REVIEW: AGENCY

CAST

Robert Mitchum (African Skies)
Lee Majors (The SIx Million Dollar Man)
Valerie Perrine (Superman 1 & 2)
Alexandra Stewart (BLack Moon)
Saul Rubinek (George Touliatos)

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Timely movie,especially now when political campaigning never seems to end even after the elections, about the takeover of a large advertising agency, Porter & Stripe, and it’s being used to further the agenda of a shadowy and unelected group of power brokers to shape America and the world into what they feel that it should be. Unknown to the advertising world but with an unlimited amount on money Ted Quinn, buys out the giant Porter & Stripe advertising agency. Quinn soon begins producing and peddling commercials on everything from deodorants drain cleaners and soap products to powered chocolate milk for children. It turns out that the real reason for Quinn’s takeover of the agency is not to sell household goods but to sell politicians and even more sinister political ideas to an unsuspecting public.
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Quinn slowly starts getting rid of the people working at the agency and begins replacing them with undercover political operatives. One of the people working for the agency as a commercial writer Sam Goldstein, Saul Rubinek, gets wind of what Quinn’s plans really are which leads to his death. Sam’s friend Philip Morgan, Lee Majors, who at first seemed to be ignorant of what was happening and thinking that Sam was a bid paranoid in his behavior changed his opinion after Sam’s death when he comes across a audio tape that Sam recorded just minutes before he died. Marked to be eliminated because he knows too much Morgan is on the run from Quinn’s goons throughout the rest of the movie.
Even though dated “Agency” still packs a punch about media manipulation via outside sources and is as good as the many movies made about the same subject since then, 1980. “Agency” is not a top flight Hollywood production with very bad lighting and occasional muffles and drops in the soundtrack but the film still grabs your attention and keeps you interested until the final scene. Robert Mitchum gives his usual good and workman like performance as Ted Quinn like he did in the many films that he made in the last years of his acting career. Mitchum also gives the movie class and respectability just by being in it. Lee Majors is surprisingly good with a much more in-depth acting role then what you usually saw him in on TV and in films back then.

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Vallerie Perrine is more then adequate as Lee Majors’ love interest in the film as well as the damsel in distress. Yet by far the biggest surprise in the movie was Saul Rubinek as Sam Goldstein. Sam who when you first saw him you would think that he’s only in the film for comic relief instead became the most pivotal character in the movie. What I liked most about Rubinek’s performance is that the more he got closer to the truth the more his paranoia subsided. As Sam seemed to resigned himself to the fate that was in store for him. Which made Sam both believable and tragic at the same time and which is just the opposite of what you would expect from a part like his in a movie filled with surprises and paranoia like “Agency” to be like.

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REVIEW: FAMILY GUY – DVD SEASONS 1-5

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MAIN CAST (VOICES)

Seth MacFarlane (Flashforward)
Alex Borstein (Power Rangers Zeo)
Seth Green (IT)
Mila Kunis (Black Swan)
Mike Henry (Ted)
Jennifer Tilly (Curse of Chucky)
Patrick Warburton (Scream 3)
Adam West (60s Batman)
Lacey Chabert (Mean Girls)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST (VOICES)

