REVIEW: HOW I MET YOUR MOTHER – SEASON 1-9

MAIN CAST
Josh Radnor (Not Another Teen Movie)
Jason Segel (The Muppets)
Cobie Smulders (The Avengers)
Neil Patrick Harris (Dr. Horrible’s-Sing Along Blog)
Alyson Hannigan (American Pie)
Bob Saget (Full House)
RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST STARS
Lyndsy Fonseca (Agent Carter)
David Henrie (Paul BLart: Mall Cop 2)
Marshall Manesh (True Lies)
Joe Nieves (The Bling Ring)
Anne Dudek (Bones)
Charlene Amoia (The Finder)
Samm Levine (Inglourious Basterds)
Jayma Mays (Ugly Betty)
Camryn Manheim (Scary Movie 3)
Martin Starr (Knocked Up)
Bill Fagerbakke (The Artist)
Suzie Plakson (Red Eye)
Danica McKellar (The Wonder Years)
J.P. Manoux (Scary Movie 5)
Ashley Williams (Warehouse 13)
Virginia Williams (Fairly Legal)
Kelly Stables (Two and a Half Men)
Bryan Callen (The Hangover)
Taran Killam (The Heat)
Diane Salinger (Power Rangers Lightspeed Rescue)
Alexis Denisof (Dollhouse)
George Cheung (Dark Angel)
Eric Allan Kramer (The Incredible Hulk Returns)
America Olivo (Bitch Slap)
Nate Torrance (Get Smart)
Amy Acker (Angel)
Premiering in Sept. 2005, created by Carter Bays and Craig Thomas and billed as “a love story in reverse,” How I Met Your Mother turns the “Friends” formula on its head by having one of its main characters, Ted Mosby (voiced by Bob Saget), some 30 years after the modern day events of the show, relaying the twists and turns of said events to his two, often disinterested children (David Henrie and Lyndsy Fonseca). It’s a nifty approach to what would otherwise be well-worn material, although the chemistry of the ensemble cast goes a long way towards smoothing over any feelings of seen-it-before-ness. Joining the modern day Ted Mosby (winningly portrayed by Josh Radnor) are his quartet of New York City-dwelling companions: the goofy couple Lily Aldrin (Alyson Hannigan) and Marshall Eriksen (Jason Segel), former flame Robin Scherbatsky (Cobie Smulders) and the scene-stealing maniac Barney Stinson (Neil Patrick Harris).
How I Met Your Mother wouldn’t be nearly as entertaining as it is without its cast — it’s unquestionably the show’s biggest strength, although some interesting creative choices by Bays and Thomas run a close second; the pilot episode ends with a mildly shocking twist: The woman that Ted has been avidly pursuing for the past 22 minutes is not, in fact, the mother of his children. It throws you off-balance and guarantees that you’ll tune in for ensuing episodes to see exactly how Ted ends up telling stories to two youngsters 30 years hence. It’s a pretty nifty narrative trick and one which ensured the show had longevity
MAIN CAST
Josh Radnor (Not Another Teen Movie)
Jason Segel (The Muppets)
Cobie Smulders (The Avengers)
Neil Patrick Harris (Dr. Horrible’s-Sing Along Blog)
Alyson Hannigan (American Pie)
Bob Saget (Full House)
RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST STARS
Lyndsy Fonseca (Agent Carter)
David Henrie (Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2)
Charlene Amoia (The Finder)
Joe Manganiello (Spider-man)
Joe Nieves (The BLing Ring)
Dawn Olivieri (The Vampire Diaries)
Valerie Azlynn (Julia X)
Bryan Cranston (Godzilla)
Jane Seymour (Wedding Crashers)
Morena Baccarin (Gotham)
Todd Stashwick (The Originals)
Patricia Belcher (Bones)
Kate Micucci (The Big Bang Theory)
Wayne Brady (Everybody Hates Chris)
Cristine Rose (Heroes)
Harry Groener (Buffy: The Vampire Slayer)
Michael Gross (Tremors)
Wayne Knight (3rd Rock From The Sun)
Lucy Hale (Bionic Woman)
Ryan Pinkston (Bad Santa)
John Ducey (Sabrina: The Teenage Witch)
Meredith Scott Lynn (Roswell)
Rachelle Lefevre (Twilight)
Jessica Barth (Ted)
K Callan (Lois & Clark)
Meagen Fay (Agent Carter)
Candice King (The Vampire Diaries)
Scoot McNairy (Monsters)
The second season of How I Met Your Mother continues with a similar tone to the first season. The show follows a couple dramatic storylines that affect the lives of the cast, all the while doing and saying goofy things. Notably, Neil Patrick Harris repeatedly steals the spotlight as the overzealous, egotistical, and downright fun character Barney Stinson.
In the close of the show’s first season, Marshall’s life was turned upside down. Lily was accepted into an art internship. The catch is that it meant spending the summer in San Francisco. Marshall gave Lily an ultimatum, the internship or their relationship. She picked San Francisco. As season two begins, Marshall is approaching relationship rock bottom. Having lost the woman of his dreams, he quickly spirals down a destructive path. While Ted would normally be there for him, he has his own issues to deal with. At the end of season one, Ted realized his feelings for Robin and pursed her (again). In season two, they test out relationship-waters.
As the second season continues, Marshall pines over Lily and the Ted-Robin relationship blooms. The contrast between Marshall and Ted makes for a hearty chuckle, as they are as night and day. Life for Marshall is not all bad. One day he wakes up and understands it is time to move on. He becomes himself again (as much as he can without Lily) and even tries to meet women. These outings are fantastic, with Barney continually stealing the show (and the women!). Then boom! Lily returns from San Francisco and tries to adjust to life without Marshall, which includes getting a dumpy apartment and moving in with Barney. Marshall and Lily eventually get back on track and conclude the season with a wedding.
In the early half of the season, Ted and Robin’s relationship is roses and daffodils. They are getting along great… in fact too great. They start to get pretty serious, which includes saying I love you to each other, although Robin has some difficulty expressing it. The two decide to move in together, which Barney wholeheartedly disapproves of. “Moving Day” is a really silly story; Barney goes out of his way to stop Ted from moving into Robin’s place.
In addition to the second season’s relationship story arcs, there are some plain old fun episodes. “Brunch” is a great story. Ted reveals the details leading up to when he learned about his parent’s divorce. It is a hilarious sequence of events, with the entire cast shining. “Aldrin Justice” is silly episode where Barney tries to tame a wild beast. He uses sex to persuade Marshall’s tough law professor (Jane Seymour) into grading easier. “Single Stamina” is a simply ridiculous. Barney’s gay, black brother James (Wayne Brady) comes to visit. The fun part about this episode is Brady’s performance, as he does a fine job mimicking Barney’s outrageous personality, except he targets men.
The season’s remaining episodes offer a fun compilation of fun storylines . It is hilarious and entertaining material. In the end, How I Met Your Mother’s second season is a solid collection of episodes.
MAIN CAST
Josh Radnor (Not Another Teen Movie)
Jason Segel (The Muppets)
Cobie Smulders (The Avengers)
Neil Patrick Harris (Dr. Horrible’s-Sing Along Blog)
Alyson Hannigan (American Pie)
Bob Saget (Full House)
RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST STARS
Lyndsy Fonseca (Agent Carter)
David Henrie (Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2)
Charlene Amoia (The Finder)
Mandy Moore (Saved)
Enrique Iglesias (Desperado)
Busy Philipps (The Smokers)
Danica McKellar (The WOnder Years)
Christine Woods (FLashforward)
Neil Jackson (Alexander)
Brad Rowe (Shelter)
Abigail Spencer (Cowboys & Aliens)
Betsy Rue (Halloween II)
John Cho (Sleepy Hollow)
Maggie Wheeler (The Parent Trap)
April Bowlby (Two and a Half men)
Lindsay Price (Eastwick)
Stephanie Faracy (Sideways)
Kristen Schaal (The Boss)
Sarah Chalke (Scrubs)
Britney Spears (Crossroads)
Marshall Manesh (True Lies)
April Bowlby (Mom)
Dawn Olivieri (The Vampire Diaries)
Bob Odenkirk (Breaking Bad)
Bryan Callen (The Hangover)
Taran Killam (The Heat)
James Van Der Beek (Dawsons Creek)
Ian Abercrombie (Birds of Prey)
Will Forte (The Lego Movie)
John Getz (The Fly)
Darcy Rose Byrnes (My Name Is Earl)
After a successful first two seasons, How I Met Your Mother dives into new (and old) territory by continuing the story of five New York friends. Season three has a similar tone to past seasons with a great mixture of comedy and drama. The main characters continue to go through the ups and downs of life. Notably, there are stories about the aftermath of the Ted-Robin breakup, Marshall and Lily experience life as newlyweds, Marshall passes the bar and goes to work, Barney learns something about his past and sleeps with a lot of women, and more. It is a very fun season with Neil Patrick Harris continuing to steal the spotlight.

The season opens with “Wait For It…”, which addresses a couple storylines. Towards the end of season two, there were a couple shifts in the romances. Ted and Robin called it splitsville, but remained friends. Robin went on vacation to South America. In season three, Robin comes back with boyfriend Gael (Enrique Iglesias). The introduction of Gael causes complications for Ted, Robin, and the rest of the gang. As the season continues, Ted slowly gets his life back together and the idea of Robin not being an important part of his life. The other key development from the season premiere dealt with Marshall and Lily. They got married at the end of season two and are now a happy couple that still shares an apartment with Ted. As the season progresses, they consider new living situations, which include a crooked house. Included in this development, Marshall passes the New York bar and gets a job as a real life lawyer. His dream job is complicated by the decision of saving the environment or providing for his family. Lily has a surprise in store for him that makes the decision easy. John Cho guest stars as one of Marshall’s boss.

 

The season has many other big developments. Barney gets a case of “The Yips”, where he loses his confidence with women. Barney learns that his first time with cougar Rhonda was not as good as he was led to believe. Afterwards, he doubts his ability to please women. Ted joins him on a few escapades, which include acting as tourists, a wild St. Patrick’s Day, and more. Ted also embarks on a relationship with Stella (Sarah Chalke), which gets pretty serious. Robin dates an old flame played by an overweight James Van Der Beek.

Overall, season three is exciting, hilarious, and just all around fun. There are a lot of dramatic developments that are supplemented with lots of great laughs. Fans of the show will not be disappointed.

