REVIEW: REDBELT

CAST

Chiwetel Ejiofor (Doctor Strange)
Tim Allen (Last Man Standing)
Alice Braga (I Am Legend)
Rodrigo Santoro (Westworld)
Jose Pablo Cantillo (The Walking Dead)
Randy Couture (The Scorpian King 2)
Caroline Correa (Go Big)
Ricky Jay (Mystery Men)
Joe Mantegna (The Rat Pack)
Max Martini (The Town)
Emily Mortimer (Lars and the Real Girl)
Jake Johnson (New Girl)
Jennifer Grey (Dirty Dancing)
Ed O’Neill (Modern Family)

While closing his Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu studio one evening, martial arts teacher Mike Terry (Chiwetel Ejiofor) is approached by attorney Laura Black (Emily Mortimer), who is seeking the owner of the vehicle she accidentally sideswiped. Off-duty police officer Joe Collins (Max Martini), who was receiving a private lesson from Mike, sees that Laura is distressed and tries to take her coat. Startled, Laura grabs Joe’s gun and it goes off, shattering the studio’s front window. To avoid having Laura charged with attempted murder, Mike and Joe agree to conceal the event.Mike’s insurance, however, will not cover his act of God claim that the window was broken by a strong wind. Mike’s wife Sondra (Alice Braga), whose fashion business profits are the only thing keeping the struggling studio afloat, requests that Mike ask for a loan from her brother Ricardo (John Machado), a mixed martial arts champion. At Ricardo’s nightclub, Mike meets with Sondra’s other brother, Bruno (Rodrigo Santoro), and learns that Joe quit as the club’s bouncer because Bruno never paid him. Mike confronts Bruno about the situation but is rebuffed. Mike then declines Bruno’s offer to fight on the undercard of an upcoming match between Ricardo and Japanese legend Morisaki (Enson Inoue), which could potentially pay out $50,000. Mike believes competitions with money as the incentive are not honorable and weaken the fighter.Meanwhile, aging Hollywood action star Chet Frank (Tim Allen) enters the nightclub without security and is accosted by a man with a broken bottle. Mike intervenes and subdues three men in the process. The following day, Mike receives an expensive watch and an invitation to dinner from Chet. Mike gives the watch to Joe to pawn in lieu of his unpaid salary at the nightclub. At the dinner party, Chet’s wife Zena (Rebecca Pidgeon) arranges an informal business deal to buy a large amount of dresses from Sondra’s company. Chet, impressed by Mike, invites him to the set of his current film. As Mike and Sondra leave the dinner, Mike explains his unique training method to Chet’s business associate Jerry Weiss (Joe Mantegna). Before a sparring match, each fighter must draw one of three marbles, two white and one black; whoever draws a black marble has to fight with a handicap.Mike uses his military experience to answer a few technical questions for Chet on the film set and is offered the role of co-producer. That evening, Mike faxes the details of his training methods to Jerry so they can be used in the film. Joe arrives at the studio and informs Mike that he was suspended from duty for pawning the watch, which turned out to be stolen. During their dinner that evening, Mike relays the information to Jerry who excuses himself to handle the matter, but never returns. At home, Mike learns that the phone numbers that Zena gave Sondra have been disconnected. Sondra is panicky, having borrowed $30,000 from a loan shark to order the fabric for the dresses. As he meets with the loan shark to discuss an extension, Mike notices Bruno and Marty Brown (Ricky Jay) on television using Mike’s marble-drawing method as a promotional gimmick for the undercard fights of Ricardo’s match.Mike hires Laura to sue, but Marty’s lawyer threatens that if they do not drop the lawsuit, he will give the police an empty shell casing with Laura’s fingerprints, as proof that she attempted to kill an off-duty cop. He also threatens Mike as a witness who covered up the crime by bribing the cop with a stolen watch. When told of the situation, Joe feels responsible and kills himself. Mike feels obligated to help Joe’s financially struggling wife and, in desperate need of money himself, decides to compete as an undercard fighter in the upcoming competition. At the arena, Mike discovers the fights are being fixed via a magician (Cyril Takayama) using sleight of hand to surreptitiously switch the white and black marbles. Disgusted by this revelation, Mike confronts the conspirators: Marty, Jerry and Bruno who confirm that unknown to the competitors, the fights are handicapped by the fight promoters so as to ensure winning bets. They also reveal that Ricardo is intentionally losing the fight to Morisaki so they can make money on the rematch. Jerry tells Mike that Sondra is the one who told them about Laura shooting the window and Bruno justifies her betrayal by explaining that his sister is too smart to stay with someone who cannot provide for her.As Mike is exiting the arena, he meets Laura. Their conversation is not audible, but it ends with Laura slapping Mike. Mike then re-enters the arena. He incapacitates several security guards trying to stop him and is ultimately engaged by Ricardo. The audience and camera crews take notice as Mike and Ricardo face off in the arena’s corridors. Inspired by the Professor (Dan Inosanto), an elderly martial arts master attending the match, Mike manages to slip a difficult choke hold and defeats Ricardo, making it onto the ring to speak to the Professor personally. He is approached by Morisaki, who offers Mike his ivory-studded belt, previously referred to as a Japanese national treasure, as a sign of respect. He is then approached by the Professor himself, who proceeds to award the coveted red belt to an incredulous Mike, and embraces him, acknowledging his dedication to the art.Red Belt doesn’t fail at being an action flick; it just succeeds more so at being an entertaining drama with an MMA theme. This is an easy movie to recommend.

