REVIEW: HIGHWAYMEN

CAST

Jim Caviezel (High Crimes)
Rhona Mitra (Nip/Tuck)
Frankie Faison (Luke Cage)
Colm Feore (Gotham)
Gordon Currie (Puppet Master 4)
Andrea Roth (Robocop: The Series)
Noam Jenkins (Earth: Final Conflict)
Guylaine St-Onge (Mutant X)

A man known only as Rennie (Jim Caviezel) is motivated by revenge to track down and kill the man who ran over his wife, a serial killer (Colm Feore) immobilized by the man himself. The killer is wheelchair-bound and uses a 1972 Cadillac Eldorado to stalk and kill his victims in car accidents. When the serial killer makes a young woman (Rhona Mitra) his next target, the man has to stop the killer once and for all.Director Robert Harmon returns to the road with this his new thriller. I didn’t expect a whole lot due to the releasing woes the film has had which culminated in it being dumped on home video after a woeful limited release. Strangely enough it was a good, fast paced revenge flick that moved about as fast as the souped-up Barracuda driven by none other than Christ himself. Some nice camera-work adds to the tension of several sequences involving car wrecks and attacks. The film also had some nice photography of the open toad too. The sound design was a hit with a very powerful dts track to highlight all that car action. The acting was what you expect from a script that isn’t driven by characters but by steel and asphalt.
If you are able to overlook some glaring plot inconsistencies and an occasional implausible set piece then you might like Highwaymen. I was pleasantly surprised.

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REVIEW: HIGHLANDER: THE SERIES – SEASON 1-6

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MAIN CAST

Adrian Paul (Eyeborgs)
Alexander Vandernoot (Pret-A-Porter)
Stan Kirsch (Shallow Ground)
Amanda Wyss (A Nightmare On Elm Street)
Elizabeth Gracen (Death of The Incredible Hulk)
Jim Byrnes (Sanctuary)
Philip Akin (Robocop 2014)
Michel Modo (My Father’s Glory)
Lisa Howard (Earth: Final Conflict)
Peter Wingfield (Caprica)

RECURRRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Christopher Lambert (Fortress)
Richard Moll (Scary Movie 2)
Wendell Wright (Power Rangers Wild Force)
Peter Deluise (21 Jump Street)
Matthew Walker (Andromeda)
Soon-Tek Oh (Mulan)
Vincent Schiavelli (Buffy)
John Novak (Wishmaster 3 & 4)
Garry Chalk (Dark Angel)
Joan Jett (The Sweet Life)
Gary Jones (Stargate SG.1)
Wes Studi (Mystery Men)
Marc Singer (V)
Brent Stait (Andromeda)
Joe Pantoliano (The Matrix)
Stephen Macht (Galaxina)
Scott McNeil (Beast Wars)
Vanity (52 Pick-Up)
J.G. Hertzler (Star Trek: DS9)
Tom Butler (Freddy vs Jason)
Werner Stocker (The White Rose)
Peter Howitt (Defying Gravity)
Roland Gift (Brakes)
Dee Dee Bridgewater (Another Life)
Jason Isaacs (Peter Pan)
Nigel Terry (Troy)
Anthoyn Head (Buffy)
Marion Cotillard (Contagion)
Peter Guinness (Alien 3)
Roger Daltrey (Tommy)
Peter Hudson (Hitman)
Michael Shanks (Stargate SG.1)
Cameron Bancroft (Legends of Tomorrow)
Douglas Arthurs (Stargate SG.1)
J.H. Wyman (Sirens)
Geraint Wyn Davies (Cube 2)
Traci Lords (Zack & Miri Make a Porno)
Andrew Jackson (Earth: Final Conflict)
Kendall Cross (Caprica)
Sheena Easton (Young Blades)
Don S. Davis (Stargate SG.1)
Robert Wisden (Watchmen)
Mitchell Kosterman (Smallville)
Dan Castellaneta (The Simpsons)
Robert Ito (Quincy M.E.)
Dustin Nguyen (21 Jump Street)
Bruce A. Young (Jurassic PArk III)
Andrea Roth (Ringer)
Roddy Piper (They Live)
Bill Dow (Stargate Atlantis)
Gabrielle Miller (Down River)
Bruce Weitz (Hill Street Blues)
Nicholas Lea (V)
Lochlyn Munro (Little Man)
Jonathan Banks (The Lizzie Borden Chronicles)
Ed Lauter (The Number 23)
Roark Critchlow (V)
Jeremy Brudenell (Wish Me Luck)
Peter Firth (Victoria)
Angeline Ball (My Girl 2)
Nia Peeples (Pretty Little Liars)
James Faulkner (X-Men: First Class)
Nadia Cameron-Blakey (Batman Begins)
Emile Abossolo M’bo (Hitman)
Martin Cummins (Bates Motel)
Stephen McHattie (300)
Tamlyn Tomita (Heroes)
Hiro Kanagawa (Heroes Reborn)
Randall Cobb (Liar Liar)
Chandra West (White Noise)
Brion James (Blade Runner)
Jason Gray-Stanford (Bones)
Alan Scarfe (Andromeda)
John Pyper-Ferguson (Caprica)
Myles Ferguson (Little Criminals)
Jesse Moss (Ginger Snaps)
Sherry Miller (Bitten)
Laura Harris (Dead Like me)
Garwin Sanford (Stargate SG.1)
Anthony De Longis (Masters of The Universe)
Vincent Gale (Van Helsing)
Tamara Gorski (Hercules: TLJ)
Stella Stevens (General Hospital)
Barry Pepper (The Green Mile)
Vivan Wu (Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles III)
Richard Lynch (Puppet Master III)
Eugene Lipinski (Arrow)
David Robb (Downtown Abbey)
Lynda Boyd (Sanctuary)
Kim Johnston Ulrich (3rd Rock From The Sun)
Ben Pullen (Elizabeth I)
Paudge Behan (Veronica Guerin)
Carsten Norgaard (Alien vs Predator)
Anna Hagen (The Messengers)
Laurie Holden (the Walking Dead)
Gerard Plunkett (Sucker Punch)
Kristin Minter (Home Alone)
Wolfgang Bodison (A Few Good Men)
Pruitt Taylor Vince (Heroes Reborn)
Callum Keith Rennie (Flashforward)
Louis Ferreira (Stargate Universe)
Travis MacDonald (Warcraft)
Venus Terzo (Arrow)
Rachel Hayward (Jingle All The Way 2)
Nicholas Campbell (Da Vinci’s Inquest)
Peter Outerbridge (Beauty and the Beast)
Jill Teed (Battlestar Galactica)
Molly Parker (Deadwood)
Emmanuelle Vaugier (Two and a Half men )
Ann Turkel (The Fear)
Ron Halder (Stargate Sg.1)
Ocean Hellman (Voyage of The Unicorn)
Rae Dawn Chong (Commando)
Carl Chase (Batman)
Michael J. Jackson (Coronation Street)
Ricco Ross (Wishmaster)
Peta Wilson (La Femme Nikita)
Jamie Harris (Agents of Shield)
Crispin Bonham-Carter (Basil)
Stephen Tremblay (Unnatural Pursuits)
Jesse Joe Walsh (JCVD)
Tracy Scoggins (Lois & Clark)
Real Andrews (Born on The 4th of July)
Eric McCormack (Will & Grace)
Ian Tracey (Bates Motel)
Michael Kopsa (Dark Angel)
Alastair Duncan (The Batman)
Sandra Bernhard (2 Broke Girls)
April Telek (Walking Tall)
Andrew Divoff (Wishmaster)
Steve Bacic (Andromeda)
Kira Clavell (Ninja Turtles: Next Mutation)
Ron Perlman (Hellboy)
Peter Hanlon (Scary Movie)
Musetta Vander (Stargate SG.1)
Valetnine Pelka (8mm 2)
Sonja Codhant (Navarro)
Jonathan Firth (Withering Heights)
Danny Dyer (Severance)
Rachel Shelley (The L Word)
Alexis Denisof (Angel)
Anita Dobson (Eastenders)
Jasper Britton (The New World)
Alice Evans (The Originals)
Andrew Bricknell (Victoria)
Justina Vail (Seven Days)
Sandra Hess (Encino Man)
Claudia Christian (Babylon 5)
Jack Ellis (Bad Girls)
Paris Jefferson (Xena)_
Martin McDougall (Batman Begins)

Few television series’ that are based on movies live up to the original version, either because they simply don’t have right qualities that made the movie great or they the people making the show just don’t give a damn. “Highlander: The Series”, however, is one of those rare exceptions.

Image result for highlander the seriesBased off of the original 1986 fan favorite and produced by same the executive producers William Panzer and Peter Davis, it continued the saga of the immortals, a race of beings destined to fight one another in sword fights in a centuries long event called the game and who can only be killed by decapitation, with the opponent taking their head and their power. In particular, the show centers around one such immortal named Duncan Macleod (Adrian Paul in his best role) of the Clan Macleod, a descendant of Connor Macleod (Christopher Lambert who reprises his role for the pilot) from the first film.Image result for highlander the seriesBorn in the highlands of Scotland in 1592, Duncan has roamed the world for 400 years, seen many different events, and has fought in many different wars and many battles with other immortals. And that last part is one of the things that made the show great. You could count on almost every episode to feature a spectacular sword fight with the villain of the week, a battle of life and death, with Duncan Macleod emerging victorious from yet another trying ordeal and even more spectacular quickening.

