Hodgins can’t work with Booth, Angela, and Cam pressuring them to guess, so the latter three leave the room. After a bunch of calculations they figure out that the killer is at a subway station (based on the steel dust) which is under a flower shop (based on the Hawaiian flower spores).Booth and Brennan call for backup on the way to the crime scene, while also arguing about whether Brennan guessed about the location or not. Arriving at the scene they find a subway entrance. They go down into a tunnel and find a room with mummification chemicals in it. After finding other drugs in the room, Booth figures out that the murderer is someone who has access to drugs and an ambulance – the EMT who was treating the nurse at the amusement park fun house where they found the second mummified corpse.Leaving the room, they hear Megan screaming from a locked room. Bones tries to shoot the lock off the door but shoots Booth too, giving him a flesh wound. When they open the door they see a bunch of snakes, which Bones is scared of. She goes on Booth’s back as they enter the room. A man dressed as a clown comes to the door with a gun and Bones tries to shoot him, but she misses. Booth drops her and goes after the clown while he tells Bones to stay in the snake room and protect Megan.
Booth has an intense shoot-out with the clown, and eventually the clown notices that Booth only has one bullet left in his gun. Booth grabs a metal panel which he uses to protect himself from the clown’s bullets, but is knocked over after another bullet shot by the clown. The clown hides behind a wall, but Booth’s gun was powerful enough to shoot through it, killing him. Amber returns to the lab to tell Angela that she tried to seduce Grayson to see how in love he was with Angela. It didn’t work and she found out that Grayson is deeply in love with Angela. She suggests that Angela should go talk to Grayson, but she declines. As Angela leaves Amber runs into Hodgins. She says that most of the time in this type of case, the partners go back to their old husbands and wives, but in this case she doesn’t think Angela will, because she doesn’t have any interest in Grayson, despite Amber telling her of his attractiveness.  Booth and Bones finally arrive back at the lab and agree that they shouldn’t go to the party looking all dirty like they do. Booth says he’s sort of mad that Bones shot him, and then in a change of mood Bones says she’s sorry that Booth had to kill someone because she knows that Booth doesn’t like to be forced to kill people. They then decide to get something to eat and walk away, with Bones doing a Lynda Carter-esque Wonder Woman twist on the way out.

This is a pretty interesting episode with a good mix of suspense and comedy.I would definitely recommend watching it if you get a chance to.

THE RESURRECTION IN THE REMAINS

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It was Halloween on Bones Season 11 Episode 5, and all bets were off. From headless corpses to witchcraft, flatlining to pranking, there was plenty of spooky fun to go around. Not to mention Ichabod Crane dropping in for a visit that gave us both historical and supernatural moments. When you watch a show week in and week out, there are little things you forget, like the fact that The Jeffersonian was named after Thomas Jefferson or that its archives are filled with old documents, some of which were written by Ichabod himself.recaps-bones-3Yes, this was the cross over episode with FOX’s Sleepy Hollow. Is handwriting really that precise a science? I thought Ichabod’s explanation about the matching handwriting was an adept way of handling the situation. As Brennan said, what other explanation could there be? Ichabod was obviously not a 200 year old man…or was he? But Brennan has never believed in the hereafter or the supernatural. She’s a women of science who requires proof. It’s nice to know that hasn’t changed, even if other things have. Leave it to Brennan to make a exact edible mold of a brain for her young daughter’s school party. It wasn’t all that many years ago that she couldn’t have pulled off that prank on Booth. I’m not sure she even would have tried, but being married and having kids have let her grow and have more fun. Hodgin’s demon contact lenses were startling. I can only imagine what Halloween is like in the Hodgins household. I wish we had seen what all of the kids were wearing.

Thankfully this installment had a lot of fun moments, such as…
• Booth comparing soy cheese to hell.
• Brennan encouraging Ichabod to explore the sexual side of he and Abbie’s relationship.
• Ichabod claiming that Benjamin Franklin named a drink Fondling the Forest.
• Hodgins saying he was a conspiracy theorist and not a supernatural nut and Cam looking at him like she wasn’t sure there was a difference.
It maybe odd to crossover these shows, but it actually worked and was a fun experience.