MAIN CAST
Josh Radnor (Not Another Teen Movie)
Jason Segel (The Muppets)
Cobie Smulders (The Avengers)
Neil Patrick Harris (Dr. Horrible’s-Sing Along Blog)
Alyson Hannigan (American Pie)
Bob Saget (Full House)
RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST STARS
Lyndsy Fonseca (Agent Carter)
David Henrie (Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2)
Charlene Amoia (The Finder)
Sarah Chalke (Scrubs)
Darcy Rose Byrnes (Desperate Housewives)
Virginia Williams (Fairly Legal)
Bryan Callen (The Hangover)
Courtney Ford (The Big Bang Theory)
Candace Moon (Shredder)
Will Sasso (Anger Management)
Khary Payton (Teen Titans)
Erin Cahill (Power Rangers Time Force)
Amy Gumenick (Arrow)
Joe Nieves (The Bling Ring)
Jordan Masterson (That 70s Show)
Marshall Manesh (True Lies)
Frances Conroy (Six Feet Under)
Brooke D’Orsay (Two and a Half Men)
Laura Prepon (Karla)
Danny Glover (Earthsea)
Rebecca Budig (Batman Forever)
Kevin Michael Richardson (The Cleveland Show)
Dan Castellaneta (The Simpsons)
Ron Roggé (Power Rangers Lightspeed Rescue)
The Ted-Robyn relationship provided much of the ongoing story arc for the first three seasons; In season Three  Ted embarked on a romance with Stella (guest star–and Scrubs regular–Sarah Chalke) that provides that year with a cliffhanger–will she accept Ted’s marriage proposal? Well, spoiler alert, she does. But this stroke of happiness for our Ted is short-lived; their rushed wedding, in episode five, ends with Stella leaving Ted at the altar following a reconciliation with her ex. Bruised and a little battered, Ted spends the remainder of the season mostly playing the field; this year’s will-they-or-won’t-they involves not Robin and Ted, but Robin and Barney, who slept together at the end of season three, leading to–shockingly and alarmingly–a genuine flush of romantic feelings by the notorious womanizer.
By this point in its run, How I Met Your Mother has settled into a comfortable routine, and I mean that in a good way; the show is in the character-comedy mold of Seinfeld and Friends (its two clearest influences), and like those shows, the situations get funnier, the more familiar we are with the characters. The series’ ingenious structure and inventive narrative tricks also continue to entertain; the hopscotching timelines of the “Three Days of Snow” and “The Front Porch” episodes are outstanding, while the clever flashbacks of “Sorry, Bro” build to some big laughs. Other standout episodes include “I Heart NJ,” which perfectly encapsulates the love/hate relationship between island-dwelling New Yorkers and commuters from the Garden State; “The Best Burger in New York,” a fine portrait of New York foodie-ism (and how to best utilize a Regis Philbin guest shot); and “The Stinsons,” which reveals one of Barney’s more peculiar secrets.
But the season’s finest episode, without question, is “Murtaugh,” centered on Ted’s “Murtaugh List”–i.e., a list of things that would fall under Danny Glover’s Lethal Weapon catchphrase, “I’m getting too old for this shit” (the replacement of “shit” with “stuff” in the story that aged Ted is telling his children is a particularly nice touch). It’s a funny idea (and dovetails nicely with the season-long running theme of aging; there’s 30th birthdays all around this season), well-developed, and the episode’s B-plot includes an homage to Teen Wolf, so what else could you ask for? Radnor and Smulders, continue to develop into engaging, charismatic comic actors. Hannigan and Segal’s chemistry remains one of the show’s biggest assets. But Harris’ Barney Stinson remains the show’s comic gold mine, and the skilled thespian uses the season-long Robin crush to lend some additional pathos to the character. His desperation reaches a fever pitch in the wonderful “Benefits” episode, in which new roommates Ted and Robin end up sleeping together to end domestic arguments, leading jealous Barney to start dropping by with groceries and pitching in on household chores–all the better to keep tempers smooth and to keep the “friends” out of each other’s pants.
How I Met Your Mother remains one of the most consistently, reliably funny series on network television. Season four finds the show continuing in fine form, taking its characters in interesting new directions and providing its talented cast with a prime showcase for their crackerjack comic skills.
MAIN CAST
Josh Radnor (Not Another Teen Movie)
Jason Segel (The Muppets)
Cobie Smulders (The Avengers)
Neil Patrick Harris (Dr. Horrible’s-Sing Along Blog)
Alyson Hannigan (American Pie)
Bob Saget (Full House)
RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST STARS
Lyndsy Fonseca (Agent Carter)
David Henrie (Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2)
Charlene Amoia (The Finder)
Joe Manganiello (Spider-Man)
Lindsay Sloane (Sabrina: The Teenage Witch)
Olga Fonda (The Vampire Diaries)
Marshall Manesh (True Lies)
April Bowlby (Two and a Half Men)
Matt Jones (Mom)
Eva Amurri Martino (Saved)
Sarah Wright (The House Bunny)
Chris Elliott (Kingpin)
Suzie Plakson (Red Eyes)
Bill Fagerbakke (The Artist)
JoAnna Garcia Swisher (The Internship)
Matthew Moy (2 Broke Girls)
Bob Odenkirk (Breaking Bad)
Harvey Fierstein (Kull)
Rachel Bilson (Jumpe)
Amanda Peet (Identity Thief)
Taran Killam (12 Years a Slave)
Larry Poindexter (Blade: The Series)
Carrie Underwood (Soul Surfer)
Matt Frewer (Taken)
Laura Prepon (That 70s Show)
Anne Dudek (Bones)
Cristine Rose (Heroes)
Harry Groener (Buffy: The Vampire Slayer)
Gary Anthony Williams (Mike & Molly)
Michael York (Logans Run)
Arianna Huffington (The Cleveland Show)
Malin Akerman (Watchmen)
Judy Greer (Jurassic World)
Chris Kattan (Undercover Brother)
Ted begins his job as a professor of architecture, standing in the middle of a classroom – although the mother was present, it turns out to be an economics class as he’s in the wrong lecture hall. Barney and Robin have had a sexual relationship throughout the summer and Lily locks them in a room, forcing them to come to terms with their relationship. After a rough patch they decide to break up. Robin describes it instead as “two friends getting back together.” Barney immediately goes back to his old ways, using the playbook to score with women. Throughout the season Barney and Robin show feelings of regret over their break-up.
Ted dates a graduate student named Cindy (Rachel Bilson) and it is revealed her roommate is his future wife. Robin meets Don Frank (Benjamin Koldyke), her new co-anchor on her 4 AM TV show. Though she initially dislikes him, the two start dating and eventually she moves in with him. At the end of the season they break up when Don takes a job in Chicago — a job which Robin had previously turned down to stay in New York with Don. Marshall uses his fourth slap on Barney, once again at Thanksgiving. Ted buys a house, which needs to be fixed up badly, but is later revealed to be the future home for Ted and his children.
Lily and Marshall are still unsure about having children. After watching four doppelgangers of their group (Lesbian Robin, Moustache Marshall, Stripper Lily and Mexican Wrestler Ted) they decide to leave the big decision to the universe’s “infinite wisdom” and start trying when they have seen Barney’s Doppelganger. In the season finale, Barney disguises himself to have sex with a girl from every country in the world, and Lily and Marshall mistake him for the final doppelganger. When Marshall finds out, he decides not to tell Lily, fearing she will want to wait even longer to have children. Lily eventually finds out and decides to wait. In the season finale, Lily thinks she sees Barney’s doppelganger as a hot dog vendor, which causes the group to realize she is seeing what she wants to see, and play along. Eventually Barney agrees having babies is not a stupid idea and Lily and Marshall should go forth. The season ends with Lily asking Marshall to “put a baby in my belly”.
Another great season which leaves you wanting to fin out what happens next in season 6.
MAIN CAST
Josh Radnor (Not Another Teen Movie)
Jason Segel (The Muppets)
Cobie Smulders (The Avengers)
Neil Patrick Harris (Dr. Horrible’s-Sing Along Blog)
Alyson Hannigan (American Pie)
Bob Saget (Full House)
RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST STARS
Lyndsy Fonseca (Agent Carter)
David Henrie (Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2)
Charlene Amoia (The Finder)
Rachel Bilson (Jumper)
Frances Conroy (Six Feet Unde)
Wayne Brady (Baby Daddy)
David H. Lawrence XVII (Heroes)
Geoff Stults (The Finder)
Laura Bell Bundy (Anger Management)
Marshall Manesh (True Lies)
Bill Fagerbakke (The Artist)
Suzie Plakson (Red Eye)
Virginia Williams (One Life To Live)
Mikaela Hoover (Super)
Jennifer Morrison (Urban Legends: Final Cut)
Will Forte (MacGruber)
Bob Odenkirk (Breaking Bad)
Kyle MacLachlan (Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.)
Nicole Scherzinger (Men in Black 3)
Joe Nieves (The Blking Ring)
Jorge Garcia (Lost)
Alexis Denisof (Dollhouse)
Bill Suplee (Love or War)
Chris Elliott (Scary Movie 2)
Michael Gross (Tremors)
Ray Wise (Robocop)
Katy Perry (The Smurfs)
Suzy Nakamura (Dodgeball)
Robbie Amell (The Flash)
John Lithgow (3rd Rock From The Sun)
Nancy Travis (Last Man Standing)
Michael Trucco (Battlestar Galactica)
Cristine Rose (Heroes)
Chi McBride (Human Target)
In the season opening, Ted sees Cindy again with a girl who he thinks to be her roommate, but she turns out to be Cindy’s girlfriend whom she later marries. After prodding by Barney, Ted is eventually hired by GNB once more as the architect of the bank’s new headquarters, which was originally scrapped in Season 4. However, he encounters opposition when he meets Zoey Pierson (Jennifer Morrison), a woman who is protesting against GNB for selecting a decrepit hotel, the Arcadian, to be torn down for the headquarters. Over the season, Ted’s encounters with Zoey eventually blossom into a relationship after she divorces her rich husband, the Captain (Kyle MacLachlan), but they break up as he puts his career and friends over love, leading to the Arcadian’s demolition. Ted also resolves not to get back with Zoey.
Having agreed to conceive a baby at the end of the previous season, Lily and Marshall keep having sex, hoping she will get pregnant. Around Christmas, they have a false alarm and later seek fertility testing. The fertility specialist, Dr. Stangel, turns out to be Barney’s doppelgänger, fulfilling their promise with the universe in regard to their decision to have a child. However, tragedy strikes when Marshall’s father passes away, leaving him devastated and the gang comforting him. Marshall tries to get over his father’s death and live again. Despite a pledge to Lily to work harder for their future, Marshall resigns from GNB and follows his dream of being an environmental lawyer. Zoey also hires him as her lawyer in what became a futile battle to save the Arcadian. At the end of the season, Lily reveals that she is pregnant.
Barney finally admits to the gang that Bob Barker is not his real father, especially when his mother decides to sell the house he grew up in and his brother, James, meets his own father. Loretta offers the identity of Barney’s father on a sheet of paper, but Barney tears this up after realizing her efforts as a single mother. At the funeral of Marshall’s father, Barney tells Loretta that he wants to see his father at last. The man, Jerry Whittaker (John Lithgow), is eventually revealed to be someone whom Barney thought was his uncle. Barney, who remembers Jerry as a fun-loving man, is disappointed after learning how Jerry has grown out of his free-wheeling ways. Although he tries to bring back Jerry’s old behaviors, Barney admits that he wants to settle down someday. He is also introduced to Nora (Nazanin Boniadi), a co-worker of Robin, for whom he develops feelings. After an initial falling out, the two reconcile at the end of the season after Barney asks her for coffee.
Robin continues to work at her talk show, Come On, Get Up, New York!, but the presence of a new hyperactive co-host forces her to leave. She is accepted as a researcher in another network, World Wide News. The gang also discovers more of her past as the Canadian pop star Robin Sparkles. Robin also encounters a man (Michael Trucco) she has had a secret crush on since first seeing him when she and Ted were dating, and Future Ted hints that they will see more of him later.
Short scenes during the season premiere and finale feature a wedding set sometime in the future, where Ted will meet his future wife. In the final scene of the season, the groom is revealed to be Barney.
A great new story Arc for the season, all the cast are still on top form and shows you why its a top notch comedy.
MAIN CAST
Josh Radnor (Not Another Teen Movie)
Jason Segel (The Muppets)
Cobie Smulders (The Avengers)
Neil Patrick Harris (Dr. Horrible’s-Sing Along Blog)
Alyson Hannigan (American Pie)
Bob Saget (Full House)
RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST STARS
Lyndsy Fonseca (Agent Carter)
David Henrie (Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2)
Charlene Amoia (The Finder)
Joe Nieves (The Bling Ring)
Ashley Williams (Margin Call)
Martin Short (Mars Attacks)
Kal Penn (Superman Returns)
Jimmi Simpson (Westworld)
Alexis Denisof (Dollhouse)
Vicki Lewis (Finding Nemo)
Katherine Von Till (Timer)
Jay Acovone (Beauty and The Beast 1989)
Ray Wise (Robocop)
Chris Elliott (Kingpin)
‘Weird Al’ Yankovic (Batman vs Robin)
Frances Conroy (Six Feet Under)
Bill Fagerbakke (The Artist)
Wayne Brady (Stargate Sg.1)
Cristine Rose (Heroes)
Katie Holmes (Batman Begins)
Christina Pickles (Masters of The Universe)
Jacob Witkin (Evil Bong)
Ernie Hudson (Ghostbusters)
Danielle Weeks (Buffy: The Vampire Slayer)
Chasty Ballesteros (Final Destination 5)
David H. Lawrence XVII (Heroes)
Rebecca Creskoff (Bates Motel)
Becki Newton (Ugly Betty)
Ellen D. Williams (Salesgirl)
Marshall Manesh (True Lies)
K Callan (Lois & CLark)
Season seven opens with another flash forward, in which Ted is helping Barney get ready for his wedding to a still unknown bride. In the present, Marshall gets a job in environmental law while Lily progresses with her pregnancy. Barney proves to Nora that he can be a good boyfriend to her, while Robin is revealed to still have feelings for Barney. Robin meets a therapist Kevin (Kal Penn) and they start to date. Meanwhile, after a period of unemployment since leaving GNB, Marshall finally manages to land his dream job at a top environmental law firm. After losing a bet, Barney is forced to wear a tie with a duck pattern on it (nicknamed the ‘Ducky Tie’) which he hates. Marshall allows him to take it off when meeting Nora’s parents on the condition that Barney has three slaps added to the one still remaining from the Slap Bet. Marshall uses two slaps immediately, leaving two left.
While reminiscing about Hurricane Irene, Lily and Marshall reveal they conceived their baby in Barney’s apartment, and Barney and Robin end up sleeping together. Barney and Robin decide to break up with their partners, but Robin reneges on the deal, returning to Kevin and leaving Barney alone and heartbroken. Robin has a pregnancy scare at Thanksgiving and tells Barney the child is his, since she and Kevin had not yet slept together. However, Robin’s doctor informs her that she cannot have children at all. Kevin, who wants children, proposes to Robin who decides that the pair must break up. Ted comforts Robin and reveals he still loves her, but the gesture is unrequited.
Marshall and Lily decide they want to move to Long Island, after Lily’s paternal grandparents offer them their house there. Eventually, they move back to the old apartment in New York City after realizing suburban life is not for them. Ted gives them his apartment because he believes he cannot move on from Robin while living there, while he and Robin become estranged and do not speak for several weeks. Robin is eventually offered a news anchor job and subsequently achieves recognition after preventing a helicopter she is flying in from crashing.
Barney starts dating a stripper named Quinn, to the group’s initial apprehension. The gang begins to meddle in their relationship, but Barney and Quinn outsmart their attempts and win their approval. Quinn moves in with Barney, while Ted buys Quinn’s old apartment. Lily goes into labor and frantically calls Barney and Marshall, who are out at a casino. After many attempts to escape, Barney helps Marshall arrive in time for Lily’s delivery and chooses the middle name for the baby, Marvin Waitforit Eriksen. Ted and Robin’s friendship also recovers as a result of Marvin’s birth. As the season concludes, Marshall and Lily begin their new family with their baby, Barney proposes to Quinn, and Ted contacts his old girlfriend Victoria. Unhappy with
Another highly enjoyable season with two more seasons to go it’s nice to see the show coming to an endgame.
MAIN CAST
Josh Radnor (Not Another Teen Movie)
Jason Segel (The Muppets)
Cobie Smulders (The Avengers)
Neil Patrick Harris (Dr. Horrible’s-Sing Along Blog)
Alyson Hannigan (American Pie)
Bob Saget (Full House)
RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST STARS
Lyndsy Fonseca (Agent Carter)
David Henrie (Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2)
Joe Nieves (The Bling Ring)
Becki Newton (Ugly Betty)
Ashley Williams (Magin Call)
Michael Trucco (Wishmaster 4)
Bob Odenkirk (Breaking Bad)
Suzie Plakson(Red Eye)
Chris Elliott (Scary Movie 2)
Joe Lo Truglio (Superbad)
Chelan Simmons (Final Destination 3)
Ellen D. William (Salesgirl)
Seth Green (Idle Hands)
Peter Gallagher (American Beauty)
Marshall Manesh (True Lies)
Rachel Bilson (Jumper)
Ashley Benson (Pretty Little Liars)
James Van Der Beek (Dawsons Creek)
Abby Elliott (2 Broke Girls)
Kyle MacLachlan (Dune)
Laura Bell Bundy (Anger Management)
Jayma Mays (Ugly Betty)
Ralph Macchio (The Karate Kid)
Cristin Milioti (The Wolf of Wall Street)
Ted visits Robin on the day of her wedding to Barney, causing him to remember how he and Victoria ran away from her wedding to be together. The summer is spent with Ted, Barney and Robin enjoying their current relationships however all subsequently break up with their partners. Victoria splits up with Ted over his friendship with Robin, Barney and Quinn break up due to their inability to trust each other and Robin breaks up with Nick realizing his immaturity. Robin and Barney kiss but decide not to get together, despite Barney’s wishes. Barney then begins dating Robin’s hated co-worker Patrice (Ellen D. Williams), a relationship later exposed as a ruse to make Robin realize her true feelings for him. In a culminating scene Barney proposes to Robin, who says yes.
Marshall and Lily attempt to get used to being parents, which causes a brief estrangement from the gang as Baby Marvin takes up the majority of their time. Lily’s father Mickey becomes Marvin’s nanny, freeing the two up to spend more time with their friends. The Captain, ex-husband of Ted’s old girlfriend Zoey, offers Lily a job as an art consultant due to her identifying a painting that made a huge profit for him. Lily accepts, happy to finally achieve her dream of having a job in the art industry while Marshall decides to apply to become a judge. The Captain offers Lily a year’s work in Rome, which she accepts with Marshall’s blessing. However, just before Barney and Robin’s wedding, Marshall is informed that his application to become a judge has been granted, a development that would require them to stay in the US.
Ted briefly dates Jeanette (Abby Elliott), a girl who stalked him after he appeared on the cover of New York Magazine due to his design of GNB headquarters. He quickly realizes he’s made a mistake and breaks up with her. Ted’s feelings of loneliness grow, especially as he is now the only single member of the group, and he decides he is truly ready to settle down. He argues with Lily over hiring a DJ or a band for Barney and Robin’s wedding, but is forced to provide a band at short notice when Lily concedes the argument. During a chance meeting on the subway, Cindy offers the services of her roommate’s wedding band; said roommate is Ted’s future wife.
As the week of the wedding approaches, Robin has doubts about marrying Barney and shares an emotional moment with Ted. Guilty, Ted realizes he can’t be around Barney and Robin after they’re married and decides to move to Chicago the day after the wedding. The season concludes with everyone travelling to Barney and Robin’s wedding, including the mother of Ted’s children (revealed on screen for the first time and portrayed by Cristin Milioti), who is seen buying a train ticket to the venue and holding her yellow umbrella.
The Second to last season brings us closer to the endgame and the big reveal of the Mother is the biggest of all the revelations.
MAIN CAST
Josh Radnor (Not Another Teen Movie)
Jason Segel (The Muppets)
Cobie Smulders (The Avengers)
Neil Patrick Harris (Dr. Horrible’s-Sing Along Blog)
Alyson Hannigan (American Pie)
Cristin Milioti (The Wolf of Wall Street)
Bob Saget (Full House)
RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST STARS
Lyndsy Fonseca (Agent Carter)
David Henrie (Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2)
Sherri Shepherd (Precious)
Wayne Brady (Stargate Sg.1)
Suzie Plakson (Red Eye)
Marshall Manesh (True Lies)
Robert Belushi (Valentines Day)
Ellen D. Williams (Salesgirl)
Frances Conroy (Six feet Under)
Virginia Williams (One Life To Live)
Katie Holmes (Batman Begins)
Edward Herrmann (The Lost Boys)
Harry Groener (Buffy)
Cristine Rose (Heroes)
Bryan Cranston (Breaking Bad)
John Lithgow (3rd Rock From The Sun)
James Van Der Beek (Dawsons Creek)
April Bowlby (Mom)
Eva Amurri Martino (Saved)
Rachel Bilson (Jumper)
Sarah Chalke (Scrubs)
Abby Elliott (2 Broke Girls)
Bill Fagerbakke (The Artist)
Ray Wise (Robocop)
Lucy Hale (Bionic Woman)
Jon Heder (Blades of Glory)
Tracey Ullman (Into The Woods)
Chris Elliott (Scary Movie 2)
Kyle MacLachlan (Dune)
Laura Bell Bundy (Anger Management)
Jennifer Morrison (Urban Legends 2)
Alexis Denisof (Dollhouse)
Abigail Spencer (Cowboys & Aliens)
With the exception of the very last episode, the entirety of season nine takes place in the 56 hours leading up to Barney and Robin’s wedding.
Marshall, who is stuck in Minnesota, desperately tries to find a way to get to the wedding in time. Meanwhile, in Farhampton, the time is slowly counting down to the wedding, with a new problem arising in almost every episode. It is revealed that Lily is pregnant and that she and Marshall will have a daughter. It was also revealed that Ted’s children are named Penny and Luke. In addition, the 200th episode detailed the Mother’s eight years before meeting Ted, while later episodes gave viewers a glimpse of Ted and the Mother together in flash forward scenes.
In the series finale, it was revealed that after three years of marriage, Barney and Robin decide to divorce. Barney ends up fathering a child conceived through a one-night stand. Marshall eventually becomes a judge, and he and Lily have three children. Ted’s wife, Tracy, dies of illness in 2024, six years prior to Ted telling his children the full story of how they met. Upon finishing the story, at the urging of his kids, Ted decides to ask Robin out. Alluding to the first season, the finale ends with Robin looking out her apartment window to see Ted on the street holding the blue French horn.
Season 9 may have a controversial ending but it’s nice to see a show have a proper ending with so many shows ending early they often fail to finish. How I Met You Mother proved it could stay the distance and the ending will be talked about for years to come.
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REVIEW: EPIC MOVIE

