REVIEW: BEDTIME STORIES

CAST

Adam sandler (Jack &Jill)
Keri Russell (Waitress)
Guy Pearce (Prometheus)
Russell Brand (Get Him to The Greek)
Richard Griffiths (Harry potter)
Teresa Palmer (Warm Bodies)
Lucy Lawless (Ash vs Evil Dead)
Courteney Cox (Scream)
Jonathan Pryce (Game of Thrones)
Aisha Tyler (The Babymakers)
Allen Covert (The Weding Singer)
Kathryn Joosten (Desperate Housewives)
Rob Schneider (The Hot Chick)
Nick Swardson (Bolt)
Carmen Electra (Scary Movie)
Sarah Buxton (Spread)

Skeeter Bronson (Adam Sandler) is a hotel handyman who was promised by his father, Marty Bronson (Jonathan Pryce), to be the manager of the family hotel. A mysophobe named Barry Nottingham (Richard Griffiths) agreed to keep that promise when the Bronson family sold their hotel to him—then built a new hotel instead. Thirty years later, when the story begins, Skeeter is the hotel’s handyman while management is held by Kendall (Guy Pearce). Barry’s new hotel, the Sunny Vista Nottingham Hotel, is a hit, but he’s got plans to build an even more elaborate hotel, one designed around a theme that he’s keeping secret. Skeeter’s sister and principal of Webster Elementary School, Wendy (Courteney Cox), asks Skeeter to watch her kids, Bobbi (Laura Ann Kesling) and Patrick (Jonathan Morgan Heit), while she goes out of town. Skeeter does not know his niece and nephew very well, but agrees. Helping him during the day is Wendy’s friend, Jill Hastings (Keri Russell), a teacher who works at the same school as Wendy. That night, putting Bobbi and Patrick to bed, Skeeter tells them a story, one inspired by his own life as an “underappreciated” handyman: a downtrodden squire “Sir Fixalot” rivals the pompous “Sir Buttikiss” in competition for a new job. The kids add their own details such as the king giving Sir Fixalot a chance to prove himself, a mermaid based on Jill, and a downpour of gumballs when Fixalot prevails.

The following day, while fixing Barry’s television, Skeeter learns that the new hotel’s surprise theme will be rock and roll. He shocks Barry by telling him of the Hard Rock Hotel. Barry offers Skeeter a chance to compete with Kendall for a better theme. While driving, Skeeter is suddenly greeted with a shower of gumballs caused by a crashed candy delivery truck he doesn’t see, so he concludes that the story had come true and quickly develops a plan. His next story, a Western in which he is given a horse named “Ferrari” by a Native American horse trader (Rob Schneider). The children have him save a damsel in distress and, deserving a reward kiss, gets kicked by a dwarf instead. That night, out in search of his Ferrari, he meets a man (also played by Rob Schneider), who steals his wallet. He rescues Barry’s daughter, Violet Nottingham (Teresa Palmer), from the paparazzi, and, just as he is about to kiss her, he is kicked by a dwarf. At this point, with no Ferrari to be found, he determines that only the children’s story changes come true.

The following night’s story is about a Greek gladiator, Skeeticus, who, after impressing the emperor and a stadium of onlookers, attracts the attention of the most beautiful maiden. After a meal in which all the girls who used to pick on him in high school were so impressed by the beautiful maiden he is with, they start randomly singing the “Hokey Pokey.” After Skeeticus saves a man’s life, a rainstorm sends him and the maiden into a magical cave which has Abraham Lincoln in it. Skeeter loses his patience with the story and upsets the children, telling them that their stories have nothing to do with real life. Unable to get them to continue, the story ends. The next day, Skeeter learns Violet will not be meeting with him per the story design, but unexpectedly runs into Jill at the beach who invites him to lunch. Recognizing girls at the restaurant from his high school days, Skeeter asks Jill to pretend to be his girlfriend. The girls are plainly impressed and then inexplicably break into the “Hokey Pokey.” Walking on the beach with Jill, Skeeter casually saves the life of a man before a sudden rainstorm sends them under the dock. Skeeter realizes that the girl in the stories is Jill, not Violet, and that he is falling in love with her. As they are about to kiss, Skeeter remembers that Abe Lincoln is supposed to appear and moves away. Instead, an American penny (with Lincoln’s face on it) falls from through the cracks of the dock, completing the story.

