REVIEW: THE DEFENDERS

CAST

Charlie Cox (Stardust)
Krysten Ritter (Veronica Mars)
Mike Colter (Zero Dark thirty)
Finn Jones (Game of Thrones)
Élodie Yung (Gods of Egypt)
Sigourney Weaver (Avatar)
Rachael Taylor (The Loft)
Eka Darville (Power Rangers RPM)
Elden Henson (The Hunger Games: Mockingjay)
Deborah Ann Woll (Ruby Sparks)
Jessica Henwick (Game of Thrones)
Ramón Rodríguez (The Taking of Pelham 123)
Rosario Dawson (Sin City)
Scott Glenn (The Silence of The Lambs)
Simone Missick (K-Town)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Wai Ching Ho (Cadillac Man)
Carrie-Anne Moss (Chuck)
Peter McRobbie (16 Blocks)
Rob Morgan (Stranger Things)
Marko Zaror (Machete Kills)
Amy Rutberg (NCIS: New Orleans)

 

The Defenders is Marvel’s best Netflix show, hands down.  While the crossover between Daredevil, Jessica Jones, Iron Fist, and Luke Cage can occasionally veer into a fragmented set of mini-episodes early on, the awesome foursome eventually unites to form a show greater than the sum of its parts. The street-level superheroes provide a fantastic eight-episode run with high stakes, a frenzied pace and, most importantly, effortless chemistry.Things don’t start off that way, though. The opening pair of episodes read almost as a greatest hits collection of each hero’s respective shows before the narrative eventually relents and shoehorns the plot in a comically convenient way for the four to come together. The lack of instant gratification can be grating, but this is easily relieved by the fun interaction between fan-favourites that leads up to the team-up. Misty Knight and Jessica Jones’ brief scenes are worth the price of admission alone and there are a few, shall we say interesting, crossovers you won’t see coming. Without giving too much away, a cataclysmic event is unleashed upon New York and The Defenders, each following their own leads, stumble into each other’s paths in the same building. And then things get good. Really, really good. Unsurprisingly, The Hand are the villains of the season and are led by Sigourney Weaver’s Alexandra. Her performance is tempered by an unidentified terminal illness which spurs her character on and at least drives her away from the realms of cartoonish MCU villain as  she has an actual character arc rather than the bland go there, be evil trope of prior bad guys. When the show does focus on The Defenders (and, in fairness, that’s 90% of the time) the show is a rollercoaster of wisecracks, quips and, yup, Jessica Jones’ side-eye. It’s glorious fun and, for my money, feels like a much bigger event than The Avengers ever was. There’s a spine-tingling moment, complete with an inspirational score bubbling up in the background, where the four heroes unite to take on a foe at the midway point which ranks as an all-time great Marvel moment.Yes, The Defenders run is short, but those thinking a mere eight episodes won’t cut it can have their fears put to rest. Coupled with Game of Thrones season 7’s clipped seven-episode run, it feels like we’re reaching a watershed point in television where shows don’t need to be chained to a long episode run anymore. Barely a second is wasted in The Defenders: Every quiet character moment is poignant and fleshes out something or someone; every action sequence leads to something bigger, better, and more shocking; and every one-liner and on-the-nose dig at Iron Fist will make you laugh. Nothing outstays its welcome.

 

 

 

 

 

REVIEW: IRON FIST – SEASON 1

MAIN CAST

Finn Jones (Game of Thrones)
Jessica Henwick (Star Wars: The Force Awakens)
Tom Pelphrey (Banshee)
Jessica Stroup (The Hills have Eyes 2)
Ramón Rodríguez (The Taking of Pelham 123)
Sacha Dhawan (The Last Train)
Rosario Dawson (Daredevil)
David Wenham (Lord of The Rings)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Wai Ching (Daredevil)
Carrie-Anne Moss (Jessica Jones)
Michael Maize (Power Rangers In Space)
Lewis Tan (The Hangover – Part III)
Hoon Lee (Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 2012)
Barrett Doss (The Pioneers)

Danny Rand returns to New York City after being missing for years, trying to reconnect with his past and his family legacy. He fights against the criminal element corrupting his world around him with his incredible kung-fu mastery and ability to summon the awesome power of the fiery Iron FistIron Fist was one of my most anticipated Netflix shows. After hearing the bad reviews, I got scared a little, and couldn’t wait to see the show for myself. And now, I dare to say that the critics are wrong, and most of the critics’ opinion aren’t justified. First of all, Danny Rand has always been a white character, who feels like an outcast after his parents’ death. He is trying to find his place, while trying to figure out who he is.He’s suffering from both a trauma and an identity crisis, not sure whether he should be Danny Rand or Iron Fist. He is trying to embrace his real self, while struggling a lot. The fact that a white man, an outsider has earned the title of Iron Fist is unprecedented both in the comics and in the show. This is why Danny is white, to show that he is different, he’s not your regular Asian guy, who does kung fu. Saying that Danny should have been Asian is foolish and racist. Not only Asians can learn kung fu, and everyone is able to harness their chi. It shows that several people can share the same beliefs and ideas, regardless of race, sex or ethnicity.Finn Jones does a wonderful job portraying the character, he is like the Danny Rand, I’ve been reading about for so many years. Sure, the story is slow paced sometimes, and Finn can go a little over the top, but is nothing bothering. With his boyish charm, dedication and skills, he makes you overlook the minor issues. But claiming that this show is a failure is ridiculous. It’s nicely built up, gets you hooked on, and shows you what it’s really like to handle a trauma. It doesn’t disappear miraculously, it’s always there, and Danny has to fight it all the time. Fight it and embrace it.https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/M/MV5BNTJjNjJiMzAtNjBlYS00MmViLWFiMjktMmQ0ZTQwNTZjMWI4L2ltYWdlXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNjUwNzk3NDc@._V1_SY1000_CR0,0,1499,1000_AL_.jpgThis is why the show gets slow sometimes. After all, a guy, who was presumed dead for 15 years suddenly comes back and claims to have fought a dragon. Of course the issues won’t be solved within an hour. Besides Danny, you also care for the other characters, and their development is astonishing. Iron Fist is up there for me with Daredevil, even though, I enjoyed Daredevil somewhat more. All the critics, who jumped to conclusions after 6 episodes are fools.