CAST
Kal Penn (Superman Returns)
Adam Campbell (Date Movie)
Jennifer Coolidge (2 broke Girls)
Jayma Mays (Ugly Betty)
Crispin Glover (Alice In Wonderland)
Tony Cox (Bad Santa)
Carmen Electra (Scary Movie)
Fred Willard (Lois & Clark)
David Carradine (Kill Bill)
Kevin McDonald (That 70s Show)
Crista Flanagan (Disaster Movie)
Tad Hilgenbrink (American Pie: Band Camp)
Taran Killam (Ted 2)
Kevin Hart (Central Intelligence)
Lucy (Jayma Mays) finds that her adoptive father (David Carradine), a museum curator, has been attacked by Silas (Kevin Hart). Before dying, he gives clues which lead her to a “Golden Ticket” in a vending machine candy bar. Edward (Kal Penn) is training at a Mexican monastery to be a monk. Ignacio (Jareb Dauplaise) becomes enraged at Edward’s displeasure at the living conditions and has him beaten and thrown out the window. On the way Edward grabs a Monk’s “Golden Ticket”. Next, the film introduces Susan (Faune Chambers). She is going to Namibia to meet her new adoptive parents. While she orders water, snakes come out and hijack the plane. Samuel L. Jackson (James Walker, Sr.) pops up and starts repeatedly saying “I have had it with these goddamn snakes on this goddamn plane!” and he throws Susan out of the plane. Susan accidentally falls on Paris Hilton and finds her “Golden Ticket” in Paris’ purse. Then the film introduces Peter (Adam Campbell), a mutant, a student at Mutant Academy, who is often teased for his chicken-like wings. One day he asks Mystique (Carmen Electra) to come with him to the homecoming dance, but he ends up bullied by Mystique’s jealous boyfriend, Wolverine (Vince Vieluf), and the Headmaster, Magneto (Jim Piddock). As Magneto wills a locker door to open and knock Peter to the ground, another student’s “Golden Ticket” falls onto Peter’s chest.
All four meet up at Willy’s Chocolate Factory. Willy (Crispin Glover) reveals his diabolical secret: he plans to use them all as the ‘special ingredient’ in the treats (which is actual human parts). In an effort to hide from the maniacal Willy, Lucy soon finds a wardrobe. On the other side, in the middle of a wintry forest, she finds Mr. Tumnus (Hector Jimenez). He welcomes Lucy to Gnarnia. Feeling a burst of compassion, he manages to warn Lucy of the danger she is in. Edward follows Lucy to Gnarnia and meets the White Bitch (Jennifer Coolidge). She convinces him to trap the other orphans and he can be the king of Gnarnia in her White Castle. All four main characters make their way to Mr. Tumnus’ house, where the orphans discover that they are all related to one another, and that the White Bitch killed their parents. They ally themselves with Harry Beaver (Katt Williams), Tumnus’ life partner. While this is occurring, Peter becomes Superman, but in the dream he gets shot in the eye and causing him to falls off the building, only to find out it is a nightmare. Edward sneaks off to the White Bitch’s castle, despite realizing she intends evil. Edward refuses to tell the White Bitch where his friends are, so she flashes him her breasts, hypnotizing him into giving up the information on the orphans; he is then imprisoned. The White Bitch sends Silas after the trio; Tumnus sacrifices himself to ensure their safety.
They end up meeting a graying Harry Potter (Kevin McDonald), along with a balding Ron Weasley (George Alvarez), and a pregnant Hermione Granger (Crista Flanagan) at Hogwarts, and other characters from famous movies. They all help Lucy, Susan, and Peter train for the war against the White Bitch. It’s soon revealed she plans to create a new continent for her followers via a magic crystal; she acknowledges this is the same plot as Superman Returns. Edward escapes with the assistance of Captain Jack Swallows (Darrell Hammond), only to find out later that it was a ruse as the Captain, the Bitch’s old enemy, needs intelligence out of Edward. Jack is then stabbed by the White Bitch as the crystal is thrown in the ocean and grows, putting the witch’s plan in motion.
Upon finishing their training, Lucy, Susan, and Peter head to the camp of Aslo (Fred Willard). Aslo agrees to help Edward, and he manages to kill Silas, but while breaking Edward out, Aslo is slain by the White Bitch. Despite this, the ungrateful orphans have a pre-battle party, during which Peter and Mystique (who, along with the others who bullied Peter, had come to help the trio) get in bed where Mystique asks what he would like her to be and Peter asks for big hooters and a ghetto booty which he says is a lot of junk in the trunk which she replies kinky. He then asks for badonkadonk, but then changes his mind for a mono-brow. He finally asks for big flabby grandma arms which disgusts her and he yells bingo wings like a fat blue Brittney Spears and then says come here and they have sex. Susan gets drunk and vomits everywhere; this so disgusts their new army that nobody shows up to help the orphans the next day. Despite the presence of a revenge-craving Jack on a giant wooden wheel, the four siblings are easily dispatched by the enemy. Peter is about to be slain when he finds the remote from Click using the device’s reality altering powers to save his siblings; they kill the army and erase the White Bitch’s plot. Although the others attempt to kill her while frozen, Peter declares the White Bitch will receive a fair and just trial in the new Narnia as it will be under a democracy. However, before it can be done, Jack’s wheel accidentally crushes her. The four are crowned the new rulers of the land: Peter the Heroic; Susan the Just; Edward the Loyal; and Lucy the Dumb-shit. Tumnus then shows up, having survived his battle with Silas. Decades later, the four now elderly rulers find the wardrobe again. They appear moments after they had left, now young again. They meet Borat (Danny Jacobs), who congratulates them on a happy ending but, then, the four are accidentally run over by Jack’s wheel. Borat is mad with himself for saying it was a happy ending, so he slaps his butt, ending the film.
Extended version
The unrated, longer version (released in the United Kingdom as the “Rude & Crude Unseen Version”) of the film features some scenes not shown in the theatrical version. In the last scene, Willy Wonka, instead of Borat, comes in and says: “I told you it was going to be an epic adventure.” Willy Wonka then goes in the wardrobe and puts out a “do not disturb” sign that refers to the girl in the wardrobe. The Oompa-Loompas come in and start singing the Willy Wonka theme song. The four are then crushed by the wheel. Also, during the scene where Lucy is crushed under the junk that falls out of the “Narnia” closet, the girl who runs out is nude, as opposed to wearing a bikini. In the Snakes on a Plane scene, when the Samuel L. Jackson lookalike yells, he replaces “goddamn” with “motherfuckin'”. In the sex scene with mystique, Peter follows big hooters with the words silver dollar nipples.
The jokes were funny but the plot was a little weird. You have to be knowledgeable about recent movies to get the jokes though because this is a spoof. All in all, it was hilarious. Crispin Glover is excellent here spoofing Willa Wonka. This movie got a lot of bad reviews because eople are being too critical and uptight about it