For Skeeter and the kids’ final night together, a space-themed story begins with Skeeter’s character who battles Kendall’s character in anti-gravity. Skeeter’s character, who speaks in alien gibberish, wins and Skeeter quickly ends the story. Patrick interjects that the story is too predictable and—remembering Skeeter’s argument against whimsically happy endings—pointless. Instead, Skeeter’s character is incinerated by a fireball and there ends the story.

Panicking, Skeeter sees/hears signs of fire everywhere. At Barry’s luau-themed birthday party, while dodging many fiery hazards, Skeeter’s tongue is stung by a bee, making him as hard to understand as his character was in the last of the stories. Luckily, Skeeter’s best friend, Mickey (Russell Brand), can still understand him and offers to translate for him. Kendall’s idea is for a hotel with a theme celebrating Broadway musicals—an idea that impresses no one. Barry much prefers Skeeter’s approach—simply reminding them of how much fun children have when staying at a classy hotel. After winning the competition, Skeeter thinks he’s found his happy ending. Instead, Kendall reveals to Skeeter that the new hotel is replacing Jill, Patrick and Bobbi’s school, which is to be demolished the next day. Stunned at that, Skeeter then panics when he sees Barry’s oversized birthday cake. Skeeter douses the candle and Barry with a fire extinguisher. Barry immediately tells Skeeter that he’s fired.

Afterwards, Jill, Patrick, and Bobbi discover that the school where they all work and attend is to be knocked down to make way for the new hotel, and they are all upset with Skeeter, refusing to believe that he didn’t know about the location. Wendy believes him, but is upset because he taught her children not to believe in happy endings. She confesses that she had always been jealous of his and their father’s ability to believe in made up stories and have fun the way she never did and had secretly hoped that, by leaving her children with him, his fun loving nature would rub off on them. When they attend the demolition to protest, Skeeter is inspired to prevent the school from being demolished—Donna Hynde (Aisha Tyler), one of the girls from his high school days, is a zoning commissioner, and helps find Barry Nottingham an alternative location on the beach in Santa Monica. Skeeter takes Jill on a wild motorcycle ride (during which Skeeter steals back his wallet from the thief (Rob Schneider) who stole it) which ends at the school and manages to stop the countdown of the demolition. As a reward, Skeeter asks Jill for a kiss and she gladly complies.

Sometime later, Skeeter opens Marty’s Motel (named after his late father) while Kendall and his scheming partner, Aspen (Lucy Lawless), are demoted to Skeeter’s motel wait staff. In the film’s conclusion, Marty Bronson narrates that Barry Nottingham overcame his fear of germs to the degree that he left the hotel business to become a school nurse at Webster Elementary School. His daughter, Violet Nottingham, became the new owner of her father’s hotel business and married Mickey, while Skeeter and Jill got married as well and live happily ever after.The idea of the film is hilarious, and Disney have managed to pull it off very well.Overall a great family sci-fi / comedy for children and adults.

