REVIEW: IRON FIST – SEASON 2

Iron Fist (2017)

MAIN CAST

Finn Jones (Leatehrface)
Jessica Henwick (Game of Thrones)
Tom Pelphrey (Banshee)
Jessica Stroup (Ted)
Sacha Dhawan (After Earth)
Simone Missick (A Taste of Romance)
Alice Eve (Star Trek Into Darkness)

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RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Giullian Yao Gioiello (Scream: The Series)
Jowin Marie Batoon (Master of None)
James Chen (The Walking Dead)
Julee Cerda (Passengers)
Christine Toy Johnson (The Americans)
Natalie Smith (Beautiful Dreamer)
Fernando Chien (Fast & Furious 5)
Hoon Lee (Bosch)
Murray Bartlett (Girl Most Likely)
Rob Morgan (Stranger Things)
James Saito (Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles)
Rosa Arredondo (Blood Bound)
Gita Reddy (The Mindy Project)

ironfirst-season2-classiccostume-700x322You can always tell when a show has undergone significant changes in leadership and artistic direction between seasons because it shifts the overall energy—chi, if you will—flowing through the stories being told. Marvel’s Iron Fist has returned for a second season on Netflix and the influences of its new showrunner Raven Metzner and fight choreographer Clayton Barber are immediately evident.FM_161210_EW_05_102_V5.JPGThe difficulties with adapting a character like Iron Fist in Netflix’s MCU—a purposefully more grounded place than Marvel’s films—have always been manifold even if you don’t factor in the fact that Danny Rand is a living, breathing white savior trope. Between the magic, and the dragons, and the ridiculous (but still cool) costume, the Danny Rand of Marvel Comics has just simply never been a great fit for the MCU. And yet, Iron Fist has been doing its damnedest to make the source material work. Iron Fist’s second season is infinitely more aware of the property’s inherent narrative snagging points than the first, but rather than avoid them altogether, it makes a valiant effort of actually trying to mold them into something that feels a part of Netflix’s MCU.707979-iron-fist-season-2-2-editWhen we catch up with Danny (Finn Jones), he’s become something more of a proper New Yorker like his fellow Defenders. Even though at first he says he’s filling the void Daredevil left after “dying” during The Defenders, he conveniently sets up shop in the show’s idea of Manhattan’s Chinatown which, in reality, is a little over four miles away from Hells Kitchen. Danny’s reason for claiming Chinatown as his stomping grounds to protect are two-fold. With the Hand now squarely out of the NYC crime scene, other criminal organizations now vie to exist in that space and murder anyone willing to challenge them. At the same time, though, Iron Fist grounding Danny in Chinatown feels like a weaselly way of giving Danny a reason to fight hordes of nameless, and occasionally faceless, Asian people—something that happens throughout the season more times than it really needs to.While Danny’s narrative isn’t initially the most competitive, the thing that really does make it pop is just how legitimately enthralling the fight sequences are. Under almost any other circumstances, the arrival of a new fight choreographer wouldn’t necessarily be all that much to opine about, but Barber’s keen sense of how battling bodies move through space and connect with one another is both gorgeous to watch and obviously something the actors took to heart.landscape-1533553994-iron-fist-season-2-finn-jones-jessica-henwickThis time around Danny, the supposed Chosen One selected to defend the world with his fists actually gives off the impression that he knows a number of kung-fu variants which, shallow though it may sound, immediately elevates the show. The series sets up its central antagonists—Joy Meachum (Jessica Stroup), Davos (Sacha Dhawan), and newcomer Mary (Alice Eve)—early on and the motives behind their actions are established in ways that make you want to follow their plot lines. Still fresh from their perceived betrayals by Danny in the first season, Joy and Davos find allies in one another and set out on a mission of vengeance that culminates in robbing Danny of his legendary Iron Fist abilities.iron-fist-season-2-marvel-netflix-e1534442088624As Davos begins working his way through the NYC Chinatown underground in an effort to cleanse and purify the city of evil through draconian means, it’s Misty and Colleen who put in the work, both mental and physical, to dig into and expose the villain’s scheme. In addition to ridding the neighborhood of factional crime syndicates, Davos is on a mission to take the Iron Fist, which he believes to rightfully be his, from Danny by any means necessary. Even though it’s clear early on that Davos is a deranged lunatic who was never worthy to inherit the power, the show casts him in a somewhat sympathetic light that makes you understand why he would harbor resentment for the outsider who stumbled into K’un L’un only to become its supposed greatest warrior.
Colleen reminding Danny what it feels like to get wrecked.
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Before Danny and Davos have their inevitable showdown, Mary, a curious puzzle of a character, steps onto the scene to insinuate herself into the lives of Iron Fist’s heroes at first as a helpless bystander and later as a lethal assassin. Like her comics counterpart Typhoid Mary, Iron Fist’s Mary is a woman living with dissociative identity disorder whose different personalities are brought to the surface by external stimuli. Refreshingly, Iron Fist doesn’t treat Mary’s condition as a curious oddity or something that can be twisted into a semblance of a superpower and at no point is she ever truly made out to be a victim because of it. She’s lethal, complicated, and at literal at odds with herself in ways that make it difficult to pin down just where she stands in relation to everyone else.Iron-Fist-season-2-photosFamily and community are themes recurring throughout the show that develop into some of the season’s strongest and weakest character arcs. Danny and Davos’ longstanding brotherly rivalry has the makings of being something impactful but ultimately feels like a by-the-numbers story about familial resentment and revenge. Colleen, on the other hand, is given a meaningful arc as she tries to unpack the mystery of her biological family and build relationships with her chosen family. That includes Danny and Misty, yes, but also the people relying on the local community center for support and protection. Iron Fist’s pacing is something of a glass half full/glass half empty situation. On the one hand, the season is blessedly short—10 episodes—compared to Netflix’s other solo her shows, but as tends to be the case, much of the first half of the season drags in a number of spots. That being said, however, the last two episodes of the season take stunning dramatic turns that introduce new ideas and set up a third season in a way that will legitimately surprise and delight the hell out of you and makes the season worth watching. Iron Fist’s second season is kind of a mixed bag. There’s plenty to slog through but if you’re willing to make your way to the finale, it’s something you won’t regret.

