REVIEW: WRONG TURN 3: LEFT FOR DEAD

CAST

Tom Frederic (Blood Trails)
Janet Montgomery (Black Swan)
Gil Kolirin (Capsule)
Christian Contreras (Zero Dark Thirty)
Jake Curran (Stardust)
Tamer Hassan (Kick-Ass)
Emma Clifford (John Carter)


Alex (Janet Montgomery) and her friends Trey (Jack Gordon), Sophie (Louise Cliffe) and Brent (Charley Speed) go into the woods of West Virginia on a rafting trip. As they are camping, Alex’s friends are killed by Three Finger. Sheriff Carver and Deputy Lane receive a report about the missing group.
Two days later, prison guard Nate (Tom Frederic) is assigned with Walter (Chucky Venn) and Preslow (Mike Straub) to transfer a group of prisoners to a distant prison. The prisoners are Crawford (Jake Curran), a car thief, Floyd (Gil Kolirin), a neo-Nazi serial killer, Brandon (Tom McKay), who was wrongly convicted of murder, Chavez (Tamer Hassan), the leader of a crime organization and Willy (Christian Contreras), an undercover agent who is posing as a prisoner in order to get information from Chavez. While driving, their bus is rammed by Three Finger’s truck and crashes in the woods of West Virginia, forcing them to continue on foot. Walter is badly injured, but Nate manages to rescue him from the truck before it explodes.
They begin to follow Alex, and on the way, they find an abandoned armored truck. Chavez tells Nate to check the cab of the truck. Nate finds a set of keys and a gun. He secretly gives the gun to Walter, after handing the keys over to Chavez. Chavez uses the keys to open the back of the truck, and finds several bags of money. He intends to steal the money and demands that everyone carry two bags, but Walter refuses because of his injury. In a last-ditch effort to regain control of the situation, Walter pulls out the gun and tries to shoot Chavez. Unfortunately, the gun is not loaded and Chavez shoots and kills Walter. Chavez forces those left alive to carry the money and they continue on foot.https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/M/MV5BMTI1ODg1NzE4MF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwMTY0NjI4Mg@@._V1_SY1000_CR0,0,1503,1000_AL_.jpg
Along the trail, they stumble upon a trap, set by Three Toe, Three Finger’s son (from the second film). They escape then catch the son and behead him, leaving a trophy on the spent booby trap for Three Finger to find as a deterrent. This enrages Three Finger’s, who sets traps for the group, killing first Willy and then Crawford. Meanwhile, Sheriff Carver decides to go looking for Nate, and Deputy Lane sets out look for the missing group of rafters. Sheriff Carver manages to find the group, but is soon killed by Three Finger. Soon after, Chavez and Floyd get into a fist fight while Brandon watches, allowing an opportunity for Nate and Alex to escape. After the fight, Chavez and Brandon leave the knocked out Floyd behind. When they hear Alex and Nate talking, they lay the money down and go to find them, taking them hostage again. They are able to find the location where the watch tower once stood, only to discover it was burned down years ago (in the first film). Meanwhile, Floyd finds the money and attempts to run away with it, but he stumbles on some rocks and cries out. Chavez hears him and finds Floyd, only to see Three Finger lobbing a molotov cocktail at Floyd, killing him and burning all the money. Chavez then decides to give Alex to Three Finger to improve his chances of survival. Three Finger drags Alex into his truck and drives off. He secures Alex at his house and goes back out to hunt the rest of the survivors. Chavez finds Three Finger and fights him, but Three Finger overpowers and kills him.
Alex awakens in Three Finger’s house, and sees Deputy Lane die in a razor wire net. Nate finds Three Finger’s house and frees Alex, but Three Finger attacks him. Alex saves him by stabbing Three Finger with a large stake. Nate and Alex take his tow truck and drive away, but Three Finger follows them and leaps on top of the truck, causing them to crash the truck into a tree. As the truck catches fire, Brandon appears and pulls Alex out. While Brandon is helping Nate, Three Finger attacks them, but Nate manages to stab him in the head with a meathook. Afterwards, a U.S. Marshal team arrives and rescues Nate and Alex. Sometime later, Nate greedily returns to take the remaining money from the armored truck. Brandon appears and betrays him, shooting him in the back with an arrow. While Brandon is taking the money, an unknown cannibal appears and bludgeons him with a crude club.
These films are what they are. Very low budget, small cast, similar theme. I’ve watched all of them and they are great. Remember, no multi millions on special effects and cgi. Proper old fashioned horror and gore with a very loose plot.