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REVIEW: ACE VENTURA 1,2 & 3

CAST
Jim Carrey (The Number 23)
Courteney Cox (Masters of the Universe)
Sean Young (Blade Runner)
Tone Loc (Heat)
Robbie Willingham (The Last Boy Scout)
Udo Kier (Blade)
David Margulies (Ghostbusters 1 & 2)
Randall Cobb (Liar Liar)
Ace Ventura is a private investigator living in Miami, Florida, who specializes in retrieval of tame or captive animals. Despite the success of his methods, he does not receive many assignments and therefore cannot pay rent or repair his battered 1970s Chevrolet Monte Carlo; furthermore, his eccentricities make him the laughing stock of the Miami-Dade Police Department. At Joe Robbie Stadium, Snowflake, a bottlenose dolphin mascot of the Miami Dolphins, is kidnapped two weeks before the team is due to play in the Super Bowl. The team’s owner Mr. Riddle (Noble Willingham), believing the team will lose the Super Bowl unless Snowflake is returned, orders his Head of Operations Roger Podacter (Troy Evans) and Chief Publicist Melissa Robinson (Courteney Cox) to find the dolphin, or they will be fired. They hire Ventura to solve the case. He discovers his first clue in the form of a rare triangular-cut orange amber stone, which he speculates to have fallen from a 1984 AFC Championship Ring. Ventura then tries to find his culprit by tricking each player who played in this competition into showing their ring, but every ring he checks appears to be intact and original.
Later, Podacter mysteriously falls to his death from his apartment, which Robinson and Ventura go to investigate. Although Miami Police Lt. Lois Einhorn (Sean Young) insists it was suicide, Ventura proves it was murder, embarrassing and infuriating Einhorn. While trying to find how Podacter’s death is connected to Snowflake’s disappearance, Ventura learns of a former Dolphins player named Ray Finkle, whom he has not investigated because he did not appear in the team photo since he wasn’t added to the team roster until later in the season. Finkle had missed the potentially game-winning field goal kick at the end of Super Bowl XVII, causing the Dolphins to lose the game and ruining his football career. That same night, Ace and Melissa fall in love and have sex while hiding out in Ace’s apartment. The next day, Ventura later visits Einhorn and explains his theory: Finkle kidnapped Snowflake out of revenge due to his career having failed and the Dolphins giving their mascot his number and teaching him how to kick a field goal, which Finkle took as an insult.
Ventura visits Finkle’s parents and discovers that they blame Dan Marino for taking the snap incorrectly (he was not holding the ball with “laces out”), causing him to miss the kick. Finkle then became so obsessed with the loss and Dan Marino to the point that he became insane and was committed to a mental hospital. Ventura and Robinson go to the mental hospital where Finkle resided. Under the guise of a mental patient, Ventura searches Finkle’s belongings and discovers a newspaper article about a missing woman, coincidentally named Lois Einhorn. Studying this, Ventura realizes that Lt. Lois Einhorn is actually Ray Finkle in transgender disguise.
Ventura then follows Einhorn to an abandoned yacht storage facility, where he finds a kidnapped Marino and Snowflake. When the police arrive, Einhorn orders the cops to shoot Ventura, whereupon Ventura tries to expose Einhorn by ripping off her clothes, but fails until assisted by Marino, who points out a protrusion near her buttocks; Podacter was killed by Finkle because he had discovered this detail during a rendezvous with Einhorn. Exposed, Einhorn is humiliated and attempts to kill Ventura, but Ace throws her over into the water and removes a ring from her finger; which happens to be the 1984 AFC Championship ring that has a missing stone. Ace closes the case.
Marino and Snowflake return in time for the Super Bowl between the Miami Dolphins and Philadelphia Eagles. At halftime, Ventura attempts to capture an albino pigeon (worth a $25,000 reward if found and returned to the owner) earlier sought by himself, but is prevented by Swoop, the Eagles’ mascot, who shoos the pigeon away when getting a drink from a cooler. Enraged, Ventura beats the mascot while he is thanked on the JumboTron for saving Marino and Snowflake; Ventura briefly stops fighting Swoop (while still pinning the mascot down) and smiles as the audience cheers for him.
This was the movie, one of Jim Carrey’s first leading roles, which launched him into superstardom shortly before such hits as ‘The Mask’ and ‘Dumber and Dumber’, and ‘Ace Ventura – Pet Detective’ was to spawn two sequels, an animated series, as well as gain a huge cult following. It’s pure cheese, but jolly good fun.
CAST
Jim Carrey (The Number 23)
Ian McNeice (The Black Dahlia)
Simon Callow (Amadeus)
Maynard Eziashi (The Contract)
Bob Gunton (Argo)
Sophie Okonedo (After Earth)
Adewale Akinnuoye-Agaje (Lost)
Bruce Spence (Mad Max 2)
In the Himalayas, a failed rescue mission results in a raccoon falling to its death (a parody of Cliffhanger). Ace Ventura then undergoes an emotional breakdown and joins a Tibetan monastery. Once he has recovered, he is approached by Fulton Greenwall, a British correspondent working for a provincial consulate in the fictional African country of Nibia. Because Ace’s presence is troublesome to the monastery, the Grand Abbot gives Ace excuses to justify his departure, and sends him with Greenwall.