 

REVIEW: LUKE CAGE – SEASON 2

Mike Colter in Luke Cage (2016)

 

MAIN CAST

Mike Colter (Zero Dark Thirty)
Simone Missick (K-Town)
Theo Rossi (Red Sands)
Gabrielle Dennis (Bring It On 5)
Mustafa Shakir (The Deuce)
Finn Jones (Game of Thrones)
Jessica Henwick (Star wars: The Force Awakens)
Stephen Rider (The Butler)
Alfre Woodard (Star Trek: First Contact)

Mike Colter in Luke Cage (2016)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST STARS

Rosario Dawson (Sin City)
Reg E. Cathey (Fantastic Four)
Thomas Q. Jones (Being Mary Jane)
Elden Henson (The Butterfly Effect)
Rob Morgan (Stranger Things)

Rosario Dawson and Mike Colter in Luke Cage (2016)Is it ever okay to do the wrong thing for the right reason?” That line, spoken by Misty Knight (Simone Missick) in episode six, is the key to the excellent second season of Luke Cage. Every one of its major characters is playing a game without rules, a game to save the district of Harlem, and there’s no way to win by playing clean. The constant interest comes from watching how dirty they’re prepared to get.Mike Colter in Luke Cage (2016)Since we last saw him, Cage (Mike Colter) has become a huge celebrity. The public track him via an app. Everyone wants selfies. He is as famous as it gets, but he’s flat broke (helping the helpless doesn’t pay) and he can’t save everyone. Luke’s a plaster over Harlem’s problems, not a cure. He can’t really help Harlem unless he can bring down Mariah Dillard (Alfre Woodard), whose fingerprints stain almost every crime in the neighbourhood. Cage is not the only one looking to bring Dillard to justice. John McIver, aka Bushmaster (Mustafa Shakir), has arrived in town with an old grudge to settle and some dark magic that could help him defeat Cage.Alfre Woodard and Mustafa Shakir in Luke Cage (2016)The introduction of Bushmaster, who can match Cage punch for punch with the help of some herbal witchcraft, may sound like the show is heading back to Diamondback territory, but that’s not the case. Bushmaster isn’t really here to serve as an adversary to Cage, but to Dillard, who is as much a series lead as Cage. And thank God. You can never have too much Alfre Woodard. Mariah is the best kind of villain because she thinks she’s doing the right thing and doing what she has to do to achieve it. She’s building hospitals and safe homes for single mothers, but she’s selling guns, blackmailing officials and having people murdered to achieve it. If she’s only hurting bad people to help good people, is she really so wrong? Her family’s history of betraying others is what brings Bushmaster after her. He’s the only man she can’t negotiate with.Simone Missick and Mike Colter in Luke Cage (2016)Most of Marvel’s superhero series suffer a mid-season sag, without enough plot to fill their episode quota. This season never succumbs to that because it’s not rooted in plot but character. There are episodes where little happens in terms of event, but characters deepen and crack, becoming less who they want to be and more who they have to be, even Luke. Luke Cage could now remove any superhero elements almost entirely and still function as a series. It’s become Game Of Thrones-esque in its battle for Harlem, and like that show, whoever claims the prize will do so with bloodied hands.

REVIEW: THE DEFENDERS

CAST

Charlie Cox (Stardust)
Krysten Ritter (Veronica Mars)
