25 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS REVIEW: HOME ALONE 2: LOST IN NEW YORK

Starring

Macaulay Culkin (Saved)
Joe Pesci (JFK)
Catherine O’Hara (Beetlejuice)
Daniel Stern (The Wonder Years)
John Heard (Runner Runner)
Diana Rein (Dennis The Menace)
Anna Slotky (3rd Rock From The Sun)
Devin Ratray (R.I.P.D.)
Hillary Wolf (Sunday Drive)
Michael C. Maronna (40 Days and 40 Nights)
Gerry Bamman (Runaway Jury)
Kieran Culkin (Scott Pilgrim vs The World)
Senta Moses Mikan (My So-Called Life)
Brenda Fricke (Inside I’m Dancing)r
Tim Curry (IT)
Eddie Bracken (Oscar)
Rob Schneider (The Hot Chick)
Dana Ivey (The Help)
Ally Sheedy (Short Circuit)
Ron Canada (Wedding Crashers)
Abdoulaye NGom (My Name Is Earl)

Macaulay Culkin, Joe Pesci, and Daniel Stern in Home Alone 2: Lost in New York (1992)The McCallister family is preparing to spend Christmas in Miami, gathering at Peter and Kate’s home outside of Chicago. Peter and Kate’s youngest son, Kevin, sees Florida as contradictory to Christmas, due to the lack of Christmas trees in Florida. Later, at a school Christmas pageant, Kevin’s older brother Buzz humiliates him, causing Kevin to retaliate and ruins the pageant. Back home, Kevin storms to the third floor of the house after refusing to apologize to his family. During the night, Peter accidentally resets the alarm clock, causing the entire family to oversleep. At the airport, the family rushes to their plane.Macaulay Culkin in Home Alone 2: Lost in New York (1992)Kevin stops to replace the batteries for his Talkboy, carrying Peter’s bag which contains the batteries (along with Peter’s wallet and large amounts of cash). Losing sight of his family, Kevin inadvertently boards a flight to New York City after mistakenly following a man wearing a jacket identical to Peter’s. Upon arrival in New York City, Kevin decides to have fun with his unexpected adventure and tour the city. While there, Kevin meets a homeless woman tending to pigeons at Central Park, which frightens him. Kevin goes to the Plaza Hotel, where he uses Peter’s credit card to check in. Meanwhile, the “Wet Bandits”, Harry and Marv, have traveled to New York City after escaping during a prison riot and now call themselves the “Sticky Bandits”.Macaulay Culkin in Home Alone 2: Lost in New York (1992)On Christmas Eve, Kevin tours the city via a limousine and visits a toy store where he meets its philanthropic owner, Mr. E.F. Duncan. Kevin learns that the proceeds from the store’s Christmas sales will be donated to a children’s hospital, and provides a donation. As a token of appreciation, Mr. Duncan offers Kevin a pair of ceramic turtledoves as a gift, instructing him to give one to another person as a sign of eternal friendship. After a run-in with Harry and Marv, Kevin rushes back to the Plaza. The hotel’s suspicious concierge, Mr. Hector, confronts Kevin about the credit card, which has been reported stolen. Kevin flees the hotel after evading Mr. Hector, but he is eventually caught by Harry and Marv. They brag about their plan to break into the toy store at midnight, just before Kevin manages to escape from them.After landing at Miami International Airport, the rest of the family discovers that Kevin is missing. After tracking the whereabouts of the “stolen” credit card, they fly to New York to search for him. Meanwhile, Kevin goes to his uncle Rob’s townhouse, only to find the house vacant and undergoing renovations while Rob and his family are still in Paris. At Central Park, he encounters and befriends the pigeon lady. They go to Carnegie Hall, where the pigeon lady explains how her life collapsed when her lover left her. Kevin encourages her to trust people again, and promises to be her friend.Macaulay Culkin in Home Alone 2: Lost in New York (1992)Kevin returns to the townhouse and rigs it with numerous booby traps. He later arrives at the toy store during Harry and Marv’s robbery and breaks the store’s window, setting off the alarm. Kevin then lures the duo to the townhouse, where they spring the traps and suffer various injuries. While the duo pursues Kevin outside of the townhouse, he calls the police before Harry and Marv catch him and discuss how they will kill him in Central Park. Before they can shoot him, the pigeon lady has her pigeons incapacitate them. Kevin sets off fireworks to signal the police, who arrest Harry and Marv. At the toy store, Mr. Duncan finds a note from Kevin, explaining about the robbery.Macaulay Culkin in Home Alone 2: Lost in New York (1992)While searching for Kevin, Kate remembers his fondness for Christmas trees and heads to Rockefeller Center. After observing Kevin making a wish at the Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree, Kate meets him there and they reconcile. On Christmas Day, a truckload of gifts arrive at the McCallisters’ hotel room from the toy store. Kevin reconciles with the rest of his family, and goes to Central Park to give the pigeon lady the second turtledove, cementing their friendship. At the Plaza, Buzz receives the bill for Kevin’s stay and shows it to Peter who calls out, “Kevin! You spent $967 on room service?!” prompting Kevin to run back to the hotel.Macaulay Culkin, Joe Pesci, and Daniel Stern in Home Alone 2: Lost in New York (1992)Home Alone 2: Lost in New York was an absolute blast.  I love this movie and I’m always going to recommend it for a good watch, I think you’ll enjoy it if you give it a chance.

