REVIEW: BONES – SEASON 2

Starring

Emily Deschanel (Boogeyman)
David Boreanaz (Angel)
Michaela Conlin (Yellowstone)
Eric Millegan (The Phobic)
Tamara Taylor (Lost)
T. J. Thyne (Ghost World)

David Boreanaz and Emily Deschanel in Bones (2005)

Recurring / Notable Guest Cast

Christine Estabrook (Spider-Man 2)
Ray Wise (Robocop)
Ann Cusack (Stigmata)
Sam Witwer (Supergirl)
Alex Hyde-White (Pretty Woman)
JoNell Kennedy (Dreamgirls)
Jessica Capshaw (Valentine)
Leah Pipes (The Originals)
Kathleen Gati (Arrow)
Heath Freeman (Skateland)
Christie Lynn Smith (The Crazies)
Jim Jansen (A.I.)
Keri Lynn Pratt (smallville)
Lamont Thompson (Evan Almighty)
Danny Woodburn (Watchmen)
Carlos Lacamara (Heroes Reborn)
John Kassir (Pete’s Dragon)
Cerina Vincent (Power Rangers Lost Galaxy)
Kali Rocha (Man With A Plan)
Lisa Thornhill (After The Sunset)
Kyle Gallner (Veronica Mars)
Amanda Carlin (Superhero Movie)
Grace Fulton (Shazam!)
John Marshall Jones (Con Air)
Nelson Lee (Blade: The Series)
Theo Rossi (Luke Cage)
Benito Martinez (Sons of Anarchy)
Julie Ann Emery (Better Call Saul)
Charles Mesure (V)
Salli Richardson-Whitfield (I Am Legend)
Kristoffer Polaha (Ringer)
Amanda Fuller (Last Man Standing)
Joshua Leonard (Bates Motel)
Michael Trevino (Roswell, New Mexico)
Ryan O’Neal (Love Story)
Loren Dean (Apollo 13)
Patricia Belcher (Jeepers Creepers)
Ryan Cutrona (Changeling)
Ty Panitz (Because I Said So)
Stephen Fry (V For Vendetta)
Eddie McClintock (No Good Nick)
Alex Winter (Bill & Ted)
Eric Jungmann (Not Another Teen Movie)
Ernie Hudson (Ghostbusters)
Meredith Monroe (Dawson’s Creek)
James Earl (The Lazarus Effect)
Jonathan Slavin (Santa Clarita Diet)
Chris Conner (Walk of Shame)
Steve Braun (The Trip)
James Hong (Blade Runner)
Deborah Theaker (A Mighty Wind)
Eric Stonestreet (Modern Family)
George Coe (Kramer vs Kramer)
Wendy Braun (Atypical)
David Burke (The Tick)
Johnny Lewis (Sons of Anarchy)
Tom Everett (Dances with Wolves)
Derek Webster (Stargate)
Ian Anthony Dale (The Event)
Glenn Morshower (Transformers)
Brian Hallisay (American Sniper)
Hillary Tuck (Life as a House)
A.J. Buckley (SEAL Team)
Roxanne Hart (Highlander)
Joe Nieves (How I Met Your Mother)
Cleo King (Mike & Molly)
Billy Gibbons (Two and a Half Men)

David Boreanaz, Jessica Capshaw, and Ty Panitz in Bones (2005)The start of the season sees a new boss, Cam, arrive at the Institute. Not only is she very hands on, she is a former love of Booth, and Tempe and Cam do not hit it off in the early episodes. The new character is well written and softens as the season progresses until it is hard to imagine the team without her input. Meantime Zac undergoes a make-over in order to secure a permanent place on the staff once he gains his doctorate, and Hodkins and Angela begin a tentative office romance.David Boreanaz and Emily Deschanel in Bones (2005)Booth and Brennan continue to spar verbally with each other and some of their exchanges will have you laughing out loud. When a fellow agent, Sully, begins a relationship with Tempe, Booth’s feelings are confused – but as is observed, Tempe “is rubbish at being a girl” and her own complicated life does not bode well for a permanent relationship. Tempe continues to put her foot in it socially, particularly when a case involves Booth’s Catholic religion.David Boreanaz and Emily Deschanel in Bones (2005)Among the classy episodes are ‘The Girl with the Curl’ about child beauty Queens, (with a wonderful scene of Tempe trying to talk to a group of 8 year olds at a dance class!), ‘Aliens in a Spaceship’ which has Tempe and Hodgkins buried alive by a serial killer, and ‘The Headless Witch in the Woods’ which has more than a nod to The Blair Witch Project. David Boreanaz and Emily Deschanel in Bones (2005)Guest stars this season include Stephen Fry as a laid back, insightful Psychiatrist whom Booth must see after he shoots an ice cream van, and Ryan O’Neal as Tempe’s estranged and mysterious father whose elusive character comes into his own when Booth is targetted by the Mob. And, once again, Angela’s instantly recognisable father – from ZZ Top – pops up!

REVIEW: BURIED

 

CAST

Ryan Reynolds (Deadpool)
José Luis García Pérez (La verdad)
Robert Paterson (Faust)
Stephen Tobolowsky (Groundhog Day)
Samantha Mathis (American Psycho)
Kali Rocha (Buffy)
Chris Willaim Martin (The Vampire Diaries)
Anne Lockhart (Tangled)

For several seconds after the opening credits of Buried have ended, the screen is dark, the soundtrack silent. Director Rodrigo Cortés holds that empty screen for as long as he can, and then he keeps holding it; we lean forward, peering into the darkness, straining our ears for any sound that will punctuate the stillness. (It’s a brilliant, if risky, tool for focusing an audience.) Finally, thankfully, there is a quiet cough, then breathing, breathing which becomes more panicked in the darkness. As Paul Conroy (Ryan Reynolds) wakes from a blackout, bound and gagged, he lights his Zippo and realizes what has happened. He’s been buried alive.

Conroy is a contractor in Iraq, a truck driver for a company that (he stresses at one point) is not Blackwater. His convoy was ambushed by a band of insurgents; many of his co-workers were killed. He has been placed in a rickety old wood coffin and buried somewhere in Iraq, who knows where; he’s got his Zippo and his flask, and his abductors have left a Blackberry, which they use to inform him that he is being held for ransom. They don’t seem concerned that he can also call for help, because no one can help him.

Cortés tells Paul’s story in (basically) real time, the 90 minutes or so he’s got until his phone battery, Zippo, and air all run out. So it is the tale of a man trapped, in a seemingly impossible situation, who must keep his wits about him and focus on his own possible survival, slim though his odds may be. The challenge that Cortés places on himself (and on screenwriter Chris Sparling) is borderline masochistic: he stays inside that 2’x7′ box with Conroy for the entirety of the picture. No prologues, no flashbacks, no cutaways, nothing but what is happening right there in that moment, pushed in, pressed up, squished like a vice.

Sparling’s clever screenplay seems to think through every possible action and reaction, and then push two steps ahead; he’s playing three-dimensional chess, and if there are holes in the logic or progression of events, I didn’t see them.  Reynolds, the only face on screen for the entire 90+ minutes, gives an unassuming, matter-of-fact, and ultimately effective performance.