Lori Alan (Wall-E)
Fred Tatasciore (Hulk Vs)
Phil LaMarr (Free Enterprise)
Billy West (Futurama)
Joey Slotnick (Nip/Tuck)
Frank Welker (Transformers)
Rachael MacFarlane (American Dad)
Alex Rocco (The Simpsons)
Kevin Michael Richardson (The Cleveland Show)
Dick Van Patten (Spaceballs)
Fairuza Balk (Almost Famous)
Charles Durning (The Sting)
Dwight Schultz (The A-Team)
Patrick Duffy (Dallas)
Victoria Principal (Blind Witness)
Will Sasso (Movie 43)
Sam Waterson (Law & Order)
Tara Strong (Batman: TAS)
Norm MacDonald (Billy Madison)
Candice Bergman (Gandhi)
Martin Mull (Sabrina: TTW)
Lee Majors (Ash vs Evil Dead)
Faith Ford (Hope & Faith)
Will Ferrell (The Lego Movie)
Jay Mohr (Cherry Falls)
Brian Doyle-Murray (Groundhog Day)
Robert Costanzo (Batman: TAS)
Michael Chiklis (Gotham)
Jon Cryer (Two and a Half Men)
Gary Cole (One Hour Photo)
Luke Perry (The Fifth Element)
Adam Carolla (Wreck-It Ralph)
Michael McKean (This Is Spinal Tap)
Thomas Dekker (Terminator: TSCC)
Haley Joel Osment (A.I.)
Leif Garrett (The Outsiders)
June Foray (Mulan)
Ray Liotta (Killing Them Softly)
Ron Jeremy (Orgazmo)
Alyssa Milano (Charmed)
Edward Asner (Elf)
Hugh Laurie (House)
Estelle Harris (3rd Rock From The Sun)
R. Lee Ermey (Full Metal Jacet)
Majel Barrett (Star Trek)
Carol Kane (Gotham)
Dakota Fanning (Taken)
Jane Lynch (Glee)
Meredith Scott Lynn (Legally Blonde)
Valerie Bertinelli (Hot In Cleveland)
Tony Danza (Who’s The Boss?)
Fred Willard (Anchorman)
Jennifer Love Hewitt (Ghost Whisperer)
Andy Dick (2 Broke Girls)
Jon Favreau (Iron Man)
Lauren Graham (Bad Santa)
Judy Greer (Jurassic World)
Mark Hamill (Star Wars)
Peter Riegert (The Mask)
Drew Barrymore (Poison Ivy)
Jonathan Lipnicki (Jerry Maguire)
Gina Gershon (Bound)
Judd Hirsch (The Big Bang Theory)
Indigo (Weeds)
Stacey Scowley (Dollhouse)
Jane Carr (Treasure Planet)
Cloris Leachman (The Iron Giant)
LeVar Burton (Star Trek: TNG)
Jessica Biel (Stealth)
Nancy Cartwright (The Simpsons)
Alexandra Breckenridge (The Walking Dead)
Michael Dorn (Ted 2)
Jonathan Frakes (Star Trek: TNG)
Marina Sirtis (The Grudge 3)
Patrick Stewart (X-Men)
Gabrielle Union (Flashforward)
James Woods (Another Day In Paradise)
Carrie Fisher (Star Wars)
Mia Maestro (Alias)
Maurice LaMarche (Futurama)
Robert Downey Jr. (Iron Man)
Sherman Hemsley (Lois & Clark)
Marion Ross (Happy Days)
Carol Channing (The Love Boat)
Jay Leno (The Simpsons)
Alexander Siddig (Game of Thrones)
Bryan Cranston (Argo)
Wallace Shawn (The Princess Bride)
Kate Jackson (Charlies Angels)
Betty White (The Golden Girls)
Chad Morgan (Pearl Harbor)
Judith Light (Ugly Betty)

Out of the small animation boom that happened several years ago came “Family Guy”, one of the most hilarious and controversial shows that Fox has aired

For those unfamiliar with the show, it focuses on the Griffin family, residents of Quahog, Rhode Island. Peter (creator Seth MacFarlane) is the heavy-drinking father who works in a toy factory, Lois (Alex Borstein of “Mad TV”) is the calm leader, Meg (Mila Kunis of “That 70’s Show” and Lacey Chabert for the earlier episodes) is the insecure daughter, Chris (Seth Green) the chubby and dim-witted son, Brian (MacFarlane) is the alcoholic dog who talks and Stewie (creator Seth MacFarlane earned an Emmy for his voice work on the character) is the diabolical baby who is bent on world domination.The first two volumes of the show on DVD offers both the first season and half of the second seasons of the show and gives viewers who missed it another chance to witness some of “Family Guy”‘s most brilliant moments. “E. Peterbus Unum” has Peter breaking off from Quahog to form his own country when he finds out that his house is a blank spot on the map. When confronted after breaking the law, he gets out of it due to diplomatic immunity (“like that guy in ‘Lethal Weapon 2′”, says Peter). “The Son Also Draws” has Peter and Chris going on a Vision Quest when they lose their car at an Indian casino. When the trees start chatting with Peter, he asks, “If one of you falls, and no one’s around, does it make a noise?” The tree responds, “Are you kidding? Scott fell last week, and he hasn’t shut up about it since.” In “Death Is a Bitch”, Death (voiced by Norm MacDonald) comes after Peter after he fakes death to get out of paying his hospital bill. When Death sprains his ankle, Peter has to take over. “Da Boom” has the family searching for food (they dismiss a potential house after they find out Randy Newman is there, singing about everything he sees) after information hears about the world nearly coming to an end after Y2K turns out to be true.

