REVIEW: THE OUTPOST – SEASON 1

CAST

Jessica Green (Ash vs Evil Dead)
Jake Stormoen (War Pigs)
Imogen Waterhouse (Nocturnal Animals)
Anand Desai-Barochia (A Holiday Heist)
Andrew Howard (Bates Motel)
Robyn Malcolm (The Code)
Kevin McNally (Pirates of The Caribbean)

Jessica Green in The Outpost (2018)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Richard Ashton (The New Adventures of Robin Hood)
Philip Brodie (Broken News)
Julian Cihi (Gypsy)
Cokey Falkow (Starship Troopers 3)
Thor Knai (Crazy Ex-Girlfriend)
Michael Flynn (The Hollow Point)
Adam Johnson (Waffle Street)
Ric Sarabia (Runaways)
David Ury (3 From Hell)
William Rubio (Show Offs)
Jake Suazo (Zombie Hunter)
Sonalii Castillo (Voodoo Vanessa)
Medalion Rahimi (My Dead Ex)
Baylee Self (The Appearance)
Medalion Rahimi (The Catch)
Elizabeth Birkner (Behind You)

The Outpost (2018)To be honest no one can truely judge a TV show just after one episode but after so many do. The Outpost is a Low Budget High-Fantasy project from movie makers in Utah. The sets are well chosen even if they had to use very often green screen, something that can look cheap if you give it a closer look. Still I see the love for details in the set and appreciate that. Either you find nothing that seems out of place, everything in the set fits in.Michael Flynn and Imogen Waterhouse in The Outpost (2018)I think 90 % of the reviews on imdb  expected another Game of Thrones, and that isn’t the case here, and it wasn’t supposed to be that way. If a show is something new it is hard to tell right at the pilot. I liked the actors yet, the acting was decent and the story introduction a little rushed to get it into the first episode without getting too slow and not bore the audience. A little too much action but I understand why they did so. The effects aren’t high-end but decent as well. It gives the show a slight retro fantasy series look. The story yet has a few minor logic and plot holes but nothing to worry about. Some logic holes you have to deal with at fantasy stories and plot holes happen to the best writer.Anand Desai-Barochia and Jessica Green in The Outpost (2018)One of the best parts in the opening episode was the grand Music in the background, something that never gets enough attention. The most costumes look new and clean but I see no issue in that, people have still to see that it’s a low budget production. The Armors are very detailed and well made, I saw worse ones in movies with a higher budget, and there too is a love for details. The show has humor, and even if there are very clean and yet plane characters, that doesn’t mean that they are not supposed to get deeper. Andrew Howard and Jessica Green in The Outpost (2018)I think many who wrote reviews on imdb are too spoiled by expensive CGI and Special Effects and don’t see that even bigger and more popular shows are full with problems they here whine about. As the show continues through it’s 10 episode run, it gets better and better and becomes must see show.

REVIEW: THE TICK – SEASON 2

The Tick (2017)

MAIN CAST

Peter Serafinowicz (Spy)
Griffin Newman (Draft Day)
Valorie Curry (Blair Witch)
Brendan Hines (Lie To Me)
Yara Martinez (Jane The Virgin)
Scott Speiser (6 Ways To Die)

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RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Happy Anderson (The Knick)
François Chau (Lost)
John Hodgman (Arthur)
Patricia Kalember (Signs)
Marc Kudisch (Smash)
Alan Tudyk (Doom Patrol)
Tom O’Keefe (The Gifted)
Joshua Schubart (After)
Adam Henry Garcia (Royal Pains)
Steven Ogg (The Walking Dead)
Lucas Dixon (A Picture of You)
Brian Faherty (Measure of a Man)
Grant Harrison (Snafu)
Jade Elysan (Bonding)
Clara Wong (Louie)
Julian Cihi (The Outpost)
Liz Vassey (Two and a Half Men)
Clé Bennett (Heroes Reborn)