REVIEW: LOST – THE NEW MAN IN CHARGE

Lost - Epilogue: The New Man in Charge (2010)

CAST

Jorge Garcia (Alcatraz)
Malcolm David Kelley (Saving Grace)
Michael Emeson (Saw)
Francois Chau (Stargate SG.1)

The New Man in Charge is the epilogue of Lost that was released on August 24, 2010 on both the Complete Sixth Season DVD and the Complete Collection boxset. The epilogue is divided into three segments: Ben’s mission to Guam, the Hydra Orientation film, and Ben’s visit to Santa Rosa Mental Health Institute.An old fashioned printer is seen printing “DHARMA Peas” onto successive labels in what is revealed to be the present day DHARMA Logistics Warehouse in Orote Peninsula, Guam. Two DHARMA Initiative workers, Hector and Glen, argue over the loading of the food pallet, specifically about missing their launch window. Suddenly, Ben enters the warehouse. The workers are startled, demanding to know who he is. Ben introduces himself and explains that he is from the home office. Ben informs them there is a new man in charge and Ben has been sent to tie up a few loose ends. He instructs the workers that this facility is being shut down and they are free to go. The workers protest, claiming they have been loading food pallets under unmanned drone planes for the past twenty years. Ben gives them wallets containing their severance pay and explains that the DHARMA Initiative has not been in existence for over twenty years. The DHARMA workers are visibly confused and claim that they “deserve answers”.e63Ben says that they can each ask one question in return for their departure. Glen wants to know where they have been sending the pallets for the past twenty years. Ben explains that the launch information they receive from the typing machine is automated, sent from the Lamp Post station. It changes every launch because the pallet is being sent to a moving Island. Glen tries to ask how it is that an Island can move, but Ben reinforces his one question only policy. Hector infers that since they are in Guam, this Island that Ben has talked about must be in the tropics; yet one of the items in the pallet is a box of polar bear fish biscuits. Hector questions the presence of polar bears on a tropical island, to which Ben leafs through a DHARMA Initiative binder filled with DVD’s, and asks the workers if they have a DVD player.EpilogueBen then tells the two workers that they should watch it together. The video starts playing, and is revealed to be the Hydra orientation film with Dr. Pierre Chang, not using an alias. The video explores the nature of the Hydra experiments on birds and polar bears, as well as the purpose of Room 23. After the video, they all leave as Ben eats a DHARMA granola bar. Ben arrives at Santa Rosa Mental Health Institute and asks the nurse to allow him to see Walt, who has taken up residency there. Walt has been going by the name of Keith Johnson. The nurse lets him into the facility after being shown a note that Ben says Walt will want to see him after reading. Ben finds Walt playing Connect Four alone. He sits down at the table with the now 16-year-old boy he once kidnapped and proceeds to tell him that he was sent by a friend. Walt is hostile at first, having not seen Ben since he left the Island, but Ben stays calm and apologizes for taking him. He says that although he can’t change the past, he can take responsibility for it. Walt gets frustrated and begins to put away the Connect Four set but stops when Ben tells him that he’s special. He listens as Ben explains that Walt has work to do; work that starts with helping Michael. When Walt objects to that point on the grounds of his father being dead, Ben says that Michael can still be helped. ? Ben makes one final plea that Walt go back to The Island with him. Walt finally agrees.lost3Outside the mental hospital, Ben leads Walt to a DHARMA van parked in the parking lot. To Walt’s surprise, Hurley is waiting for them in the back seat. Walt confesses to Hurley that he had long waited for the survivors to come back for him, and that he had been labeled crazy because no one believed his story. Hurley reassures him that he’s not crazy at all, and attributes Walt’s existential duress to his separation from the Island. He tells Walt that the island is his home, and that he intends to talk to Walt about a job. Hurley then suggests they all go home, and the van drives away into the night on their way back to where they belong; the Island.TheNewManInChargeIt’s a good epilogue that answers a few questions left unanswered and is a nice little expansion to the lost universe

REVIEW: LOST – SEASON 5

Starring

Matthew Fox (Alex Cross)
Jorge Garcia (How I Met Your Mother)
Elizabeth Mitchell (V)
Evangeline Lilly (Ant-Man and The Wasp)
Jeremy Davies (Hannibal)
Terry O’Quinn (The Rocketeer)
Josh Holloway (Colony)
Naveen Andrews (The Brave One)
Michael Emerson (Arrow)
Rebecca Mader (Iron Man 3)
Daniel Dae Kim (Insurgent)
Yunjin Kim (Shiri)
Henry Ian Cusick (Hitman)
Ken Leung (Inhumans)

Naveen Andrews in Lost (2004)

