REVIEW: FREDDY’S NIGHTMARES – SEASON 1 & 2

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MAIN CAST

Robert Englund (Wishmaster)

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RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Lar Park-Lincoln (Friday The 13th – Part VII)
Yvette Nipar (Robocop: The Series)
Lori Petty (Tank Girl)
Mariska Hargitay (Law & Order: SVU)
Shiri Appleby (Roswell)
Joyce Hyser (The Flash 90s)
Sarah Buxton (Little Children)
George Lazenby (Winter Break)
Andrew Prine (V)
Jeremy Roberts (Hercules: TLJ)
Brad Pitt (Fight Club)
Bill Moseley (Army of Darkness)
Jeffrey Combs (Gotham)
Eva LaRue (CSI: Miami)
Dick Miller (Gremlins)
Jeff Conaway (Babylon 5)
Charles Cyphers (Halloween)
Anne Lockhart (Battlestar Galactica)
Kyle Chandler (Supoer 8)
Tracey Walter (Batman)
Jeff Yagher (V)
Marc Alaimo (Star Trek: DS9)
Sherman Howard (Superboy)
Christine Belford (Wonder Woman TV)
Sandahl Bergman (Conan The Barbarian)
Clifton Collins Jr. (Westworld)
Morris Chestnut (Kick-Ass 2)
Penny Johnson Jerald (Star Trek: DS9)
Raymond Cruz (My Name Is Earl)
Paul Ben-Victor (Daredevil)
Ellen Albertini Dow (Wedding Crashers)
Brett Cullen (Joker)
Tamara Glynn (Halloween 5)
Leland Crooke (Angel)
Timothy Bottoms (The Paper Chase)
David Kaufman (Superman: TAS)
Dick Gautier (Transformers)
Wings Hauser (Rubber)
Richard Eden (Robocop: The Series)
Robert F. Lyons (Death Wish II)
Fabiana Udenio (Austin Powers)
Clayton Landey (Sully)
Tim Russ (Star Trek: Voyager)

MV5BNTIzODY4NjMtZGE0NC00NTI1LWE1OTktYjNkZjkzZGNhMDA2XkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNzQ1NjgzOTA@._V1_Based on the popular horror series, Freddy’s Nightmares was a Tales From The Crypt style anthology/spin off which focused on a series of events that people would find themselves in when they went to sleep from embarrassing situations to terrifying blood curdling nightmares, which they sometimes did not wake up from.Image result for FREDDY'S NIGHTMARESThe master behind all these nightmares was none other than Freddy himself, who would narrate every now & then throughout the episodes, an interesting theme & idea the series had which lifted it up above many similar anthologies, was to basically have two episodes in one, in which the the survivor of the first half of the episode would meet his or her death in the second half, usually friends or family members of the characters that have died in the first half. While other episodes featured characters from another episode popping up in others (most of which met their demises in the follow up episodes).

MV5BYmQ0MThmZGItYzhkOC00ZTIzLTliZWMtN2VjNWZjMTIwZmMzXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNzQ1NjgzOTA@._V1_Despite his many brief pop up appearances, Freddy was the main focus of a few episodes such as The pilot episode No More Mr. Nice Guy(Directed by Texas Chainsaw Massacre’s own Tobe Hooper!! & my personal favorite out of all the ones Freddy was in) which was a prequel set before the original Nightmare on elm Street,  where Freddy due to an unjust law system was set free after murdering a series of  little children, outraged, the parents decide to take the law into their own hands including a police officer, who’s twin daughters were on the verge of death when he saved them & arrested Freddy. Burned alive in his boiler room, he returned as a badly burned boogeyman to kill & torture some of those responsible for his execution, this episode was very entertaining bringing back the creepy nightmarish monster of the original, rather than the jokey character he later became in parts 3 & up. It’s second half, Sisters Keeper was also pretty decent, other episodes Freddy appeared in were, Freddys Tricks & Treats, Safe Sex, Photo Finish, Dreams Come True, It’s My Party & You’ll Die If I Want You Too!Image result for FREDDY'S NIGHTMARESThe last episode I mentioned which was both scary & hilarious when Freddy decides to attend his class reunion, killing off all of his graduating class including the pretty girl who stood him up & best of all we even got to see Freddy’s nerdish pal from high school!. Another great thing about the series was it’s many familiar acting faces such as Brad Pitt, Dick Miller, and many others.  All in all if you ever get a chance to view the episodes, I do recommend them. A lot of them weren’t great, but unlike Friday The 13th: The Series, at least this had the character from the movies in them & connected to the movies, rather than being in name only, with the humorous Freddy character actually playing better on the small screen than he did on the big screen & a few episodes were actually better than many of the Nightmare sequels!