MV5BMTg3MjY1MDUxMV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwMzczNTU2NzM@._V1_SY1000_CR0,0,675,1000_AL_Certain comedies get better as they go along, when the writers and the actors have all had a chance to gel and figure out what everyone’s strengths and weakness are. That’s certainly true of Amazon’s The Tick, as it feels almost like an entirely new show at the start of season 2. Some of that is certainly due to the show’s continued refinement of Tick’s (Peter Serafinowicz) suit (or is it his body?), The new suit is much more practical, and it allows for a greater range of motion for the man wearing it, which in turn lets The Tick worry less about how its title character looks and more about the level of self-awareness it wants to infuse into its ongoing story of hopelessly flawed superheroes fighting crime in a city called the City.The Dark Crystal_BreaAt times it felt as though season 1 of The Tick was an attempt for the show to find how it fit with the current glut of superhero films and TV series as much as it was about the effort of Tick and his nascent sidekick, Arthur (Griffin Newman), to root out evil and discover their place among the alleged pantheon of heroes sworn to protecting the City. Tone and pacing were common issues throughout the first season, which were then exacerbated by a protracted midseason break (almost six months). And still, even upon the series’ return, the balance between humor and superhero action felt off and the serialized nature of the series couldn’t quite turn a plot involving the return of the Terror (Jackie Earle Haley) into the kind of energized storytelling previous incarnations of The Tick enjoyed.the-tick-season-2-peter-serafinowiczThat isn’t an issue for season 2, which returns a funnier, faster-paced, and far more confident series than it was in season 1. From the first episode on, The Tick feels very much like the buddy comedy it was meant to be. Serafinowicz and Newman enjoy an easy chemistry with one another, which along with the self-aware, super-heroic dialogue, becomes key to the season’s early success. It helps that Arthur is fully committed to his role as a superhero, and that his family is (for the most part) supportive of his decision to pursue a life of crimefighting while also being an accountant. Removing the will they or won’t they from Tick and Arthur’s relationship gets the series off on the right foot, allowing the show to lean into the absurdity of its premise and its characters by making it all seem perfectly normal for these two heroes.dimsSeason 2 has some help in the normalizing department, as the defeat of the Terror has brought a huge influx of extremely weird (and often ridiculous) heroes and villains to the City, thanks in large part to A.E.G.I.S (The Tick’s cheeky riff on S.H.I.E.L.D.) re-opening a branch in Tick and Arthur’s neck of the woods. That opens the door for the series to get precisely as weird as it need to, introducing characters like Steve Ogg’s semi-retired Flexon (a Tick analogue to Marvel’s Mr. Fantastic), John Hodgman’s Hobbes, and Marc Kudisch as the hyper masculine, tough-as-nails head of A.E.G.I.S., Tyrannosaurus ‘Ty’ Rathbone. Part of what has made The Tick an enduring character since the 1980s is the ever-changing community of oddballs he is surrounded by. While Arthur is and will always be the Watson to his dim-bulb Sherlock Holmes, the franchise has proven adept at introducing new characters who are inherently ridiculous but just serious enough to work, and to keep things fresh, interesting, and funny.zUOS95Hv_400x400Season 2 also introduces a new plot line for Arthur’s sister Dot (Valerie Curry), as she begins to wonder whether or not Arthur’s the only one in the family destined to spend their spare time seeking justice. This thread works to give Tick and Arthur some breathing room, but it also spares Curry from being primarily relegated to reacting to the danger her onscreen sibling finds himself in. In her expanded role, Dot manages to get into some trouble and forge a bond with Overkill (Scott Speiser), which, in turn, offers that character a chance to be something more than a spoof on hyper-violent vigilante characters who rose to prominence in the ‘90s. The biggest improvements in season 2, however, are in how the season is structured. Though the overarching narrative of the season is still serialized, each episode functions on its own as a complete episode of television. Having a distinct beginning, middle, and end focuses the story and the comedy on more specific elements integral to the episode at hand. As a result, the jokes are funnier, the action livelier, and the story threads more compelling.the-tick-season-2-peter-serafinowicz-griffin-newman-interview-slice-600x200All in all, The Tick returns with the terrific new season of television. More heroes, more villains — all of them ridiculous in their own way — means more opportunities for laughs and for superhero action. Much like the Tick’s costume, the series received the right kind of upgrade in between seasons, and in doing so has become a real contender in the world of superhero TV.