31 DAYS OF HORROR REVIEW: PATHOLOGY

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CAST

Milo Ventiglia (Heroes)
Michael Weston (Garden State)
Alyssa Milano (Charmed)
Lauren Lee Smith (Mutant X)
Johnny Whitworth (Ghost Rider 2)
John de Lancie (Star Trek: TNG)
Larry Drake (Firefly)
Alan Blumenfeld (Jingle All The Way)
Sam Witwer (Smallville)
Keir O’Donnell (Wedding C rashers)

The intro shows a camera recording faces of corpses, with their mouths being moved by medical students.

Med school student Teddy Grey (Milo Ventimiglia) graduates top of his class from Harvard and joins one of the nation’s most prestigious pathology programs. There, a rivalry develops between a group of interns and Teddy. They invite him into their group, which entertains itself with a secret after-hours game at the morgue of who can commit the perfect undetectable murder. Eventually the group’s leader, Jake Gallo, realizes that Teddy is sleeping with his girlfriend, Dr. Juliette Bath. When Teddy catches several members of the group in lies, he realizes that what initially seemed like vigilante killings are, in actuality, just innocent people murdered for sport.

Teddy’s fiancée Gwen arrives to stay with him in his apartment. Gallo, angered by Juliette’s infidelity, kills her for the next game. However, just as they are about to begin the autopsy on Bath (in the meantime plotting Teddy’s death), Gallo realizes that the gas has been left on in the room, resulting in a massive explosion as one of the group lights a meth pipe, killing everyone but Teddy who was not in the room. Gallo realizes what is about to happen and survives. Teddy is seen walking away from the explosion.

Later, Gallo manages to kill Gwen in what he believes to be the “perfect murder”. Upon completing his autopsy report on his murdered fiancée, Teddy is knocked out by Gallo and then is forced to trade verbal barbs with him. Teddy uses some of Gallo’s own rhetoric against him in reverse psychology fashion, after which fellow pathologist Ben Stravinsky frees Teddy and together they kill Gallo in exactly the same way that he killed Teddy’s fiancée. In the process, they vivisect Gallo.This is quite a good thriller if you can get past some of the implausibilities: for instance, how very convenient to have a fully functioning pathology lab that no-one knows about; and would you really bring your girlfriend to live with you when your mates are a bunch of psychos? .

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REVIEW: BIG FAT IMPORTANT MOVIE

CAST
Kevin P. Farley (The Waterboy)
Kelsey Grammer (Frasier)
Leslie Nielsen (The Naked Gun)
Trace Adkins (The Virginian)
Gary Coleman (Diff’rent Strokes)
Robert Davi (Maniac Cop 2 & 3)
Nikki Deloach (The Net 2.0)
David Alan Grier (Jumanji)
Paris Hilton (Bottom’s Up)
Dennis Hopper (Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2)
Zachary Levi (Chuck)
Christopher McDonald (Fanboys)
Gail O’ Grady (The Sitter)
Simon Rex (Scary Movie 3,4 & 5)
Kevin Sorbo (Andromeda)
Jon Voight (Transformers)
James Woods (Another Day In Paradise)
Lauren Lee Smith (Mutant X)
Nadine Ellis (500 Days of Summer)
Alaina Huffman (Stargate Universe)
Left-wing activist and filmmaker Michael Malone (Kevin Farley), a parody of Michael Moore, campaigns to end the celebration of the Fourth of July holiday. Malone holds pronounced anti-American views and truculently argues that America’s past and present are both offensive, and therefore should not be celebrated. On the evening of July 3, Malone watches a speech from President John F. Kennedy and mistakenly interprets the speech to mean avoiding war at any cost. President Kennedy rises out of the television set, corrects Malone regarding the intent of the speech, and informs him that he will be visited by three spirits.
The following morning, Malone is visited by General George S. Patton (Kelsey Grammer), who shows him an alternate United States where slavery still exists because Abraham Lincoln (founder of the Republican Party) chose not to fight the Civil War. Malone later sees George Washington (Jon Voight) who gives a passionate speech about God’s gift of freedom and the price many people pay for others to have it. Malone is visited by the angel of death (Trace Adkins), who takes him to a future Los Angeles completely taken over by radical Islamists. He is then taken to the ruins of his hometown in Michigan, which has been destroyed by a nuclear bomb planted by Al Qaeda. In a mortuary, Malone learns that he will be killed in this attack, leaving nothing behind but his trademark hat and “big ass.” Facing his death, Malone pleads for his life with the Angel, promising to change. However, all is not well after Malone’s revelation, for Aziz, a Middle Easterner he had interviewed, is actually a terrorist who will bomb a 4 July rally along with his underlings Ahmed and Fayed. However, when Fayed and Ahmed learn they are going to be detonated along with the planned bomb, they figure their slim chance of survival is by seeking out Malone.
Later, Malone arrives at an anti-Fourth of July protest rally and publicly renounces his former views. This triggers an outraged mob from which he is rescued, however, by American servicemen. Meeting up with Malone, Ahmed and Fayed defuse their own bomb, thus sparing the people at the anti-Independence Day rally and resulting in the capture of the terrorist Aziz. Safe inside a country music concert, the three are formally welcomed to “the real America” by Trace Adkins (this time as himself). A reformed Malone then goes to a Navy base to see his nephew Josh off to the Persian Gulf. He tells Josh how very proud he is of him and promises to look in on his wife and family during his deployment. In the final scene, Malone now decides to make films he feels people would appreciate, as well as Fayed and Ahmed as part of the crew, who have been pardoned for foiling the bombing. Malone is last seen working on a biographical film about President Kennedy.
I watched this through and I did chuckle a few times. It’s not as terrible as it could have been. It’s just that its whole story is based on a political agenda and it gets a little tiring being constantly slapped in the face with the same message.