REVIEW: THIS IS SPINAL TAP

CAST

Michael McKean (1941)
Christopher Guest (Little Shop of Horrors)
Harry Shearer (The Simpsons)
Rob Reiner (EdTV)
June Chadwick (V: The Series)
Ed Begley Jr (Veronica Mars)
Fran Drescher (Picking Up The Pieces)
Patrick Macnee (The Avengers)
Dana Carvey (Waynes World)
Julie Payne (Wizards and Warriors)
Billy Crystal (City Slickers)
Paul Benedict (The Goodbye Girl)
Howard Hesseman (Halloween II)
Joyce Hyser (The Flash 90s)
Anjelica Huston (The Addams Family)
Fred Willard (Anchorman)
Brinke Stevens (Die Sister, Die!)

This is Spinal Tap is presented as a serious rock documentary, purportedly filmed and directed by the fictional Marty Di Bergi (Rob Reiner, who was also the actual director of the movie). The faux documentary covers a 1982 United States concert tour by the fictional British rock group “Spinal Tap” to promote their new album Smell the Glove, interspersed with Di Bergi’s one-on-one interviews with the members of the group and footage of the group from previous periods in their career.

The band was started by childhood friends, David St. Hubbins (Michael McKean) and Nigel Tufnel (Christopher Guest), during the 1960s. Originally named “The Originals”, then “The New Originals” to distinguish themselves from an existing group of the same name,[5] they settled on the name “The Thamesmen”, finding success with their skiffle/rhythm and blues single “Gimme Some Money”. They changed their name again to “Spinal Tap” and enjoyed limited success with the flower power anthem “Listen to the Flower People”. Ultimately, the band became successful with heavy metal and produced several albums. The group was joined eventually by bassist Derek Smalls (Harry Shearer), keyboardist Viv Savage (David Kaff), and a series of drummers, each of whom mysteriously died in odd circumstances, including spontaneous human combustion, a “bizarre gardening accident” and choking to death on the vomit of unknown person(s); their current drummer is Mick Shrimpton (R. J. Parnell). 

Di Bergi’s interviews with St. Hubbins and Tufnel reveal that they are competent composers and musicians, but are dimwitted and immature. Tufnel, in showing his guitar collection to Di Bergi, reveals an amplifier that has volume knobs that go to eleven; when Di Bergi asks, “Why don’t you just make ten louder and make ten be the top number and make that a little louder?” Tufnel can only reply, “These go to eleven.” Tufnel later plays a somber quasi-classical music composition on piano for Di Bergi, claiming it to be a “Mach piece” (a hybrid between Mozart and Bach), before revealing the composition to be entitled “Lick My Love Pump”.

As the tour starts, concert appearances are repeatedly canceled because of low ticket sales. Tensions continue to increase when several major retailers refuse to sell Smell the Glove because of its sexist cover art and there is growing resentment shown towards the group’s manager Ian Faith (Tony Hendra). Tufnel becomes even more perturbed when St. Hubbins’ girlfriend Jeanine (June Chadwick)—a manipulative yoga and astrology devotee—joins the group on tour, begins to participate in band meetings, and attempts to influence their costumes and stage presentation. The band’s distributor, Polymer Records, opts to release Smell the Glove with an entirely black cover without consulting the band. The album fails to draw crowds to autograph sessions with the band.