 

 

Advertisements

REVIEW: FAMILY GUY – DVD SEASON 16

Image result for family guy logo

MAIN CAST (VOICES)

Seth MacFarlane (Flashforward)
Alex Borstein (Power Rangers Zeo)
Seth Green (IT)
Mila Kunis (Black Swan)
Mike Henry (Ted)
Jennifer Tilly (Curse of Chucky)
Patrick Warburton (Scream 3)
Adam West (60s Batman)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST (VOICES)

Rachael MacFarlane (The Batman)
Sanaa Lathan (Blade)
Fred Tatasciore (Hulk vs)
Kevin Michael Richardson (The Cleveland Show)
Cary Elwes (The Princess Bride)
Ed O’Neill (The Bone Collector)
Lucas Grabeel (Smallville)
Dee Bradley Baker (American Dad)
Kate McKinnon (Ghostbusters)
Gary Cole (Chuck)
Carrie Fisher (Star Wars)
Margaret Cho (Hurricane Bianca)
C.S. Lee (Dexter)
Chad L. Coleman (Arrow)
Christina Milian (Bring It On 5)
Martha MacIsaac (Superbad)
Ashton Kutcher (Two and a Half Men)

This season is really season 14. The episodes this season are as follows.

Pilling Them Softly:


So this episode tries to tackle the issue of ADHD medication and whether or not it should be used on students who haven’t been paying attention in school. It’s pretty ambitious for the show to try and do this. On the Positive side  the episode handles the subject well and t demonstrates that some doctors would prescribe medication to the kid, even if he doesn’t need it. This can be done through not testing it and going off of what people see while the kid is at school. The sad truth is that there are parents out there that don’t ask their kid questions about what they learned in school, and it’s nice for this episode to show it


Papa Has a Rollin’ Son:


The main plot has Joe’s father coming to visit, but Joe doesn’t want that because he never told his dad that he was handicapped and his dad makes fun of handicapped people. It’s one of those situations where you can replace Joe’s father’s prejudice with anything and you can see how well this episode tackles the issue. It’s just as hard in real life as it sounds, and how this episode portrays the emotions realistically is damn impressive. The ending where Joe confesses to his father and reunites with him is very satisfying given how realistically portrayed it’s handled.

Guy, Robot:

The main plot has Stewie making a robot as a friend after Brian stole all of his jokes from Twitter for a stand up routine. While Brian did act like a dick stealing Stewie’s jokes, it’s actually neat of him to try and make it up to him by helping him stop the robots later on. The robots getting smarter leads to a joke about Asperger’s Syndrome, which I’m not really sure I get. Stewie says that the robots have Asperger’s because they are doing math on glass and invading each other’s personal space The majority of the main plot focuses on Stewie slowly being alienated by Lyle and the other robots, but I don’t like the implication that if you grow more intelligent, you see less intelligent people as beneath you. I don’t think the writers were intending to make it come off that way, but it’s still something I can’t ignore.

Peternormal Activity:


This episode is one that has a really good main plot,  I really like the idea here, being that Peter and his friends try to write their own horror movie after seeing a terrible one. So they go to a spooky asylum to write the movie, and lots of craziness happens from there. The ideas they come up with at the beginning of this plot are references to classic horror tropes, like the couple getting killed at Make Out Point, a person waking up in an empty hospital, and something that wouldn’t normally be scary being made scary. In this case, that ends up being a bar of soap, and it’s just as hilarious as it sounds.