31 DAYS OF HORROR REVIEW: SON OF THE MASK

CAST

Jamie Kennedy (Scream)
Alan Cumming (Tin Man)
Traylor Howard (Two Guys & A Girl)
Kal Penn (Superman Returns)
Steven Wright (Resevoir Dogs)
Bob Hoskins (Hollywoodlamd)

A decade after the events of the first film, Dr. Arthur Neuman is giving a tour of the hall of Norse mythology in Edge City Museum. When Dr. Neuman reaches the part concerning Loki’s mask, a man in black becomes increasingly anxious. Dr. Neuman mentions that Loki created the mask and unleashed it on Earth, and that those who wear the mask would have the powers of Loki. When Dr. Neuman mentions that Odin punished Loki with imprisonment, the stranger becomes very angry and transforms, revealing himself to be Loki. The tourists panic and flee, but Dr. Neuman stays to argue with the angry god. Loki takes the mask, but realizes it is a fake. In anger, he removes Dr. Neuman’s still talking face from his body and puts it on the mask stand, before getting rid of the guards and storming out of the museum in a whirlwind of rage.
Meanwhile, the real mask, which was thrown in the river by Stanley Ipkiss and Tina Carlyle at the end of the previous film, makes its way to a town called Fringe City, not far from Edge City, and is found by a dog named Otis – who belongs to Tim Avery, an aspiring cartoonist at an animation company, is feeling reluctant to become a father. He has a beautiful wife, Tonya, and a best friend, Jorge. On a tropical island, Loki is relaxing until Odin confronts him and orders his son to find the mask. Loki asks Odin to help him, but Odin tells Loki that this is his mess and he has to clean it up. Later that night, Tim puts on the mask for a Halloween party, transforming into a party animal similar to the mask character from the first film. Tim notices Jorge’s crush, Sylvia, standing alone in the back, eagerly confronts her and has her stripped out of her costume and into a skimpy red suit. Sylvia falls into Jorge’s arms, which pleases them both. When the company party turns out to be a bore, Tim uses his mask powers to perform a remix of “Can’t Take My Eyes Off You”, making the party a success, and giving Tim’s boss the idea for a new cartoon, resulting in his promotion the next day.

Tim returns to his house and, while still wearing the mask, conceives a baby. The baby, when he is born, has the same powers as Loki. Meanwhile, Loki is trying to find the child born from the mask, as his father Odin, possessing a store clerk, tells him if he finds the child, he will find the mask. Later, Tonya goes on a business trip, leaving Tim with the baby. Tim, who has been promoted at work, desperately tries to work on his cartoon at home, but is continuously disrupted by baby Alvey. In order to get some peace and quiet, Tim lets Alvey watch TV, which shows Michigan J. Frog. Alvey devilishly obtains the idea to mess with his father’s head by using his mask powers. Meanwhile, Otis the dog, who has been feeling neglected by Tim because of Alvey, dons the mask by accident and becomes a crazed animal version of himself, who wishes to get rid of the baby, but all his attempts are overturned by Alvey. Tim starts to notice his son and dog’s wild cartoonish behavior when Alvey starts harassing him.

Eventually, Loki finds the mask-born baby, and confronts Tim for the mask back, but is thwarted again and again by Alvey who uses his powers to protect his father. Eventually, Odin becomes fed up with Loki’s destructive approach and strips his son of his powers. A seemingly-deranged Tim is later fired after failing to impress his boss during a pitch, but is able to reconcile and bond with Alvey. Loki, still determined to please his father, manages to complete a summoning ritual and appeal to Odin to restore his powers. Odin agrees, but only for a limited time, stating this as “your final chance”. Loki then kidnaps Alvey to exchange for the mask, but decides to keep him despite the exchange, forcing Tim to don the mask again to fight Loki. The subsequent confrontation is relatively evenly matched due to Loki and Tim-in-the-Mask possessing equal powers, prompting Loki to halt the fight, and suggest that they let Alvey decide who he wants to live with. Although Loki tries to lure Alvey to him with toys and promises of fun, Tim wins when he removes the mask and asks Alvey to come back to him using the human connection he has forged with his son. Saddened and enraged, Loki tries to kill Tim, but his time runs out and Odin appears in person. Odin disowns Loki, calling him a failure, and begins to banish Loki, but Tim confronts the powerful Norse god and tells him that the most important thing in life is a relationship with your family, and Odin accepts Loki as a son, accepting the mask from Tim as well. Tim’s cartoon, based on his own experiences of a boy and a dog competing for the father’s attention (with Jorge playing the father via motion capture performance), is a hit, and Tonya reveals that she is pregnant again before the film closes.

Nowhere near a scratch on the surface of the original Mask film but is still family fun. Isn’t a complete waste of money you can still enjoy the film for some of its comic worth’s but in all honesty the film should never have been made.