25 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS REVIEW: HOME ALONE

Starring

Macaulay Culkin (Saved)
Joe Pesci (JFK)
Catherine O’Hara (Beetlejuice)
Daniel Stern (The Wonder Years)
John Heard (Runner Runner)
Roberts Blossom (Christine)
Angela Goethals (Spanglish)
Anna Slotky (3rd Rock From The Sun)
Devin Ratray (R.I.P.D.)
Gerry Bamman (Runaway Jury)
Hillary Wolf (Sunday Drive)
Larry Hankin (Breaking Bad)
John Candy (Spaceballs)
Michael C. Maronna (40 Days and 40 Nights)
Kristin Minter (Highlander: The Series)
Kieran Culkin (Scott Pilgrim vs The World)
Diana Rein (Dennis The Menace)
Senta Moses Mikan (My So-Called Life)
Hope Davis (Captain America: Civil War)

Macaulay Culkin in Home Alone (1990)The McCallister family is preparing to spend Christmas in Paris, gathering at Peter and Kate’s home outside of Chicago on the night before their departure. Peter and Kate’s youngest son, Kevin, is being scorned by his siblings and cousins. Later, Kevin accidentally ruins the family dinner after a fight with his older brother Buzz, resulting in him getting sent to the attic of the house for punishment where he berates Kate and wishes that his family would disappear. During the night, heavy winds cause damage to the power lines, which causes a power outage and resets the alarm clocks, causing the family to oversleep. In the confusion and rush to get to the airport, Kevin is accidentally left behind.Macaulay Culkin and Daniel Stern in Home Alone (1990)Kevin wakes to find the house empty and, thinking his wish has come true, is overjoyed with his newfound freedom. However, he soon becomes frightened by his next door neighbor, Old Man Marley, who is rumored to be a serial killer who murdered his family; as well as the “Wet Bandits”, Harry and Marv, a pair of burglars who have been breaking into other vacant houses in the neighborhood and have targeted the McCallisters’ house. Kevin tricks the pair into thinking his family is home, forcing them to put their plans on hold.Macaulay Culkin and Joe Pesci in Home Alone (1990)Kate discovers mid-flight that Kevin is missing and upon arrival in Paris, the family discovers that all flights for the next two days are booked. Peter and the rest of the family stays in his brother’s apartment in the city while Kate manages to get a flight back to the United States, only to get as far as Scranton, Pennsylvania. She attempts to book a flight to Chicago but again, everything is booked. Unable to accept this, Kate is overheard by Gus Polinski – the lead member of a traveling polka band – who offers to let her travel with them to Chicago on their way to Milwaukee in a moving van, which she graciously accepts.Meanwhile, Harry and Marv realize that Kevin is alone, and on Christmas Eve, Kevin overhears them discussing plans to break into his house that night. Kevin starts to miss his family and asks the local mall Santa if he could bring his family back for Christmas. He goes to church and watches a choir perform and meets Old Man Marley, who dispels the rumors about him. He points out his granddaughter in the choir, whom he never gets to meet as he and his son are estranged; Kevin suggests that he should reconcile with his son.Kevin returns home and rigs the house with booby traps to take on the bandits. Harry and Marv break in, spring the traps and suffer various injuries. While the duo pursues Kevin around the house, he calls the police and flees, luring the duo into a neighboring home which they previously broke into. Harry and Marv subdue him, but Marley sneaks in and knocks them unconscious with his shovel before they can harm Kevin. The police arrive and arrest Harry and Marv, having identified all the houses they broke into due to the latter’s habit of flooding them.564564465On Christmas Day, Kevin is disappointed to find that his family is still gone, and discovers that Santa is not real due to the untouched state of his cookies and milk. He then hears Kate enter the house and call for him; they reconcile and are soon joined by the rest of the McCallisters, who waited in Paris until they could get a direct flight to Chicago. Kevin keeps silent about his encounter with Harry and Marv, although Peter finds Harry’s knocked-out gold tooth. Kevin then observes Marley reuniting with his son and his family. Marley notices Kevin, and the pair wave to each other. Buzz suddenly calls out, “Kevin, what did you do to my room?” at which point Kevin runs off.lead_960All in all, ‘Home Alone’ is probably the best Christmas movie to rise out of the film industry in the last twenty years. It seamlessly blends humor, pain, emotion, human instinct and some great booby-traps all into one little bundle. This film has stood the test of time greatly.