Recurring / Notable Guest Cast

Sam Anderson (Angel)
L. Scott Caldwell (Chilling Adventures of Sabrina)
Alan Dale (Ugly Betty)
William Mapother (The Mentalist)
Sonya Walger (Termiantor: TSCC)
Sean Whalen (Twister)
François Chau (The Tick)
Michelle Rodriguez (The Fast and The Furious)
Jeff Fahey (Texas Rising)
Cheech Marin (Machete)
Fionnula Flanagan (The Others)
Nestor Carbonell (Bates Motel)
Alexandra Krosney (Last Man Standing)
John Terry (Full Metal Jacket)
Raymond J. Barry (The Gifted)
Zuleikha Robinson (Homeland)
Saïd Taghmaoui (Wonder Woman)
Malcolm David Kelley (You Got Served)
Lance Reddick (Bosch)
Reiko Aylesworth (24)
Patrick Fischler (Happy!)
Doug Hutchison (Punisher: War Zone)
Sterling Beaumon (THe Killing)
Brad William Henke (Bright)
Eric Lange (Narcos)
Jon Gries (Taken)
Tania Raymonde (Texas Chainsaw)
William Sanderson (Blade Runner)
Kim Dickens (Hollow Man)
Dean Norris (Breaking Bad)
Marsha Thomason (The Haunted Mansion)
Alice Evans (The Vampire Diaries)
Andrea Gabriel (2 Broke Girls)
Mark Pellegrino (13 Reasons Why)
Titus Welliver (Argo)

Jeremy Davies and Nestor Carbonell in Lost (2004)Last season, Lost successfully made the transition into the realm of science fiction with classic episodes like “The Constant” and of course, making the island literally disappear in “There’s no Place Like Home.” Season 5 dives head first into weighty science fiction concepts with time travel playing a major role in the narrative for the entire year. There are inherent risks with introducing time travel into a story that is already as complex as the one Lost has become over the past few years. For the most part, the writers do a good job of keeping the time travel aspect of the story from becoming too complicated, but there is no dispute that it is the driving force of the season’s narrative.The first half of the season is comprised of two very distinct storylines.Jeremy Davies, Ken Leung, and Rebecca Mader in Lost (2004)One of those being Jack Shephard’s desperate attempt to reunite the Oceanic Six in order to return to the island and the other being the journey of those left behind as they find themselves inexplicably traveling through time. The Oceanic Six storyline is definitely the weaker of the two. The story of the Six, hours before they return to the island was weakened by a slow start with the somewhat Hurley-centric “The Lie.” This is an episode that featured a little too much of Hugo Reyes’ wacky exploits as he transports an unconscious Sayid around Los Angeles. The rest of the Oceanic Six story is essentially a waiting game as we watch the pieces fall into place so that these characters can return to where we really want them to be – on the island. In fact, their return to the island in “316” feels rushed, almost as if the writers realized that the best place for these characters is back on the island.The aptly named “The Life and Death of Jeremy Bentham” is the best episode that takes place almost entirely off the island.Terry O'Quinn and Rebecca Mader in Lost (2004)The story chronicles John Locke’s attempt to convince the Oceanic Six that they need to return to the island in order to save those left behind. It’s a tragic story for John Locke who has spent the last four seasons in the belief that the survivors of Flight 815 are tied by a single destiny but only in death does he finally make people believe. It’s a well-scripted story and wonderfully acted by Terry O’Quinn who does a great job of portraying an interesting transition for Locke on screen.Locke isn’t the only one who goes through a transition this season as Benjamin Linus is forced into a situation that is quite surprising for the character.Daniel Dae Kim and Melissa Farman in Lost (2004)Without delving into too much detail, the dynamic between Locke and Ben changes quite a bit but the great chemistry between O’Quinn and Michael Emerson is still as exceptional as it has always been. Linus fans should not be disappointed by some of the great developments for the character this season. On the island, Sawyer and the rest of the survivors left behind are forced to cope with the fact that they are constantly flashing through time, either to the past or the future. The approach taken here is straightforward and clearly laid out in the first episode of the season; you cannot change events in the past – whatever happened, happened and couldn’t of happened any other way. Faraday acts as the mouth piece for much of the technobabble in the early part of the season with Sawyer playing the part of the ‘everyman’ who constantly questions why things are happening the way they are. This allows the writers an opportunity to ease the audience into this shift of events without making things too complex to follow. There is plenty of exposition,Matthew Fox in Lost (2004)but with Sawyer’s classic charm to offset Faraday’s jargon, it makes it a lot easier to swallow.Time travel is utilized to its fullest here to reveal some of the island’s back-story over the last 50 years. Sawyer and co. pay a visit to the Others of the 1950s and are introduced to past leaders of the mysterious group. We also see some much-needed loose ends tied up as we finally learn more about Rousseau and her research team and we also discover why Richard Alpert visited a young Locke just one season ago. As secrets are revealed and key puzzle pieces are slid into place it’s surprising to see just how well everything fits together. Some of this is certainly due to the asset of knowing how many episodes you have left to tell your story in, but I’m hard pressed to find many plot holes in any of the explanations given. Cuse and Lindelof deserve credit for maintaining a watertight narrative throughout most of the season.