Thereafter, Greenwall asks Ventura to find the white bat ‘Shikaka’, a sacred animal of the Wachati tribe, which disappeared shortly after being offered as dowry of the Wachati Princess, who is set to wed the Wachootoo Prince to form armistice between the two people. Accompanied by his capuchin monkey, Spike, Ace travels to Africa to search for the missing bat.
After arriving in Nibia and meeting with consul Vincent Cadby, Ace begins investigating his case, but must overcome his intense fear of bats in order to succeed. He travels to the Wachati tribal village, where he learns that if the bat is not returned in time, the Wachootoo will declare war on the Wachati tribe. Thereafter much of Ace’s activity involves eliminating obvious suspects—animal traders, poachers, and a Safari park owner among others—and enduring the growing escalations of threat between the Wachati and the Wachootoo. This proves difficult, and is made more so by other incidents including attempts to kill him, a series of exhausting tasks set by the Wachootoo, and the Wachati princess’ attempts to seduce him.
Confused by the case, Ace consults the Grand Abbot via astral projection. Advised by the Abbot, Ace deduces that Vincent Cadby has taken the bat and hired Ace to divert suspicion from himself, having planned to let the tribes destroy each other so that he can then take possession of the numerous bat caves containing guano to sell as fertilizer worth billions. When Ace confronts Cadby with this knowledge, Ace learns he was hired as Cadby’s alibi, and he is arrested by tribal security chief, Hitu. Shortly after, Ace calls an elephant to escape, and summons herds of jungle animals to destroy Cadby’s house. Cadby then tries to shoot Ace, but is defeated by Greenwall who punches him in the face. Cadby escapes with the bat in a car, but Ace follows him in a monster truck. In pursuit, Ace destroys Cadby’s car, leaving the bat cage lodged in a tree.
Ace, despite his chronic chiroptophobia, bravely yet dramatically returns the bat just as the tribes are charging on a field to fight until they notice the bat and kneel before it; and Cadby, watching nearby, is discovered by the Wachati prince, Ouda, and pursued by both tribes, later to be raped by an amorous silverback gorilla (the rape is mostly left to the viewers’ imagination; they see the palm trees shaking in sympathy, but nothing else) The Princess is married to the Prince, who Ace had to fight as one of the Wachootoo tribal challenges. Moments later, it is discovered that the young bride is no longer a virgin, apparently on Ace’s account. Both tribes then viciously chase after Ace, concluding the movie.
A superb follow up with some truly hysterical moments and lines and even though its not as good as the first film it has some brilliant stars, animals and locations and a lead star at the peak of his career
CAST
Josh Fitter (License to Wed)
Emma Lockhart (Batman Begins)
Ann Cusack (Nightcrawler)
Cullen Douglas (Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.)
Art LaFleur (Cobra)
Ralph Waite (Bones)
Audrey Peeples (Jem and The Holograms)
Ace Ventura, Jr. must follow in his father’s (Ace Ventura, Sr.’s) footsteps to save his mother from going to jail. In the beginning, Ace is chasing a rat. He catches it, and walks straight into the alligator habitat. Later in a dream Ace sees a panda (Ting Tang) being captured. Soon his mother is blamed for the theft. She asks if she can make one phone call. She calls Rex Ventura, Ace’s grandfather. Rex tells Ace the history of the Ventura Family and their relationship with the animals. Rex Ventura is an elderly man with several animals such as a cat, a turtle and a dog which Ace thinks is dead. On his mother’s trial, Ace presented evidence that proves that his mother didn’t commit the crime; however, the Ranger, the one that Ace doesn’t like, dismissed the evidence
.
At school the next day, Ace hears that many of his classmates, including his crush Laura (Emma Lockhart), have lost their pets. Laura has lost her pet emerald green koi fish. Ace goes to school the next day and talks to a boy nicknamed A-Plus. A-Plus has a hidden lab in his locker, which Ace uses as his office. They believe Dr. Sickinger (Cullen Douglas) has stolen the panda because he has created a site called Pandafanatic. Sickinger is a bit insane. It turns out that he used to work for Quenton Pennington, Jr. (Reed Alexander), a rich kid whose family motto is, “What a Pennington wants a Pennington gets.” Dr. Sickenger is found to be innocent, so Ace must look for a new culprit. In the end Ace finds that Pennington, Sr. (Brian Patrick Clarke) stole Ting Tang and other famous animals (Tabby the tabby, Princess the lap dog, Freedom the hawk, and Callypso the magic horse), and Pennington, Jr. stole Ace’s classmates’ pets. His mother’s name is finally cleared and is rewarded for his heroics.
Ace’s father does not appear in this film. For the most of the first part of the film, Ace’s mom told him that his dad disappeared on a business trip when he was just a baby, but she later explains the rest of the story.
Watching this movie I thought it was going to suck, that its going to be the worst movie out there. But to be completely honest with you, it was  funny. It was a cheesy movie, but if you take it for that, just being a cheesy movie, than you’ll like it. Its not a master piece and not nearly as good as the originals.