Mike Colter (Zero Dark thirty)
Finn Jones (Game of Thrones)
Élodie Yung (Gods of Egypt)
Sigourney Weaver (Avatar)
Rachael Taylor (The Loft)
Eka Darville (Power Rangers RPM)
Elden Henson (The Hunger Games: Mockingjay)
Deborah Ann Woll (Ruby Sparks)
Jessica Henwick (Game of Thrones)
Ramón Rodríguez (The Taking of Pelham 123)
Rosario Dawson (Sin City)
Scott Glenn (The Silence of The Lambs)
Simone Missick (K-Town)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Wai Ching Ho (Cadillac Man)
Carrie-Anne Moss (Chuck)
Peter McRobbie (16 Blocks)
Rob Morgan (Stranger Things)
Marko Zaror (Machete Kills)
Amy Rutberg (NCIS: New Orleans)

 

The Defenders is Marvel’s best Netflix show, hands down.  While the crossover between Daredevil, Jessica Jones, Iron Fist, and Luke Cage can occasionally veer into a fragmented set of mini-episodes early on, the awesome foursome eventually unites to form a show greater than the sum of its parts. The street-level superheroes provide a fantastic eight-episode run with high stakes, a frenzied pace and, most importantly, effortless chemistry.Things don’t start off that way, though. The opening pair of episodes read almost as a greatest hits collection of each hero’s respective shows before the narrative eventually relents and shoehorns the plot in a comically convenient way for the four to come together. The lack of instant gratification can be grating, but this is easily relieved by the fun interaction between fan-favourites that leads up to the team-up. Misty Knight and Jessica Jones’ brief scenes are worth the price of admission alone and there are a few, shall we say interesting, crossovers you won’t see coming. Without giving too much away, a cataclysmic event is unleashed upon New York and The Defenders, each following their own leads, stumble into each other’s paths in the same building. And then things get good. Really, really good. Unsurprisingly, The Hand are the villains of the season and are led by Sigourney Weaver’s Alexandra. Her performance is tempered by an unidentified terminal illness which spurs her character on and at least drives her away from the realms of cartoonish MCU villain as  she has an actual character arc rather than the bland go there, be evil trope of prior bad guys. When the show does focus on The Defenders (and, in fairness, that’s 90% of the time) the show is a rollercoaster of wisecracks, quips and, yup, Jessica Jones’ side-eye. It’s glorious fun and, for my money, feels like a much bigger event than The Avengers ever was. There’s a spine-tingling moment, complete with an inspirational score bubbling up in the background, where the four heroes unite to take on a foe at the midway point which ranks as an all-time great Marvel moment.Yes, The Defenders run is short, but those thinking a mere eight episodes won’t cut it can have their fears put to rest. Coupled with Game of Thrones season 7’s clipped seven-episode run, it feels like we’re reaching a watershed point in television where shows don’t need to be chained to a long episode run anymore. Barely a second is wasted in The Defenders: Every quiet character moment is poignant and fleshes out something or someone; every action sequence leads to something bigger, better, and more shocking; and every one-liner and on-the-nose dig at Iron Fist will make you laugh. Nothing outstays its welcome.