REVIEW: LOST – SEASON 4

Starring

Matthew Fox (Alex Cross)
Jorge Garcia (How I Met Your Mother)
Elizabeth Mitchell (V)
Evangeline Lilly (Ant-Man and The Wasp)
Jeremy Davies (Hannibal)
Terry O’Quinn (The Rocketeer)
Josh Holloway (Colony)
Naveen Andrews (The Brave One)
Emilie de Ravin (Operation: Endgame)
Michael Emerson (Arrow)
Rebecca Mader (Iron Man 3)
Daniel Dae Kim (Insurgent)
Yunjin Kim (Shiri)
Henry Ian Cusick (Hitman)
Ken Leung (Inhumans)
Harold Perrineau (Sabotage)

Jorge Garcia and Dominic Monaghan in Lost (2004)

Recurring / Notable Guest Cast

Dominic Monaghan (Flashforward)
Sam Anderson (Angel)
L. Scott Caldwell (Chilling Adventures of Sabrina)
Michael Cudlitz (The Walking Dead)
Mira Furlan (Babylon 5)
Tania Raymonde (Texas Chainsaw)
Lance Reddick (John Wick)
Fisher Stevens (Hackers)
John Terry (Full Metal Jacket)
Marsha Thomason (White Collar)
Zoë Bell (The Hateful Eight)
Jeff Fahey (Texas Rising)
Thekla Reuten (Highlander 5)
Beth Broderick (Sabrina: TTW)
Shawn Doyle (Impulse)
Anthony Azizi (Eagle Eye)
Alan Dale (Ugly Betty)
Kevin Durand (Swamp Thing)
Sonya Walger (Flashforward)
Graham McTavish (The Hobbit)
Andrea Roth (Cloak & Dagger)
M.C. Gainey (Breakdown)
Grant Bowler (Harrow)
George Cheung (Rush Hour)
Cynthia Watros (Titus)
Galyn Görg (Robocop 2)
Malcolm David Kelley (Detroit)
Faran Tahir (Iron Man)
Andrea Gabriel (2 Broke Girls)
April Parker Jones (Supergirl)
Nestor Carbonell (Bates Motel)
Doug Hutchison (Punisher: War Zone)
Amanda Carlin (Friends)
Michelle Forbes (True Blood)
Veronica Hamel (Cannonball)
Cheech Marin (Coco)

Jeff Fahey in Lost (2004)After a stunning conclusion to the show’s third season, the bar was raised and much was expected of the fourth season of Lost. With the final three seasons reduced to sixteen episodes each and a clear finish line. The creative team could now focus on telling their story without having to worry about how many episodes they had left to work with. Season four is the first to benefit and delivers a faster paced and leaner story that expands the Lost universe in some unexpected ways and delves into the mystery that was introduced at the end of last season.Mira Furlan, Michael Emerson, Josh Holloway, Terry O'Quinn, and Rebecca Mader in Lost (2004)The “flash-forward” at the end of last season introduced an exciting new way in which Lost stories could be told. The use of these flash-forwards continues through the fourth season, revealing that even more Oceanic survivors made it off the island and also introduces an intriguing conspiracy of silence regarding those who weren’t so lucky. This storyline is the backbone of the fourth season as we discovered who was fortunate enough to escape the island and who was left behind. This is arguably the series’ best story arc since the mystery surrounding the hatch and is a well-developed, tightly paced narrative that actually has a satisfying conclusion at the end of the season.The benefit of a shortened schedule is apparent and this season has far less “filler” than previous outings.Michael Emerson in Lost (2004)Less episodes means that every minute of screen time becomes that much more precious and the outcome is a season that doesn’t have what we’d consider a bad episode in the bunch. Even this season’s Kate-centric episode is decent when compared to previous years’ outings. There are plenty of episodes that you will want to revisit here, including the pivotal “The Constant” that is a game-changer when it comes to the series’ mythology. It also features Henry Ian Cusick’s best performance as Desmond to date and one of the more memorable Michael Giacchino scores. The rest of the season is filled to the brim with moments that will have any Lost fan riveted.Michael Emerson in Lost (2004)Acting wise, all the great performances that you have come to expect from the series’ regulars are present. Henry Ian Cusick in Lost (2004)Michael Emerson and Terry O’Quinn continue to put in stellar performances as Ben Linus and John Locke respectively. As has been stated many times throughout the last couple of seasons, these two have some phenomenal chemistry on screen and they spend a great deal of time verbally sparring with each other this season. The newcomers to the show are no slouches either. Veteran actor Jeff Fahey is memorable as helicopter pilot Frank Lapidus. Ken Leung has already become a series favorite as the sharp-tongued Miles Straume and while some fans have had a negative reaction towards Rebecca Mader’s Charlotte Lewis, it is hard to deny that she puts in a respectable performance here.Elizabeth Mitchell in Lost (2004)Jeremy Davies deserves special recognition for his portrayal of physicist – Daniel Faraday. Simply put, Davies’ is awesome as the polite and awkward scientist whose unique viewpoint of the island’s core mysteries is a benefit to the series. If given more screen time he would have probably stolen the show and he stands alongside Ben Linus and Desmond Hume as yet another exceptional new addition to the series.With the introduction of new characters and the already expanded Lost cast, some regulars take a step back and are not featured as prominently as you would expect. Most notable are series heavyweights Jack and Kate, who are present and accounted for, but see their roles slightly reduced as other characters are brought to the forefront. As the cast and story expand, it has obviously become a necessity to focus on a wider range of characters. The series’ writers are equal to the task and do a good job of handling a large cast without forgetting anyone in the mix.