“Family Guy” remained remarkably politically incorrect throughout its original run, but most of the jokes were rolling-on-the-floor funny because they were throwaway, including one exchange between Peter and Brian: “Brian, there’s a message in my Alpha Bits. It says “OOOOOO”!”. “Peter, those are Cheerios.” Every episode of the show was packed with such minor gags, most of which were successful and unexpected. The show’s voice talent, especially MacFarlane, Kunis and Green, handled the material with perfect comedic timing.

This second DVD volume of the series includes second half of season two and all of third season of the series, along with the controversial episode, “Wish Upon a Weinstein”, where Peter tries to get Chris to become Jewish because he believes he’ll be successful if he does. The plots of season three still get laughs fairly often, although I don’t think they reach the inspired heights of earlier episodes, such as the one where Peter’s house became its own country or lead his family towards a twinkie factory after the apocalypse.

Still, there are certainly some highlights throughout many of the episodes. In “Peter Griffin: Husband, Father…Brother?” Peter takes Chris to an Irish Heritage Museum to learn more about his heritage, where both find out that, before alcohol, Ireland was a futuristic utopia. “Mr. Saturday Knight” has Peter working at Quahog’s Renaissance Faire as a jouster when his boss accidentally dies at dinner. His competition is the Black Knight, brilliantly voiced by Will Farrell. “Thin White Line” and “Brian Does Hollywood” have Brian overdoing his new job as drug sniffing police dog, then running off to Hollywood and ending up with a job directing porn (at the adult awards in the episode, John Williams is one of the composers nominated for Best Original Score). In “Lethal Weapons”, Peter uses Lois’s newfound fighting skills to drive out New Yorkers who come up to Rhode Island just to stare at the leaves changing color.

Rude, crude and often hilarious, “Family Guy” saw fit to offend just about every group, but did so in a way that was sharp, funny and wonderfully absurd.Often brilliant, extremely witty and darkly hilarious, “Family Guy” was unfortunately cancelled after season three Fox bumped it around six or seven different time slots. Although this third season wasn’t as consistent as the first two, it’s still hilarious and fans of the show should definitely pick up this terrific set. thankfully a few years later the show would return for a fourth and become a constant.

Back on the air after an unprecedented un-cancellation, “Family Guy” had a slight bit of leeway in its return. Fans were rabid for some new episodes, while the network that had cancelled it once wasn’t likely to do so again and risk being considered foolish twice-over. As a result, there was a chance to experiment and try something new, and expand the horizons of the show. Or, they could choose to keep doing the same thing they did before, which is exactly the choice they made.

In a way, it was the smart choice. Why mess with a good thing, when you could keep making the kind of show the fans fell in love with and bought rapidly on DVD. The un-PC content is still in place, along with the pop-culture references, cut-aways and nonsensical characters. Call-backs to old favorites, like Herbert the old molester and the evil monkey were good, but the shows tended to settle into ruts. A love of musicals is appreciated, but is it funny every time a character breaks into song, as in “Jungle Love”

This set has some very good episodes in this set, starting with “Petarded,” which sees Peter declared mentally retarded. The ways he takes advantage of this status is classic “Family Guy” material, while the musical montage here, involving phone calls all over town, is actually quite funny. Plus, the appearance of the Greased-Up Deaf Guy gave hope that the creators still had that sense of the bizarre in them.