REVIEW:TRU CALLING – SEASON 1 & 2

MAIN CAST

Eliza Dushku (Wrong Turn)
Shawn Reaves (Shadowheart)
Zach Galifianakis (The Hangover)
A.J. Cook (Final Destination 2)
Jessica Collins (Lois & Clark)
Benjamin Benitez (True Detective)
Jason Priestley (Beverly Hills, 90210)

Image result for tru calling
RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Matthew Bomer (Chuck)
Kristopher Polaha (Ringer)
Hudson Leick (Xena)
Heath Freeman (Bones)
John Newton (Superboy)
Callum Rennie (Flashforward)
Michael Trucco (Battlestar Galactica)
Missy Peregrym (Heroes)
Cobie Smulders (How I Met YOur Mother)
Joe Flanigan (Stargate: Atlantis)
Leonard Roberts (Smallville)
Kal Penn (Van Wilder)
Alaina Huffman (Stargate Universe)
Brendan Fletcher (News Movie)
Evangeline Lilly (Lost)
Ryan Kwanten (True Blood)
Mary Elizabeth Winstead (10 Cloverfield Lane)
Garwin Sanford (Stargate SG.1)
Chris William Martin (The Vampire Diaries)
Christina Hendricks (Mad Men)
Emily Holmes (Dark Angel)
Jodi Lyn O’Keefe (The Vampire Diaries)
Jennifer Spence (Stargate Universe)
Devon Gummersall (Roswell)
Sarah Deakins (Andromeda)
Clare Kramer (Buffy)
Alexandra Holden (The Hot Chick)
Michelle Harrison (The Flash)
Erica Durance (Smallville)
Rachel Hayward (Jingle All The Way 2)
Cotter Smith (Alias)
Wade Williams (Gangster Squad)
Jeffrey Dean Morgan (Watchmen)
Agam Darshi (Sanctuary)
Alec Newman (Dune)
Jesse Moss (Ginger Snaps)
Derek Hamilton (Disturbing Behavior)
Nick Wechsler (Roswell)
Daivd Lipper (Full house)
John Reardon (The Killing)
Carly Pope (Arrow)
Liz Vassey (Two and a Half Men)
Eric Christian Olsen (Not Another Teen Movie)
Lizzy Caplan (Cloverfield)
Parry Shen (Hatchet)
Erick Avari (Stargate)
Dominic Zamprogna (Odyssey 5)
Maggie Lawson (Two and a Half Men)
William Sadler (Iron Man 3)

Image result for tru callingAfter the grant sponsoring her internship loses funding, an aspiring medical student (Tru Davies) takes a job at the local morgue. On her first day of work, incidentally the 10th anniversary of her mother’s death, one of the bodies from the crypt springs to life for a brief moment and asks her for help. Instantly, her day “rewinds” and she quickly realizes that it’s her responsibility to try and save the woman who called out to her from a death that should not have happened, all the while trying to repair the lives of her immature brother and drug-addicted sister. With the help of her clumsy but loveable boss at the morgue, Tru strives to put right what once when wrong and hoping each time that her next leap will be the leap home.

Eliza Dushku played prominent characters in a few popular films before Buffy the Vampire Slayer, but it was her portrayal of Faith in the 3rd season of the popular television show that helped set her on the path to becoming a star. It’s understandable, then, that fans of the show were not particularly happy with her when she turned down a chance for a television series based around the Faith character in favor of Tru Calling. However, it’s equally understandable that as an actor, she would want to try new things, and carrying an unproven series with a new character offered her that opportunity.

On the surface, Tru Calling is a formula show. Borrowing elements from Quantum Leap, Early Edition and Goundhog Day, each episode follows a similar pattern. A body arrives in the morgue and asks for help triggering a rewind before the opening titles, and Tru spends the rest of the episode trying to piece together what caused the death and how to prevent it. The premise sounds interesting enough, but without clever writing and entertaining characters, such a concept could get stale very quickly, especially over an entire television season. Thankfully, the show’s creators appear to recognize this early on and make efforts to tweak the formula just enough to keep the stories fresh and interesting.

As with any show that hopes to build an audience, Tru Calling is not just about the “Death of the Week.” While it is the focus of each episode, not every day is a rewind, and Tru still has a life of her own and a family she cares about. The death of their mother and subsequent remarriage and general absence of their father has made things difficult on the Davies family, and Tru is struggling to keep them together. This is not an easy task as her sister Meredith (Jessica Collins) is a fast-paced businesswoman in denial over her drug habit, and her brother Harrison (Shawn Reaves) has a bit of a responsibility problem. And what superhero story would be complete without the lead character’s romantic relationships suffering from the strains of a secret double-life? Certainly not this one. All the pieces are there, including the loveable but awkward mentor (Zach Galifianakis) who always seems to know just a little more than he lets on.

The character of Tru is likeable and well meaning, and as she comes to empathize with those she is trying to help, the audience cannot help but do the same. Offsetting much of the dramatic tension is quite a bit of humor with Shawn Reaves’s performance as Harrison. He’s a complete screw-up, but he’s so charming and creative (not to mention very loyal to Tru) that his misadventures are a continuing source of entertainment. Equally effective is Davis who, although clumsy in his interactions with others, serves as a surrogate older brother and sounding board for Tru, something she desperately needs considering the double burden she carries.

Tru Calling is an excellent example of a television series that can flourish if given time to grow. Many of the early episodes aren’t anything special. They’re a bit predictable and formulaic, but underneath them is a level of quality worth exploring. As they find their rhythm and tweak the show a bit, everything falls into place, and by the season finale, it’s a pretty darn good show. While Eliza Dushku is a capable actress and portrays Tru very well, much of the show’s quality can be attributed to outstanding performances by the supporting cast, most notably Zach Galifianakis and Shawn Reaves, as well as the addition of Jason Priestley, who elevates the show to another level. What he brings to the character and the show is both nuanced and compelling, and it’s fascinating to watch him on screen.

The second season only offered a very brief six episodes before being pulled.  Once again, the season continues to improve over the early goings, ratcheting up the tension between Jack and Tru, which is effective due to the chemistry between the two and the fact that Priestley’s menacing performance is his finest work. It’s really too bad that the series couldn’t have at least finished out this second season, as it continued to improve and the final episode here really isn’t much of a conclusion.

REVIEW: BUFFY: THE VAMPIRE SLAYER – SEASON 1-7

Buffy the Vampire Slayer Logo 3840x2160 wallpaper

CAST

Sarah Michelle Gellar (Ringer)
Nicholas Brendon (Children of The Corn III)
Alyson Hannigan (How I Met Your Mother)
Charisma Carpenter (Scream Queens)
Anthony Stewart Head (The Iron Lady)
Davis Boreanaz (Bones)
Seth Green (Austin Powers)
James Marsters (Caprica)
Marc Blucas (Red State)
Emma Caulfield (Supergirl)
Michelle Tractenberg (17 Again)
Amber Benson (The Killing Jar)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST STARS

Mark Metcalf (Drive me Crazy)
Brian Thompson (Hired To Kill)
Ken Lerner (The Running Man)
Kristine Sutherland (One Life To Live)
Julie Benz (No Ordinary Family)
Eric Balfour (Skylive)
Persia White (The Vampire Diaries)
Mercedes McNab (The Addams Family)
Elizabeth Anne Allen (Bull)
Robin Riker (The Bold and The Beautiful)
Musetta Vander (Stargate SG.1)
Christopher Wiehl (Cold Hearts)
Geoff Meed (Little Miss Sunshine)
Andrew J. Ferchland (The Last Leprechaun)
Jennifer Sky (Cleopatra 2525)
Chad Lindberg (The Fast and The Furious)
Armin Shimerman (Star Trek: DS9)
Dean Butler (Little House on The Prairie)
Clea DuVall (The Lizzie Borden Chronicles)
Robia LaMorte (Spawn)
Michael Bacall (Django Unchained)
Juliet Landau (Ed Wood)
Ara Celi (American Beauty)
Clayne Crawford (Roswell)
Danny Strong (The Prophecy II)
Kavan Smith (Stargate SG.1)
Robin Sachs (Jurassic Park 2)
Larry Bagby (Walk The Line)
Jason Behr (Roswell)
Will Rothhaar (Kingpin)
Julia Lee (A Man Apart)
Bianca Lawson (The Vampire Diaries)
Saverio Guerra (Becker)
John Ritter (8 Simple Rules)
Jeremy Ratchford (Cold Case)
James Parks (Kill Bill)
Vincent Schiavelli (Batman Returns)
Jack Conley (Fast & Furious)
Willie Garson (Stargate SG.1)
Christopher Gorham (Ugly Betty)
John Hawkes (Winter’s Bone)
Meredith Salenger (Lake Placid)
Charles Cyphers (Halloween)
Wentworth Miller (Legends of Tomorrow)
Shane West (Nikita)
Max Perlich (Blow)
Richard Riehle (Office Space)
Carlos Jacott (3rd Rock From The Sun)
Nancy Lenehan (Two Guys and a Girl)
Jason Hall (American Sniper)
K. todd Freeman (The Dark Knight)
Fab Filippo (Guidestones)
Jeremy Roberts (The Mask)
Eliza Dushku (Tru Calling)
Ian Abercrombie (Army of Darkness)
Harry Groener (About Schmidt)
Jack Plotnick (Rubber)
Nicole Bilderback (Dark Angel)
Jeff Kober (New Girl)
Harris Yulin (Training Day)
Dominic Keating (Star Trek: Enterprise)
Michael Cudlitz (The Walking Dead)
Alexis Denisof (Dollhouse)
Christian Clemenson (Lois & Clark)
Ron Rogge (Power Rangers Lightspeed Rescue)
Ethan Erickson (Jawbreaker)
Andy Umberger (Deja Vu)
Katharine Towne (Evolution)
Lindsay Crouse (The Insider)
Phina Oruche (The Forsaken)
Adam Kaufman (Taken)
Walter Jones (Mighty Morphin Power Rangers)
Kal Penn (Van Wilder)
Bailey Chase (Longmire)
Leonard Roberts (Heroes)
Andy Hallett (Chance)
Doug Jones (Hellboy)
George Hertzberg (Too Much Magic)
Alastair Duncan (The Batman)
Rob Benedict (Birds of Prey)
Erica Luttrell (Lost Girl)
Kathryn Joosten (desperate Housewives)
Connor O’Farrell (Lie To Me)
Rudolf Martin (Swordfish)
Tom Lenk (The Cabin In The Woods)
Charlie Weber (Gacy)
Clare Kramer (Bring it On)
Ravil Isyanov (Alias)
Amy Adams (Man of Steel)
Brian Tee (Jurassic World)
Kali Rocha (Buried)
Kevin Weisman (Alias)
Abraham Benrubi (Open Range)
Cynthia LaMontagne (That 70s Show)
Oliver Muirhead (The Social Network)
Shonda Farr (Crossroads)
Adam Busch (Sugar & Spice)
Joel Grey (Cabaret)
Karim Prince (Mighty Morphin Alien Rangers)
Wade Williams (Gangster Squad)
Todd Stashwick (The Originals)
Amber Tamblyn (Two and a Half Men)
Jordan Belfi (Surrogates)
Mageina Tovah (Spider-Man 2 & 3)
Ivana Milicevic (Casino Royale)
Lee Garlington (Flashforward)
Jan Hoag (Scream Queens)
Nicole hiltz (Smallville)
Alexandra Breckenridge (The Walking Dead)
D.B. Woodside (24)
Zachery Ty Bryan (The Fast and the Furious 3)
Sarah Hagan (Freaks and Geeks)
Jonathan M. Woodward (Firefly)
Stacey Scowley (The Brotherhood 2)
Felicia Day (The Guild)
Megalyn Echikunwoke (Arrow)
Ashanti (Resident Evil: Extinction)
Indigo (Broken City)
Nathan Fillion (Firefly)
Dania Ramirez (Heroes)
Julia Ling (Chuck)

Buffy The Vampire Slayer is one of the wittiest, most well developed, and consistent cult fantasy shows on television. Unlike other shows in the genre, it has been able to showcase a wide balance between fantastic character development, humor, topical plotlines, heart wrenching drama, science fiction, and horror- a horn a plenty of styles all in one 44 min episode. While entertaining, everyone probably can’t relate to the technobabble machinations of a Star Trek episode, or the convoluted paranoia of and X-Files episode, but we all went through high school and whether you were average, popular, or an outcast, we know, we remember, all too well, the emotional highs and lows of growing up. Its something everyone can relate to, and its the central fire that keeps Buffy grounded.