Peter, Chris & Brian:

The episode begins with Peter being worried about his porn collection possibly being found by someone after his mother sold everything. I will admit, however, that it’s kind of dickish of him to only focus on his porn collection instead of his mother. Thankfully, that aspect isn’t focused on too much, so it doesn’t really become distracting. I love the little build up to Peter wanting to watch all his porno movies nonstop, and then through “11 minutes later”, he says that he will never watch another one of these movies ever again. That’s a pretty funny joke.


Peter’s Sister:

Peter’s sister Karen comes over for Thanksgiving, while Stewie goes a little too far as he and Brian go on a cleanse to avoid overeating.A fumy thanksgiving episode the highlight is the wrestling match at the end.

Hot Pocket-Dial:

Now this is a concept I can get behind: Quagmire’s feelings for Lois being brought to the forefront, and everybody having to deal with the consequences that can come from it. I never thought it would happen in this show, but I’m glad that the writers are finally doing something with this other than jokes. For the most part, the episode handles the concept fairly well. Everybody reacts like they really would in a situation like this, and there are some decent jokes that come from this. My favorite is the one where Peter accidentally lets everyone hear a message he said about an idea called “Fop Cop.” It’s so strange and out of nowhere that it’s damn funny.

Brokeback Swanson:


Joe becomes a quadriplegic while Brian has an affair with a married woman.  Despite some cringe-worthy jokes during this plot, it’s decently told, the characters act realistically, and the ending reveal of how Joe ended up being paralyzed is a funny twist.

A Shot in the Dark:

So this episode deals with the subject of hate crimes that have been going on in recent years. Peter ends up shooting Cleveland Jr while trying to protect the neighborhood, and he gets blamed for doing it from racism. In terms of that….it surprisingly does a good job of it!

Candy, Quahog Marshmallow:

This episode is a pretty good dramatic episode in regards to Quagmire’s story. I like the idea of him wanting to live a life in Korea with his old flame. It definitely leads to some good dramatic moments when he suggests that he’s going to stay there with her.

The Peanut Butter Kid:


After the Griffin family’s bank account begins to run dry, Peter and Lois have Stewie star in a peanut butter commercial. Peter and Lois soon start getting hooked on making Stewie a child star, which causes Brian to be concerned about their motives. A Good episode that  showcases those parents who push there kids to be famous so they can live off them.

Scammed Yankees:

Peter and Carter go to Africa to return Carter’s money he lost to a Nigerian scammer. Meanwhile, Brian tries to hook up with one of Meg’s friends after he finds out that she has a great body. Another great Brian episode.

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/M/MV5BZDZiYzhkNjctZjFmZi00YmRiLTgyNTMtZmRlMmMyZTkwNjY4XkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMjYwNDA2MDE@._V1_SY999_SX1776_AL_.jpg

An App A Day:


Peter learns about phone apps and overloads his phone with them. He buys a new phone with more memory and gives his old phone to Chris, which causes a series of horrible events. Meanwhile, Stewie joins a tennis club and invites Brian to be his tennis partner.  A great episode that shows us just how addicted we all are to our apps and phones.

Underage Peter:


Thanks to dog years, Brian is the only one old enough to drink when Mayor West raises the drinking age to 50 following Peter’s latest drunken rampage, so Peter makes Brian buy his beer. There were several things that I genuinely enjoyed. Some of the jokes managed to get a chuckle out of me(aside from the confusing ones, like Thomas Edison’s cutaway), and when Peter isn’t taking advantage of Brian and coming across as unlikable, the episode does fine with the story and the moral it tries to teach.

A Lot Going On Upstairs:

The main plot of the episode reminds me somewhat of MLP’s Do Princesses Dream of Magic Sheep. This isn’t quite like that episode, since that dealt with a character’s depression(whether or not you think it worked depends on who you are), but the way the episode uses the dream sequences is just so incredible. Not only do the scary visuals actually have a point unlike in Seahorse Seashell Party, but it leads to some of the best and most creative animation the show has ever put out. It even manages to get some hilarious jokes, like Stewie’s perception of what the news is like. Watch that moment yourself if you want a good laugh. The main plot ends with Brian being revealed as the reason for Stewie’s nightmares, and it’s not from him being an asshole like you would think nowadays. It’s actually from Stewie not wanting Brian to be disappointed in him. That’s a feeling I think all of us can sympathize with, whether it relates to a parent, friend, or anyone, really. It’s a mature moment that is worth watching the episode alone.