 

REVIEW: BATTLESTAR GALACTICA (2004) – SEASON 2

Starring

Edward James Olmos (Blade Runner)
Mary McDonnell (Donnie Darko)
Katee Sackhoff (Riddick)
Jamie Bamber (Marcella)
James Callis (Flashforward)
Tricia Helfer (Powers)
Grace Park (Hawaii Five-0)
Michael Hogan (Red Riding Hood)
Aaron Douglas (Chaos)
Nicki Clyne (Saved!)
Tahmoh Penikett (Dollhouse)
Kandyse McClure (Mother’s Day)
Paul Campbell (Knight Rider)
Alessandro Juliani (Smallville)

Tahmoh Penikett and Katee Sackhoff in Battlestar Galactica (2004)Recurring / Notable Guest Cast

Samuel Witwer (Smallville)
Donnelly Rhodes (Legends of Tomorrow)
Rekha Sharma (V)
Callum Keith Rennie (Impulse)
Lucy Lawless (Ash vs Evil Dead)
Matthew Bennett (Stargate SG.1)
Dean Stockwell (Quantum Leap)
Rick Worthy (The Vampire Diaries)
Richard Hatch (InAlienable)
Lorena Gale (The Exorcism of Emily Rose)
Michael Trucco (Sabrina: TTW)
Michelle Forbes (Powers)
Graham Beckel (The Loft)
Leah Cairns (Interstellar)
Bodie Olmos (Walkout)
Luciana Carro (Helix)
Kate Vernon (Heores)
Alonso Oyarzun (Reindeer Games)
Jen Halley (Red Riding Hood)
Ty Olsson (War of TPOTA)
Aleks Paunovic (Van Helsing)
Malcolm Stewart (Jumanji)
Dominic Zamprogna (Stargate Universe)
James Remar (BLack Lightning)
Patricia Idlette (Ginger Snaps 2)
Benjamin Ayres (The Vampire Diaries)
Don Thompson (Watchmen)
Fulvio Cecere (Valentine)
John Pyper-Ferguson (Caprica)
Sebastian Spence (First Waves)
Mike Dopud (Arrow)
Vincent Gale (Bates Motel)
Colm Feore (Thor)
David Richmond-Peck (Sanctuary)
Claudette Mink (Paycheck)
Bill Duke (Black Lightning)
Christopher Jacot (Slasher)
John Heard (Home Alone)
Kavan Smith (Staragte Atlantis)
Stefanie von Pfetten (Cracked)
Erica Cerra (Power Rangers)
Alisen Down (Smallville)
David Kaye (Beast Wars)
Colin Lawrence (Watchmen)