Advertisements

REVIEW: BLACK SWAN

 

CAST

Natalie Portman (Thor)
Mila Kunis (Ted)
Vincent Cassel (Jason Bourne)
Barbara Hershey (Falling Down)
Winona Ryder (Edward Scissorhands)
Ksenia Solo (Lost Girl)
Kristina Anapau (Cursed)
Janet Montgomery (Wrong Turn 3)
Sebastian Stan (Captain America: The First Avenger)
Toby Hemingway (The Finder)

Nina Sayers (Natalie Portman), is a professional dancer in a New York ballet company. Nina lives in New York City with her overprotective mother, Erica (Barbara Hershey). The company is preparing to open the season with Swan Lake. The director, Thomas Leroy (Vincent Cassel), is looking for a new principal dancer after forcing Beth Macintyre (Winona Ryder) into retirement. Thomas wants the same ballerina to portray the innocent, fragile White Swan as well as her mysterious, sensual twin, the Black Swan. Nina auditions for the part, performing flawlessly as the White Swan, but she is not able to emulate the characteristics of the Black Swan. Upset, Nina approaches Thomas and asks him to reconsider her as the lead role. Thomas forcibly kisses Nina, and she displays a change of character and bites him, convincing him that she has the ferocity to play the Black Swan. Nina begins to witness strange happenings, and her mother finds scratches on her back.

An intoxicated Beth angrily confronts Thomas and Nina. Nina is worried that she will befall the same eventual fate as Beth, but stays quiet. Thomas tells Nina she needs to give herself to the sensuality of the Black Swan. He tells her to go home and masturbate, which she does. The next day, Nina finds out that Beth was seriously injured in a car accident, and Thomas tells her it was a suicide attempt. Nina realizes Beth will never dance again, and tearfully unpacks her belongings in Beth’s former dressing room.

Thomas tells Nina to watch Lily (Mila Kunis), another dancer in the company, whom he describes as lacking Nina’s flawless technique but possessing an uninhibited quality that Nina has not shown. The relationship between Nina and Lily grows tense. During rehearsal, Thomas kisses Nina passionately, but leaves abruptly and tells her she must seduce him with her dancing. Nina finds unexplained scratches and blood on her body. Nina and her mother have an argument, interrupted by Lily’s unexpected arrival at their apartment. Lily and Nina go for a night out.

At a restaurant that evening, Lily offers Nina a capsule of ecstasy to help her relax. Initially, Nina turns it down, but later accepts a drink with ecstasy powder in it. Nina returns home late with Lily, fights with her mother, barricades herself in her room, and has sex with Lily until the latter seemingly smothers her with a pillow. The next morning, Nina wakes up alone and late for the dress rehearsal. When she arrives at the studio, she finds Lily dancing the Black Swan. After she confronts her, Lily admits she spent the night with a man she met at the club, and Nina realizes the encounter didn’t really happen. Nina’s hallucinations become stronger and more graphically sexual and violent.

Nina trashes the apartment and slams her bedroom door on her mother’s hands, and has hallucinations of becoming freakishly swanlike. Concerned about Nina’s behavior, her mother tries to prevent her from performing on opening night in an effort to keep her daughter safe. An enraged Nina forces her way out of the apartment. Thomas had assigned understudy Lily to take over, but is impressed at Nina’s confidence, and lets her play the Swan Queen. The first act goes well, until Nina is distracted by a hallucination during a lift, causing her partner to drop her. Distraught, she returns to her dressing room and finds Lily there. Lily announces her plans to play the Black Swan. Nina shoves her into a mirror, shattering it. Lily, seemingly dead, awakens, and her face changes shape, now a copy of Nina’s. The doppelganger starts to strangle Nina, who then grabs a shard of glass and stabs her rival in the stomach, apparently killing her. The doppelganger’s face reverts to that of Lily’s. Nina hides the body and returns to the stage.

Sprouting feathers, her arms become black wings as she finally loses herself and is transformed into a black swan. At the end of the act, she receives a standing ovation. Offstage, Thomas and the rest of the cast congratulate her on her stunning performance. Nina takes Thomas by surprise and kisses him. Back in her dressing room before the final act, Nina is congratulated by Lily, revealing that their fight was, again, imaginary. The mirror, however, is still shattered. Nina removes a small shard from her own body and realizes she stabbed herself. Dancing the last scene, in which the White Swan throws herself off a cliff, Nina spots her mother weeping in the audience. As Nina falls backward onto a hidden mattress, the theater erupts in thunderous applause. Thomas and the cast gather to congratulate her—only to find that she is bleeding profusely. As the white ceiling lights envelop her, she whispers, “I felt it. Perfect. It was perfect.”