But if any moment stands out among this run, it’s the supermarket scene in “Breaking Out is Hard to Do.” When Chris is pulled into the “Take On Me” video by A-Ha, it’s a perfect blend of what this show does best, combining nonsense, the ’80s and some neat animation. The lead-in, the punchline and the execution of the whole scene is handled so well that it might be one of the show’s most memorable ever.If there’s a real reason for fans of the show to own this set, it’s provided in the extras. According to the commentaries, there are scenes included that were produced for the show that the creators knew would be cut, but did them with the intent of including them on DVD. I’m not certain what scenes were added, but there are several lines that would have been questionable for network TV. Also included are uncensored audio tracks that were bleeped on TV. It’s certainly a welcome change having the series presented as they were intended, instead of chopped up as so many shows are on DVD.

Among the 14 episodes in this set is a number of funny moments, normally involving either Lois or Chris, though neither enjoys a spotlight episode. Instead, Peter powers a couple of inspired shows, starting with “PTV,” a sharp rebuttal of the FCC’s assault on broadcast standards. As a fan of entertainment for adults, the crippling of language by the government certainly needs to be skewered. Peter’s revolutionary instincts crop up again in “The Father, the Son and the Holy Fonz.” It delivers an entertaining parody of religion, as Peter forms a faith based around Henry Winkler’s “Happy Days” character, with about as valid a basis as most religions.
comedy. There’s some good stuff in here, culled from the 14 episodes, including some subplots that were cut. They are joined by three featurettes that look behind the scenes of the show. The first is a simple one, as supervising director Peter Shin shows how to draw Stewie. Straightforward, but a bit interesting. “A Director’s Life: Debunking the Myth” spends almost 15 minutes looking at the job of the directors on the show, explaining in detail what they do to make the series go. It’s rather good and shows how much goes into making animation.

I enjoy sitting down with a set of “Family Guy” episodes, thanks to the voices and rather lush animation, another great set thou some fans might be confused with the season box sets not watching the actual seasons but once you figure out the numbering its

REVIEW: HUMAN TARGET – SEASON 1 & 2

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MAIN CAST

Mark Valley (Zeo Dark Thirty)
Chi McBride (Pushing Daisies)
Jackie Earle Haley (Watchmen)
Indira Varma (Game of Thrones)
Janet Montogomery (Black Swan)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Tricia Helfer (Powers)
Donnelly Rhodes (Battlestar Galactica)
Adrian Hough (Underworld: Evolution)
Danny Glover (Lethal Weapon)
Ali Liebert (Legends of Tomorrow)
Courtney Ford (The Big Bang Theory)
Alessandro juliani (Smallville)
David Nykl (Arrow)
Aleks Paunovic (Mortal Kombat: Legacy)
Sean Maher (Firefly)
William Mapother (Powers)
Peter Bryant (Dark Angel)
Emmanuelle Vaugier (Two and a Half Men)
Sam Huntington (Superman Returns)
Kristin Lehman (Andromeda)
William B. Davis (The X-Files)
Chris Mulkey (Whiplash)
Dylan Neal (Arrow)
Brandon Jay McLaren (Power Rangers SPD)
Ted Whittall (Beauty and The Beast)
Mitch Pileggi (Stargate: Atlantis)
Leonor Varela (Blade II)
Kim Coates (Silent Hill)
Autumn Reeser (Sully)
Samantha Ferris (Along Came A Spider)
Lennie James (The Walking Dead)
Grace Park (Battlestar Galactica)
Peter Wingfield (Caprica)
Moon Bloodgood (Terminator Salvation)
Kavan Smith (Stargate: Atlantis)
Christopher Heyerdahl (Sanctuary)
Mackernzie Gray (Man of Steel)
Armand Assante (The Odyssey)
Christina Cole (Hex)
Robert Lawrenson (Underworld: Awakening)
Amy Acker (Angel)
Timothy Omundson (Xena)
Lee Majors (Ash vs Evil Dead)
Tahmoh Penikett (Dollhouse)
M.C. Gainey (Lost)
Cameron Daddo (Andromeda)
Tracie Thoms (Cold Case)
John Michael Higgins (Still Waiting)
David Orth (The Lost World)
Marie Avgeropoulos (The 100)
Tony Hale (Chuck)
Carlo Rota (Stargate Universe)
James Remar (Flashforward)
Nicole Bilderback (Buffy)
Steven Brand (The Scorpion King)

Christopher Chance (Mark Valley, Boston Legal), is a bodyguard for hire. His clients come to him as a last resort because their lives are in serious danger and they have no other alternatives. Chance’s mysterious past is only partially revealed as the season progresses–much of it in the season finale. What is known about him is that he’s probably a genius, he can hold his own in a fight, he’s a super-thief, he’s a crackshot with a gun, and the ladies love him.