REVIEW: MUTANT X – SEASON 1-3

MAIN CAST
Forbes March (As The World Turns)
Victoria Pratt (Cleopatea 2525)
Lauren Lee Smith (Lie With Me)
Victor Webster (Wishmaster 4)
John Shea (Lois & Clark)
Karen Cliche (Flash Gordon 2007)
RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST
Tom McCamus (Ginger Snaps Back)
Douglas o’ Keeffe (Dark Angel)
Cedric Smith (X-men: The Animated Series)
Andrew Gillies (Odyssey 5)
Michael Easton (Coldfire)
George Buza (X-men: The Animated Series)
Dylan Bierk (Andromeda)
Laura Vandervoort (Bitten)
Yannick Bisson (Beauty and the Beast 2012)
Monique Ganderton (Smallville)
Anthony Lemke (Robocop: Prime Directives)
Mark Lutz (Angel)
Greg Bryk (Reign)
Anne Openshaw (Izombie)
Guylaine St-Onge (Highwayman)
Sarah Gadon (Dracula untold)
Larissa Laskin (John Q)
Callum Keith Rennie (Memento)
Louis Ferreira (Stargate Universe)
Krista Allen (The Final Destination)
Lindy Booth (Cry Booth)
Noah Danby (Painkiller Jane)
Sandrine Holt (Underworld Awakening)
Philip Akin (Highlander: The Series)
Melinda Deines (Earth: Final Conflict)
Frank Moore (Rabid)
David Sutcliffe (Lie To Me)
Jenya Lano (Xena)
Alan C. Petersen (Stargate SG.1)
Rachel Hayward (Jingle All The Way 2)
Steve Bacic (Blade: The Series)
Gary Hudson (Cold Case)
Sebastian Spence (First Wave)
Alan Van Sprang (Reign)
Lauren Collins (Degrassi: The Next Generation)
Euegne Robert Glazer (La Femme Nikita)
Peter Stebbings (Bates Motel)
John Ralston (The Lizzie Borden Chronicles)
Sasha Roiz (Caprica)
 Mutant X was a brilliant, and totally original, syndicated series that had have genre fans tuning in faithfully week after week. Drawing from the timely topic of genetic research and engineering and experimentation on human DNA, Mutant X tells the completely original story of a group of outcasts with genetically engineered super-human powers and abilities and their attempts to evade capture or destruction by the ultra-secret, evil government agency which created them.
Mutant X  created by comics veteran Howard Chaykin (writer for Earth: Final Conflict and Viper) and Avi Arad (executive producer of X-Men, X-Men 2, and every other Marvel comic to movie adaptation in the pipeline from Daredevil  to The Fantastic Four). With a totally straight face, they insist that this new show has absolutely nothing whatsoever to do with the X-Men. Both of these guys know the comic industry and Arad obviously is familiar with  X-Men, and yet they expect us to believe that cashing in on the popularity of the X-Men wasn’t in their minds at all while developing this series. They can’t even seem to recognize the similarity.

The main difference in plot line deals with the fact that the powers that the Mutant X mutants possess were a result of human intervention through science rather than a naturally-occurring genetic mutation, as in the X-Men. Apart from this very minor difference, the sky is the limit when it comes to Mutant X – X-Men similarities.
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The leader of the Mutants is Adam, a wealthy scientist who headed up the government project that created the Children of Genomex (a.k.a. the Mutants). He has seen the error of his ways and now is engaged in a crusade to locate, protect, and train the Mutants. He doesn’t actually own a school or have mutant powers himself, but this is the Professor X of the group.371266752_640The leader of the evil, covert government agency is Mason Eckhart, played by Andy Warhol as himself. This guy, complete with white hair and chunky glasses, wants to either use the Mutants for evil purposes or see them all destroyed. He’s sort of the Magneto of Mutant X without the overwhelming desire to see the Mutants rule the earth. Eckhart doesn’t have any super powers, unless you count just plain being evil, but his right hand man has telekinetic abilities.
a great series that lasted 3 seasons and only ended because the tribune company came to and end