Image result for highlander the seriesBased on that, you might expect a show centering on such a plot to become boring or same old, same old, and the show might very well have become so. But, the truth is the show managed to constantly entertain and thrill for most of its run in large part because of the talent the show had. Adrian Paul was more than capable of carrying a show, bringing not only charm and charisma to the role of Duncan but also a strong sense of honor and chivalry, thus making Duncan Macleod one of the great television heroes.Image result for highlander the seriesBut it wasn’t just Adrian’s acting that made the show great; it was also due to the well blending of strong supporting actors, guest stars and villains, writers, and set designers and directors. You had Richie Ryan (Stan Kirsch), a young man who becomes a part of Duncan’s world in a way he never imagined. Joe Dawson (Jim Byrnes) a member of a secret society of mortals called the Watchers who dedicate themselves to watching and recording the deeds and actions of the immortals; the always enjoyable Methos (the wonderfully charismatic Peter Wingfield), a 5,000 year old immortal and the oldest living of his kind; Amanda (Elizabeth Grace), an immortal who’s had an on again, off again relationship with Duncan throughout the ages and who’s not put off by an occasional high-value heist or two to make a living, and a slew of guest stars, villains and other supporting actors that added to the show every week.Image result for highlander the seriesPlus, one must also give credit to behind the scenes people, who not only managed to make things interesting in the present, but the past as well. Every episode featured dazzling historical flashbacks, flashbacks that were so good there isn’t one where you didn’t believe the characters weren’t where the show said they were, be it World War I France or British Colonial India (these flashbacks are even more remarkable when you consider the fact that the show, because it was syndicated, had a much smaller budget than shows tied directly to a network). It was also a show that, like the original film, caused the viewer to wonder what would it be like to live indefinitely and witness the changing of the times? What kind of person would you become if you witnessed your time, your religion, possibly even your entire culture disappear into the mists of time?Image result for highlander the seriesAll this must be credited to the writers, led by creative consultant David Abramowitz, who had a lot to do with the magic of the show. Not to say, of course, that weren’t imperfections; some episodes dragged, and one or two of them were pretty bad (the episode “The Zone” is a good example of this), not to mention the fact that the show badly lost steam in the last season, a thing that tends to happen to most shows in the end. However, that being said, the show did far more for the Highlander franchise than any of the sequels ever did. For that reason, it’s a show that all fans of action and fantasy should check out.