In each episode, Chance typically assumes a cover to stay close and protect the client. He uses the client as bait to uncover the killer’s identity. In these episodes, Chance assumes a multitude of identities ranging from a prize fighter to a monk. Beyond Batman-like fighting skills, Chance’s best tools are his intelligence and charismatic personality; he holds his own in a conversation on any topic and masterfully fits in with any group of people. Joining Chance are Winston (Chi McBride, Boston Public, Pushing Daisies), his straight-laced handler, and Guerrero (Jackie Earle Haley, Watchmen), a computer hacker with questionable methods, but indisputable loyalty.Human Target is a throwback to the action series of the 80’s. While an intriguing backstory develops across the entire show, each episode is self-contained and follows a specific case from beginning to end. Viewers can practically jump in on any episode and not miss a beat. This is due in part to the swashbuckling, tongue-in-cheek script that never takes itself too seriously. It is also partly due to the brilliant performances by the main actors, Mark Valley, Chi McBride, and Jackie Earle Haley. The three play off each other extremely well. You can’t help but watch this show with a smile on your face as straight-man and former detective, Winston cringes at yet another action by Christopher Chance or Guerrero that gets the job accomplished, but is probably not entirely legal. Guerrero, especially, has morally ambiguous moments that cause those around him to be hysterically uncomfortable. When he makes his appearance on-screen, you know that hilarity and awesomeness are about to ensue. It’s similar to the height of Kramer’s heyday in Seinfeld where the studio audience would erupt when he appeared and he’d completely steal the scene. Laughs are guaranteed with Guerrero and his antics are accentuated into priceless gems by Winston’s reactions.The over-the-top action in each episode is wonderfully shot and rivals the quality of some Hollywood films. The outlandishness of the action is offset by the fact that the actors revel in the absurdity and take all the events in stride. No matter how desperate the situation, Christopher Chance always flashes a wry grin. His antics and expressions are reminiscent of Harrison Ford’s performances as Han Solo or Indiana Jones. The action is intense, but Christopher Chance can handle it and make you laugh while he does.Another testament to the excellent writing is that not a single episode is wasted. Obviously, some episodes are better than others, but all are highly watchable and re-watchable, action-packed, mysteries. Even the product placements are great and fit in with the spirit of the show. In the Tanarak episode, one of the most blatant product placements of all time occurs with a Camaro. It’s done with such blithe satire, instead of feeling the need to bathe after watching more advertisers nauseatingly snake their way into television, you just laugh at the silliness.In every episode, without requiring any background information, you are brought into the characters’ circle and get an immediate feel for their relationships. However, more information could have been provided earlier about Christopher Chance and his cohorts’ origins. Some of the information that was dumped in the final episode of this set could have been dispersed throughout the previous episodes. Instead you are left to fill in massive blanks with assumptions about the characters’ pasts. This is not a huge misstep by the writers because the characters’ mysterious origins are a large part of what makes the show so accessible.  This show is just pure fun to watch unfold and will appeal to practically anyone. Pop a bag of microwave popcorn, kick back, relax, and enjoy the ride.In season 2, with Matt Miller (Chuck) taking on executive producer-writer-show runner duties, he promised to flesh things out a bit without changing much of the original allure, which was good news. Mostly, he brought in Indira Varma  (Luther, Rome) as Ilsa Pucci, a widowed billionaire who takes a liking to the boys. And Janet Montgomery (Entourage) as a thief who also gets reluctantly entangled with the trio. So you can see the note Fox put on the show: Let’s leaven the testosterone a bit.And yet, nothing’s really changed. The escapism is sky high. Valley remains as charismatic as ever, with McBride’s disdainful asides and Haley’s chilly creepiness intact. It would be unfortunate if Human Target somehow got soapy or dumber, because good popcorn is rare.