Some cynical individual, at some time, blurted out that “there’s always room for improvement” about an accomplishment or achievement that was fine in its own right. In the spectrum of film and television, it’s true that all material can be tightened, focused, and made even more compelling with practice; but oftentimes creative teams fall back into comfort zones and neglect to spit-shine where improvement is needed. Ronald Moore and David Eick, the creators of the reimagined Battlestar Galactica series, understand this concept. They accomplished something intriguing, thrilling, and dramatically magnetic with their initial 2003 miniseries and, later, a full subsequent season that grappled the structure of the three-hour introduction — characters, mythos, and stunning production merits through striking photography and convincing computer effects — and ran with it. However, there’s always room for improvement, and Battlestar Galactica’s second season finds a deeper focus and more thrill-inducing pace that fully ratchets the series into the stratosphere of superb science-fiction creations.Nicki Clyne and Aaron Douglas in Battlestar Galactica (2004)The first season constructs a “reboot” of the highest accord, taking the original content from the 1978 television series and shaping it into an edgy and modern production in the vein of “West Wing … in space”. Grecian mythology, military-heavy hierarchal bickering, and the relationships between people on the space ship Galactica — both tender and volatile — are all sparked into action when the Cylons, humanity’s slave-like machines evolved into enlightened yet vengeful beings, attack their creators after 40 years of recoiled hibernation. These attacks, which left around 50,000 humans alive, wiped out sixteen of the individuals in-line for the presidency over the “colonies”, which left Secretary of Education Laura Roslin (Mary McDonnell, Dances With Wolves) as the next in line. Somehow, this all gyrates around the weasel-like scheming of Dr. Gaius Baltar (James Callis, Bridget Jones’ Diary), who inadvertently fell for the whims of a blonde-haired Cylon (Tricia Helfer) and revealed humanity’s defense secrets — and, now, follows orders from the sultry “machine” in the confines of his own mind, with her as little more than an illusion reminding him of his “importance” as one of God’s pawns. Monotheistic God, not polytheistic, but that’ll become important later on.After its thrilling two-part miniseries and a handful of tense cat-and-mouse episodes at the start, the first season (which should be viewed before continuing this review, as the context here relies on the fact that you’ve seen the first season) coasts along a stream of dynamic back-and-forths between Galactica’s Commander Bill Adama (Edward James Olmos, Blade Runner) and President Roslin — leading to a point where Adama is stretched out on the ship’s command center deck, bleeding from gunshot wounds incurred by an assassination attempt. Season Two picks up directly after the shooting, showing how the military hierarchy moves its pieces around Adama’s incapacitation. His XO (second in command) Saul Tigh (Michael Hogan) wrestles with his alcohol addiction