REVIEW: THE SIMPSONS – SEASON 30

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CAST

Dan Castellaneta (Super 8)
Julie Kavner (Dr. Dolittle)
Yeardley Smith (Dead Like Me)
Nancy Cartwright (Kim Possible)
Hank Azaria (The Smurfs)
Harry Shearer (This Is Spinal Tap)
Pamela Hayden (Recess)
Tress MacNeille (Futurama)
Russi Taylor (Babe)

The Simpsons (1989)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Emily Deschanel (Bones)
Gal Gadot (Wonder Woman)
Kevin Michael Richardson (The Cleveland Show)
Rhys Darby (Yes Man)
George Segal (2012)
H. Jon Benjamin (Wet Hot Ameircan Summer)
Jon Lovitz (Happiness)
Kristen Schaal (Gravity Falls)
Tracy Morgan (Cop Out)
Maggie Roswell (Pretty In Pink)
Ksenia Solo (Lost Girl)
RuPaul (But I’m a Cheerleader)
Scott Thompson (The Kids In The Hall)
Peter Serafinowicz (The Tick)
J.K. Simmons (Justice League)
Jane Lynch (Glee)
Bryan Batt (Scream: The Series)
Patti LuPone (Witness)
Guillermo del Toro (The Shape of The Water)
Wallace Shawn (Young Sheldon)
Ken Jeong (The Hangover)
Natasha Lyonne (American Pie)
Awkwafina (Ocean’s 8)
Nicole Byer (Tuca & Bertie)
Chelsea Peretti (Game Night)
John Lithgow (3rd Rock From The Sun)
Josh Groban (The Crazy Ones)
Will Forte (The Lego Movie)
Jackie Mason (The Jerk)
Liev Schreiber (The 5th Wave)
Illeana Douglas (Ghost World)
Jenny Slate (The Secrets Life of Pets)
Werner Herzog (Jack Reacher)

The Simpsons (1989)It’s hilarious comedy, funny, and one of my all time favorite T.V shows .. The series is a satirical depiction of a middle class American lifestyle epitomized by the Simpson family, which consists of Homer, Marge, Bart, Lisa, and Maggie. The show is set in the fictional town of Springfield and parodies American culture, society, television, and many aspects of the human condition. Modern Simpsons episodes are often both overstuffed and under-imagined, resulting in two indifferent, inadequately realized stories. Even though the show has dropped in creativity and in the joke department, it’s still worthy.Nancy Cartwright, Pamela Hayden, and Tress MacNeille in The Simpsons (1989)

Season 30 Highlights are…

The Simpsons (1989)

Bart’s Not Dead

Bart ends up in the hospital after taking a dare and lies about going to heaven to cover it up, but is forced to confess after Homer takes a deal with Christian producers to make a movie about the whole thing.

Julie Kavner, Nancy Cartwright, Dan Castellaneta, and Yeardley Smith in The Simpsons (1989)

Heartbreak Hotel

Marge and Homer travel to a tropical island and go on Marge’s favorite reality competition program to win a million dollars.

Yeardley Smith in The Simpsons (1989)

My Way or The Highway to Heaven

While God and St. Peter discuss who will get into heaven, the citizens of Springfield recall divine encounters.

Julie Kavner and Dan Castellaneta in The Simpsons (1989)

Baby You Can’t Drive My Car

A self-driving car company comes to Springfield, poaching all of the power plant employees with their fun work environment.

Julie Kavner and RuPaul in The Simpsons (1989)

Werking Mom

In search of a job, Marge gets one selling plastic food storage containers – as a drag queen; Lisa tries to make the world better.

The Simpsons (1989)

Mad About The Toy

Motivated by a PTSD episode Grampa had while babysitting the kids, the Simpsons take a journey to Grampa’s past as a post-WW2 toy model for plastic army men, and Abe finally faces his on confused sexuality.

The Simpsons (1989)

The Girl On The Bus

Lisa tries to live a double life when she makes a new friend and gets a taste of what it would be like to live with a more cultured family.