The Heartbreak Dog:
Brian kisses Bonnie during her 46th birthday party and she (briefly) leaves Joe. Meanwhile, Meg starts stealing from a retirement home after the residents she volunteered to help mistreat her. The ending leaves me split down the middle. On the one hand, it’s nice that Joe is willing to listen to his wife and help her achieve her dreams that she never got to since his accident. That’s a nice, mature moment from him that bumps his likability up at least a little bit after the rest of the episode. On the other hand, it kind of feels like the episode is okay with someone’s wife cheating on them because of her lost dreams. That’s just how it came across to me.

Take a Letter:

The main plot has Lois find an old letter from Peter telling an old girlfriend that he was having doubts a week before his marrying Lois. While this plot is good for the most part, it does feel a little unfocused. The first two thirds of it focuses on Lois being worried about whether or not Gretchen and Peter were seeing each other. The last third has Gretchen go all yandere on Peter and trying to kill Lois so they can be together. The story does have many good moments.


The New Adventures of Old Tom:

This is actually a pretty good story for the show, even though it kind of feels like And It’s Joyce Kinney, except focusing on Tom Tucker. It does a decent job telling it, and even the climax where Peter gets Tom his job back is pretty satisfying. The only real problem I have with the main plot is Lois. She shows that she cares much more about how hot the new news anchor is than she is for her husband’s safety. When she does that, on top of leaving Peter at the mall to fend for himself, it kind of sours the moments when we’re supposed to care about her.

Run Chris Run:


Chris gets elected homecoming king, but Meg discovers that the cool kids only voted for him in order to prank him. Meanwhile, Peter and the gang get jealous when Cleveland starts hanging out with Jerome, so they try to get him back. A Good epiosde as the main plaot relates to me when I was at school the same thing happened to me.

Road to India:

Brian and Stewie go to India to find a tech support worker with whom Brian has fallen in love. Meanwhile, Peter becomes the center of attention when Joe invites him to bingo night. A great episode made me think of all the times I pranked the fake tech supporters.

Another great season and a must have for all Family Guy fans.

REVIEW: 8 SIMPLE RULES – SEASON 1-3

Image result for 8 simple rules

MAIN CAST

John Ritter (Bad Santa)
Katey Sagal (Futurama)
Kaley Cuoco (The Big bang Theory)
Amy Davidson (Goyband)
Martin Spanjers (Good Luck Charlie)
James Garner (The Notebook)
David Spade (Rules of Engagement)

 

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST STARS

Larry Miller (10 Things I Hate About You)
Mo Gaffney (That 7os Show)
Billy Aaron Brown (Jeepers Creepers 2)
Brian Sites (Gigli)
Patrick Warburton (Ted)
Rachel Bilson (Chuck)
Cole Williams (North Country)
Jason Priestley (Tru Calling)
Shelley Long (Cheers)
John Ratzberger (Up)
Cybil Shepherd (Moonlighting)
Cindy Williams (American Graffiti)
Paul Wesley (The Vampire Diaries)
Suzanne Pleshette (The Birds)
Amanda MacDonald (The Naked Ape)
Lisa Rinna (Veronica mars)
Ethan Philips (Star Trek: Voyager)
Jonathan Taylor Thomas (Smallville)
Tatum O’Neal (Paper Moon)
Keir O’Donnell (Wedding Crashers)
Lee Garlington (Flashforward)
Adam Arkin (Hitch)
Jan Hoag (Scream Queens)
Eric Jungmann (Sabrina: TTW)
Raquel Welch (Fantastic Voyage)
Pamela Anderson (Scooby-Doo)
Ed O’Neill (Married With Children)
Beth Grant (Wonderfalls)
Danny Woodburn (Watchmen)
Leighton Meester (The Judge)
Matt Lanter (Heroes)
Rachael Harris (Lucifer)
Nicole Richie (Chuck)
Kenneth Kimmins (Lois & Clark)