To revive interest, Tufnel suggests staging a performance of “Stonehenge”, an epic song that is to be accompanied in concert by a lavish stage show, and asks Ian to order a giant Stonehenge megalith for the show. However, Tufnel, rushing a sketch on a napkin, mislabels its dimensions, using a double prime symbol instead of single prime. The resulting prop, seen for the first time by the group during a show, is only 18 inches high (instead of the intended 18 feet), making the group a laughingstock on stage. The group accuses Faith of mismanagement, and when St. Hubbins suggests Jeanine should co-manage the group, Faith quits in disgust.

The tour continues, rescheduled into smaller and smaller venues. Tufnel becomes marginalized by Jeanine and St. Hubbins. At their next gig (at a United States Air Force base near Tacoma, Washington) Tufnel is upset by an equipment malfunction and leaves the group in the middle of a show. In their next gig, in an amphitheater at an amusement park in Stockton, California, they find that Nigel’s absence severely limits their repertoire. They are forced to improvise a fusion-esque, experimental song entitled “Jazz Odyssey”, which is poorly received. At the last show of the tour, the remaining group considers retirement and venturing into forgotten side projects such as a musical theatre production on the theme of Jack the Ripper entitled Saucy Jack, and acoustic pieces with the London Philharmonic. Just before they go on stage, Tufnel reappears and informs them that he is “a messenger” from Ian Faith and the Spinal Tap song “Sex Farm” is wildly popular in Japan; in fact it has reached number 5 in the charts there. He then tells St. Hubbins that Faith would like to arrange a new tour in that country. St. Hubbins is initially cool to the idea, but later on during their show, St. Hubbins convinces Tufnel to join them on stage, reuniting the band. With Faith as manager once again, and despite losing their drummer Mick as he inexplicably explodes onstage, the film ends with Spinal Tap playing a series of sold-out arena shows for enthusiastic fans on their Japanese tour.

Spinal Tap gives you the absurdity of the rock and roll world, yet still respects the music. Overall this is a great film

REVIEW: THE FLASH (1990)

CAST

John Wesley Shipp (Dawsons Creek)
Amanda Pays (The Knife)
Alex Desert (Swingers)

Recuring / Notable Guest Cast

Paula Marshall (Gary Unmarried)
Michael Nader (All My Children)
Tim Thomerson (Trancers)
Priscilla Pointer (Carrie)
Lycia Naff (Lethal Weapon)
Richard Belzer (Scarface)
Robert Hooks (Star Trek III)
M. Emmet Walsh (Blade Runner)
Vito D’Ambrosio (Bones)
Wayne Pére (CLoak & Dagger)
Justin Burnette (Hearts Afire)
Biff Manard (The Wrong Guys)
Mike Genovese (ER)
Sven-Ole Thorsen (Mallrats)
Dick Miller (Gremlins)
Clarence Clemons (Blues brothers 2000)
Ian Buchanan (Panic Room)
Elizabeth Gracen (Highlander: The Raven)
Miguel Fernandes (Relic Hunter)
Clifton Collins Jr. (Westworld)
Chuck Hicks (Dick Tracy)
Wes Studi (Mystery Men)
Robert Shayne (Adventures of Superman)
Jonathan Brandis (IT)
Perrey Reeves (Child”s Play 3)
Kirk Baltz (Face/Off)
Mark Dacascos (Kamen Rider: Dragon Knight)
Adam West (Batman)
Patricia Tallman (Babylon 5)
Jason Bernard (Liar Liar)
Lois Nettleton (Centennial)
Ian Abercrombie (Birds of Prey)
Anthony Starke (Hand of God)
Sherrie Rose (Black Scorpion)
Gloria Reuben (Lincoln)
Deborah May (The Walking Dead)
Christopher Neame (The Prestige)
Ken Foree (The Lords of Salem)
Angela Bassett (Green Lantern)
Jay Arlen Jones (Eight Legged Freaks)
Joyce Hyser (The Wedding Pact)
Timothy Stack (My Name Is Earl)
Remy Ryan (Robocop 3)
Yvette Nipar (Robocop: The Series)
Bryan Cranston (Breaking Bad)
Kimberly Neville (Noises Off…)
Robert Z’Dar (Maniac Cop)
Robert O’Reilly (Star Trek: DS9)
Richard Burgi (The Green Inferno)
Denise Crosby (Star Trek: TNG)
Jeri Ryan (Star Trek: Voyager)
Michael Champion (Total Recall)
Lisa Darr (Popular)
Jeffrey Combs (Re-Animator)
François Chau (The Tick)
Lenny von Dohlen (Electric Dreams)
David Cassidy (The Partridge Family)
Signy Coleman (The X-Files)
Carolyn Seymour (Congo)
Bill Mumy (Lost In Space)
Matt Landers (Die Hard)
Victor Rivers (Hulk)
Claire Stansfield (Xena: WP)
Corinne Bohrer (Veronica Mars)