 

REVIEW: LOST – SEASON 3

Starring

Evangeline Lilly (Ant-Man and The Wasp)
Matthew Fox (Alex Cross)
Josh Holloway (Colony)
Elizabeth Mitchell (V)
Henry Ian Cusick (Hitman)
Dominic Monaghan (Flashforward)
Naveen Andrews (The Brave One)
Michael Emerson (Arrow)
Jorge Garcia (How I Met Your Mother)
Daniel Dae Kim (Insurgent)
Yunjin Kim (Shiri)
Terry O’Quinn (The Rocketeer)
Emilie de Ravin (Operation: Endgame)
Rodrigo Santoro (300)
Kiele Sanchez (A Perfect Getaway)
Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje (Suicide Squad)

Josh Holloway in Lost (2004)

Recurring / Notable Guest Cast

Julie Adams (Code Red)
Brett Cullen (Ghost Rider)
M.C. Gainey (Breakdown)
William Mapother (The Mentalist)
Julie Bowen (Modern Family)
John Terry (Full Metal Jacket)
Michael Bowen (Kill Bill)
Tania Raymonde (Texas Chainsaw)
Paula Malcomson (The Hunger Games)
Ian Somerhalder (The Vampire Diaries)
Chris Mulkey (Whiplash)
Justin Chatwin (War of The Worlds)
Kim Dickens (Gone Girl)
Bill Duke (Black Lightning)
Adetokumboh M’Cormack (Gods & Heroes)
Andrew Divoff (Wishmaster)
Aisha Hinds (Cult)
François Chau (The Tick)
Nathan Fillion (Firefly)
Fredric Lehne (Men In BLack)
Zeljko Ivanek (Heores)
Nestor Carbonell (Bates Motel)
Robin Weigert (Jessica Jones)
Alan Dale (Ugly Betty)
Sonya Walger (Flashforward)
Shishir Kurup (Coneheads)
Fionnula Flanagan (The Others)
Bai Ling (The Crow)
Diana Scarwid (Wonderland)
Cheech Marin (Coco)
Kimberley Joseph (Hercules: TLJ)
Sung Hi Lee (The Girl Next Door)
April Grace (A.I.)
Shaun Toub (Iron Man)
Gabrielle Fitzpatrick (MMPR: The Movie)
Kevin Tighe (My Bloody Valentine)
Cleo King (Mike & Molly)
Patrick J. Adams (Legends of Tomorrow)
Billy Dee Williams (Star Wars)
Daniel Roebuck (Final Destination)
Beth Broderick (Sabrina: TTW)
Andrew Connolly (Heroes)
Marsha Thomason (White Collar)
Jon Gries (Welcome To The Jungle)
Doug Hutchison (Punisher: War Zone)
Samantha Mathis (American Psycho)
Carrie Preston (True Blood)
Sterling Beaumon (The Killing)
Sam Anderson (Angel)
L. Scott Caldwell (Chilling Adventures of Sabrina)
Andrea Gabriel (2 Broke Girls)
Neil Hopkins (The Net 2.0)
Tracy Middendorf (Scream: The Series)
Lana Parrilla (Once Upon A Time)
Malcolm David Kelley (Detroit)
James Lesure (Las Vegas)
Fisher Stevens (Hackers)
Mira Furlan (Babylon 5)