Hank Azaria, Julie Kavner, Dan Castellaneta, and Yeardley Smith in The Simpsons (1989)

I’m Dancing as Fat as I Can

Homer tries to make amends for binging his and Marge’s favorite show without her; Bart prepares for “Krusty’s Holiday Trample”

Wallace Shawn and Dan Castellaneta in The Simpsons (1989)

I Want You (She’s So Heavy)

When a romantic night ends in injury for Homer and Marge, Lisa turns to an unlikely source to fix their strained relationship.)

The Simpsons (1989)

E My Sports

Homer discovers a passion for coaching Bart in video game competitions; Lisa’s plan to bring Homer back to reality creates chaos.

J.K. Simmons and Yeardley Smith in The Simpsons (1989)

Girl’s in the Band

Homer works extra shifts at the plant so Lisa can play in the Capitol City Youth Philharmonic.

The Simpsons (1989)

I’m Just a Girl Who Can’t Say D’oh

Marge becomes Director of Springfield’s local theater, armed with Lisa’s script resembling “Hamilton”; Homer joins a baby class with Maggie, and takes a liking to supervisor Chloe.

Julie Kavner, Nancy Cartwright, Dan Castellaneta, Yeardley Smith, and Awkwafina in The Simpsons (1989)

D’oh Canada

Lisa is mistakenly given political asylum in Canada during a family trip to Niagara Falls.

Julie Kavner, Nancy Cartwright, Dan Castellaneta, and Yeardley Smith in The Simpsons (1989)

Crystal Blue-Haired Persuasion

Marge starts a business selling healing crystals and other New Age products to the naive mothers of Springfield when Homer’s work cuts children’s health-care benefits, leading Marge to use the crystals as a cheaper solution for Bart’s ADD.

REVIEW: MY STEPMOTHER IS AN ALIEN

CAST

Dan Aykroyd (Ghostbusters)
Kim Basinger (LA Confidential)
Jon Lovitz (The Simpsons)
Alyson Hannigan (How I Met Your Mother)
Joseph Maher (Mars Attacks)
Seth Green (Austin Powers)
Wesley Mann (Soul Surfer)
Tony Jay (Lois & Clark)
Peter Bromilow (Scrooged)
Harry Shearer (This Is Spinal Tap)
Juliette Lewis (Some Girl)
Suzie Plakson (Disclosure)
Earl Boen (The Terminator)

Image result for my stepmother is an alienCeleste (Kim Basinger) is an alien sent on a secret mission to Earth and Steven Mills (Dan Aykroyd) is a widowed scientist who is working on different ways to send radio waves into deep space. An accident causes a disruption of gravity on Celeste’s home world (Cosine N to the 8th). She’s sent to investigate who could affect gravity and how it was done, believing it was an attack. She’s aided by an alien device resembling a tentacle with an eye, which hides in a designer purse to aid Celeste with her encounters on Earth. The Bag is able to create any object, such as diamonds and designer dresses almost instantaneously. Celeste crashes a party hosted by Steven’s brother Ron (Jon Lovitz) where she immediately draws attention to herself by making dated references to old TV shows and political slogans under the mistaken belief that it was current (her superiors had just collected the information, which had taken 92 years to get from Earth to her home world).

Celeste’s inexperience almost results in her exposing herself as alien when she struggles with simple tasks like trying to kiss for the first time or cooking. Jessie Mills (Alyson Hannigan), Steven’s 13-year-old daughter, notices Celeste’s strange habits, like eating car batteries and pulling hard boiled eggs out of boiling hot water with her bare hands and becomes suspicious of her. However, she can’t convince her smitten father that there is something unusual about Celeste. Ron also has his doubts about Celeste, but more on the basis that he feels his brother is doing too much too soon by asking to marry Celeste only a few days after they first met. Ron tries to dissuade Steven from marrying Celeste on the idea she is an illegal immigrant or planning economic espionage, but then admits he is jealous his brother found his dream girl whereas he will never find a girl like Princess Stéphanie of Monaco.
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Celeste encounters a lot of new experiences such as sneezing, sexual intercourse and love. When finally confronted about being an extraterrestrial by Jessie, Celeste admits her home world is without emotion. Celeste plans to depart once she discovers the truth, but is put in a quandary by Jessie, who says it will devastate her father, whom Celeste has now developed feelings for. After Jessie argues with her dad, she runs away and is nearly hit by a car, but is saved by Celeste’s powers. This reveals to Steven that Celeste is indeed an alien and that she has fallen in love with him as well as accepting Jessie as her own daughter. When the leaders of Celeste’s home world report in they ask her to destroy the planet Earth until she and Steven manage to convince them it was not an act of aggression, but an accident. They accept the explanation on the basis that gravity is returning to normal on their planet and give their blessing for Celeste to be with Steven. Initially, however, they demand that Celeste return to explain human culture to them but settle for a native of Earth to serve as ambassador to their world as a token of goodwill. The ambassadorship is accepted by Ron, who departs for Celeste’s world in a spaceship served by several flight attendants, all of whom look like Princess Stéphanie.MV5BMjAwODU5ODE3OV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwNjY5MjEyNQ@@._V1_SY1000_CR0,0,706,1000_AL_This is a classic movie not to be over looked as others have been from the 80’s
If you are at a loose end and need a good laugh and be entertained this is a good movie to watch.