 The series is a mash-up of the Barry Allen and Wally West eras of the comics. The show’s producers, Danny Bilson and Paul De Meo, wisely chose to use the Barry Allen version of the character (played by John Wesley Shipp). This was probably due to the greater story possibilities that Allen’s job as a police forensic scientist could offer. It didn’t matter that Barry had been killed off in the comics five years prior to the show. The character of Dr. Tina McGee (played by the savoury Amanda Pays) comes from the Wally West comics. She is a scientist who helps Barry understand and cope with his new powers of super speed.  The solid performances of the core cast make this show work despite its cartoony conventions. Barry Allen is an easy character to like because we can appreciate and empathize with his underdog-makes-good nature. Barry has always been inferior to his Dad and his overachieving older brother Jay. When he gains his extraordinary powers we can’t help but think that it couldn’t have happened to a more deserving guy.

Also noteworthy is the impish chemistry between Shipp and Pays. Their characters have an intimate, yet platonic relationship that is almost as charming as Pays’ accent. Alex Désert is underused as Barry’s friend and coworker, Julio Mendez. Désert’s easy-going, friendly presence provides a necessary counterpoint to Barry’s no-nonsense ‘get-the-job-done’ attitude. It’s too bad that he didn’t have more to do than set Barry up on blind dates and make wisecracks. The show was produced in the wake of the massive success of Tim Burton’s 1989 Batman film. The mood and tone of that movie is a huge influence on the first few episodes of The Flash, especially the Pilot episode, “The Origin of a Super Hero.” That episode begins with an establishing shot of Central City that is a blatant copy of the opening scene in Batman where we first see Gotham. We also see the same ‘evil steam’ shooting up from the sewers and citizens scurrying to get indoors, away from all the immoral activity that abounds on the mean streets of Gotham . . .er. . . Central City. Later on, the confrontation between Flash and the bad guy is also an obvious lift from Batman, complete with the “You made me!” line.As the series progresses, it stops trying to ape the manner and feel of Batman and takes on more of a 1940s film-noir motif – only a lot more colourful. The ‘Tim Burton Effect’ still lingers though. One such pastiche, which ironically is not in the Pilot episode, is the use of period props such as 1950s automobiles. Burton can get away with such an aesthetic because his films often take place in an ambiguous timeline where stylistically, anything goes. In The Flash, the out-of-time props are an unnecessary distraction. They’re especially irrelevant during the episode titled “Ghost in the Machine” where The Ghost, a villain from the 1950s, comes out of a deep freeze to again wreak havoc on Central City in 1990. It’s hard to buy into The Ghost’s future shock when people are still wearing trilbies and driving around in Ford Fairlanes.
The show didn’t have great villains but like most genre entertainment, thinking is the real enemy. The Trickster, played by Mark Hamill, is definitely the show’s greatest and most memorable antagonist, even if he is just a check-in-the-box inclusion of a Joker-like homicidal clown. Hamill is great, playing the character as an obsessed, erotomaniacal master-of-disguise while the script, unfortunately, wants him to be a poor man’s Joker. Ironically, he would later go on to recycle his Trickster performance as the voice of the Joker on Batman: The Animated Series. Even Captain Cold works reasonably well within the context of the series, reinvented here as an albino mercenary with an ice gun. Actor Michael Champion plays the role relatively straight and plausible, as if shooting people up with frost is an everyday occurrence. He even gets to deliver the line, ‘The Iceman Cometh,’ six years before Arnold Schwarzenegger would as Mr. Freeze in Batman and Robin.