 

 

 

 

 

REVIEW: IRON FIST – SEASON 1

MAIN CAST

Finn Jones (Game of Thrones)
Jessica Henwick (Star Wars: The Force Awakens)
Tom Pelphrey (Banshee)
Jessica Stroup (The Hills have Eyes 2)
Ramón Rodríguez (The Taking of Pelham 123)
Sacha Dhawan (The Last Train)
Rosario Dawson (Daredevil)
David Wenham (Lord of The Rings)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Wai Ching (Daredevil)
Carrie-Anne Moss (Jessica Jones)
Michael Maize (Power Rangers In Space)
Lewis Tan (The Hangover – Part III)
Hoon Lee (Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 2012)
Barrett Doss (The Pioneers)

Danny Rand returns to New York City after being missing for years, trying to reconnect with his past and his family legacy. He fights against the criminal element corrupting his world around him with his incredible kung-fu mastery and ability to summon the awesome power of the fiery Iron FistIron Fist was one of my most anticipated Netflix shows. After hearing the bad reviews, I got scared a little, and couldn’t wait to see the show for myself. And now, I dare to say that the critics are wrong, and most of the critics’ opinion aren’t justified. First of all, Danny Rand has always been a white character, who feels like an outcast after his parents’ death. He is trying to find his place, while trying to figure out who he is.He’s suffering from both a trauma and an identity crisis, not sure whether he should be Danny Rand or Iron Fist. He is trying to embrace his real self, while struggling a lot. The fact that a white man, an outsider has earned the title of Iron Fist is unprecedented both in the comics and in the show. This is why Danny is white, to show that he is different, he’s not your regular Asian guy, who does kung fu. Saying that Danny should have been Asian is foolish and racist. Not only Asians can learn kung fu, and everyone is able to harness their chi. It shows that several people can share the same beliefs and ideas, regardless of race, sex or ethnicity.Finn Jones does a wonderful job portraying the character, he is like the Danny Rand, I’ve been reading about for so many years. Sure, the story is slow paced sometimes, and Finn can go a little over the top, but is nothing bothering. With his boyish charm, dedication and skills, he makes you overlook the minor issues. But claiming that this show is a failure is ridiculous. It’s nicely built up, gets you hooked on, and shows you what it’s really like to handle a trauma. It doesn’t disappear miraculously, it’s always there, and Danny has to fight it all the time. Fight it and embrace it.https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/M/MV5BNTJjNjJiMzAtNjBlYS00MmViLWFiMjktMmQ0ZTQwNTZjMWI4L2ltYWdlXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNjUwNzk3NDc@._V1_SY1000_CR0,0,1499,1000_AL_.jpgThis is why the show gets slow sometimes. After all, a guy, who was presumed dead for 15 years suddenly comes back and claims to have fought a dragon. Of course the issues won’t be solved within an hour. Besides Danny, you also care for the other characters, and their development is astonishing. Iron Fist is up there for me with Daredevil, even though, I enjoyed Daredevil somewhat more. All the critics, who jumped to conclusions after 6 episodes are fools.