But, Buffy began as a humble mid season replacement on a non entity network, and its early days when it was gaining its footing, starting its mythology, seeing how far they could tweek the drama and the horror with a minuscule budget… well, its not nearly the powerhouse it would quickly become in its second season. There are of course, subtle signs of the drama and humor to come, little hints that it was more than a teen show with vampires. And, honestly, if you were going to try and impress someone who had never seen The X-Flies, you certainly wouldn’t show them the first season without saying, “It gets much better.”

KEY EPISODES ARE –


Episode 1: Welcome to the Hellmouth- Buffy Summers, a high school sophomore, transfers to Sunnydale High. There she meets her “Watcher” and learns she cannot escape her true destiny.— Like most pilots, its all about introductions- Buffy the reluctant Slayer, her pals and soon to be Scoobies, spazz with a heart of gold Xander, shy brain Willow, her stuffy Watcher Giles, the mysterious Angel, and the snobbish beauty queen Cordelia. Also, of course, establishes the first main villain, The Master, and the Hellmouth, the demonic portal that would provide the show with its main mythological device keeping the town of Sunnydale infested with all manner of creatures for Buffy to slay

Episode 2: The Harvest:- A Stranger named Angel tells Buffy that if she does not stop the Harvest, the Hellmouth will open and the Master roam free.— Whereas the first episode was focused on introducing the characters and didn’t have much room for tension or action, The Harvest provides a look at Buffy having to accept her role as Slayer as she realizes the deadly consequences if she abandons her destiny.

Episode 5 : Never Kill a Boy on the First Date:

While awaiting the arrival of a warrior vampire called the Anointed One, Buffy’s big date at the Bronze ends with an assault on a funeral home. — Once again, showing Buffy’s attempts to balance a normal life with her secret life as the Slayer. While a little weak and cornball, it also manages to show the villain thread well, how most main Buffy villains will have some sort of evolution, twists and turns to keep the viewer guessing.

Episode 7: Angel: A moment of passion turns to terror as Buffy discovers Angel’s true identity and learns about the Gypsy curse that has haunted him for almost 100 years.— Probably the most weak, ill-defined character early on, this episode finally showcased more about Angel and gave his character some considerable fleshing out. Taking into account the large part his character would play in the Buffyverse, and the leaps and bounds of change he would undergo, his affect on all the characters, particularly Buffy, in one way or another, it makes this one of the seasons better episodes.

Episode 11: Out of Mind, Out of Sight: As Cordelia prepares for Sunnydale High’s May Queen competition, an invisible force starts attacking her closest friends.— Another of the seasons better episodes, and a clever look an always pertinent issue, showing yet another sympathetic foe, those fringe kids who are always ignored, sometimes until it is too late.

Episode 12: Prophecy Girl:

As the Spring Fling dance approaches, Giles discovers an ancient book foretelling the Slayers death at the hands of The Master.— While a tad abrupt, this finale serves up everything one wants, tension, conflict, and turns you don’t quite see coming. Pivotal in the series for all players, but mainly Buffy, showing that she isn’t just an invulnerable buttkicker able to save the day alone, but through banding together her and the Scoobies will take on many a Big Bad to come.

Season 2 of Buffy the Vampire Slayer is quite possibly the best season of the bunch. Season 2 is by definition, where things get darker and more complex, this was the season that really made Buffy an unpredictably smart series.

The season opens with ‘When She Was Bad’ which deals with the fallout of Buffy’s momentary death in the previous year one finale; this episode is appropriately handled and sees Buffy acting rather out of character after returning from her summer away from Sunnydale. The preceding episodes are a fun affair and help the viewer to settle back into the rhythm of the series with various episodes focusing upon certain characters.

The ‘Big Bads’ of the season appear early on and come in the form of Drusilla and Spike, the former being a rather off-her-rocker vampire and the latter a bleached, leather wearing, cocky undead Englishman! As villains they are a lot of fun and help to shape season 2 as something unique and well constructed. However, come the end of the year things are considerably shaken up in terms of ‘the Big Bads’, with the appearance of Angelus.

Willow, Xander and Giles all find themselves venturing into new territory: dating! Cordelia continues to redeem herself and becomes a fully fledged scoobygang member, whilst Buffy and Angel undergo many changes to their relationship which is mostly the driving force of the season. By the middle of the season the episodes gradually become darker and a more coherent storyarc begins to emerge, starting with the events of ‘Surprise (Part 1)’ which culminate in the emotional and incredibly shocking ‘Innocence’ (Part 2). Said episodes are some of the best in the history of the series and set in motion events that help to lead to the end of the season. The circumstances surrounding this two parter does literally change everything once established between Buffy and Angel; and brings into question their future. The continuity, witty one liners, oblique use of language does continue into this season and helps to boost the chemistry between the actors as they discuss, for example the oddness of some TV movies and sore thumbs. These subtle touches give the season a vibrancy and kooky edge; what makes Buffy such an enjoyable show is the warmth and heart it retains, mostly provided by the actors but also by the wonderfully consistent writing.

The two part finale ‘Becoming’ is well set up as a consequence of the episode ‘I Only Have Eyes For You’, which happens to be beautifully moving and tragic respectively. The complexity of the Angelus arc presented here really sets up and supports the actions that lead to the occurrences of the finale. ‘Becoming’ part 1 & 2 with all it’s flashback goodness brings about tumultuous change and throws one through the emotional wringer all the while its still surprising, sad and gut wrenching upon each rewatch. The issues dealt with this season are far more adult and dark than is the usual, and in turn it delivers a wonderfully realized arc which never fails to amaze.


This third season of Buffy the Vampire Slayer contains some of my favourite episodes from the entire run of the show and also has the fewest offbeat episodes. This year Buffy and the gang are in their final year of high school but living on the Hellmouth is never easy and in addition to the usual demons and vampires they must deal with the schemes of the Watchers Council, a new slayer and a politician after even more power.

Buffy has really found its feet with this season and I would say that it is this year that the show reaches its peak. All the regular cast members give their usual brilliant performances but the season is really stolen by the new cast members, specifically Eliza Dushku as Faith the new Slayer and Harry Groener as the eccentrically evil Mayor Wilkins, who is probably my favourite of all the Buffy villains.

It is difficult to choose favorite episodes from this season as it includes so many great ones. `Bad Candy’, `Amends’, `Earshot’ and the two part season finally `Graduation’ are all excellent episodes being both funny and enthralling but my favorite episode has to be `Lover’s Walk’ where a lovesick Spike returns to Sunnydale after breaking up with Drusilla in order to find a way to get her back. James Marsters is truly excellent in this episode and livens up the series brilliantly. Another couple of episodes of note are `The Wish’ and `Doppelgangland’ both of which involve a parallel universe where vampires have taken over and feature a vamped up Willow, brilliantly portrayed by Alyson Hannigan who seems to enjoy the role immensely. Although none of the episodes could truly be considered awful, `Gingerbread’ and `The Zeppo’ are the weakest episodes of this season and are slightly painful to watch in places.

Overall this season is truly great, with brilliant writing and a plot that never ceases to be in turns exciting, funny and touching.

With the loss of David Boreanaz and Charisma Carpenter to the spin-off show, “Angel”, there were voids to be filled in this, the first season out of high school, and Marc Blucas and Emma Caulfield suitably obliged. The fragmentation of the Scooby Gang was for many the core reason why Season Four didn’t match the heights of the previous three: nobody seemed to care enough about each other any more. With Giles out of work, Xander flitting from one deadbeat job to another, and Buffy and Willow settling in to life on campus, there was concern that the old gang would never get back together.


A big risk was taken in introducing a more sci-fi element with the arrival of a secret government demon-hunting operation. But there’s a big difference from other genre shows: the Initiative was never in control of its actions. And that’s the gist of the season: that Buffy and her traditional methods will always be superior, and that it’s through her skills and her friends that evil is defeated, not bureaucracy. Which is why there’s no big finish in episode 22 (the grand climax happens in episode 21), because the most important storyline is about the reaffirmation of friendships, demonstrated in the most bizarre way imaginable in an episode composed almost entirely of dream sequences.


There are some classics (the Emmy-nominated “Hush” was possibly the boldest piece of television attempted before “The Body” the following year). And in the final scene of the season, we get a great setting-up of what’s to come, without knowing any specific details. All in all, a season that left a few minor gripes, but which in the overall scheme of things, has continued the journey of life into adulthood. Now they’re all supposed to be grown up, but the future still holds a great deal of uncertainty, and that can only be good for the show.

Although Season 5  still has comedic moments, it also has many more serious moments. Not to spoil it for those who have not seen the series yet, two major deaths rock the Sunnydale Slayage Crew. These are excellently handled, and in no way seem like they are tying off loose ends.

The episodes are excellent. From fighting Dracula, to multiple Xanders. From a new sister, to an old foe swapping sides. This season is excellent. the first disc houses such gems as the introduction of Dawn, without any back story or any clues into why she is there. These facts are revealed slowly through the next disc, with amusing storylines for Spike, clearly an excellent addition to the principal cast. Anya also comes into her own, and becomes revels in the joys of capitalism.

Through the next disc a departure of a relatively new character, Riley, hurts Buffy tremendously, whilst the appearance of a troll lightens the mood considerably. The fourth disc includes the fun episode where the Watcher’s Council return to Sunnydale, and reveal a shocking secret about the main enemy of this series. Spike also has a choice to make, whether to fall back into the arms of his old flame, Drusilla, or to move on and persue his newest conquest, a source of exasperation for Buffy.

The fifth disc is a solemn affair, with the death of a principal cast member, who had been with Buffy from the beginning. As Buffy and her ‘Scoobies’ attempt to cope, the attacks on them by the villain of the series grow more violent and frequent, leaving a dissuaded Buffy sure that she cannot beat the villain. When his new enemy learns of an importance in the Scooby gang, and this member of the gang get captured, Buffy goes into meltdown. With the help of Willow, Buffy recovers and faces the most terrifying villain ever in the history of Buffy The Vampire Slayer, with a conclusion that is heart wrenching.


“The Gift”, the season five finale, ended with Buffy dead and buried after battling deranged fallen goddess Glory. Dying is kind of old hat for Buffy, and I don’t think I’m giving too much away by revealing that the show’s title character quickly gets over the whole death thing. Although the ensuing gang of biker demons is corny, I thought her return from the grave in the feature-length “Bargaining” hit all the right notes. Her reappearance is heartbreaking and almost horrifying, and it avoids undermining the events that concluded the previous season.

Rather than just toss her back in this mortal coil as if she’d never left, Buffy is distant and depressed, not quite the elated response her friends were expecting to see. The opening of the season offers an evenhanded blend of humor and drama, particularly the early escapades of the Troika. The all-nerd supersquad — robotics whiz Warren (Adam Busch), clumsy sorceror-lite Jonathan (Danny Strong), and summoner Andrew (Tom Lenk). They added a well-needed dose of geeky comedy to the season, which made the bitter pill of the agony Buffy and friends endure later on easier to swallow.

The darker spin the three of them eventually take also resonates more having seen several episodes worth of their giddiness at being supervillains. I also thought the aftermath of Buffy’s return, seen in “After Life”, “Flooded”, and “Life Serial”, worked well as she tried to find her place in the world (and her friend’s worlds) after being plucked from the afterlife. These episodes also manage to strike that perfect balance between humor and drama.