As well as Portman shining, it is Aronofsky’s direction that makes the film. Akin to the work of Dario Argento, `Black Swan’ mixes ripe drama with horrific imagery. This is not a horror film as such, but does play on the psychology of is characters and you as an audience. `Black Swan’ is a great film.

12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS REVIEW: HUMAN TARGET: THE OTHER SIDE OF THE MALL

CAST
Mark Valley (The Siege)
Chi McBride (Pushing Daises)
Jackie Earle Haley (Watchmen)
Indira Varma (Game of Thrones)
Janet Montgomery (Black Swan)
GUEST CAST
John Michael Higgins (Bad Teacher)
Rebecca McFarland (Two and a Half Men)
Taylor Boggan (Safelight)
David Orth (The Lost World)
Marie Avgeropoulos (Cult)
This Christmas-themed episode opened with a family being driven off the road by a 4×4 and a slightly creepy man telling the driver to kill the family. Luckily, the cops show up. Back at the office the family show up asking for help, interrupting a Christmas argument. As the team takes the case, Ilsa tells Chance that she’s going to Uganda for the holiday. To protect the family, Chance starts work as a temp beside the father, Richard Applebaum (John Michael Higgins) with Guerrero working in the office as a janitor. Winston watches after Richard’s wife, Rachel (Rebecca McFarland), while Ames watches their son, Joel (Taylor Boggan), while he works at the mall.
Richard is convinced his boss, Nick Meachem (Chad Willet), is behind the attack, so when he is asked to go down to the file room, he expects the worst. Thankfully, Chance stops him attacking his boss. While this is going on, however, the men behind the attack are at Richard’s house giving Winston a little bit of trouble. Later that night, after a little coercion from Ames, Joel sneaks out to a party down the street. At this point, Guerrero finds out that the guy behind the attacks is named Klemah Severenson and he’s actually after Joel and his laptop. Severenson’s men then turn up at the party, leading to a pretty good fight once Chance has gotten there. With the novel use of a stapler, Guerrero helps Chance arrange an exchange so that Severenson can get the laptop and then leave the family alone. The exchange is to take place at the mall where Joel works. The team take their strategic posts around the meeting place, the best of which is Winston dressed as Santa. Once the meeting goes wrong, of course, a chase ensues during which Chance borrows Santa’s sleigh to catch Severenson. Back at the office, the team have a little Christmas moment before they all have to leave and Ilsa comes back. Then we get a little sentimental scene between Ilsa and Chance.
 The Christmas episode of Human Target was a very light-hearted affair with some very good action in it. The team dynamic seemed much more balanced without Ilsa being involved. Ames really seems to have fit in and the writers aren’t just using her as comic relief. A lot of the humour in this episode comes from Chance’s hatred of Christmas and how, on this job, he’s in ‘hell’.

REVIEW: HUMAN TARGET – SEASON 1 & 2

Image result for human target logo

MAIN CAST

Mark Valley (Zeo Dark Thirty)
Chi McBride (Pushing Daisies)
Jackie Earle Haley (Watchmen)
Indira Varma (Game of Thrones)
Janet Montogomery (Black Swan)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Tricia Helfer (Powers)
Donnelly Rhodes (Battlestar Galactica)
Adrian Hough (Underworld: Evolution)
Danny Glover (Lethal Weapon)
Ali Liebert (Legends of Tomorrow)
Courtney Ford (The Big Bang Theory)
Alessandro juliani (Smallville)
David Nykl (Arrow)
Aleks Paunovic (Mortal Kombat: Legacy)
Sean Maher (Firefly)
William Mapother (Powers)
Peter Bryant (Dark Angel)
Emmanuelle Vaugier (Two and a Half Men)
Sam Huntington (Superman Returns)
Kristin Lehman (Andromeda)
William B. Davis (The X-Files)
Chris Mulkey (Whiplash)
Dylan Neal (Arrow)
Brandon Jay McLaren (Power Rangers SPD)
Ted Whittall (Beauty and The Beast)
Mitch Pileggi (Stargate: Atlantis)
Leonor Varela (Blade II)
Kim Coates (Silent Hill)
Autumn Reeser (Sully)
Samantha Ferris (Along Came A Spider)
Lennie James (The Walking Dead)
Grace Park (Battlestar Galactica)
Peter Wingfield (Caprica)
Moon Bloodgood (Terminator Salvation)
Kavan Smith (Stargate: Atlantis)
Christopher Heyerdahl (Sanctuary)
Mackernzie Gray (Man of Steel)
Armand Assante (The Odyssey)
Christina Cole (Hex)
Robert Lawrenson (Underworld: Awakening)
Amy Acker (Angel)
Timothy Omundson (Xena)
Lee Majors (Ash vs Evil Dead)
Tahmoh Penikett (Dollhouse)
M.C. Gainey (Lost)
Cameron Daddo (Andromeda)
Tracie Thoms (Cold Case)
John Michael Higgins (Still Waiting)
David Orth (The Lost World)
Marie Avgeropoulos (The 100)
Tony Hale (Chuck)
Carlo Rota (Stargate Universe)
James Remar (Flashforward)
Nicole Bilderback (Buffy)
Steven Brand (The Scorpion King)