REVIEW: THE SUPER HERO SQUAD SHOW – SEASON 1-2

CAST (VOICES)

Charlie Adler (Wall-e)
Alimi Ballard (Sabrina: TTW)
Steven Blum (Wolverine and the X-Men)
Dave Boat (Ultimate Spider-Man)
Jim Cummings (Darkwing Duck)
Grey DeLisle (The Fairly Oddparents)
Mikey Kelley (Gravity Falls)
Tom Kenny (The Batman)
Stan Lee (Avengers Assemble)
Tara Strong (Batman: The Killing Joke)
Travis Willingham (Dragon Ball Z)

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RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Shawn Ashmore (X-Men)
Dee Bradley Baker (American Dad)
John Barrowman (Arrow)
A.J. Buckley (Disturbing Behavior)
Ty Burrell (Muppets Most Wanted)
LeVar Burton (Star Trek: TNG)
Taye Diggs (Private Practice)
Michael Dorn (Ted 2)
Suisan Eisenberg (Justice League)
Carl Lumbly (Alias)
Robert Englund (A Nightmare on Elm Street)
Jonathan Frakes (Star Trek: TNG)
Greg Grunberg (Heroes)
Nika Futterman (Futurama)
Mark Hamill (Star Wars)
Lena Headey (Game of Thrones)
Tricia Helfer (Powers)
Cheryl Hines (The Ugly Truth)
Josh Keaton (Justice League: Gods and Monsters)
Wayne Knight (3rd rock from The Sun)
Maurice LaMarche (Futurama)
Phil LaMar (Free Enterprise)
Jane Lynch (Glee)
Jason Marsden (Full House)
James Marsters (Smallville)
Jennifer Morrison (Urban Legends 2)
Scott Menville (Teen Titans)
Jim Parsons (The Big Bang Theory)
Adrian Pasdar (Heroes)
Kevin Michael Richardson (The Cleveland Show)
Katee Sackhoff (Battlestar Galactica)
Kevin Sorbo (Hercules: TLJ)
Ray Stevenson (Divergent)
Fred Stoller (Little Man)
George Takei (Star Trek)
Cree Summer (Batman Beyond)
Michelle Trachtenberg (17 again)
Hynden Walch (The Batman)
Jim Ward (Danny Phantom)
Adam West (Batman 60s)
Nina Dobrev (The Vampire Diaries)