Another early highlight is “Tabula Rasa”, where a spell gone awry robs the Scoobies of their memories.  Of special mention from this chunk of the season, of course, is the musical episode “Once More with Feeling”. The version presented here is the original broadcast, a few minutes lengthier than your average Buffy installment. Although the concept of characters in an established drama singing and dancing for an hour screams ‘gimmick’, it’s not a standalone episode, tying in heavily to the previous episodes of the season and setting up some of what would soon follow. The songs are surprisingly good, particularly impressive considering that they were written by someone without much of a musical background.Image result for buffy once more with feeling

The season closes out with a series of strong episodes. “Hell’s Bells” features the chaos of a wedding between a human raised in a dysfunctional family and his millennia-old former vengeance demon fiancee, the aftermath of which is explored in “Entropy”.

One of the season’s best is “Normal Again”, which questions the reality of what we’ve seen for the past six seasons, and Buffy’s assault on her possibly-delusional friends and family is as chilling as anything seen up to that point on the series. The darkness pervasive throughout much of the season culminates in “Seeing Red”, which has two monstrous turning points. Its fatal closing events lead into the three-episode arc that rounds out the season. Similar to Angelus’ appearances on both Buffy and Angel, the immeasurably powerful antagonist in these final episodes tear down the main characters.

In its final season, Buffy the Vampire Slayer issued a mission statement you might not expect from a series that’s been on the air for seven years: go back to the beginning. After a foray at college and a year spent toiling away in the working world, Buffy’s going back to high school. Several years after its destruction at the hands…or giant coiled tail, whatever…of the ascended Mayor Wilkins, Sunnydale High has been rebuilt from the ground up. The Hellmouth beneath the school happens to lurk directly below the office of Principal Robin Wood (D.B. Woodside), who’s harboring some sort of dark secret that may or may not work to Buffy’s favor. Anyway, Wood continually stumbles upon Buffy as she spirits Dawn off to her first day of school as a freshman and ensuring both Summers girls make the most of the lovingly-crafted Sunnydale High set, Wood offers Buffy a job as a part-time counselor. Holed up in the bowels of Sunnydale High is Spike, who’s been driven mad by a combination of his newly-acquired soul and an entity that’s been haunting him, one that’s soon going to expand its grasp to the rest of the Scooby Gang and the world at large.

These early episodes really do capture the feel of the first few seasons of the series, a very welcome change after the grim year that came before it. This is one of the stronger opening salvos of Buffy. “Him” is played pretty much for laughs, revolving around a football player whose letter jacket makes him irresistible to the fairer sex, compelling Dawn, Buffy, Willow, and Anya to take drastic and wholly over-the-top measures to win his complete adoration.

 

Three of the season’s best episodes run back-to-back. “Same Time, Same Place” follows Willow’s return to the group, still reeling from the near-apocalyptic events of the previous year and further disheartened when she’s apparently abandoned by her friends. Buffy and company really are there for Willow, but the problem is that there are kind of two separate and distinct “there”s. The cannibalistic Gnarl is one of the most effectively creepy creatures of the show’s entire run, and his confrontation with Willow is unsettling and horrifying…and I mean that in the best possible way. “Help” quickly follows, chronicling Buffy’s quest to save the life of an awkward, introverted poet who foretells her own death.

Although I really like all of the first batch of episodes, this season has two particularly strong stand-outs. Following the excellent “Same Time, Same Place” and “Help” is “Selfless”, which features Anya returning to form as a mass-murdering vengeance demon, a decision that awes her demonic coworkers and conflicts her former friends as Buffy must make a difficult decision. The episode makes use of flashbacks from several vastly different time periods and juggles drastically different tones. We see what led young Aud to become the vengeful Anyanka in a hysterical glimpse back at her life with her wench-drenched, troll-hating brute of a husband, Olaf. There’s also a flashback to “Once More, With Feeling”, complete with a new musical number, followed by a brutal, brilliant cut to the present.

The other standout is “Conversations with Dead People”, an inventively structured episode penned by four different writers. The title is a decent enough synopsis, as a number of characters communicate in varying forms with the dearly departed. Buffy allows herself to be psychoanalyzed by a recently-risen Psych major, Dawn is haunted by a poltergeist that takes on a shockingly familiar image, Willow is delivered a message from a lost love one, Spike goes out on the town, and the remnants of last year’s nerdy Troika return to Sunnydale.

In general, season seven feels like Joss Whedon and company had a clear beginning and a clear ending. The Finale does give the show a nice ending, but is left open should the show ever return in any format.

REVIEW: VAN WILDER 1,2 & 3

CAST

Ryan Reynolds (Deadpool)
Tara Reid (American Pie)
Tim Matheson (The West Wing)
Kal Penn (How I Met Your Mother)
Teck Holmes (Love Song)
Daniel Cosgrove (Guiding Light)
Deon Richmond (Not Another Teen Movie)
Emily Rutherfurd (Pain & Gain)
Paul Gleason (Die Hard)
Erik Estrada (Chips)
Curtis Armstrong (New Girl)
Chris Owen (The Mist)
Simon Helberg (The Big Bang Theory)
Teresa Hill (Cruel Intentions 2)
Sean Marquette (13 Going on 30)
Tom Everett Scott (Scream: The Series)

Van Wilder (Ryan Reynolds) is an extremely popular student at Coolidge College who has been in school for seven years. For the past six semesters, he has made no effort to graduate, instead spending his time organizing parties and fundraisers, doing charity work, helping other students, and posing for figure drawing classes. When Van’s father (Tim Matheson) discovers that Van is still in college, however, he decides to stop paying Van’s tuition.

Meanwhile, Gwen Pearson (Tara Reid), a star reporter for the student newspaper, is asked to do an article on Van. It proves to be so popular that she is asked to write a follow-up article for the front page of the graduation issue. Although that would be a big win, she is rather put off when Van interprets her attempts to schedule interviews as romantic advances—when she already has a boyfriend, Richard “Dick” Bagg (Daniel Cosgrove). Van and Richard dislike each other immediately, and perform increasingly disgusting pranks on each other. In one infamous scene, Van and his friends replace the cream inside some pastries with semen from Van’s pet bulldog, Colossus, and send them to Richard’s fraternity, where the frat brothers do not realize what they are eating until it is too late.

At one point, Richard has sex with another woman from a sister sorority, which would be the final straw for Gwen later on. Richard also sets up Van at one of his own parties in which there are some (very) underage drinkers and reports it to the police, which leads to Van almost being expelled. However, Van proposes an alternative punishment: that the school force him to complete a semester’s worth of work in the six days remaining, and then graduate. The committee agrees to this by a three-to-two decision.

Gwen is impressed that Van is taking the initiative to get his life together. She then learns of Richard’s setting up of Van, as well as his infidelity, and decides to take retribution. On the morning of Richard’s MCAT and interview with Northwestern Medical School, Gwen laces his ritualistic protein shake with a powerful laxative. Since there are no bathroom breaks allowed during the test, Richard rushes through the 2-hour exam in 20 minutes, “dialing down the middle” while disgusting the other test-takers with frequent flatulence. Afterwards, just as he’s about to reach the bathroom, he unexpectedly runs into the medical school interview committee. They pull him aside into an office to begin the interview and Richard ends up defecating explosively into a trash can while in their presence. He is briefly seen again in the film, reading Gwen’s article in the school paper in the bathroom (presumably, his medical school dreams are ruined, as he mentions to Van in a deleted scene). Meanwhile, Van does well on his finals and celebrates his graduation with a party, where his father and Gwen congratulate him.

A subplot depicts the saga of Taj Mahal Badalandabad (Kal Penn), an Indian foreign exchange student who is accepted (out of many “talented” applicants) to be Van’s personal assistant. The main reason for his application for this position, Taj explains, is he wants to have sex with an American girl before he goes home. He meets a girl named Naomi (Ivana Bozilovic), and Van pushes Taj to go for her, but Taj accidentally sets himself on fire with massage oil. At the end of the film, Taj meets an attractive Indian girl (Teesha Lobo), and it seems like they are going to hit it off.

Van Wilder is a simple crude story wrapped with a wonderful central performance by Reynolds. Where this 2001 picture won’t give fans the same satisfaction and buoyancy as American Pie or Euro trip, there is enough crude comedy to reward the target youthful audience for their money.

CAST

Kal Penn (How I Met Your Mother)
Lauren Cohan (Chuck)
Daniel Percival (Son of God)
Glen Barry (Dracula Untold)
Holly Davidson (Essex Boys)
Anthony Cozens (The Gathering)
Steven Rathman (The Magic)

Taj Badalandabad (Kal Penn), the personal assistant to the legendary Van Wilder, has just graduated Coolidge College and is now on his way to England’s Camford University. Taj plans to follow in the footsteps of his father- not only by obtaining a degree, but also to become a member of an exclusive campus Fraternal Guild, the Fox and Hounds, where Taj hopes he will become the next generation of Badalandabads to be deservedly nicknamed the “Sultan of Snatch.”

However, when Taj arrives at Camford, he is told by Pip Everett, the Earl of Grey (Daniel Percival), the stuffy head of the Fox and Hounds, that there had been a mistake and he has actually not been accepted into the Fraternal Guild. Devastated, Taj, with his faithful bulldog Ballzac in tow, instead takes the only housing opening available on campus and becomes the “Head of House” for a group of student misfits – Sadie (Holly Davidson), a gorgeous Cockney girl with a mouth like a gutter, Seamus (Glen Barry), an English-hating Irishman, Gethin (Anthony Cozens), the ultimate nerd, and Simon (Steven Rathman), a goofy-looking kid who rarely talks. Stuck with a band of misfits, Taj considers what Van Wilder would do in the same dismal situation, and in classic “Van” fashion he decides to take on the challenge and turn the house around. At the campus Society Inaugural Ball, Taj announces to the uptight crowd that he and his new mates are starting their own exclusive society – the Cock and Bulls. In addition, the Cock and Bulls declare that are going to compete in the venerable Hastings Cup – an ongoing series of campus academic events and athletic competitions.

Also, as part of his duties, Taj finds out that he will be a history teacher to his new mates and that his teaching supervisor will be Charlotte Higginson (Lauren Cohan), an English beauty, who just happens to be dating Pip Everett. Taj is instantly smitten with Charlotte. Charlotte instantly is not smitten in return. Taj and Charlotte clash over Taj’s less conventional traditional teaching methods until Charlotte points out that his new mates are in danger of flunking out of school because their grades are so low. Taj takes Charlotte’s challenge to heart and starts turning the mates around – their grades as well as their self-esteem.Meanwhile, much to the chagrin of Pip Everett, not only are the Cock and Bulls catching up to the Fox and Hounds in the Hastings Cup, but Taj and Charlotte are spending a lot of time together.

Pip sets out to get rid of Taj by attempting to humiliate him at the Royal Literary Ball and then sabotaging Ballzac at the Camford Dog Show, but both cases backfire and Pip ends up the one embarrassed. Much to Pip’s horror, Taj and Charlotte are clearly falling in love and the Cock and Bulls are moving into a close second behind the Fox and Hounds.

Pip decides to set up Taj and the Cock and Bulls by planting stolen test exams in their house. The plan works temporarily, and the mates are about to get expelled until Taj steps up and takes the blame for the theft – on the condition that his friends are allowed to stay in school. The school Provost agrees to the terms, and Taj has to leave Camford. Heart-broken, Charlotte tells Taj she never wants to see him again. The mates are now left to compete in the final event of the Hastings Cup without their fearless leader. But when Charlotte finds evidence that proves Taj’s innocence, she and Taj rush to the Hastings Cup, just in time for Taj to compete against Pip in the final event – fencing. A humiliated and furious Pip makes sure that the fencing match degenerates into an all-out sword fight, but in the end, Taj defeats Pip and the mates win the Hastings Cup. Pip gets expelled for planting the exams and Taj and Charlotte get to live happily ever after.