This season is easily broken down into two separate parts; the first six episodes that aired before an eight week hiatus and then the rest of the season. Even though the first six are considered part of the third season, they feel much more like a prologue. Very little time is spent with the survivors on the beach and the main focus of the story is Jack (Matthew Fox), Kate (Evangeline Lilly) and Sawyer’s (Josh Holloway) imprisonment by the Others.Evangeline Lilly in Lost (2004)The second half of the season also featured some of the show’s best episodes to date. Including the brilliantly told “Flashes Before Your Eyes”, which is an interesting twist on Lost’s flashback scenario. Other episodes like “The Man from Tallahassee” and “The Brig” answered long asked questions while “The Man Behind the Curtain” and “One of Us” gave us a much needed back-story on both Ben (Michael Emerson) and Juliet (Elizabeth Mitchell).Really, the only weak point of the final sixteen-episode run would be “Stranger in a Strange Land”, an episode that primarily focused on the origins and meaning of Jack’s tattoo. We still don’t really understand the significance and we’re not too sure if the writers do either as they never bring up the subject again for the rest of the season.Terry O'Quinn in Lost (2004)Even “Expos¿”, an episode that featured fan-hated Nikki (Kiele Sanchez) and Paulo (Rodrigo Santoro), told an interesting “Twilight Zone” style story and we couldn’t be happier with the conclusion.If you were to suggest that the theme for season one was man vs. the unknown and that season two’s was man vs. machine it would be fair to suggest that the theme for season three is man vs. man, as the main crux of the season deals with the survivors of Flight 815 dealing with the Others. There is a constant power struggle between the two groups and the narrative frequently shifts back and forth from the Others camp to the survivor’s beach. Intertwined throughout, are personal struggles for several of the characters in both camps and we realize as the story pushes forward that even though they are enemies, their survival appears to be dependant on each other.At the core of this struggle is Benjamin Linus, and it would be a sin not to mention Michael Emerson’s fantastic performance as the enigmatic leader of the Others. He never once falters in portraying a creepy and unnerving nemesis for the survivors of Flight 815 and in particular, John Locke.Evangeline Lilly in Lost (2004)Terry O’Quinn puts in an equally inspired performance and every time these two appeared on screen together, you knew something special was about to happen. Everything culminates in what can be described as one of the best season finales in recent memory. Carlton Cuse and Damon Lindelof deliver a brilliantly told story that is full of emotion, suspense and action.

REVIEW: LOST – SEASON 2

Starring

Matthew Fox (Alex Cross)
Terry O’Quinn (The Rocketeer)
Jorge Garcia (How I Met Your Mother)
Josh Holloway (Colony)
Evangeline Lilly (Ant-Man and The Wasp)
Michelle Rodriguez (The Fast and The Furious)
Daniel Dae Kim (Insurgent)
Yunjin Kim (Shiri)
Naveen Andrews (The Brave One)
Dominic Monaghan (Flashforward)
Cynthia Watros (Finding Carter)
Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje (Suicide Squad)
Emilie de Ravin (Operation: Endgame)
Harold Perrineau (Constantine)
Maggie Grace (Taken)
Malcolm David Kelley (Deriot)

Matthew Fox in Lost (2004)

Recurring / Notable Guest Cast

Henry Ian Cusick (Hitman)
John Terry (Full Metal Jacket)
Julie Bowen (Modern Family)
Anson Mount (Star Trek: Discovery)
Tamara Taylor (Bones)
Saul Rubinek (Warehouse 13)
Kevin Tighe (My Bloody Valentine)
Katey Sagal (Futurama)
François Chau (The Tick)
L. Scott Caldwell (Chilling Adventures of Sabrina)
Sam Anderson (Angel)
Marguerite Moreau (Wet Hot American Summer)
DJ Qualls (Road Trip)
Kimberley Joseph (Hercules: TLJ)
Brittany Perrineau (Felon)
Ian Somerhalder (The Vampire Diaries)
Brett Cullen (Ghost Rider)
Rachel Ticotin (Total Recall)
Michael Cudlitz (The Walking Dead)
Rick Overton (Willow)
Fredric Lehne (Men In Black)
Beth Broderick (Sabrina: TTW)
Lindsey Ginter (Argo)
Adetokumboh M’Cormack (Gods & Heroes)
M.C. Gainey (Breakdown)
Neil Hopkins (D-Sides)
Robin Atkin Downes (Babylon 5)
Kim Dickens (Gone Girl)
Kevin Dunn (Transformers)
Clancy Brown (Highlander)
Mira Furlan (Babylon 5)
Michael Emerson (Arrow)
Theo Rossi (Luke Cage)
William Mapother (THe Mentalist)
Tania Raymonde (Texas Chainsaw)
Andrea Gabriel (2 Broke Girls)
Evan Handler (Californication)
Bruce Davison (X-Men)
Wayne Pygram (Farscape)
Gabrielle Fitzpatrick (MMPR: The Movie)
Nick Jameson (Frozen)
Oliver Muirhead (The Social Network)
Michael Bowen (Kill Bill)
April Grace (A.I.)
Alan Dale (Ugly Betty)
Sonya Walger (Flashforward)