REVIEW: GODZILLA (1998)

CAST

Matthew Broderick (Election)
Jean Reno (Leon)
Maria Pitillo (True Romance)
Hank Azaria (The Simpsons)
Kevin Dunn (Transformers)
Michael Lerner (Elf)
Harry Shearer (This Is Spinal Tap)
Doug Savant (Desperate Housewives)
Nancy Cartwright (The Simpsons)
Glenn Morshower (Supergirl TV)
Derek Webster (Stargate)
Ali Afshar (Power Rangers Turbo)
James Black (Kick-Ass 2)
Clyde Kusatsu (Midway)
Frank Welker (Transformers)
George Cheung (Rush Hour)
Ken Lerner (Robocop 2)
Lance Reddick (John Wick)

MV5BYzVjY2QyZjktMWQ5NS00OTZlLTk1NGQtY2Y0YmJiMWUxNjY5XkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNzc5NjM0NA@@._V1_Roland Emmerich specializes in movies that are practically critic proof. He populates his films with amazing spectacle, blockbusters packed with explosions, disasters, and well known landmarks destroyed in various ridiculous ways — exactly what people want to see when they desire entertainment that won’t spoil the taste of their movie theater popcorn with intellectually challenging issues or drama. Emmerich therefore makes sure to keep things simple with his films, which means a sacrifice of character development and depth, logic, and general believability. Emmerich’s 1998 remake of Godzilla is no exception to the rule. While there’s a definite sense of grandeur and epic destruction, it is like a paper-mache pinata. When you hit it hard enough with a bat, there is certainly some disposable candy to be found. But what’s truly there is now a broken, empty hull that never really had any substance.MV5BNDI4M2RkZjgtZDhkZS00YzczLWFhYWUtNDhiMjY0MjAwMjEwXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNzc5NjM0NA@@._V1_

The plot manages to be simple and yet garbled. The US military recruits a humble Nuclear Regulatory Commission scientist, Niko Tatopoulos (Matthew Broderick), to investigate some strange discoveries, namely a shipwreck with giant claw marks in the hull and equally giant footprints in the French Pacific. Before Niko figures out what’s really going on, a giant pregnant lizard starts attacking New York City. It lays eggs in Madison Square Garden and smashes up the skyline. There’s also some business with the French Secret Service, and Niko’s college sweetheart, but these subplots are thin and underdeveloped. The focus of the movie is really about a giant lizard destroying NYC.  What Emmerich gets right is the spectacle. While nothing on the scale of global destruction of his earlier Independance Day, he again shows that he knows how to deliver shock and awe in an entertaining way. The sequence where Godzilla chases a taxi through the streets of New York, and the taxi (defying all reason) desperately manages to evade the giant lizard is just one of many that simply work on a visual and visceral level. The action keeps a swift pace punctuated with destruction, distracting your brain with explosions and the like so you don’t have time to think about any flaws in logic that might come up. You can’t really knock the effects and the action sequences, even if the CGI of Godzilla seems a little clunky and obvious by modern standards. The reason Emmerich manages to keep getting audiences to come see his films is that he delivers pure eye candy, the kind that appeals to a mass audience.This would work just fine and dandy if Emmerich kept the pace plowing forward without pausing. Sadly, he takes the time to try and explain things. The instant the pace slows down and we return to the characters, we can’t help but notice that they’re cardboard cutouts, shambling around New York City having conversations that don’t sound anything like how real people talk. Every time we get into a slow sequence, there’s practically has a neon sign in the background flashing the word ‘Exposition’ just in case anyone was missing that fact. We are taken out of the action into these sequences that are utterly useless and draw attention to the weaknesses of Emmerich’s style. Lets face it, do any of us really care about the particulars of why Godzilla is smashing up New York? No. We just want him to carry on doing it, while we enjoy our buttery popcorn and big gulp sodas. Now, Emmerich does have a reason for this exposition. It’s a sad attempt to make us feel for this Godzilla creature. In many ways, he’s trying to set up this empathy, in that ‘the animal was just scared and doing what came natural, it didn’t want to hurt anyone’ sort of way. You see, Godzilla is rampaging New York just because he came to lay some eggs and make a nest. So it’s just Godzilla’s hermaphroditic mother bear rage, and who can’t empathize with that, right?