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When I saw a preview of The Super Hero Squad Show back in February of 2009, I thought it looked pretty interesting, but certainly aimed at the kiddies, and as it aired on Cartoon Network, I never saw an episode. In fact, I forgot all about it, and when I got my hands on this disc, I thought it was an animated take on the old Fisher-Price Marvel kiddie figures. So I had no expectations coming in. Well, my only expectation being that it would be bad. So it was with a good deal of shock that I found it to be a pretty entertaining action-comedy series, if you don’t mind the cheese-level of many of the jokes.MV5BMTY4MzMzMzM2OF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwMTE2OTc3MjE@._V1_The Super Hero Squad (sort of a loose version of the Avengers) is made up of an assortment of Marvel heroes, including Iron Man (as the leader), Captain America (who provides aid on a regular basis), Wolverine (adding the X-Men’s popularity,) The Hulk, Thor, a spacey surfer-dude version of the Silver Surfer, and Falcon (obviously added to bring some diversity.) Joining them is the mostly unknown Reptil (a dinosaur-powered bit player from the Avengers comics) who is both a young guy and Hispanic, helping fill out the P.C. scorecard a bit more and give younger viewers a stand-in.  They go up against Doctor Doom and his legion of bad guys (and ineffective henchmen), as he searches for the Infinity fractals, shards of the Infinity Sword (which seems connected to the Infinity Gems of the Infinity Gauntlet. Infinity.)MV5BMTUwMzc1OTEzNV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwMjU3MDg3MjE@._V1_Though the storylines are pretty solid and offer big action-packed battles, the bulk of the show is comedy, with the character’s out-sized personalities carrying the jokes, be it Thor’s overwhelming concern about his appearance or Captain America being stuck in the ’40s. Maybe I don’t give kids a lot of credit, but I can see a large portion of these gags flying over their heads, which will make the show far more enjoyable for adults than one would have expected. There was more than one joke that got a genuine laugh out of me, though many of them rely on bodily functions or pratfalls for the punchline. The wordplay and character-generated jokes are much more entertaining and fun, especially Thor’s Asgardian versions of modern language, the Silver Surfer’s alien view of Earth life, and anything involving the always-ridiculous floating head known as M.O.D.O.K. (voiced hilariously by Tom Kenny.) One joke about the Hulk swallowing a yo-yo is technically genius. The only thing about the show that doesn’t really work is Reptil, who feels like the Poochie of the show, coming off as a bone tossed to kids, with his dino-focused power, youthful role and extreme behavior.MV5BNzQ1MjI0NzUzOV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwNzk1OTc3MjE@._V1_This version of the Marvel Universe smartly keeps the same look for its characters, giving long-time Marvel fans an in for the series, but presents them in a super-deformed style (squat bodies, large heads and feet, four fingers) that’s kid-cartoon friendly and which easily separates it from any other version of the Universe you’ve ever seen. That way, there are no issues with continuity or previous incarnations, and the show can be enjoyed on its own merits (allowing them to do something like make Dr. Strange a complete lunatic.) That’s a good thing, because the show is loaded to the gills with fan-service goodies, like the episode titles (which reference famous comic titles) and title cards which replicate memorable cover art. The show also pulls characters from the depths of the Marvel roster, like Screaming Mimi and the Melter, and having silly cartoon fun with them. Taken simply as a silly, almost What The–?! treatment of the characters, it’s well worth a look for comic-book fans out of grade school.MV5BMjM1ODQ2NDUxNl5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwNjk1OTc3MjE@._V1_On a non-story note, the theme song, provided by Parry Gripp of Nerf Herder, is an energetic blast, while the voice cast for this series has to be one of the best for a non-prime time animated series, with tons of veterans of the cartoon industry, like Kenny, Tara Strong, Jess Harnell, Grey DeLisle, Cree Summer and Charlie Adler, along with plenty of genre stars, including Robert Englund, Tricia Helfer, Jennifer Morrison and Adrian Pasdar. It’s rare to see a show like this pull this kind of voice cast.MV5BNzQ1MjI0NzUzOV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwNzk1OTc3MjE@._V1_The overall plot of the cycle will feature the villain Thanos seeking the six stones of the Infinity Gauntlet, a powerful cosmic weapon. Opposing him will be the titular Super Hero Squad, which is made up of goofball takes on Iron Man, Thor, Falcon, Wolverine, Hulk, Ms. Marvel, original character Reptil, Scarlet Witch, and sometimes Captain America. While the first two shows focus specifically on the Thanos plot, other episodes detour into one-off excursions. For instance, “World War Witch!” takes the heroes back in time to when Cap was fighting the Red Skull alongside the Invaders in WWII, while “Support Your Local Sky-Father!” pits Olympus vs. Asgard, and it features the Marvel Universe rendition of Hercules.

 

REVIEW: THE AVENGERS: EARTH’S MIGHTIEST HEROES

MAIN CAST (VOICES)

Brian Bloom (Vampirella)
Chris Cox (All Star Superman)
Jennifer Hale (The Rick)
Peter Jessop (Jla Adventures)
Phil LaMarr (Free Enterprise)
Eric Loomis (Shin Chan)
James C. Mathis III (Undercover Brother)
Colleen Villard (Duel Masters)
Fred Tatasciore (Hulk Vs)
Rick D. Wasserman (Planet Hulk)
Wally Wingert (American Dad)

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RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST COICES