REVIEW: SCREAM 1,2,3 & 4

CAST

Neve Campbell (Wild Things)
Skeet Ulrich (As Good as it Gets)
Courteney Cox (Masters of The Universe)
Matthew Lillard (Scooby-Doo)
David Arquette (Eight Legged Freaks)
Jamie Kennedy (Son of The Mask)
Drew Barrymore (Charles Angels)
Liev Schreiber (The Fifth Wave)
Rose McGowan (Jawbreaker)
W. Earl brown (Bates Motel)
Roger Jackson (The Powerpuff Girls)
Joseph Whipp (A Nightmare on Elm Street)
Linda Blair (The Exorcist)
Henry Winkler (Happy Days)

Sidney Prescott isn’t your typical hometown girl… at least, not anymore. She’s been trying to cope with the brutal rape and murder of her mother for almost a year now, but the town of Woodsboro just isn’t willing to let her move on. It’s a small town where hardly anything of interest ever happens, so it didn’t even take a heartbeat’s notice for a small time reporter, Gale Weathers, to start spreading tabloid propaganda about Sid’s mom. More or less, she pegged Mrs. Prescott as the town bicycle that everyone got a chance to ride, and unfortunately, this ongoing story has made it very difficult for Sidney to find peace with the biggest tragedy she’s ever had to face. Not that you can blame the poor girl, what with her mom’s good name and reputation constantly being soured and all. To top things off, her father is always away on business, and she’s catching some flak from her boyfriend for being intimately distant. Sid’s nightmare is about to get worse however, as a killer in a generic five-and-dime Ghostface costume has gutted two of her classmates. It isn’t long before Sid realizes that the timing of the latest deaths in Woodsboro (leading up to the one year anniversary of her mother’s death) isn’t a coincidence. After being put into protective custody by local Deputy Dewey, everyone close to Sidney starts dropping like flies, making it painfully clear that she’s at the center of the killer’s murderous rampage. Finding the killer will unfortunately be no easy feat however, as everyone is seemingly a suspect.
The plot’s implementation in Scream is what really allowed Wes Craven to once again change the face of the genre. Unlike any horror film before its time, the characters in Scream are completely self aware. That is, thanks to the Ghostface killer pretending like he’s the star in some slasher flick, everyone knows they’re playing by the rules of a horror movie – If you don’t want to die, don’t say something to foreshadow your own demise like ‘I’ll be right back’, don’t drink or do drugs, and above all else, you better hope to God that you’re a virgin.

Of course, despite the fact everyone is actually aware of the ‘horror movie as life’ analogy at play, most people dismiss the genre clichés that could potentially save their lives, and inevitably end up meeting their maker anyway. By taking the bold step to often times put the main characters in the very situations they’re attempting to satire. So, without question, Craven and Williamson revitalized the horror scene in 1996 with this film. Not only because it was actually able to deliver legitimate scares and keep the audience guessing who the killer was until the very end, but because it’s genuinely entertaining throughout its entirety.

CAST

Neve Campbell (Wild Things)
Courteney Cox (Masters of The Universe)
David Arquette (Eight Legged Freaks)
Jamie Kennedy (Son of The Mask)
Liev Schreiber (The Fifth Wave)
Jada Pinkett Smith (Gotham)
Laurie Metcalf (The Big Bang Theory)
Omar Epps (House)
Timothy Olyphant (Hitman)
Sarah Michelle Gellar (Gruel Intentions)
Jerry O’Connell (Sliders)
Joshua Jackson (Cursed)
Heather Graham (Killing Me Softly)
Duane Martin (Any Given Sunday)
Rebecca Gayheart (Dead Like Me)
Portia de Rossi (Stigmata)
Roger Jackson (The Powerpuff Girls)
Rebecca McFarland (Two and A Half Men)
Elise Neal (Hustle & Flow)
Lewis Arquette (Tango & CAsh)
Marisol Nichols (Riverdale)
Tori Spelling (Scary Movie 2)
Luke Wilson (That 70s Show)
David Warner (Tenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 2)
Selma Blair (Hellboy)
Matthew Lillard (Scooby-Doo)

