REVIEW: WHITE CHICKS

CAST
Marlon Wayans (Dungeons and Dragons)
Shawn Wayans (Scary Movie)
Jaime King (Sin City)
Frankie Faison (The Silence of The Lambs)
Lochlyn Munro (Freddy vs Jason)
John Heard (The Lizzie Borden Chronicles)
Busy Philipps (The Smokers)
Terry Crews (Get Smart)
Brittany Daniel (That 80S Show)
Jennifer Carpenter (Limitless tv)
Evangeline Lilly (Lost)
Jessica Cauffiel (Valentine)
Anne Dudek (House)
Steven Grayhm (Between)
David Lewis (Man of Steel)
Kristi Angus (Jason X)
Luciana Carro (Helix)
The plot begins in a convenience store where two FBI agents and brothers, Kevin Copeland and Marcus Copeland (Shawn and Marlon Wayans), try to capture members of an organization that sells drugs inside ice cream boxes, posing as dominican clerks. Unfortunately, the first arrival turns out to be a genuine ice cream delivery, and the actual drug dealers manage to get away. The situation is worsened by the fact that Kevin and Marcus have decided to resolve this bust by themselves.
The FBI supervisor, Elliott Gordon (Frankie Faison), gives the two agents a last chance to remain in the FBI by giving them the duty of protecting the mega-rich billionaire cruise line heiresses Brittany and Tiffany Wilson (Maitland Ward and Anne Dudek), who are arriving in town for a beauty competition, from a kidnapping plot (known as the socialite kidnappings). When the Wilson sisters get minor facial cuts in a car accident, they refuse to leave the hotel. Kevin and Marcus then disguise themselves as Wilson sister look-alikes in order to save their jobs.
At the Hamptons hotel, Kevin and Marcus meet Brittany and Tiffany’s three best friends, Karen, Tori and Lisa, and their rivals Megan and Heather Vandegeld. They also encounter Karen’s abusive boyfriend, Heath, a broke, out of work actor. John “where am I” Lydon shows an interest in the news reporter Brett Porter, but the affair becomes more and more complicated as the two agents must now repeatedly switch between their gender roles. Marcus’ wife Gina, whose relationship is already troubled, becomes an additional complicating factor as she gets suspicious when she hears a woman’s voice in the background during a phone conversation with Marcus. The woman is actually Kevin pretending to be female, but Gina does not know and assumes that Marcus is conducting an affair. Meanwhile, Latrell Spencer (Terry Crews) takes an interest in Marcus, thinking that he is Tiffany and white. A date with Marcus/Tiffany is then sold off to Latrell during a charity dinner. Kevin takes advantage of the situation and asks Denise out on a date, pretending that he is Latrell, as Denise has a history of dating rich men. When Marcus goes on his date with Latrell, Kevin steals the keys to his car and house. When Kevin and Denise arrive at Latrell’s house, they are confronted by Latrell’s foreign housekeeper. Because she does not speak English, Kevin pretends that he understands her and locks her out of the house claiming that she works too hard. Eventually, Kevin gets mauled by Latrell’s giant dog, generally ruining his date.
At a nightclub, Karen drinks heavily and unintentionally let’s slip that Mr. Vangergeld is penniless, and has only recently paid Karen’s own father back for loans he has lent him. The next day, the real Brittany and Tiffany see their faces on a magazine, and they realize that two people are impersonating them. They go to the hotel their ‘clones’ were seen in, and two agents, thinking that they are Kevin and Marcus after searching their room through suspicion, undress them. This leads to the chief finding out that Marcus and Kevin have been impersonating Brittany and Tiffany. Because of this, the chief fires the both of them. Later on, Kevin and Marcus find out that due to his bankruptcy Mr. Vandergeld, along with Heath, has been behind the socialiate kidnappings in order to save himself and his family from poverty. They manage to capture Mr. Vandergeld before he succeeds in his plan. Latrell takes a hit from a bullet shot by Mr. Vandergeld to protect Marcus, but he is alarmed and enraged to discover that Marcus is black (He did not seem to mind that Marcus was male). Marcus apologizes to Gina, after realizing that being a female is a hard task, and because he had been ignoring Gina for his job. Denise falls for Kevin, after Kevin saves her from a bullet. The movie ends with Tori, Lisa, Karen, Kevin and Marcus making a pact to stay together and go shopping.
Very funny film that cant fail to have you laughing aloud

REVIEW: LOCUSTS: DAY OF DESTRUCTION

 

CAST

Lucy Lawless (Ash vs Evil Dead)
John Heard (Home Alone)
Dylan Neal (Arrow)
Mike Farrell (Vanishing Act)
Gregory Alan Williams (Remember The Titans)
Natalija Nogulich (Red Widow)

 

Lucy-Locusts-lucy-lawless-37131768-850-709

For a TV movie, it clocks in nicely at just under 90 minutes  and doesn’t hang about getting going. CGI swarms are used in short glances but often and there’s enough mini set pieces to keep everything ticking over. Of course, nothing screams TV movie more than green text boldly being stamped across the bottom in tv movie font. The sheer lack of blood or violence in general means this PG release is disaster-lite too, however what’s here is good fun, if a bit on rails.