Christopher Chance (Mark Valley, Boston Legal), is a bodyguard for hire. His clients come to him as a last resort because their lives are in serious danger and they have no other alternatives. Chance’s mysterious past is only partially revealed as the season progresses–much of it in the season finale. What is known about him is that he’s probably a genius, he can hold his own in a fight, he’s a super-thief, he’s a crackshot with a gun, and the ladies love him.

In each episode, Chance typically assumes a cover to stay close and protect the client. He uses the client as bait to uncover the killer’s identity. In these episodes, Chance assumes a multitude of identities ranging from a prize fighter to a monk. Beyond Batman-like fighting skills, Chance’s best tools are his intelligence and charismatic personality; he holds his own in a conversation on any topic and masterfully fits in with any group of people. Joining Chance are Winston (Chi McBride, Boston Public, Pushing Daisies), his straight-laced handler, and Guerrero (Jackie Earle Haley, Watchmen), a computer hacker with questionable methods, but indisputable loyalty.Human Target is a throwback to the action series of the 80’s. While an intriguing backstory develops across the entire show, each episode is self-contained and follows a specific case from beginning to end. Viewers can practically jump in on any episode and not miss a beat. This is due in part to the swashbuckling, tongue-in-cheek script that never takes itself too seriously. It is also partly due to the brilliant performances by the main actors, Mark Valley, Chi McBride, and Jackie Earle Haley. The three play off each other extremely well. You can’t help but watch this show with a smile on your face as straight-man and former detective, Winston cringes at yet another action by Christopher Chance or Guerrero that gets the job accomplished, but is probably not entirely legal. Guerrero, especially, has morally ambiguous moments that cause those around him to be hysterically uncomfortable. When he makes his appearance on-screen, you know that hilarity and awesomeness are about to ensue. It’s similar to the height of Kramer’s heyday in Seinfeld where the studio audience would erupt when he appeared and he’d completely steal the scene. Laughs are guaranteed with Guerrero and his antics are accentuated into priceless gems by Winston’s reactions.The over-the-top action in each episode is wonderfully shot and rivals the quality of some Hollywood films. The outlandishness of the action is offset by the fact that the actors revel in the absurdity and take all the events in stride. No matter how desperate the situation, Christopher Chance always flashes a wry grin. His antics and expressions are reminiscent of Harrison Ford’s performances as Han Solo or Indiana Jones. The action is intense, but Christopher Chance can handle it and make you laugh while he does.Another testament to the excellent writing is that not a single episode is wasted. Obviously, some episodes are better than others, but all are highly watchable and re-watchable, action-packed, mysteries. Even the product placements are great and fit in with the spirit of the show. In the Tanarak episode, one of the most blatant product placements of all time occurs with a Camaro. It’s done with such blithe satire, instead of feeling the need to bathe after watching more advertisers nauseatingly snake their way into television, you just laugh at the silliness.In every episode, without requiring any background information, you are brought into the characters’ circle and get an immediate feel for their relationships. However, more information could have been provided earlier about Christopher Chance and his cohorts’ origins. Some of the information that was dumped in the final episode of this set could have been dispersed throughout the previous episodes. Instead you are left to fill in massive blanks with assumptions about the characters’ pasts. This is not a huge misstep by the writers because the characters’ mysterious origins are a large part of what makes the show so accessible.  This show is just pure fun to watch unfold and will appeal to practically anyone. Pop a bag of microwave popcorn, kick back, relax, and enjoy the ride.In season 2, with Matt Miller (Chuck) taking on executive producer-writer-show runner duties, he promised to flesh things out a bit without changing much of the original allure, which was good news. Mostly, he brought in Indira Varma  (Luther, Rome) as Ilsa Pucci, a widowed billionaire who takes a liking to the boys. And Janet Montgomery (Entourage) as a thief who also gets reluctantly entangled with the trio. So you can see the note Fox put on the show: Let’s leaven the testosterone a bit.And yet, nothing’s really changed. The escapism is sky high. Valley remains as charismatic as ever, with McBride’s disdainful asides and Haley’s chilly creepiness intact. It would be unfortunate if Human Target somehow got soapy or dumber, because good popcorn is rare.