…Okay, yeah, it’s totally ridiculous and feels like the plot point was plucked straight from Jurassic Park. The entire effort to make Godzilla empathetic while at the same time more beastly and unintelligent than the old Toho version simply doesn’t work. Godzilla in this movie is a completely different creature than the familiar dinosaur of the Toho incarnation. Patrick Tatopoulos’ design is much more lizard-like, and is nominally more realistic looking (if giant monstrous lizards can be realistic at all). The difficulty here is that the beast is almost too based in reality. It’s just a giant grey lizard, with little true character or feeling of intelligence. When we get flooded by a ton of raptor-like baby-zillas, it’s again feels like an attempt to cash in on the success of Jurassic Park. This Godzilla, often mockingly labelled ‘Notzilla’, is so bland and characterless that we miss the joy of watching a Godzilla movie.  Emmerich’s movie gives us a generic monster with the name Godzilla slapped on, and it really isn’t worthy of the name.The human characters fare no better than the title character. You can easily sum up all of them in a single sentence. Niko Tatopoulos is the goodnatured scientist who’s still hung-up on his college sweetheart. Victor Palotti (Hank Azaria) is a snarky Brooklyn-born camera man. They get little backstory, and in most cases none. You simply take them at their face value, stereotypes that are tired yet familiar. If you form any sort of attachment to these characters, its for reasons external to the movie. Maybe you really love Ferris Bueller, and that will help you be attached to Niko. Personally, I’m a fan of Jean Reno, so I really only cared about his character solely on that basis. This is utterly ridiculous for a film, that we form no sort of real attachment. We have no reason to actually care if Godzilla actually murders them all. In fact, given how obnoxious some of the characters are, you might actually hope Godzilla wins. The most ridiculous of the characters is actually the mayor of New York. This is not merely a cardboard-depth character. It is a wafer-thin caricature of famous film critic Roger Ebert. Emmerich’s earlier films had been rightly blasted by the man, so Emmerich takes revenge in a childish and immature way. He places Ebert into the film as an inept, sleazy, sugar-guzzling political opportunist. Mayor Ebert is constantly making decisions for his own sake, not the good of the city. He’s probably the least sympathetic character in the whole film, and it just feels like a stupid joke gone too far. It detracts from the film immensely.

I also have to make note of something that is of no fault of the filmmakers. Godzilla was released in 1998, three years before the 9/11 tragedy. Every time you see NYC skyline, you can’t help but stare at the World Trade Center. The film even has a terribly creepy line from Harry Shearer’s reporter character, talking about how the initial devastation from Godzilla is “worst since the World Trade Center bombing.” Obviously, this is in reference to the 1993 bombing, but now it serves as a terrible reminder of the more recent tragedy. When the helicopters blow up the Chrysler building, it hits the viewer in a terrible and unsettling way, and a dreadful unease takes you out of the movie.
1-godzilla-1998-1438781993Emmerich brings nothing new to the giant monster table other than a large budget, creating something that is pure edifice and no real substance. His Godzilla is full of sound and fury, signifying nothing — which is really not too much of a problem for the undiscerning movie goer. Going back to the earlier analogy, there’s nothing wrong with a pinata full of candy. You just have to ignore the sad, broken hull that remains afterward. So either you can shut off your brain and enjoy this bastard child of Emmerich’s making, or you don’t bother and watch something like Cloverfield instead.