 

REVIEW: COLD CASE – SEASON 1-7

CAST

Kathryn Morris (Mindhunters)
Justin Chambers (Grey’s Anatomy)
Danny Pino (Law & Order:SVU)
John Finn (True Crme)
Jeremy Ratchford (Angel Eyes)
Thom Barry (Texas Chainsaw)
Tracie Thoms (Looper)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Sherman Howard (Superboy)
Kate Mara (Fantastic Four)
Becki Newton (Ugly Betty)
Brett Cullen (Lost)
Jimmi Simpson (Date Night)
Daisy McCrackin (Halloween: Resurrection)
Lacey Beeman (Power Rangers Time Force)
Summer Glau (Firefly)
Vincent Ventresca (Dollhouse)
Brandon Routh (Legends of Tomorrow)
Barbara Tarbuck (American Horror Story)
Laura Regan (Minorty Report TV)
Christina Cox (Arrow)
Silas Weir Mitchell (My Name Is Earl)
Fredric Lehne (Lost)
Jeffrey Nording (Flight 93)
Josh Hopkins (The Perfect Storm)
Robert LaSardo (Nip/Tuck)
Blake Shields (Heroes)
Chelsea Field (Masters of The Universe)
Marc McClure (Superman)
Geoffrey Lewis (The Devil’s Rejects)
Leslie Silva (Odyssey 5)
Garrett M. Brown (Kick-Ass)
Molly Cheek (American Pie)
Autumn Reeser (The OC)
Amanda Wyss (Highlander: The Series)
Robin Riker (Big Love)
Nichole Hiltz (Bones)
Amber Benson (Buffy)
Maggie Grace (Lost)
Katee Sackhoff (Battlestar Galactica)
Marisol Nichols (Felon)
Mehcad Brooks (Supergirl)
Cameron Dye (Smallville)
Lee Garlington (Flashforward)
Michael Pare (Bloodrayne 3)
T.J. Thyne (Bones)
John Kassir (Pete’s Dragon)
Patty McCormack (The Bad Seed)
Barbara Niven (The Rat Pack)
W. Earl Brown (Bates Motel)
Tracy Middendorf (Scream: The Series)
Jason Dohring (Veronica Mars)
Noel Fisher (Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles)
Sam Witwer (Smallville)
Mae Whitman (The Duff)
Aloma Wright (Scrubs)
Shirley Knight (As Good As It Gets)
Ian Bohen (Hercules: TLJ)
Jenna Fischer (The Office)
Chadwick Boseman (Captain America: Civil War)
Rance Howard (A Beautiful Mind)
Nicholas D’Agasto (Gotham)
Roxanne Hart (Highlander)
Chad Lindberg (Teh Fast and The Furious)
Daveigh Chase (S. Darko)
Virginia Williams (Fairly Legal)
Chad Donella (Smallville)
Nicki Aycox (Roadkill 2)
Bob Papenbrook (Jeepers Creepers 2)
John Billingsley (Star Trek: Enterprise)
Phil LaMarr (Free Enterprise)
Johnny Whitwroth (Empire Records)
Danielle Harris (Halloween 2007)
Michael O’Neil (Roswell)
Amy Sloan (The Aviator)
Brigid Brannagh (Angel)
Andrea Savage (Izombie)
Meredith Salenger (Lake Placid)
Clare Carey (Hercules: TLJ)
Dana Davis (Heroes)
Dee Wallace (ET)
Jay Acovone (Stargate SG.1)
Bradley Stryker (The Lizzie Borden Chronicles)
Piper Laurie (Carrie)
Tessa Thompson (Veronica Mars)
Karina Logue (Bates Motel)
Sarah Brown (VR Troopers)
Brooke Anne Smith (Misschief Night)
Kristin Richardson (Lost)
Lindsay Hollister (Bluberella)
Nick Wechsler (Roswell)
Mimi Kennedy (Mom)
Christina Hendricks (Mad Men)
Thomas Kopache (Stigmata)
April Grace (Lost)
Edwin Hodge (The Purge)
Jon Huertas (Sabrina: TTW)
Phillip Jeanmarie (Power Rangers Wild Force)
Michael Grant Terry (Bones)
Deborah Van Valkenburgh (Mean Guns)
Robin Weigert (Deadwood)
James Handy (Alias)
Megan Follows (Reign)
Zachary Ty Bryan (Fast and Furious 3)
Alona Tal (Cult)
Meagen Fay (The Big Banng Theory)
Priscilla Pointer (The Flash 90s)
Tina Holmes (Taken)
Jeremy Davidson (Roswell)
Brennan Elliott (Paul Blart: Mall Cop)
Zeljko Ivanek (Heroes)
Shiloh Fernandez (Red Riding Hood)
George Coe (Smallville)
Laura Bell Bundy (Scream Queens)
John Rubenstein (Angel)
Meredith Baxter (Family Ties)
Dean Norris (Breaking Bad)
K Callan (Lois & CLark)
Michelle Harrison (The Flash)
Peter Graves (Airplane 2)
Stacy Haiduk (Superboy)
Dale Dickey (Iron Man 3)
Mageina Tovah (Spider-Man 2 & 3)
Kenny Johnson (Bates Motel)
Kyle Gallner (Veronica Mars)
Nestor Carbonell (The Dark Knight)
L. Scott Caldwell (Lost)