8 Simple Rules for Dating My Teenage Daughter (Later Shortened to 8 Simple Rules)  had an auspicious start. The supremely-talented Tom Shadyac was involved in the project. This meant that the comedy would be nothing less of spectacular, and that’s exactly what happened: the show remains one of the freshest, funniest, wittiest shows made in a very long time. Every line, facial expression, casting choice, scene, all wreaked of perfection. There was not one episode after which I thought, “Man that wasn’t as good as the rest”. Each one was a standout. Again, this is the kind of perfectionism that we’ve come to expect from Tom. For those who don’t know, Tom Shadyac is the director of Ace Ventura (first movie), The Nutty Professor (first one) and Liar Liar. Quite a résumé. He’s a producer here not a director, but his magic touch is felt in every episode.The family consists of:

The Father: Paul Hennessy (John Ritter): nice, slightly neurotic, can be a pushover from time to time, works as a sports writer. John unfortunately passed away in 2003 leaving a fond memory and near-sure cancellation contemplations by the suits.

The Mother: Cate (Katey Sagal): come on, who didn’t fall in love with Katey when she played Peg on Married With Children? Al Bundy was our hero. We viewers gave him the respect and love he never had. But without Peg’s nonchalant, parasitic, lazy lifestyle, Al would’ve probably been just another Chicago dad instead of the mess that Peg (life, actually) caused him to be. Katey was a MILF back then and still is: a brune now (instead of a redhead) and just as buxom as ever. Cate is the conservative mom and loving wife. I know it sounds boring, but comedically, she fits perfectly.

The Ditzy Blonde Daughter: Bridget (played to perfection by Kaley Cuoco): almost never has an idiot been played so well. Aside of Gob on Arrested Development, Bridget may well be a shoe-in for any awards given to this archetype. Bridget is shallow, self-centered, not very bright and a tad slutty in his look. She plays the dumb blonde role better than absolutely anyone IMO. Perfection. One of the high-points of the show.

The Overlooked Geeky Daughter: Kerry (Amy Davidson): a brune and a geek, she gets no love from life or circumstances. Feels overlooked, under-appreciated and neglected most of the time. She’s Bridget’s younger sister (in reality she’s older than her) and the two’s extremely opposite personalities and brains cause endless clashes, to much of our amusement.

The Son: Rory (Martin Spanjers): was the second funniest character IMO before the passing of Ritter, then John passes, new characters come and Rory is not the wise-cracking verbal-trouble-maker that he used to: that went mostly to David Spade’s character.


Those characters were the main ones at the time of John Ritter. Unfortunately enough, the insanely hilarious Larry Miller (one of my favorites) did not get lots of screen time. He played Paul’s co-worker/competitor. After an aortic dissection cost Ritter his life in 2003 (September 11th), the show was on hiatus for a while. No one thought it could come back, but it did later on, with a couple of new additions. This began the second phase of the show, and the new characters were:  The strict, confident school principal: Ed (Adam Arkin): I saw Adam here and there on talk shows. This was the first time that I saw him do anything. Impressed, is the word I use. His performance was very impressive. Sad he wasn’t brought in earlier. He also plays Cate’s potential love interest after Paul passes. The gradual progress towards this point (which would’ve sounded crazy at the beginning) earns the creators lots of praise. It was done slowly, carefully and excellently, with constant respect paid to the Paul (Ritter).

The Attitude Grandpa: Jim Egan (James Garner): a surprisingly welcome addition to the series, he was cannon fodder for endless ‘old’ jokes, mainly by… The 35-year-old unemployed wise-cracking half-brother of the mom: CJ (played to insanely funny heights by David Spade): I knew Spade was funny, I just didn’t know he was THIS funny. Somehow, Spade’s very familiar presence is sensed inside his character (as opposed to a separable character), which is understandable, since he’s a comic and he’s on a comedy show. This eerie feeling is kinda like seeing someone borrow lots of material from David Spade’s appearances in movies, talk shows and functions (award shows, etc.) and delivering a superb impersonation of Spade’s voice and comedy style, except, that it IS Spade. By that I mean you realize he’s not trying to play someone else, or a whole new character: he’s being the goofy, funny Spade we’ve come to know, and he takes this pleasantly humorous formula to the absolute top. Every line he uttered, every sarcasm he begot, all classics, literally. Spade was CRAZY-funny; so, SO funny.

The show’s humor and drama were both upped after the show was back, but audiences thought, “John passed, it ain’t gonna be the same anymore”. This is understandable, considering we are talking about a group of people (American viewers) who gave ‘Yes Dear’ a free ride but caused Andy Richter Controls the Universe to be cancelled in no time. As the show’s quality increased, its ratings declined. Soon it was no more, sadly.

