REVIEW: SMALLVILLE – SEASON 7

Starring

Tom Welling (Lucifer)
Kristin Kreuk (Beauty and The Beast)
Michael Rosenbaum (Impastor)
Allison Mack (Wilfred)
Erica Durance (Supergirl)
Laura Vandervoort (Bitten)
Aaron Ashmore (Veronica Mars)
John Glover (Shazam)

Laura Vandervoort in Smallville (2001)

Recurring / Notable Guest Cast

Phil Morris (Doom Patrol)
Jacqueline Samuda (Stargate SG.1)
Michael Cassidy (Batman V Superman)
Kim Coates (Goon)
Terence Stamp (Jor-El)
Tom McBeath (Van Helsing)
Peter Bryant (Legends of Tomorrow)
Eva Marcille (Crossover)
Christine Chatelain (Sanctuary)
Dean Cain (Lois & Clark)
Jovanna Burke (Fringe)
Christina Milian (Brin It On 5)
Christopher Jacot (Mutant X)
David Richmond-Peck (V)
Helen Slater (Supergirl)
Christopher Heyerdahl (Van Helsing)
Elyse Levesque (The Originals)
Alex Zahara (Horns)
Tim Guinee (Iron Man)
Anna Galvin (Warcraft)
James Marsters (Buffy: TVS)
Marc McClure (Superman)
Alaina Huffman (Stargate Universe)
Justin Hartley (This Is Us)
Alisen Down (12 Monkeys)
Corey Sevier (Immortals)
Connor Stanhope (American Mary)
David Orth (The Lost World)
Sam Jones III (Bones)
Gina Holden (Flash Gordon)
Aaron Douglas (Battlestar Galactica)
Jonathan Scarfe (Van Helsing)
Jill Teed (Godzilla)
Anne Openshaw (Narc)
Ari Cohen (IT)
Camille Mitchell (Izombie)
Robert Picardo (Star Trek Voyager)
Donnelly Rhodes (Battlestar Galactica)
Julia Benson (The Order)

Season 7 demonstrates a real maturity in terms of the characters and the wider Smallville universe. For the characters themselves we obviously have to start with Clark and Lex.Tom Welling in Smallville (2001)What I love about this series is that you don’t notice subtle changes that are going – its only when there is a sudden abrupt change that you realise that it had been going on for ages and you find yourself saying “Ah!”. Clark in this season is gradually waking up to the fact that his old life is practically gone – most friends and family have moved on. This really hits home with an episode that sees the (thankfully brief) return of Pete. This was a subtle episode that demonstrated that Pete and Clark are very different now – they are friends but have both moved on. Clark towards his greater destiny – Pete to his, well, lesser destiny. But the real tear jerker that forces Clark to face the changes is the video left by Lana in the series finale. Understated and brief – its all the more powerful. Lana functioned as a sort of bubble for Clark – a link back to his carefree past – her leaving all but cuts this.Tom Welling in Smallville (2001)For Lex – wow. Smallville always managed to avoid having him as a cartoon baddie. What really took off on this season was Lex rushing towards his destiny as the powerful enemy of the “Traveller”. We get to see the childhood of Lex and his inner struggles. The moment that he and Lionel have their final encounter – powerful stuff. But what really hits viewers is Lex’s view of what his destiny was. The link he has with the Traveller, the impact that has had on his life and how it will ultimately play out – this was biblical stuff.Laura Vandervoort in Smallville (2001)For the overarching storylines of the series. Well a special mention goes to the Veritas saga. Debate rages on message boards across the land about whether or not writers had planned this from the start of the series. Regardless if they did – the Veritas storyline weaves together almost 7 years of storylines. Smallville has always managed to pull of the secret legends stories, particularly in Season 4 and 7. But there is a real epic storylines going in season 7. Other storylines worthy mention: the return of Brainiac – always a joy. Bizzaro is also great fun. Tom welling clearly enjoys playing a baddy instead of straight-laced Clark. That and he gets to wear a blue jacket and red tshirt, instead of vice versa. And Lionel finally meets his maker.

REVIEW: LOOK, UP IN THE SKY! THE AMAZING STORY OF SUPERMAN

look-up-in-the-sky-the-amazing-story-of-superman-tv-movie-poster-2006-1020448079

Starring

Kevin Spacey (Superman Returns)
Mark Hamill (Star wars)
Stan Lee (Avengers Assemble)
Noel Neill (Atom Man vs Superman)
Jack Larson (Adventures of Superman)
Bill Mumy (Babylon 5)
Annette O’Toole (Smallville)
Adam West (Family Guy)
Margot Kidder (Superman)
Jackie Cooper (The People’s Choice)
Dean Cain (Lois & Clark)
Brandon Routh (Superman Returns)
Kate Bosworth (Blue Crush)
Sam Huntington (Fanboys)