Neil Jackson (Alexander)
Greg Cipes (Teen Titans)
Rutanya Alda (Amityville 2)
George Newbern (Justice League)
Annie Wersching (The Vampire Diaries)
Eugene Robert Glazer (La Femme Nikita)
John Aylward (Alias)
Bobby Hosea (Xena)
Charles Mesure (V)
Conor O’Farrell (Lie To Me)
Sonja Sohn (The Originals)
Thomas Ian Girffiths (XXX)
Polly Shannon (Lie With Me)
Michael Trevino (The Vampire Diaries)
Jake McDorman (Limitless TV)
Robert Picardo (Stargate: Atlantis)
Ernie Hudson (Ghostbusters)
Lucinda Jenney (Rain Man)
Jamie Bamber (Battlestar Galactica)
Bruce Boxleitner (Babylon 5)
Greg Finley (Izombie)
Paula Malcomson (Caprica)
Holmes Osborne (Donnie Darko)
Faran Tahir (Iron Man)
Jennifer Lawrence (The Hunger Games)
Mitch Pileggi (The X-Files)
Whitney Able (Monsters)
AnnaLynne McCord (Excision)
Drew Powell (Gotham)
Erin Cahill (Power Rangers Time Force)
Carolyn McCormick (Enemy Mine)
Michael Massee (Flashforward)
Helena Mattsson (Iron Man 2)
Lynda Boyd (Sanctuary)
Justina Machado (Final Destination 2)
Cynthia Ettinger (Thirteen)
Bonnie Root (Home Invasion)
Melissa Leo (The Fighter)
Shailene Woodley (Divergent)
Danielle Bisutti (Curse of Chucky)
Monet Mazur (Blow)
Justin Bruening (Knight Rider 2008)
Daphne Ashbrook (The Love Letter)
Rodney Rowland (Veronica Mars)
James Black (Anger Management)
Ralph Waite (Bones)
Aisha Hinds (Cult)
Jamil Walker Smith (Stargate Universe)
Jonathan Keltz (Reign)
Justin Hartley (Smallville)
Diane Delano (Jeepers Creeprs 2)
Nikki Deloach (The Net 2.0)
Deirdre Lovejoy (Bones)
Keone Young (Crank)
Kim Coates (The Amityville Curse)
Timothy Omundson (Xena)
Jeffrey Combs (Gotham)
Kathleen Munroe (Stargate Universe)
John Pyper-Ferguson (Caprica)
Paul Wesley (The Vampire Diaries)
Brea Grant (Heroes)
Ronny Cox (Robocop)
Nichole Tom (Gotham)
M.C. Gainey (LosT)
James Karen (Hercules In New York)
Justin Leak (Powers)
Sean O’ Bryan (The Princess Diaries)
Cassidy Freeman (Smallville)
Patricia Belcher (Bones)
Jenna Leigh Green (Sabrina: TTW)
Vernee Watson (The Big Bang Theory)
Carl Lumbly (Alias)
Charles Napier (The Silence of The Lambs)
Joel Murray (Two and a Half Men)
Elena Satine (Revenge)
Nicole Bilderback (Buffy)
Erin Cummings (Spartacus)
Tania Raymonde (Lost)
Jonathan LaPaglia (Seven Days)
Keith Szarabajka (The Dark Knight)
Christine Woods (Flashforward)
Lee Majors (Ash vs Evil Dead)
Lindy Booth (Cry Wolf)
Adrienne Barbeau (Swamp Thing)
Raymond J. Barry (Lost)
Ttaylor Cole (Heroes)
Jeff Kober (New Girl)
Courtney Ford (True Blood)
David Starzyk (Veronica mars)
Bailey Chase (Buffy)
Wynn Everett (Agent Carter)
Brad Greenquist (Heroes)
Katherine LaNasa (Lie To Me)
Jeff Fahey (Planet Terror)
Clayne Crawford (Roswell)
Brit Morgan (Supergirl)
Jonathan Banks (The Lizzie Borden Chronciles)
Victoria Pratt (Mutant X)
Ryan Wynott (The Cape)
Jonathan Schaech (Legends of Tomorrow)
Valerie Azlynn (Julia X)
Muse Watson (I Know What You did Last Summer)
Michael Ironside (Total Recall)
Daniel Baldwin (Vampires)
Ashley Johsnon (Dollhouse)
Erin Chambers (Finding Carter)
Tracey Walter (Batman)
Loren Lester (Batman: TAS)
Chris Browning (Supergirl)
Dawn Olivieri (The Vampire Diaries)
Steven Culp (Jason Goes To Hell)
Meagan Good (D.E.B.S)
Steven Williams (The X-Files)
Loretta Devine (Crash)
Yara Shahidi (Ugly Betty)
Nelson Lee (Blade: The Series)
Steven Krueger (The Originals)
Lolita Davidovich (Santa Fe)
Alan Blumenfeld (Heroes)
Chandra West (White Noise)
Carel Struycken (The Addams Family)
Justina Vail (Highlander: The Series)
Rachel Miner (the Butterfly Effect )
Sean Maguire (Meet The Spartans)
Lauren Cohan (Chuck)
Roddy Piper (They Live)
Susanna Thompson (Arrow)
John D’Aquino (Seaquest)
Azura Skype (28 Days)
Johnny Messner (Anacondas)
Rob Benedict (Birds of Prey)
JR Bourne (Stargate SG.1)