REVIEW: THE BONE COLLECTOR

CAST
Denzel Washington (Training Day)
Angelina Jolie (Wanted)
Queen Latifah (Bringing Down The House)
Michael Rooker (Mallrats)
Ed O’Neill (Modern Family)
Luis Guzman (Waiting)
Leland Orser (Confidence)
John Benjamin Hickey (Alias)
Bobby Cannavle (Paul Blart Mall Cop)
Ted Whittall (Beauty and The Beast)
The film begins in late 1999. Tetraplegic forensics expert Lincoln Rhyme (Denzel Washington) and a patrol cop, Amelia Donaghy (Angelina Jolie), team up to solve a string of murders all connected to a serial killer by his signature: a single shard of bone is removed from each of the victims. Rhyme was paralyzed from the neck down in an earlier accident and is bed-bound and completely reliant on machines and his nurse Thelma (Queen Latifah) to function. He communicates with Amelia via headset as she examines the various crime scenes and collects evidence and reports back to him.
The killer poses as a New York taxi driver, and abducts and kills those who get in his taxi. The first two victims are a married couple named Alan and Lindsay Rubin, who take a taxi home but then find themselves kidnapped by the killer. Amelia finds Alan’s body buried in a Civil War-era railroad bed. She also finds a collection of clues including a pile of piece-ground oyster shells, which eventually leads Amelia – now working with Rhyme – to Alan’s wife, and a scrap of paper. The detectives find Mrs. Rubin, too late, at a steam junction in a below-ground services area of a building in the financial district, secured using old antique handcuffs or shackles at the mouth of a pipe which emits steam. She has been scalded to death from the steam. The killer has also removed a bit of flesh and bone from her arm. Amelia finds another scrap of paper at the scene.
The killer then abducts an NYU student. He is taken to a derelict slaughterhouse where he is tied to a pole and part of his thigh bone is surgically removed, and left for rats to feed on. Amelia and Rhyme, using the clues left by the killer at the scene of Lindsay Rubin’s death (rat hairs embedded in a bone from a cow’s body), find the victim, but again too late to save him. Again, the killer has removed a piece of the victim’s bone. Amelia is able to collect the evidence, including another scrap of paper. The pressure of the tense investigation and bureaucratic challenges to both Amelia’s and Rhyme’s involvement with the case are having serious impacts on Rhyme’s health and stability.
After piecing together the message the killer was sending using the scraps of paper, Amelia and Rhyme are led to an old crime novel, whose crimes the killer was replicating. This leads them to his next victims, a grandfather and granddaughter tied to a pier as the tide rises. The girl is the first victim they manage to save, but her grandfather dies. At the scene, Amelia finds another bone, part of an old police badge, and an old subway map. These clues, and an earlier clue left by the killer at the scene of Mrs. Rubin’s death (asbestos) lead Amelia to an abandoned subway station, in which Amelia sees some numbers which have been tampered with to spell out Rhyme’s police badge number. Amelia then figures out that the killer is after Rhyme.
The killer arrives at Rhyme’s house, and after killing Rhyme’s nurse, Thelma, and Captain Howard Cheney (Michael Rooker), it is revealed that he is the medical technician who cares for Rhyme’s medical equipment, Richard Thompson (Leland Orser). Richard’s real name is Marcus Andrews. An ex-forensic cop whom Rhyme’s testimony helped convict of planting false evidence at crime scenes, Marcus intends to exact his revenge. Rhyme manages to crush Marcus’s right hand by suddenly dropping his bed horizontal, and in the struggle to free himself, Marcus pulls Rhyme with him and they both collapse to the floor. Rhyme then manages to bite Marcus in the neck, causing massive bleeding. Marcus once again manages to free himself, grabbing his knife. As Marcus raises the knife for a killing blow, Amelia suddenly arrives at the apartment and shoots Marcus who falls down dead.
The film ends at a Christmas celebration at Rhyme’s apartment. Rhyme, having given up his plans to commit suicide, faces his sister and niece coming to visit him along with Amelia and his other colleagues on Christmas Eve. It is implied that Rhyme and Amelia have a relationship.
A great film with a wonderfully dastardly bad guy who is on the same level of Hanibal Lector of Twisted genius. A well crafted story and movie.