as he tries to juggle an unwanted leadership position, shrug off his wife Ellen’s (Kate Vernon) passenger-seat manipulation of the Galactica’s workings, and make the colonies understand why President Roslin has been arrested for subordination. On top of that, we’re also watching the way Adama’s ailment affects his son, Captain Lee Adama (Jamie Bamber), as his allegiance to the Colonial fleet sways between loyalty to his father and his belief in what the theologically-focused President Roslin is trying to accomplish.Richard Hatch and Michael Hogan in Battlestar Galactica (2004)But, as Battlestar Galactica veterans know, that core quarrel really only scoops up the top layer of the conflicts that lie underneath the Colonial fleet’s hunt for a safe, habitable planet — whether it be the fabled planet Earth, the newly-discovered planet of Kobol, or beyond. Season Two also finds a deeper focus on Kara Thrace (Katee Sackhoff, “Nip/Tuck”), aka Starbuck, as more than a novel imitation of the classic series’ character, concentrating on the depth of her belief in the gods, her bull-headedness giving way to a need for deeper connections with others, and a particular point where she’s, dare I say it, made hopelessly vulnerable in the episode “The Farm”. This happens on Cylon-occupied Caprica, the colonies’ once-thriving central metropolis, where she and Lieutenant ‘Helo’ Agathon (Tahmoh Penikett, “Dollhouse”) are attempting to locate a way off the planet and back to Galactica with the “Arrow of Apollo” in their possession. There, they interact with a second version of the “Sharon” model of Cylon (Grace Park), pregnant with Helo’s child and rebellious against her kind. Along those same lines, we also see how the cluster of Colonial soldiers stranded on Kobol — deck chief Galen Tyrol (Aaron Douglas) and his “knuckledragger” subordinates, as well as Vice President Baltar — find a way to survive until they’re able to make an escape attempt.Mary McDonnell and Katee Sackhoff in Battlestar Galactica (2004)Though the introductory season of Battlestar Galactica triumphs for establishing the storyline’s intricacies, a broad spectrum of characters, and suspenseful density, Ron Moore and David Eick still had a handful of creaks in the series’ bow that needed repair — such as tighter concentration on the political banter and more focused balancing between space warfare and non-CIC dramatics. Though intriguing to some, including myself, those elements also tended to bog down the pacing to a degree that could deter some from its deliberate concentration on policy. It’s important, and necessary, for a lengthy story to grow beyond its limitations, and the Moore / Eick team hone the introductory season’s successes into a poised, pulsating blend of drama and thrills that bolsters its initial successes forward two-fold. Everything that underscores the series’ quality — superb, straight-faced acting, slickly detailed cinematography ranging from cold and dark to acidic and overblown, and some of the best music on television, period — persists into the second season, now attached to a sense of obvious plot refinement.Jamie Bamber and Katee Sackhoff in Battlestar Galactica (2004)