I’m glad I got the opportunity to catch this show. It’s no doubt one of the best shows on TV, between 2003-2010. it was a very well written show. The episodes always has their twist even though the cases, at first sight, might seem pretty much alike. This show captures the individuality of each crime, the persons involved and the surroundings in a very good way.The fact that the crimes have been committed years ago and that everything involved has changed over the time, gives this show something different then every other cop show. It also captures the humanity of both the victims the suspects and the investigators. There are a lot of feeling in it and it often gets rather touching. Some episodes might contain elements from the characters personal life. It just gives the characters a life beyond the job and this is good as it never takes over the episode or is used to cover a bad plot. The show involves several investigators and you get to know them as well. They got lives and personalities too, yet they don’t steal the show from Rush, witch in the end is the star of the show.The cast is great. Kathryn Morris does a great job portraying Rush. The cinematography and lightning of this show is just beautiful. It all looks great. Both scenes from past and present. They have given the show a unique look. A kind of white or blue, cold look. They also manage to capture the unique eras in witch the crime was committed. You know just by looking witch decade we’re in. It’s the colors, the way they shoot, the quality and the overall look that make this. The art director, production designer, costume etc. deserves credit for this too. Making the sets and such fit the era.

The original music of this show it catching and good. In addition there is a lot of none original music from the year the crimes are committed. This really gives the right feel and easy gives you the idea of witch year we’re in. The only downside to the use of music of the era means that copyright laws prohibit them being used on DVD and this is why the show has yet come to disc.