Daniel Dae Kim, Josh Holloway, and Harold Perrineau in Lost (2004)

Attempting to build on the strength of Season One, Lost Season Two introduces several new characters and a new mysterious group to keep viewers enthralled. The introduction of the tail section characters does serve a purpose early in the season as it reinforces the Others as formidable villains. While the survivors on the beach have had it relatively easy, the tailies experience 48 days of hell in which their numbers shrink to a handful. Beyond that, Libby slides into a cute love story with Hurley while Ana Lucia stands around and takes up space until she is shot to death by Michael. Neither contributes a substantial amount to the season or the series besides being canon fodder for Michael.Harold Perrineau in Lost (2004)As for Mr. Eko, he does have a couple of good flashback episodes but it also feels like the writers are never quite sure what to do with him. At some points he’s a passive observer to events unfolding and the later he actively gets involved in the pressing of the button. Those last few episodes in which he finds himself destined to push the button almost seem as if the were a scramble to give the character something substantial to do. Don’t get me wrong, I’m a big fan of Eko but I feel as if his character was completely mismanaged from the outside.Only Bernard, who really doesn’t do much himself, feels like a relevant addition from the tail section as he ties up the loose end regarding Rose’s husband.Daniel Dae Kim and Josh Holloway in Lost (2004)Their reunion alone makes his introduction worth the effort. The best new addition to the Lost cast is the person we see the least throughout the season – Desmond David Hume. His appearance in the first couple of episodes of the season were used solely to introduce the concept of the button but his flashback and story in the two hour finale presented an intriguing new character. He’s a hopeless romantic on a quest to regain his honor and reunite with his true love. Desmond’s story is leaps and bounds more exciting than the rest of the new cast.Locke’s journey this season doesn’t really start to get interesting until the introduction of Henry Gale. For the first half of the season we get to see Locke at his most confident. He’s finally opened his hatch and discovered a bevy of new treasures inside to support his claims that the island and his connection to it are part of some much larger destiny. However, Gale’s arrival brings with it seeds of doubt as John’s world begins to fall apart. This culminates in the discovery of the Pearl Station and Locke’s complete loss of faith in the button and the island. It’s a good journey that has a great conclusion in the finale.Michelle Rodriguez and Cynthia Watros in Lost (2004)I really enjoyed Sawyer’s return to form midway through this season. Sure it didn’t make much sense for Sawyer to turn the entire camp against him in “The Long Con” but it was one of my favorite story lines of the season. His return to a nastier, less fan-friendly Sawyer was short lived however as he fairly quickly crept back into the good graces of the rest of the group.Michael’s battle to get Walt back from the Others had him depart midway through the season but his return in the final few episodes of the season were thoroughly entertaining. His murder of Ana Lucia and Libby gave way to an interesting game of deception as Michael is forced to convince the survivors that Henry was behind their deaths. His absolutely disgust in himself for taking a life mixed with the continued desperation he has to reunite with his son makes for some of the best character moments of the entire season. Harold Parrineau does a fantastic job of portraying Michael’s spastic range of emotions in those final few episodes.The real gem of this season and my favorite story arc is the introduction of Michael Emerson as Henry Gale.Naveen Andrews in Lost (2004)He spends most of his time confined in the Swan Station but that doesn’t stop him from being a formidable foe for the survivors of Flight 815. With the survivors fractured and keeping secrets from one another, Henry frequently manages to turn one survivor against the other. He’s favorite prey is John Locke who we already know is quite susceptible to snide comments and underhanded suggestions. Henry turns Locke inside out and uses him against Jack causing the group of survivors to lose focus. Its brilliant to watch unfold and Emerson brings a lot of weight to the role.