does it differ? Well, this season knows when and how to play its cards, where the initial season struggles in knowing exactly what to do with the substantially impressive content that it’s generating. The thematic density that it crams into this season is staggering; the complications of martial law (military control of the government), delicateness around following an idealist (dying) leader with religion as their driving force, technology’s advancement and control over our everyday activity, the necessity of black market trade, and, eventually, the power of government-mandated control over population control. All of these elements are timely and meaningful, even allegorical to conflicts present in modern society, and they’re handled with a specific panache in this second season that remains vigilant throughout. But they’re not overtly heavy-handed; sly incorporation allows us to view these elements merely on the surface for service of the story or as deeper insights — whichever suits the viewer.James Remar and Jamie Bamber in Battlestar Galactica (2004)On top of that, Moore and Eick have set sights on how to tie these heady elements in with the bustling activity of operatic space battles, and they’ve succeeded in a way that maintains the series’ accessibility. The hyper-elaborate technobabble prevalent in other series — such as bits and pieces about a ship that “made the Kessel Run in less than twelve parsecs” and about “trionic initiators in the warp coil” — gets tossed aside to allow for a direct focus on human interactions, such as ebbs and flows between father and son in authoritative positions, the fear and fatigue within a crew that’s never given much of a chance to relax, and an affinity with Laura Roslin as she succumbs to terminal breast cancer. Emotion-heavy episodes, such as the excellent “Flight of the Phoenix” where Chief Tyrol finds distraction and a sense of hope in building a new fighter ship from scraps, are there solely for that purpose. They even work in cliché taglines like, “They can run, but they can’t hide”, and hokey plot points like a bona-fide love triangle to convincing degrees — well, with their own spins on the material. In that, the creators rope us into the emotional fabric as if we’re members of the crew, sharing their plights. We’re not forced to try and comprehend scientific jargon, aside from a few scattered discussions about firewalls, viruses, and FTL drives, but instead asked to unswervingly, and powerlessly, hold our focus on the shifts in power aboard the Galactica.Mary McDonnell, Edward James Olmos, Jamie Bamber, and Katee Sackhoff in Battlestar Galactica (2004)Then, with a flick of the writers’ wrists, they change the way that we perceive just about everything in the series with the episode “Pegasus”. Out of nowhere, another one of the colonial fighter bases, the Battlestar Pegasus, arrives unexpectedly within the proximity of Galactica’s location. Once both have confirmed that they’re friendly ships, we’re introduced to Admiral Helena Cain (Michelle Forbes) — a strong, bloodthirsty woman with a very tight, dictatorial grip on her ship. Unlike the Galactica, the Pegasus is competitive, hardened, chauvinistic and far more stringent on policy, which creates a world of conflict once the two commanders begin comparing notes on Galactica’s personnel issues, power rankings, and the lenience in handling a Cylon prisoner. More importantly, Admiral Cain is Adama’s superior officer, and her iron-fist reclaim of power decidedly tears the fleet apart. In a matter of forty-some-odd minutes, the entire power structure of Battlestar Galactica is rearranged and tossed into volatile disarray, left for our characters to plot around and sort out. And it makes for thoroughly gut-swelling television because of it, stretching over an impressive three-episode arc (“Pegasus”, “Resurrection Ship” Parts One and Two).Lucy Lawless and Patrick Harrison in Battlestar Galactica (2004)It’s at this point, once the dust clears from the Pegasus incidents, that Battlestar Galactica begins to really claim a place in the annals of science-fiction as one of its finest creations — even with a few stumbling blocks that it still fights against. Ellen Tigh’s manipulation of Saul while he’s in command of the Galactica borders on the unbelievable, though one can certainly understand the swaying power of a significant other. A few character moments feel shoehorned into the mix, such as Lee’s character history revelations in “Black Market”, where the desire to beef up each and every character overreaches their bounds. And, quite simply, one or two of the episodes still fall a tad flat, whether they’re because of an unattractive character coming into focus, such as the hot-rod stem junkie pilot Kat in the ho-hum filler ep “Scar”, or the show simply attempting to do things that it can’t pull off, like the meandering MTV reality show style footage in “Final Cut”. Each of these faults are minor blemishes on otherwise successful, and thought-provoking, installments into the story arc, proving that even weak Battlestar Galactica episodes can be compelling to a middling degree.James Callis and Tricia Helfer in Battlestar Galactica (2004)With its continual and newly-sprung ideas bubbling at the cusp, Moore and Eick reach a conclusion to the second season, the masterful two-parter “Lay Down Your Burdens”, that focuses on the much-anticipated presidential race alluded to in the first season. Restoration of complete democracy and humanization become the weighty element at play, as the candidates — surprises aplenty — duke it out with the fleet’s concerns of safe planetary habitat and population boom as key driving forces. The interplay between all of the individuals is brilliant; however, it’s the outcome, and the legitimately shocking twist at the end of the finale, that’ll likely send one on a contemplative tailspin. With no less than three cliffhanger episodes in this season, it’s only expected that the finale in itself would be a weighty one, and Syfy’s heavy-hitting series doesn’t disappoint in that regard. It’s a brilliant way to swirl the entire season together, even if everything is turned upside down once again. That’s part of Ron Moore and David Eick’s game, a sci-fi neo-political chessgame that’s well worth playing.