Scream 2 is a surprising success as a film and a sequel, instead of simply trying to play around the rules from the first film, Scream 2 builds a separate story while acknowledging the Rules of Sequels. Again, Wes Craven and Kevin Williamson have teamed up to create an entertaining, suspenseful horror film that rises to a cerebral level unparalleled by all the films in the genre except its predecessor.While the film contains an exchange between Dewey (David Arquette) and Randy (Jamie Kennedy) the film’s slasher-fan movie geek about the rules of sequels, an even more impressive exchange is a classroom discussion of sequels and whether they are inherently inferior or if there are sequels which can actually outdo their predecessors. The discussion is an accurate and realistic one that real people, especially film students would have, mentioning such great sequels as “Aliens,” “Terminator 2,” and the Oscar-winning “The Godfather, Part II.”.Another great plot device in the film is the movie within the movie- “Stab”. Based on the events of the first film and starring  Tori Spelling, the film is basically a typical horror flick without ambition or originality. It also brings up the interesting issue of what relationship films, particularly violent films, have with the violence perpetrated by its viewers. Neither “Scream” nor “Scream 2” gets overly preachy on the subject, however, and Craven seems to ultimately reject any direct link.Scream 2 updates the story of Sydney Prescott, now in college and trying to get past her traumatic experiences, who once again hears a familiar voice on the telephone and soon finds her friends and acquaintances turning into victims of a familiar ghost-mask wearing killer. Once again, there are many “red herrings” throughout the film, as the audience must once again figure out who the mysterious killer might be, and Craven does cause the viewer to keep guessing throughout the film. As in Scream, the film is driven by an all-star cast, including the return of most of the principals from Scream, as well as Sarah Michelle Gellar, Jada Pinkett Smith, Laurie Metcalf, Jerry O’Connell and Omar Epps.Although Craven did a great job building suspense in the first film, he does manage to improve upon his efforts in the second film. While some of the killings are shockingly abrupt, the suspense in the film is quite impressive. While Scream will be revered for years as a modern horror classic, “Scream 2” is a worthy successor. While likely not destined to be a classic on its own, it is clear that Williamson and Craven did not rest on their laurels and truly put an impressive effort into this film, which pays off well, and helps to establish the whole trilogy as a landmark in the horror film genre.

CAST

Neve Campbell (Wild Things)
Courteney Cox (Masters of The Universe)
David Arquette (Eight Legged Freaks)
Jamie Kennedy (Son of The Mask)
Liev Schreiber (The Fifth Wave)
Kelly Rutherford (Gossip Girl)
Heather Matarazzo (The Princvess Diaries)
Beth Toussaint (Red Eye)
Richamond Arquette (Zodiac)
Patrick Dempsey (Transformers 3)
Scott Foley (Felicity)
Lance Henriksen (Aliens)
Jenny McCarthy (Two and a Half Men)
Emily Mortimer (Hugo)
Parker Posey (Superman Returns)
Carrie Fisher (Star Wars)
Patrick Warburton (Family Guy)
Roger Jackson (The Powerpuff Girls)
Kevin Smith (Mallrats)
Jason Mewes (Dogma)

Scream 3 is a fitting end to the Scream trilogy. It contains much of what made the first two films great, lots of frights, a few laughs, a good cast, a few great cameos and a self-awareness of both the horror genre and the first Scream film expressed this time in the filming of “Stab 3” throughout much of the first half of the movie.


Because each of the three movies focuses in large part on who the killer is and there are references to the earlier culprits in this film, one should definitely watch the films in order and not watch Scream 3 first. Those who have seen the first two films however, will enjoy the subtle references made throughout the film to earlier events, particularly those in the original film.