Michael Nader’s stone-faced overacting as outlaw motorcycle gang leader, Nicholas Pike is way too over-the-top to be taken seriously. Casting soap opera or sitcom actors as villains is always a bad idea. The difference between Hamill and Nader’s performances is that Hamill is trying to be humourous, Nader isn’t. David Cassidy and his widow’s peak are unfortunately a non-presence as Mirror Master in “Done with Mirrors.” He comes off as more of a Bizarro-Keith Partridge than a threatening adversary. One of the highlights of the series is “Fast Forward” where Flash is accidentally propelled 10 years into a bleak future where his powers are unstable. He’s got to find a way to get back to his own time and set things right. Every super hero / sci-fi show has to have its ‘evil parallel universe’ or ‘undesirable future’ story and The Flash is no exception. This episode reminds me of the 1960s Spider-Man cartoon where Spidey would be sucked into some twisted alternate dimension that he would have to fight his way out of. The scene where Flash is “falling” into the psychedelic void is a direct homage to that show. It really is an entertaining story if you can plow through the painful first act of Nader’s scenery chewing and hamming it up.One episode that is way more endearing than it probably has any right to be is “Twin Streaks” where an obligatory mad scientist type tries to clone Flash and ends up creating a sort of Bizarro-Flash in a story that vaguely resembles Bride of Frankenstein. The laughs, intentional or not, are effortless. Bizarro-Flash or Pollux as he’s called, wears a blue Flash costume. It would have been a nice wink-nudge to the fans if they had given him a yellow suit as a reference to Professor Zoom, the Reverse-Flash. Zoom was mentioned in another episode, after all. One of the show’s major clunkers is “Be My Baby” where Barry has to care for an infant that was left on his doorstep. It’s nothing but recycled humour from 3 Men and a Baby and countless sitcoms. This episode reads like an attempt to inject some feel-good, warm fuzzy moments into the show. I actually felt sorry for the then-unknown Bryan Cranston, who had the thankless job of playing the bad guy on this one. If the show’s producers truly wanted to feature more heartwarming stories they could have done an episode or episodes that focused on the heroic endeavors that Flash has performed for the medical community. There was one story from Mike Baron’s run on the comic where Wally West was charged with transporting a human heart across the US to a transplant patient. Story lines such as these could have been an untapped goldmine of drama and suspense as long as they didn’t get too sappy with it. It also would have been a welcome break from the hit-or-miss villain of the week.

Shirley Walker’s score music is tailor made to suit the flavour of each individual episode. “Beat the Clock”, a story about a jazz musician falsely accused of killing his wife, appropriately has a lonely sounding Chicago jazz score while “Watching the Detectives” features music that evokes old private-eye films of the 1940s to compliment that episode’s subject matter. The Flash’s opening theme song is composed by Danny Elfman and sounds like a recycled version of his Batman theme. The Flash is a keen show that had the potential to be much greater than it was. Its adherence to the original source material and the earnest portrayal of the characters by the core cast give the series its irresistible allure. This is essential viewing for comic book and sci-fi fans and it definitely deserves a spot on your DVD shelf.