REVIEW: BLADE: THE SERIES

MAIN CAST

Sticky Fingaz (Next Friday)
Jill Wagner (Teen Wolf)
Nelson Lee (Vacancy 2)
Jessica Gower (Winners & Losers)
Neil Jackson (Sleepy Hollow)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Bill Mondy (I Spy)
David Palffy (Stargate SG.1)
David Kopp (Freddy Vs Jason)
P. Lynn Johnson (50/50)
Don Thompson (Red Riding Hood)
Randy Quaid (Kingpin)
Adrian Hough (X-Men 3)
Ryan Kennedy (Smallville)
William MacDonald (Slither)
Ryan Robbins (Arrow)
Sonja Bennett (Stargate: Atlantis)
Brandon Jay McLaren (Power Rangers SPD)
Bokeem Woodbine (Total Recall)
Steve Bacic (Andromeda)
Sahar Biniaz (Watchmen)
Emily Hirst (Smallville)
Mike Dopud (Stargate Universe)
Larry Poindexter (Sabrina: TTW)
Jody Thompson (Flash Gordon)
Hiro Kanagawa (Heroes Reborn)
Richard Roundtree (Alias)
Brent Stait (Andromeda)
John DeSantis (The New Addams Family)
Tom Butler (Painkiller Jane)
Lauren Lee Smith (Mutant X)

Following the conclusion of Blade: Trinity, Blade (Kirk “Sticky Fingaz” Jones) travels to his hometown of Detroit where the vampire nation is planning something big. Led by the wealthy and well-respected Marcus Van Sciver (Neil Jackson), The House of Chthon (one of the ten vampire houses) has begun development of a vaccine (Project: Aurora) that will cure them of all of their afflictions: silver, garlic and sunlight. It’s up to Blade to stop that from happening before it’s too late. Enlisting the help of computer whiz and weapon’s guru, Shen (Nelson Lee), Blade is ready for an all out assault to rid the world of more blood-sucking fiends.Doing her part in all of this is Krista Starr (Jill Wagner), a U.S. military combat medic who has just returned home from the war. Her welcome home celebration soon turns to sadness when she is greeted by the police, who inform her that her brother has died… or maybe he was killed. Convinced of the latter Krista takes it upon herself to investigate his mysterious death, which exposes her to the vampire world and leads to a meeting with Blade, himself. Banding together the two infiltrate Sciver’s inner circle, which results in Krista being taken and then turned into one of the undead. While Krista battles with the thirst and her unwanted transformation, she helps to feed Blade information from the inside. This information will allow the Daywalker to take down the vampire collective once and for all.The first half of this one and only season focuses a lot more on Krista’s character and less on Blade. That’s not a bad thing, actually. After going three films where Blade has been the dominant figure this show enjoys veering off and exploring other characters; giving us the chance to pick the side we like the best. Also, Krista’s character is very tragic. Losing her brother and then losing herself, so-to-speak, really laid the foundation for a woman who is torn between her human side and current vampire persona. Being a part of the sensual and romantic lifestyle that the vampires lead, it’s not easy for Krista to resist temptation. As she falls deeper into darkness, we see her crisscrossing between both of her personalities and watch her struggle to maintain some kind of balance. However, she unwittingly brings more of her family into this mess and that’s when things really begin to spiral out of control for her.The second half of the season gets down to business and shows us more of Blade, including the back-story of his childhood and life as a young Daywalker. In the episode entitled “Sacrifice” (probably the best episode of the season), we are shown Blade as a boy and experience the very first meeting between him and Whistler. You’ll get to see how Blade was treated as a child and even how Whistler got that nasty limp of his. In the episode “Bloodlines”, we are introduced to his former gang, the Bad Bloods, who are suffering from vampirism and are looking to exact revenge on Blade – or “Little Man” as they call him – for he was the one who turned them all into the creatures they have become. The gang hopes to wipe out Blade as a way to finally gain respect from the vampire houses and make their way into the collective, but Blade definitely doesn’t make it easy for them and does a bit of damage in his high-flying, kung fu way. There is also a secondary storyline where Blade meets FBI agent Ray Collins (Larry Poindexter). Prior to this meeting we watch this agent go on a bit of a trek of his own, tracking down cop-turned-vampire Boone (Bill Mondy). Now Boone makes an appearance in the pilot episode (as a “familiar”) and becomes almost the main focus in a few of the subsequent episodes until he’s gone for good. When that happens, the agent and Blade team up to try and take down one of the Purebloods, the very youthful Charlotte (Emily Hirst). This is a show that really knew how to cater to its predominantly male Spike TV audience. Blade hasn’t been toned down one bit and we are treated to tons of bloody kills and gruesome gore effects, along with quite a large helping of sexual content and nudity.Blade: The Series is still very much a Blade experience. Full of violence and gore, sex and f-bombs, this is a no-holds-barred action treat that, sadly, only lasted 13 episodes.