REVIEW: STARGATE SG.1 – SEASON 1

Starring

Richard Dean Anderson (MacGyver)
Michael Shanks (Smallville)
Amanda Tapping (Sanctuary)
Christopher Judge (The Dark Knight Rises)
Don S. Davis (Twin Peaks)

Richard Dean Anderson, Jay Acovone, Michael Shanks, and Amanda Tapping in Stargate SG-1 (1997)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Jay Acovone (Beauty and The Beast)
Vaitiare Hirshon (Far Away Places)
Robert Wisden (Watchmen)
Peter Williams (Catwoman)
Brent Stait (Blade: The Series)
Gary Jones (Chilling Adventures of Sabrina)
Alexis Cruz (Drag Me To hell)
Rachel Hayward (Wonder)
Adam Harrington (The Secret Circle)
Colin Lawrence (The 6th Day)
Kevin McNulty (Timecop)
Alan Rachins (Showgirls)
Cary-Hiroyuki Tagawa (Mortal Kombat)
Jorge Vargas (POwer Rangers Ninja Storm)
Soon-Tek Oh (Mulan)
Crystal Lowe (Final Destination 3)
Teryl Rothery (Arrow)
Steve Makaj (The X-Files)
Gerard Plunkett (Sucker Punch)
Danny Wattley (Bird ona Wire)
William Russ (The Right Stuff)
Roger Cross (First Wave)
Harley Jane Kozak (Arachnophobia)
Carmen Moore (Arrow)
Armin Shimerman (Star Trek: DS9)
Ray Xifo (Ocean’s Thirteen)
Frida Betrani (The Deal)
Bobbie Phillips (Murder One)
Gabrielle Miller (Robson Arms)
Tamsin Kelsey (Needful Things)
James Earl Jones (Star Wars)
Mark Gibbon (Man of Steel)
Elizabeth Hoffman (Dante’s Peak)
Keene Curtis (Sliver)
Paul McGillion (The Flash)
Tony Amendola (Annabelle)
Salli Richardson-Whitfield (Eureka)
Suanne Braun (Summer of Rockets)
Katie Stuart (Inconceivable)
Tobin Bell (Saw)
Garwin Sanford (Get Carter)
Tom McBeath (Riverdale)
Jay Brazeau (Bates Motel)
Michael Kopsa (Dark Angel)
Laara Sadiq (Arrow)
Ronny Cox (Robocop)

Most TV shows spun off from movies are uninvolving and uninteresting, and hopefully die and are forgotten. That wasn’t the case with the spinoff of the 1995 movie “Stargate,” a science fiction movie that spawned an excellent television series, “Stargate SG-1.” The first season is not nearly as brilliant as the ones that followed it, but it’s a welcome change from distant space operas — excellent writing, acting, and a sense of humor about itself and its characters.Christopher Judge in Stargate SG-1 (1997)The Stargate has been inactive for a year — until it is activated, and a bunch of Egyptian-styled warriors come through and kidnap a young officer. General Hammond (Don S. Davis) pulls Jack O’Neill (Richard Dean Anderson) out of retirement to learn what really happened on the planet of Abydos, and where these mysterious aliens have come from. O’Neill and a small team go to Abydos and find Daniel Jackson (Michael Shanks) who has been learning about a vast network of Stargates over the past year. But when Daniel’s wife Sha’re and brother-in-law Skaara are abducted by the same warriors, O’Neill, Jackson and Air Force scientist Sam Carter (Amanda Tapping) use the Stargate to venture to where they’re being kept. What they find is an alien race who inhabits human hosts, the Goa’uld, and their ruthless slave warriors, the Jaffa. Carter, O’Neill and Jackson are captured by the powerful Apophis — but to escape, they must have the help of an unlikely ally: Teal’c (Christopher Judge), Apophis’ First Prime. Since Earth has now annoyed the Goa’uld, several exploration teams are formed to go through the Stargate and find weapons and allies.Richard Dean Anderson in Stargate SG-1 (1997)And SG-1 — Carter, O’Neill, Jackson and Teal’c — encounters some very strange problems: a plague that turns people into savages, a people who live only a hundred days, a Viking planet, a Stargate explorer stranded since 1945, a little girl turned into a bomb, the seductive Goa’uld queen Hathor, and coming back as robots. And when the military shuts down the SG program, Daniel reveals that the Earth is about to be destroyed by Apophis’ armies.Christopher Judge in Stargate SG-1 (1997)The first season of “Stargate SG-1” isn’t the most impressive, though the last three episodes hint at the series’ future greatness. And thankfully, it drops the usual space opera stuff — instead we get Stargates, real military, and a very plausible reason why everybody in the galaxy (more or less) looks just like us. It’s graced with kitschy Egyptian-styled sets, lots of shoot-em-up action from Marines and Air Force, and plenty of planets influenced by Earth cultures, like the Minoans and the Vikings. Best of all is the snappy dialogue, mostly from the tart-tongued O’Neill.

 

REVIEW: TC 2000

 

CAST

Billy Blanks (Kiss The Girls)
Bolo Yeung (Double Impact)
Jalal Merhi (The CIrcuit)
Bobbie Phillips (Two Guys and A Girl)
Matthias Hues (Power Rangers Lost Galaxy)

Somewhere in the future the environmental overkill had come. Many people had died. The rich were able to build the underworld, the poor had to stay on the surface building gangs to survive. Jason Storm, an underworld guard gets knowledge of a conspiracy to kill all people on the surface. He needs to flee to the surface, and wins Sumai, a respected martial arts master, as his ally to stop the dirty plot.

This is quite simply cheesy entertainment at it’s best with fun performances, and great fight scenes!. Of course it’s bad, but that didn’t stop me from enjoying it, and while the acting isn’t good the performances are a lot of fun to watch, and the finale was pretty cool. The dialog is absolutely terrible,and the story is pretty ludicrous, however it’s all a lot of fun, as there are plenty of great fight scenes,and fun performances to keep you entertained!.