REVIEW: LOST – SEASON 1

Starring

Naveen Andrews (The Brave One)
Emilie de Ravin (Operation: Endgame)
Matthew Fox (Alex Cross)
Jorge Garcia (How I Met Your Mother)
Maggie Grace (Taken)
Josh Holloway (Colony)
Yunjin Kim (Shiri)
Daniel Dae Kim (Insurgent)
Evangeline Lilly (Ant-Man and The Wasp)
Dominic Monaghan (Flashforward)
Harold Perrineau (Constantine)
Malcolm David Kelley (Deriot)
Ian Somerhalder (The Vampire Diaries)
Terry O’Quinn (The Rocketeer)

Naveen Andrews, Daniel Dae Kim, Emilie de Ravin, Matthew Fox, Jorge Garcia, Josh Holloway, Yunjin Kim, Dominic Monaghan, Terry O'Quinn, Harold Perrineau, Ian Somerhalder, Maggie Grace, Malcolm David Kelley, and Evangeline Lilly in Lost (2004)

Recurring / Notable Guest Cast

Fredric Lehne (Men In Black)
L. Scott Caldwell (Chilling Adventures of Sabrina)
Kimberley Joseph (Hercules: TLJ)
Michelle Arthur (Mission: Impossible III)
Greg Grunberg (Heroes)
John Terry (Full Metal Jacket)
Veronica Hamel (Cannonball)
Neil Hopkins (D-Sides)
Michael DeLuise (Wayne’s World)
Kristin Richardson (Rock Star)
William Mapother (THe Mentalist)
Mira Furlan (Babylon 5)
Andrea Gabriel (2 Broke Girls)
Navid Negahban (Legion)
Nick Jameson (Frozen)
Keir O’Donnell (Wedding Crashers)
Charles Mesure (V)
Tamara Taylor (Bones)
David Starzyk (Veronica Mars)
Jim Piddock (Mascots)
Robert Patrick (Termiantor 2)
Brittany Perrineau (Felon)
Swoosie Kurtz (Mike & Molly)
Kevin Tighe (My Bloody Valentine)
Zack Ward (Transformers)
Julie Bowen (Modern Family)
Mackenzie Astin (The Orville)
Beth Broderick (Sabrina: TTW)
Daniel Roebuck (Final Destination)
Skye McCole Bartusiak (Don’t Say A Word)
Michelle Rodriguez (The Fast and The Furious)
M.C. Gainey (Breakdown)

 

Dominic Monaghan and Evangeline Lilly in Lost (2004)Lost Season 1 succeeds first and foremost in character development. Lost is about relationships and before we can understand the dynamic behind the various relationships that develop over the course of a season, we need to understand what motivates these characters. This shows approach of having an individual episode focus on a single character through flashback, while formulaic, is a brilliant decision.Jorge Garcia and Harold Perrineau in Lost (2004)

Episodes like “The Moth” (Charlie), “Confidence Man” (Sawyer) and “Walkabout” give us a wealth of information about the people we are being introduced to. These episodes and others are entertaining, exciting and contain pivotal character moments that are still important to the story even in season four and undoubtedly beyond. As I’ve said, this is the foundation for the whole universe that we are being presented and the team behind Lost nailed it right from the “Pilot”.With character being such an important focus of the first season, the major story and mysteries surrounding the island are deliberately underdeveloped. After the survivors’ first night and their encounter with the monster we know this island is anything but normal, but we are only given glimpses from that point on. Over the course of the season we discover that there are other people on the island but beyond that we really don’t learn anything.Josh Holloway in Lost (2004)The truth is that if the writers had tried to develop the story at the same pace as the characters it would have all been too much, too soon and the whole world they are trying to build would have come tumbling down like a deck of cards. Saying that the story is underdeveloped may sound like a complaint but I feel that it was the best decision. We are given a thin vertical slice of what is to come in later seasons and that is all we really need.Of course, there are a plethora of individual character stories that thrive over the course of the season.Naveen Andrews in Lost (2004)Jin and Sun’s tumultuous relationship and betrayal, Charlie’s battle with drug addiction, Claire copping with being a parent and the love triangle between Kate, Jack and Sawyer are just a small few of the intriguing storylines that take place. All of these work to strengthen our understanding of the survivors.Definitely of note is the story of John Locke and his relationship with the island. It’s a fascinating story to watch unfold over the course of the season and Locke’s journey is very different from the rest of the survivors. He starts perceiving the island as a living entity and develops an understanding of it that everyone else fails to understand and they fear him for it.Yunjin Kim and Evangeline Lilly in Lost (2004)Terry O’Quinn does an exceptional job of portraying Locke’s development over the course of the season. He brilliantly presents a troubled and destroyed man who has experienced a profound miracle and is now trying to make sense of what has happened to him.As long time fans have come to expect, Michael Giacchino’s score adds an extra amount of depth to the season. He stands out as one of the premiere composers on television and Lost would simply not be the same without him. Most of Lost’s twists and turns may not have the same impact the second time around but that doesn’t mean that their importance isn’t appreciated. This show’s opening season set the foundation for things to come over the course of the series.