Gabriel Mann (Cherry Falls)
Drake Bell (The Reef 2)
Bumper Robinson (Sabrina: The Teenage Witch)
Steven Blum (Wolverine and Teh X-men)
Alex Desert (The Flash 90s)
Vanessa Marshall (Duck Dodgers)
Kari Wuhrer (Eight Legged Freaks)
Elizabeth Daily (Valley Girl)
Troy Baker (Lego Batman)
Nolan North (Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles)
Crispin Freeman (Hellsing)
Scott Menville (Teen Titans)
Grey DeLisle (Danny Phantom)
Cam Clarke (He-Man)
Lance Reddick (Lost)
J.K. Simmons (Whiplash)
Kevin Michael Richardson (The Cleveland Show)
Nika Futterman (Hey Arnold!)
Lance Henriksen (The Terminator)
Jonathan Adams (Bones)
Jeffrey Combs (Gotham)
Graham McTavish (The Hobbit)
Dawn Olivieri (The Vampire Diaries)
Clancy Brown (Highlander)
Dwight Schultz (The A-Team)
Keith Szarabajka (The Dark Knight)
Lacey Chabert (Mean Girls)
Dee Bradley Baker (American Dad)
David Kaufman (Superman: TAS)

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Both Marvel and DC have to an astonishing degree started to pick up these last few years, with several well-appreciated shows that I really enjoy: Young Justice, The Spectacular Spider-Man, Iron Man: Armored Adventures, Green Lantern TAS, and now this; The Avengers: Earth’s Mightiest Heroes. It’s very rare indeed for a superhero cartoon of this magnitude to be  great from start-to-finish, but that’s what Earth’s Mightiest Heroes is, right from Episode 1 `Iron Man is Born’ to the finale `Avengers Assemble!’. There are literally no dud episodes whatsoever! The whole series is infused with tremendous intrigue, exceptional plotting and some of the tightest continuity I’ve ever seen in a TV series. The number of sub-plots and story-arcs that are juggled here is staggering, but the creative team handled it all with such precision. The coherency, intricacies and pacing is nothing short of exemplary overall. This isn’t just essential for kids; adult Marvel fans will get bags of satisfaction from watching this cartoon!MV5BMTgxOTA1Nzk3OF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwNDk0MzY2MjE@._V1_So what exactly can folk expect? Well, as I said, the choicest pieces of Marvel history (be it in comics or on film) have been successfully adapted and utilized here. From how the Avengers banded together to life-changing events like the Civil War threat and the Skrulls’ Secret Invasion (adapted beautifully here!). Iron Man, the Hulk, Captain America, Thor, Ant-Man/Yellowjacket, the Wasp and Black Panther are all superbly established before `Assembling’ for the first time, members come-and-go, characters undergo changes, Hawkeye, Ms. Marvel and the Vision join the ranks, and all-manner of superb guests join the party, such as Spider-Man, Wolverine, the Fantastic Four and even those Guardians of the Galaxy!

And on the villains-front, you can be subjected to a cracking-bunch of dastardly rogues, such as Loki, the Red Skull, Hydra, A.I.M., Baron Zemo, the Enchantress, the Masters of Evil, Kang the Conqueror, Doctor Doom and (of course!) chief arch-nemesis Ultron. And it’s not all just for window-dressing. The depictions of all these characters (hero, villain and otherwise) and their worlds is just pure gold. It’s perhaps the most faithful animated portrayal of the Marvel Universe.
Really, The Avengers: Earth’s Mightiest Heroes could (and should) have gone on for more seasons. Instead, Marvel pulled the plug in favor of the replacement show Avengers Assemble. Thus in the last batch episodes, you DO get the feel that the writers were trying to wrap things up and give the show a grand swansong to make way for the next-cartoon-in-line. Admittedly, there are a few loose ends left over, but the series is mostly wrapped-up in winning style with a very acceptable conclusion. And in an age where too many shows are cancelled prematurely/end on a sour note, it makes that final moment of `Avengers Assemble!’ all the more of a triumph, just like the entire series itself.