 

REVIEW: WHITE CHICKS

CAST
Marlon Wayans (Dungeons and Dragons)
Shawn Wayans (Scary Movie)
Jaime King (Sin City)
Frankie Faison (The Silence of The Lambs)
Lochlyn Munro (Freddy vs Jason)
John Heard (The Lizzie Borden Chronicles)
Busy Philipps (The Smokers)
Terry Crews (Get Smart)
Brittany Daniel (That 80S Show)
Jennifer Carpenter (Limitless tv)
Evangeline Lilly (Lost)
Jessica Cauffiel (Valentine)
Anne Dudek (House)
Steven Grayhm (Between)
David Lewis (Man of Steel)
Kristi Angus (Jason X)
Luciana Carro (Helix)
The plot begins in a convenience store where two FBI agents and brothers, Kevin Copeland and Marcus Copeland (Shawn and Marlon Wayans), try to capture members of an organization that sells drugs inside ice cream boxes, posing as dominican clerks. Unfortunately, the first arrival turns out to be a genuine ice cream delivery, and the actual drug dealers manage to get away. The situation is worsened by the fact that Kevin and Marcus have decided to resolve this bust by themselves.
The FBI supervisor, Elliott Gordon (Frankie Faison), gives the two agents a last chance to remain in the FBI by giving them the duty of protecting the mega-rich billionaire cruise line heiresses Brittany and Tiffany Wilson (Maitland Ward and Anne Dudek), who are arriving in town for a beauty competition, from a kidnapping plot (known as the socialite kidnappings). When the Wilson sisters get minor facial cuts in a car accident, they refuse to leave the hotel. Kevin and Marcus then disguise themselves as Wilson sister look-alikes in order to save their jobs.
At the Hamptons hotel, Kevin and Marcus meet Brittany and Tiffany’s three best friends, Karen, Tori and Lisa, and their rivals Megan and Heather Vandegeld. They also encounter Karen’s abusive boyfriend, Heath, a broke, out of work actor. John “where am I” Lydon shows an interest in the news reporter Brett Porter, but the affair becomes more and more complicated as the two agents must now repeatedly switch between their gender roles. Marcus’ wife Gina, whose relationship is already troubled, becomes an additional complicating factor as she gets suspicious when she hears a woman’s voice in the background during a phone conversation with Marcus. The woman is actually Kevin pretending to be female, but Gina does not know and assumes that Marcus is conducting an affair. Meanwhile, Latrell Spencer (Terry Crews) takes an interest in Marcus, thinking that he is Tiffany and white. A date with Marcus/Tiffany is then sold off to Latrell during a charity dinner. Kevin takes advantage of the situation and asks Denise out on a date, pretending that he is Latrell, as Denise has a history of dating rich men. When Marcus goes on his date with Latrell, Kevin steals the keys to his car and house. When Kevin and Denise arrive at Latrell’s house, they are confronted by Latrell’s foreign housekeeper. Because she does not speak English, Kevin pretends that he understands her and locks her out of the house claiming that she works too hard. Eventually, Kevin gets mauled by Latrell’s giant dog, generally ruining his date.
At a nightclub, Karen drinks heavily and unintentionally let’s slip that Mr. Vangergeld is penniless, and has only recently paid Karen’s own father back for loans he has lent him. The next day, the real Brittany and Tiffany see their faces on a magazine, and they realize that two people are impersonating them. They go to the hotel their ‘clones’ were seen in, and two agents, thinking that they are Kevin and Marcus after searching their room through suspicion, undress them. This leads to the chief finding out that Marcus and Kevin have been impersonating Brittany and Tiffany. Because of this, the chief fires the both of them. Later on, Kevin and Marcus find out that due to his bankruptcy Mr. Vandergeld, along with Heath, has been behind the socialiate kidnappings in order to save himself and his family from poverty. They manage to capture Mr. Vandergeld before he succeeds in his plan. Latrell takes a hit from a bullet shot by Mr. Vandergeld to protect Marcus, but he is alarmed and enraged to discover that Marcus is black (He did not seem to mind that Marcus was male). Marcus apologizes to Gina, after realizing that being a female is a hard task, and because he had been ignoring Gina for his job. Denise falls for Kevin, after Kevin saves her from a bullet. The movie ends with Tori, Lisa, Karen, Kevin and Marcus making a pact to stay together and go shopping.
Very funny film that cant fail to have you laughing aloud

REVIEW: LOCUSTS: DAY OF DESTRUCTION

 

CAST

Lucy Lawless (Ash vs Evil Dead)
John Heard (Home Alone)
Dylan Neal (Arrow)
Mike Farrell (Vanishing Act)
Gregory Alan Williams (Remember The Titans)
Natalija Nogulich (Red Widow)

 

Lucy-Locusts-lucy-lawless-37131768-850-709

For a TV movie, it clocks in nicely at just under 90 minutes  and doesn’t hang about getting going. CGI swarms are used in short glances but often and there’s enough mini set pieces to keep everything ticking over. Of course, nothing screams TV movie more than green text boldly being stamped across the bottom in tv movie font. The sheer lack of blood or violence in general means this PG release is disaster-lite too, however what’s here is good fun, if a bit on rails.