Brandon Routh in Superman Returns (2006)The trick with releasing a documentary about the history of Superman a mere week before “Superman Returns” arrives in theaters: you don’t want to make it feel like one big commercial for the new movie; you need to find a healthy balance between fun and informative, being careful that you don’t wind up being fluffy or stuffy; you don’t want to make it feel like one big commercial for the new movie; you need to present enough new material so you’re not merely rehashing facts that everybody already knows and clips everybody’s already seen.George Reeves and Noel Neill in Adventures of Superman (1952)In fact, Burns goes the completely opposite route (although he does bring us Kevin Spacey, star of the New Hit Movie, for narration duties); in just under two hours, he and his crew offer up the most complete history of the character I’ve ever seen. We get it all in extreme detail, from Shuster and Siegel’s original “Super-Man” short story (the name was used to define an evil psychic) to long discussions on George Reeves and Christopher Reeve to DC Comics’ ups and downs with the character on the comics page. For the newcomer, you get a detailed examination of the Man of Steel’s many changes over the decades; for the hardcore Supes fanatic, you get ultra-rare clips of the 1950s “Superboy,” “Superpup” (in which little people wore dog costumes!), and the infamous musical comedy “It’s a Bird! It’s a Plane! It’s Superman!,” seen here in a television adaptation starring David Wilson, who could not dance, as a dancing Superman. (A word of warning: Think of the worst thing you can possibly imagine. Now think of something even worse than that. Push yourself hard to think up something even worse still. Beyond that, dear reader, you will find “It’s a Bird! It’s a Plane! It’s Superman!”)Kirk Alyn, Don C. Harvey, Jack Ingram, Noel Neill, and Lyle Talbot in Atom Man vs. Superman (1950)“Look, Up In the Sky!” works best in its first hour, when time is spent detailing the history of the comics, radio shows, cartoon shorts, serial, movie (“Superman and the Mole Men”), and TV series – perhaps because by the time we turn our attention to the 1978 film “Superman,” we’ve seen a lot of this stuff before, either in previous documentaries or as DVD bonus features, unlike the earlier projects, whose behind-the-scenes shenanigans have remained relatively unseen. When the movie spends plenty of time on the Reeve era, one gets the feeling that Burns is holding back, perhaps not wanting this portion of the timeline (with its ample archival material) to overshadow the rest of the story, perhaps not to repeat too much of what’s already been seen elsewhere, or perhaps to leave a little something for the supplemental sections of the forthcoming deluxe DVD releases.Christopher Reeve in Superman II (1980)Also, the documentary struggles in how to deal with the rest of the Reeve era. How to discuss Richard Donner being replaced on “Superman II” with Richard Lester without making either Donner or producer Ilya Salkind (who, after all, were both kind enough to be interviewed for this film) look bad? How to discuss the negative responses to “Superman III” and “IV” without delivering a drubbing so terrible that potential customers might not want the box set come autumn? Heck, how to discuss “Superman III” and “IV” without showing any of the behind-the-scenes material that made the look into the first movie so interesting? And what do you do with “Supergirl,” a movie for which Warner Bros. obviously declined any effort in obtaining rights, other than to brush it off with a couple sentences of narration and a few stock photos?Christopher Reeve in Superman II (1980)By the time we hit the late 1980s, it becomes obvious that Burns has become rushed for time yet is obligated to tow the company line – he glosses over such important information as John Byrne’s critical 1986 relaunching of the character, while giving plenty of extra attention to the late-80s syndicated series “Superboy,” a show nobody remembers that much, but hey, Warner Bros. just released the first season on DVD, so we better hype it up.Richard Pryor, Christopher Reeve, Larry Lamb, and Christopher Malcolm in Superman III (1983)We get an awkward potpourri, with Burns taking the time to discuss such important matters as the death (and, natch, rebirth) of Superman and the wedding of Clark and Lois, both which temporarily helped to boost comics sales, but then becoming very unsure as to how to handle the 1996 animated series and its follow-ups, concluding with the current “Justice League Unlimited” cartoon. (Both are mentioned, but in an ill-fitting obligatory tone.) “Lois & Clark” also gets a solid mention, but it again feels as if Burns is walking on tiptoes, trying to avoid anything that might wind up on a future DVD collection. (There’s also an extremely odd breakaway to discuss 9/11, which gets tied back to Superman in the flimsiest of manners, as if Burns is now simply grasping wildly in an attempt to retain some connection with the viewer, or show the relevance of a character that at the time wasn’t much in the pop culture forefront.)Annette O'Toole, Christopher Reeve, and Paul Kaethler in Superman III (1983)The last chunk is spent singing the praises of “Smallville” and “Superman Returns,” and it’s here that it becomes very clear that the movie should’ve stopped somewhere around the mid-90s mark. There’s not enough distance to properly analyze the impact of “Smallville,” and the facts get purposely fudged to make the series feel more important than future generations may believe. (Getting the largest ratings of all shows on the WB sounds more impressive than it really is.) Without any chance at hindsight, there’s no proper way to honestly gauge how the series fits into the history of the character, but instead of omitting anything, Burns merely turns on the hard sell.Brandon Routh in Superman Returns (2006)And then comes “Superman Returns,” and Burns is left with the unfortunate job of pushing it without sounding like he’s pushing it, showing clips without giving away too much, making this present-day release sound like part of history. (Most awkward moment: Spacey refers to himself in the third person.) On the plus side, you do get to see the crazed ramblings of producer Jon Peters, who admits to having had some very bad ideas in his decade-long trek in bringing Superman back to the big screen; one wonders if anybody slipped him a copy of “An Evening With Kevin Smith” as a wake-up call.