Like the other two films before it, Scream 3 has an enjoyable cast, featuring returning cast members Courtney Cox Arquette, David Arquette, Neve Campbell and Jamie Kennedy and featuring new cast members Scott Foley, Lance Henriksen, Jenny McCarthy, Parker Posey, Emily Mortimer and Patrick Dempsey who does a surprisingly good job as a cop with more than a passing interest in the plight of Sydney Prescott, Neve Campbell’s character as the people she knows and the people playing the people she knows find themselves in grave danger. Also extremely enjoyable in the film are the cameos of Carrie Fisher, Jason Mewes, Kevin Smith, and in a larger role, Patrick Warburton, (“Puddy” from Seinfeld) Warburton’s use of the word “Aight” is a true high point in the film.


The suspense of the film is quite good and the audience is continually left guessing who the murderer might be. The killing scenes are at times graphic but will often leave viewers on the edge of their seats. Wes Craven unquestionably proves his mettle as a master of horror and suspense and does a good job of crowning off the trilogy with a good film. While many other horror franchises, including Craven’s Nightmare on Elm Street have gone on to boast a series of eight or more films, Craven deserves a great amount of credit for making the film into a trilogy and settling there. This film does have a number of parallels with “Wes Craven’s New Nightmare,” the first horror film in the genre to truly deconstruct the genre from within, but even for those who have seen “New Nightmare,” Scream 3 is still a very enjoyable film

CAST

Neve Campbell (Wild Things)
Courteney Cox (Masters of The Universe)
David Arquette (Eight Legged Freaks)
Emma Roberts (Scream Queens)
Lucy Hale (Pretty Little Liars)
Shenae Grimes-Beech (90210)
Anna Paquin (X-Men)
Kristen Bell (Veronica Mars)
Britt Robertson (The Secret Circle)
Alison Brie (The Lego Movie)
Mary McDonnell (Battlestar Galactica)
Hayden Panettiere (Heroes)
Marley Shelton (Sin City)
Roger Jackson (The Powerpuff Girls)
Rory Culkin (Mean Creek)
Anthony Anderson (Transformers)
Adam Brody (The OC)
Matthew Lillard (Scooby-Doo)

Scream 4 arrived in 2011 promising new rules for a new decade, suggesting innovation and inspiration provided by the Asian remake craze, torture porn, and reboots. Instead, the best thing about the new film is its insistence on preserving the formula that made it popular in the first place. As they say, the more things change, the more they stay the same.

Once again, the film reunites survivors Sidney Prescott (Neve Campbell), Gale Weathers-Riley (Courteney Cox), and Dewey Riley (David Arquette) in the town of Woodsboro. It’s the last stop on a nationwide tour promoting Sidney’s book about her experiences, but before she can sign a single copy, dead bodies start turning up and all-too-familiar feelings start flooding back. Among the targets: Sidney’s cousin Jill (Emma Roberts), her friends Kirby (Hayden Panettiere) and Olivia (Marielle Jaffe), and local film nerds Robbie (Erik Knudsen) and Charlie (Rory Culkin).

It’s a relief to discover that the screenplay by original writer Kevin Williamson is pointedly focused on Sidney, Gail, and Dewey, and remains refreshingly faithful to the tone and style of the original films. There’s one swipe at torture porn and an even better jab at remakes, but Williamson doesn’t seem that interested in what’s been going on in the genre since Ghostface last graced the silver screen. The script is careful to tread the line between heightened and over-the-top: any horror that has changed as a reaction to older trends is inherently meta, and it’d be easy for looping back even further to become obnoxious. Instead, Williamson saves his poison pen for a wicked, inspired ending.

In terms of direction, Craven brings his A-game. The original Scream made waves for its violence, which holds up even today as excruciatingly brutal. Scream is bloody, no doubt about it, but it’s less the splatter and more the almost sadistic glee with which Craven pummels some of its victims that keeps the original shocking. This new sequel never climbs to the same level of ferociousness, but Craven isn’t pulling his punches, either, splattering bedroom walls with a ridiculous amount of blood.Scream 4 is not only one of the best in the series, but also one of the best slasher movies in at least a decade.