Lucy Lawless is clearly a talented a lady and this leads to her vastly out acting the other larger names around her. The other two male leads fail to get out of second gear when it comes to the more emotive scenes and although their acting is far from offensive – it does feel a bit like they’re coasting. Aside from that, the whole premise is hilariously silly and the end result where all of America needs to turn off their electric to save the world is laughable and reeks of heavy handed environmentalism. In addition to that, the best line in the film is “You screw with Nature and Nature will screw with you!” and you’ve got yourself a preacher. The script isn’t awful, its just by delivering all these clangers from nowhere feels a bit random on occasion.

The Locusts are well done, especially the camera work done for when you’re meant to be flying with them. It’s less cheesy than it sounds. The biggest special effect is a plane crash which is also done very well and the artistic direction of it masks the low budget with ease. If there were one let down on effects it would be that in some scenes after the initial layer of locusts are shown, behind them is just fuzzy black smudges moving about… clearly not insects!

Locusts… is not a bad film. I was entertained! Its short and doesn’t outstay its welcome, the acting in general is good, the melodrama is classic disaster movie and its a PG and so rates as a good place to start getting your youngsters into disaster movies! Lucy Lawless is always watchable.

 

REVIEW: THE LIZZIE BORDEN CHRONICLES

MAIN CAST
Christina Ricci (The Addams Family)
Clea DuVall (The Faculty)
Cole Hauser (2 Fast 2 Furiuous)
GUEST / RECURRING CAST
John Heard (Prison Break)
Andrew Howard (Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.)
Olivia Llewellyn (Penny Dreadful)
Jeff Wincott (S.W.A.T.)
Michael Ironside (Total Recall)
John Ralston (Bitten)
Bradley Stryker (Izombie)
Jessy Schram (Veronica Mars)
Jonathan Banks (Highlander: The Series)
Rhys Coiro (30 Days of Night: Dark Days)
Stephen McHattie (300)
Ronan Vibert (Hex)
Michelle Fairley (Game of Thrones)

What happens after Lizzie Borden takes an ax to her father and stepmother? Lifetime follows up its popular television movie from 2014 about the notorious accused murderess with an eight-episode miniseries sequel that becomes a guilty pleasure


Lizzie (Christina Ricci) has been cleared of all wrongdoing in those earlier killings, though the townspeople of Fall River, Mass. suspect that she’s gotten away with murder. Lizzie delights in her new infamy, taking all the shade-throwing stares in stride and scaring the local children as opportunity permits. Trouble comes quickly, however, when her father’s former business partner, William Almy (John Heard), makes claims on the Borden estate.  Suddenly, Lizzie and her sister, Emma (Clea DuVall), find themselves threatened with bankruptcy, which doesn’t please their deadbeat half brother, William (Andrew Howard), who has appeared out of the blue looking for a handout. As if that weren’t enough, there’s also the matter of the dogged Pinkerton agent Charlie Siringo (Cole Hauser), who has come to town with the express aim of proving Lizzie’s criminality. Even Better Call Saul’s Jonathan Banks shows up as a scarily temperamental gangster who does his best to intimidate Lizzie. What’s a girl to do in the face of all this threatening machismo but strengthen her resolve and sharpen ye ole hatchet? It’s not long into the first episode before Lizzie’s back to her murderous ways, bleeding men out with the well-placed stab of a hairpin or getting them drunk enough that they can more easily be pushed from high places with nooses around their necks.


The Lizzie Borden Chronicles best talent comes exclusively from Ricci and DuVall, who have a delectable rapport not too far removed from Bette Davis and Joan Crawford at their hag-horror peak in What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? Ricci’s porcelain-doll features make her seem even more alluringly alien now than she did as a child actress. There’s a winking self-consciousness to her portrayal of Lizzie that works to the character’s advantage; she’s like an out-of-time avenging angel, a feminist icon (before there were words to describe it) lashing out at patriarchy the only way she knows how. By contrast, DuVall is all plain-faced earnestness and the loving voice of reason that complements Lizzie’s lunacy, at least for now. It’s often tough to play the straight man to a more flashy companion, but DuVall does it exceptionally well.


The sisters’ relationship intrigues because it constantly seems on the point of implosion, and does come to a head by the end of the miniseries.