The only saving grace are the actors. Despite Kal Penn not bothering to hold his accent, everybody on screen appears to be having a good time.  They all seemed determined to give their best despite what they all must have known was horrendous material. Kal and the female lead (Lauren Cohan) admirably build some chemistry with little help from their lines. Holly Davidson also steals a couple of scenes as the “cockney” member of the group.

CAST

Jonathan Bennett (Veronica Mars)
Kristin Cavallari (Wild Cherry)
Kurt Fuller (Ghostbusters 2)
Steve Talley (Fuller House)
Linden Ashby (Mortal Kombat)

Van Wilder (Jonathan Bennett) has graduated from high school. He is supposed to go on a trip to Amsterdam with his dad (Linden Ashby), but his dad is busy with work, so Van ends up going alone. Van ends up going to Coolidge, following family tradition. His family has their name on a building there, Wilder Hall. However, when he gets there, Coolidge is no longer the fun loving school of his dad’s time, but a military-based institution run by Dean Reardon (Kurt Fuller). Reardon, a military man who hates the senior Wilder, wants to make the younger Wilder’s life miserable. He can not force him out because his dad is rich and has ties to the school, so he tries to make Van’s life a living hell. Van turns a one bedroom dorm into a two bedroom (by breaking down a wall). His roommate is Farley (Nestor Aaron Absera), a pothead from Jamaica. The boys decide to throw a party on campus, which is not allowed, along with kissing, drugs, alcohol, sex, or anything else that is ‘fun’. The only person to show up to the party is Yu Dum Fok (Jerry Shea). The boys try to find the girls, but they just find some religious, prudish girls led by Eve (Meredith Giangrande).

After she throws sacramental wine on them, Van pulls a prank on them during church. Reardon knows Van is behind the prank, so he commands his ROTC students, Dirk (Steve Talley) and his closeted sidekick Corporal Benedict (Nick Nicotera), on Van, trying to make him crack. Van falls for Dirk’s girlfriend, Kaitlin (Kristin Cavallari), causing Dirk to get even more upset. Kaitlin thinks, lives, and breathes the military, and believes in chastity before marriage. Of course, Van has to shake things up. After playing a military game with Reardon that results in him stepping down as dean and being tasered, Van and Kaitlin end up together and Van decides to finish college. The film ends as Van leaves Dirk and Benedict tied to each other in their underwear.

The first thing that hits you right in the face is Jonathan Bennett’s immense effort to look and act like Ryan Reynolds . Because, lets face it, he probably isn’t that good an actor by himself. Also Kristin Cavallari is insanely sexy and hot.  The plot is the same as in many other college movies of this kind and the first Van Wilder movie also. I have no problem with that, but in that movie Van Wilder is actually a compassionate human being, rather than an all out party and sex animal. Here we have his two friends, one a pot-head Jamaican and the other is a Chinese named, Yu Dumb Fok . There is also his dog, Collosus’s origin story here! There were some pretty hilarious moments though; the dildos beneath the bench at church was awesome, the dog sucking the Dean was funny too. Other than that, this was just another excuse to get girls naked and a cheap rip-off the Van Wilder franchise.

REVIEW: SABRINA: THE TEENAGE WITCH – SEASON 1-7

MAIN CAST

Melissa Joan Hart (Melissa & Joey)
Nick Bakay (That 70s Show)
Caroline Rhea (2 Broke Girls)
Beth Broderick (Lost)
Nate Richert (Gamebox 1.0)
Jenna Leigh Green (Hard Sell)
Michelle Beaudoin (Ginger Snaps 2)
Paul Feig (Spy)
Penn Jillette (Hackers)
Martin Mull (Two and a Half Men)
Lindsay Sloane (Bring It On)
Alimi Ballard (Dark Angel)
David Lascher (Blossom)
Jon Huertas (Slash House)
China Shavers (Not Another Teen Movie)
Soleil Moon Frye (Punky Brewster)
Elisa Donovan (Clueless)
Trevor Lissauer (Roswell)
Diana-Maria Riva (17 Again)
Andrew Walker (Laserhawk)
John Ducey (How I Met Your Mother)
Bumper Robinson (Enemy Mine)

RECURRING /NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Tom McGowan (Bad Santa)
Eddie Cibrian (The Cave)
Milo Ventimiglia (Heroes)
Emily Hart (Nine Dead)
Robin Riker (Big Love)
Brian Austin Green (Terminator: TSCC)
Nicole Bilderbck (Dark Angel)
Raquel Welch (Legally Blonde)
Andrew Keegan (O)
Donald Faison (Scrubs)
Curtis Andersen (That 70s Show)
Coolio (Dardevil)
Dana Gould (Gex)
Billy West (Futurama)
Kathy Ireland (Loaded Weapon 1)
Ed Begley Jr. (Veronica Mars)
Henry Gibson (Wedding Crashers)
Chris Elliott (How I Met Your Mother)
Dann Florek (Law & Order: SVU)
Beverly Johnson (Lois & Clark)
Mika Boorem (Blue Crush)
Phil Fondacaro (Willow)
Bryan Cranston (Godzilla)
Mary Gross (Jailbait)
Cee Cee Michaela (Gia)
Andrea Savage (Veep)
Patrick Thomas O’Brien (Catch Me If You Can)
Sarah Lancaster (Chuck)
Walter Jones (Mighty Morphin Power Rangers)
Loni Anderson (A Night at Roxbury)
Caroline Williams (TExas Chainsaw Massacre 2)
Bobcat Goldthwait (Blow)
Beth Grant (Wonderfalls)
John Ratzenberger (Cheers)
Cristine Rose (Heroes)
Shelley Long (The Money Pit)
Sherman Howard (Superboy)
Steve Allen (The Player)
Kel Mitchell (Mysten Men)
Kenan Thompson (Snakes on a Plane)
Fred Willard (Anchorman)
Carol Ann Susi (The Big Bang Theory)
Dom Deluise (Spaceballs)
Shannon welles (Inception)
Gary Owens (That 70s Show)
Jacon Witkin (Showgirls)
Edward Albert (Power Rangers Time Force)
Fred Stoller (Little Man )
Jason Schwartzman (I Heart Huckabees)
Daveigh Chase (S. Darko)
Sheryl Lee Ralph (Moesha)
Jerry Springer (Austin Powers 2)
Justin Timberlake (Friends with Beefits)
Hallie Todd (The Lizzie McGuire)
Glenn Shadix (Beeteljuice0
Alex Rocco (The Simpsons)
Britney Spears (Crossroads)
Jordan Belfi (Surrogates)
Shirley Jones (The Music Man)
Audrey Wasilewski (Pushing Daisies)
Paula Abdul (Bruno)
Ginger Williams (Cruel Intentions)
Tim Thomerson (Trancers)
Bebe Newuwirth (Jumanji)
George Wyner (American Pie 2)
Eric Jungman (Not Another Teen Movie)
Matt Battaglia (Mike & Molly)
Dick van Dyke (Mary Poppins)
Richard Riehle (Office Space)
Barry Livingston (Argo)
J.G. Hertzler (Star Trek: DS9)
Brian Gross (Red Tails)
Charles Shaughnessy (Stargate SG.1)
Kal Penn (Van Wilder)
Keri Lynn Pratt (Cruel Intentions 2)
Gedde Watanabe (Mulan)
Leslie Jordan (Ugly Betty)
David Starzyk (Veronica Mars)
Molly Cheek (American Pie)
Michael Trucco (Battlestar Galactica)
Estelle Harris (Stand and Deliver)
E.J. Callahan (Wild Wild West)
Richard Steven Horvitz (Mighty Moprhin Power Rangers)
Patricia Belcher (Bones)
Larry Poindexter (Blade: The Series)
Alan Blumenfeld (Heroes)
Nicole Scherzinger (Men In Black 3)
Sisqo (Get Over it)
Winston Story (Masked Rider)
Adrienne Barbeau (Swamp Thing)
D. Elliot Woods (Star Trek: Insurrection)
Carnie Wilson (Bridesmaids)
Usher (She’s All That)
Simon Helberg (The Big Bang Theory)
Conchata Ferrell (Krampus)
Brandy Norwood (I Still Know What You did Laster Summer)
Masi Oka (Heroes)
Chyna (3rd Rock From The Sun)
Lori Alan (Family Guy)
Sean Cw Johnson (Power Rangers Lightspeed Rescue)
Nakia Burrise (Power Rangers Zeo)
Ashanti (John Tucker Must Die)
J.P. Manoux (Birds of Prey)
Clare Kramer (Buffy)
Verne Troyer (Jack of All Trades)
Frankie Muniz (Malcolm in the Middle)
Sandra McCoy (POwer Rangers Wild Force)
Sally Struthers (Nine To five)
Dylan Neal (Arrow)
Christina Vidal (Freaky Friday)
Joel David Moore (Bones)
Robert Picardo (Stargate: Atlantis)
Faith Prince (Dave)

All seven seasons of the show are available on DVD (that’s 163 episodes!)It is best to watch the show from start to finish as you can follow Sabrina’s life and understand the story lines. She changes boyfriends a few times so you need to remember which one she’s dating.

Characters come and go in the seasons. It was a shame Libby & Valerie left the show in season 4 because they were excellent characters. I think Sabrina’s aunts and Salem were the best characters. They always had good story lines and Salem got up to some crazy schemes (often roping whoever he could in to get some magical help). I loved Nick Bakay as the voice of Salem as he is very comical yet evil. The Salem animatronic improves over the course of the show and is put to good use in the later seasons. Another character I enjoyed was Morgan. I loved Elisa Donovan in Clueless  and she was so good as Sabrina’s clueless and fashionable roommate.

The best season would have to be season 3. It has the best storyline of Sabrina trying to work out the family secret and a lot of the shows characters were given major roles in these episodes. Season 3 also features the best episodes such as when the aunts need to rehab a bunch of pirates they’ve left locked up for years and Sabrina can’t control her addiction to pancakes.

I loved in season 4 when Hilda purchased the clock shop containing a magic time travelling clock. There is a hilarious scene when Hilda is trying to compete with the watch selling monkey outside her shop and she makes Salem do tricks whilst dressed up. Salem looked so cute in that little bell-hopper-style outfit! Caroline Rhea is so funny and I couldn’t image Aunt Hilda being played by anyone else. She had some of the best storylines and it was funny to watch what trouble she’d get herself into each episode.

The later seasons of the show get a bit bland and the story lines usually don’t revolve around magic. After leaving high school, Sabrina attends college where she lives with a bunch of mortals (Roxie, Morgan and Miles). In season 7, the aunts have left and Sabrina lives in the aunts house with Roxie, Morgan and Salem. Season 7 is not as bad as everyone  says, it may be the weaker season but is still good.

I was really happy when they brought Harvey back as a character. It made sense that his character left at the end of season 4, but the show didn’t feel the same without him. Nate Richert did a excellent job of playing Harvey and he was an important character in the show so he needed to come back. Harvey has some funny moments in the later seasons and it was great that he could interact with Salem cause he knew about Sabrina’s magic.

After watching this show since my childhood, Melissa Joan Hart is one of my favourite actresses. I love her expressions and she is quite funny. It’s really cute when she says Sabrina’s most common line “woo hoo!”. There was a short period where she had red hair in the show and I was so happy when she went back blonde.

Overall, I would recommend getting all seven seasons if you are a fan of the show. It is so much better when you watch it when you are older as it makes more sense and the jokes seem funnier. Plus you follow the storylines and remember which episodes are good or not. The sets are worth getting for any sitcom lover and once you start watching Sabrina’s crazy adventures, you won’t want to stop till you get to the end!