REVIEW: MASTERS OF THE UNIVERSE

CAST

Dolph Lundgren (Kindergarten Cop 2)
Frank Langella (The Box)
Meg Foster (Hercules: TLJ)
Billy Barty (Legend)
Courteney Cox (Scream)
Robert Duncan McNeill (Star Trek: Voyager)
Jon Cypher (Batman Beyond)
Chelsea Field (Commando)
James Tolkan (Top Gun)
Christina Pickles (The Wedding singer)
Anthony De Longis (Highlander: The Series)

The battle between good and evil stretches across the galaxy in Masters of the Universe, starting on the planet Eternia in the height of a siege on Castle Grayskull by the sorcerer Skeletor (Frank Langella). He’s obtained a way of traveling across long distances, even time, with a “cosmic key” that gave him the advantage in taking Castle Grayskull, leaving its defenders in disarray across the land’s outskirts. In an attempt to reclaim the area with the help of Gwildor (Billy Barty), the scientist who designed the key, He-Man and his compadres, Man-at-Arms (Jon Cypher) and Teela (Chelsea Field), make an attempt to reclaim the castle; but, in a fit of desperation, are transported to 1980s Earth, and lose the key in the process. Masters of the Universe transforms into a fish-out-of-water action-comedy at this point — think Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home meets Conan the Barbarian — where He-Man and his team scramble to hunt down the cosmic key with the help of two kids formerly in love: Julie (Courtney Cox in her first film role) and Kevin (Robert Duncan McNeill). Skeletor’s minions, led by the piercing gazes of Evil-Lyn (Meg Foster), aren’t far behind, and they’ll make sure He-Man’s trip back won’t be an easy one.I Masters of the Universe throws together some fairly cool-looking sword-‘n-sorcery set pieces that blur from Eternia over to Earth, which still possess a certain draw through their practical application. Director Gary Goddard and his production/art crew concentrated their efforts to achieving a full-bodied visual style that’d enthrall a wide range of audiences; the throne room at Castle Gayskull is a grand, handmade mythical space that’s given depth through cleverly-placed matte paintings, while intricate costume work achieves a blend of cinematic curio and “toy-ready” appeal. Playing into that, Frank Langella disappears into the prosthetics and make-up of Skeletor, while the angles and contours created with his stark-white facial moldings still capture the stone-faced force of his performance. Also, the practical Star Wars-esque effects built within certain scenes — lightning from Skeletor’s hands, the crack of an electric whip, and the movement of air gliders — give it a familiar whimsy, while wearing influences clearly on its sleeve.Grandeur can’t hide the perfunctory, unimaginative plotting at its core though, overflowing with moustache-twirling villains and goofy keep-it-rolling storytelling that’s more of a chore than charismatic. While Gary Goddard and The Dark Crystal screenwriter David Odell (among other uncredited writers) draw influence from Jack Kirby’s “Fourth World” comic series for its grand essence, basic contrivances are what flimsily glue the chapters together; secret passages conveniently lead to locations where He-Man and his crew need to be, grappling hooks grab things in the nick of time, and they always have the materials they need on-hand to repair elaborate tech. Perhaps that’s a part of making the film accessible to other audiences, almost like a darker version of one of the cartoons, but there’s a missing layer that prevents it from bottling the adventuresome magic needed. A few well-written “stranger in a strange land” moments add to the experience, such as how the Eternians react to eating a bowl of fried chicken, but they’re eclipsed by nagging goofball things like how Gwildor makes his cosmic space-travel device work by just sporadically banging on the keys for varying lengths of time.Still, Dolph Lundgren throws Masters of the Universe over his burly shoulders and stoically lugs it through active laser-pistol duels and frantic searches for the key to get back to Eternia, piecing together into a bearable journey that’s not without its own mindless fun. In his sparse warrior garb and shoulder armor that bare almost every muscle he’s got, Lundgren fits the bill of the sword-wielding hero really well — a visually-comparable, noble PG answer to Arnie’s Conan. His rapport with Skeletor is an overt black-and-white conflict, full of gallant speeches and calls of superiority in the cosmos, yet there’s an admirable quality in the straight-faced, scenery-chewing pomposity that Frank Langella evokes in the arch-nemesis. Clunky battles and higher-than-high stakes shove Gary Goddard’s film towards an unsurprising climax, but at least it stays consistent all the way up to that odd-defying moment everyone’s expecting: where the hero confidently stands and insist that he does, indeed, have the power.