Lucy Lawless is clearly a talented a lady and this leads to her vastly out acting the other larger names around her. The other two male leads fail to get out of second gear when it comes to the more emotive scenes and although their acting is far from offensive – it does feel a bit like they’re coasting. Aside from that, the whole premise is hilariously silly and the end result where all of America needs to turn off their electric to save the world is laughable and reeks of heavy handed environmentalism. In addition to that, the best line in the film is “You screw with Nature and Nature will screw with you!” and you’ve got yourself a preacher. The script isn’t awful, its just by delivering all these clangers from nowhere feels a bit random on occasion.

The Locusts are well done, especially the camera work done for when you’re meant to be flying with them. It’s less cheesy than it sounds. The biggest special effect is a plane crash which is also done very well and the artistic direction of it masks the low budget with ease. If there were one let down on effects it would be that in some scenes after the initial layer of locusts are shown, behind them is just fuzzy black smudges moving about… clearly not insects!

Locusts… is not a bad film. I was entertained! Its short and doesn’t outstay its welcome, the acting in general is good, the melodrama is classic disaster movie and its a PG and so rates as a good place to start getting your youngsters into disaster movies! Lucy Lawless is always watchable.

 

REVIEW: THE LIZZIE BORDEN CHRONICLES

MAIN CAST
Christina Ricci (The Addams Family)
Clea DuVall (The Faculty)
Cole Hauser (2 Fast 2 Furiuous)
GUEST / RECURRING CAST
John Heard (Prison Break)
Andrew Howard (Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.)
Olivia Llewellyn (Penny Dreadful)
Jeff Wincott (S.W.A.T.)
Michael Ironside (Total Recall)
John Ralston (Bitten)
Bradley Stryker (Izombie)
Jessy Schram (Veronica Mars)
Jonathan Banks (Highlander: The Series)
Rhys Coiro (30 Days of Night: Dark Days)
Stephen McHattie (300)
Ronan Vibert (Hex)
Michelle Fairley (Game of Thrones)

What happens after Lizzie Borden takes an ax to her father and stepmother? Lifetime follows up its popular television movie from 2014 about the notorious accused murderess with an eight-episode miniseries sequel that becomes a guilty pleasure


Lizzie (Christina Ricci) has been cleared of all wrongdoing in those earlier killings, though the townspeople of Fall River, Mass. suspect that she’s gotten away with murder. Lizzie delights in her new infamy, taking all the shade-throwing stares in stride and scaring the local children as opportunity permits. Trouble comes quickly, however, when her father’s former business partner, William Almy (John Heard), makes claims on the Borden estate.  Suddenly, Lizzie and her sister, Emma (Clea DuVall), find themselves threatened with bankruptcy, which doesn’t please their deadbeat half brother, William (Andrew Howard), who has appeared out of the blue looking for a handout. As if that weren’t enough, there’s also the matter of the dogged Pinkerton agent Charlie Siringo (Cole Hauser), who has come to town with the express aim of proving Lizzie’s criminality. Even Better Call Saul’s Jonathan Banks shows up as a scarily temperamental gangster who does his best to intimidate Lizzie. What’s a girl to do in the face of all this threatening machismo but strengthen her resolve and sharpen ye ole hatchet? It’s not long into the first episode before Lizzie’s back to her murderous ways, bleeding men out with the well-placed stab of a hairpin or getting them drunk enough that they can more easily be pushed from high places with nooses around their necks.


The Lizzie Borden Chronicles best talent comes exclusively from Ricci and DuVall, who have a delectable rapport not too far removed from Bette Davis and Joan Crawford at their hag-horror peak in What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? Ricci’s porcelain-doll features make her seem even more alluringly alien now than she did as a child actress. There’s a winking self-consciousness to her portrayal of Lizzie that works to the character’s advantage; she’s like an out-of-time avenging angel, a feminist icon (before there were words to describe it) lashing out at patriarchy the only way she knows how. By contrast, DuVall is all plain-faced earnestness and the loving voice of reason that complements Lizzie’s lunacy, at least for now. It’s often tough to play the straight man to a more flashy companion, but DuVall does it exceptionally well.


The sisters’ relationship intrigues because it constantly seems on the point of implosion, and does come to a head by the end of the miniseries.