REVIEW: WAR

CAST
Jet Li (The Mummy 3)
Jason Statham (Spy)
John Lone (The Shadow)
Devon Aoki (Sin City)
Luis Guzmán (Traffic)
Saul Rubinek (Memory Run)
Ryo Ishibashi (The Grduge)
Sung Kang (Fast & Furious)
Nadine Velazquez (My Name Is Earl)
Andrea Roth (Ringer)
Kane Kosugi (Ninja Sentai Kakuranger)
Terry Chen (Bates Motel)
Hiro Kanagawa (Heroes Reborn)
John Novak (Wishmaster 3)
Peter Shinkoda (Masked Rider)
During a shootout against Chinese Triads at a San Francisco dock warehouse, FBI agents John Crawford (Jason Statham) and Tom Lone (Terry Chen) stumble across the notorious assassin Rogue (Jet Li), a former CIA assassin who now works for the Japanese Yakuza. Rogue ambushes Crawford and is about to execute him when Lone appears and shoots Rogue in the face, causing him to fall into the water. Rogue’s body was never found and he is presumed dead. However, Rogue survives and retaliates against Lone, his wife and his daughter. He kills them, burns down the house, and leaves their three corpses in the ashes of their home.
Three years later, Rogue re-appears, working under Chinese Triad boss Li Chang (John Lone). Rogue is assisting Chang against Chang’s arch-enemy and Rogue’s former employer, the leader of the Japanese Yakuza, Shiro Yanagawa (Ryo Ishibashi). Rogue first attacks a club run by the Yakuza by killing the gangsters and later on the runners in order to recover a pair of antique gold horses, family heirlooms of Chang. However, Rogue is secretly setting the Yakuza and the Triads against each other, in order to push the two factions toward all-out war.
Now the head agent of the FBI’s Asian Crime Task Force, Crawford is determined to hunt Rogue down and exact revenge for Lone’s death. Crawford’s obsessive pursuit of Rogue has taken a toll on his personal life causing him to be estranged from his family. Crawford comes close to catching Rogue in the wake of Rogue’s various killing sprees against the Triads and Yakuza, but Rogue always manages to stay one step ahead.
Ultimately, Rogue’s actions have gained the trust of both Chang and Yanagawa. Rogue succeeds in betraying Chang, but spares Chang’s wife and child, turning on the Yakuza. With Chang dead, Yanagawa is finally ready to come to America, where he intends to take over and expand Yakuza business operations. However, he is confronted by Crawford and the FBI; Crawford presents Yanagawa with proof that Rogue has betrayed him and spared Chang’s family, but Yanagawa refuses to assist Crawford in locating Rogue.
Later, Rogue delivers the horses to Yanagawa personally. Knowing of Rogue’s betrayal, Yanagawa captures Rogue and demands the location of Chang’s family. Rogue turns the tables on Yanagawa’s men and kills them all, and engages in a sword fight against Yanagawa himself. Yanagawa discovers that Rogue is actually FBI agent Tom Lone (who, after undergoing plastic surgery, changed his voice to obtain a Japanese accent); and killed the real Rogue, assuming the assassin’s identity. Rogue/Lone reveals that his actions have all been designed to bring him face-to-face with Yanagawa, so he could kill the man who ordered the death of his family. Yanagawa reveals that Crawford was in his pocket that whole time and responsible for leaking Tom Lone’s identity and home address to the real Rogue. Angered, Rogue/Lone disarms and decapitates Yanagawa.
Meanwhile, Chang’s wife receives a package from Rogue/Lone, containing one of the two golden horses that belongs to Chang’s family and a message reading, “Make a new life”. Yanagawa’s daughter also receives a package with the same message and inside the box is her father’s head. Rogue/Lone then calls Crawford as he is packing up his office, asking him to meet him at the dock warehouse where they last made their investigation. Before going to the warehouse, Crawford enlists the help of Goi (Sung Kang), an FBI sniper that aided Crawford throughout the investigation. At the warehouse, Crawford and Rogue/Lone battle each other in an intense hand-to-hand fight in which Rogue/Lone reveals who he really is to Crawford. When Rogue/Lone reveals his true identity, a devastated Crawford reveals that it was true that he was working for Yanagawa at the time but had no idea that Rogue was still alive. He was then blackmailed and gave Yanagawa Lone’s address thinking that Yanagawa’s men were only going there to “rough him up a bit”. Ever since, Crawford was angry at himself and wanted revenge against Rogue and everyone else involved in what he thought was his partner’s death.
However, Crawford begs Lone for forgiveness, but Lone denies him, coldly replying “Tom Lone is dead, my name is Rogue”. As Rogue takes out a gun to shoot Crawford, Goi takes aim at him. Crawford jumps in Goi’s line of fire, and allowing Rogue the opportunity to shoot him in the back, killing him. The next day, Rogue/Lone later drives out of town to start a new life.
Very good movie overall and I would definitely recommend it for those who are and aren’t familiar with past roles of Statham and Li.

REVIEW: ROBOCOP: THE SERIES

MAIN CAST
Richard Eden (Tear It Down)
Yvette Nipar (Walking tall 2 & 3)
Blu Mankuma (Tin Man)
Andrea Roth (Ringer)
David Gardner (Mutant X)
Sarah Campbell (Body Parts)
Dan Duran (Kick Ass)
Erica Ehm (Jigsaw)
Ed Sahely (Glitter)
RECURRING CAST / NOTABLE GUESTS
Cliff De Young (The Craft)
John Rubinstein (Red Dragon)
Jenn Griffin (Freeway 2)
Jennifer Dale (Mutant X)
James Kidnie (Arrow)
Patrick McKenna (Stargate SG.1)
Maurice Dean Wint (Cube 2)
David Hemblen (Earth: Final Conflict)
Nigel Bennett (Andromeda)
Lisa Howard (Highlander: The Series)
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Although there is more than one way RoboCop could have been adapted for television, this is a very good way to do it. Although movie director Verhoeven’s touch is missing on the series, the original writers Miner and Neumeier return (at least for the pilot) to put Robocop back on track. The content is somewhat toned down over the original movie (both because of its conversion to television and because it is aimed at a younger audience), but the spirit of the original is in most ways preserved: the satire, personal drama (mostly regarding Alex Murphy/Robocop), and the good-guy vs. bad-guy action. The drama regarding Murphy is expanded on, as we get more exposure to his memories and to his family, and there is added a character, in the form of Delta City’s new brain, who shares in many ways Murphy’s plight. Ultimately, the television series comes off closer to the original movie than either of the two theatrical sequels.

The television series does take a slightly different spin than the movie, but ultimately it works out for the best. Robocop here is more of a comic book superhero, but not necessarily in a bad way. He is superhuman both physically and morally, and yet we remain sympathetic to his plight throughout. He is someone we really want to root for.  The villains are more comic-bookish as well, but they do not seem out of place given the change in tone. The series can be serious and yet be silly in an almost Batman-like way at times, without the two ever seeming at odds with each other. Also changed is the tone; the series moralizes more, and has cut the graphic violence of the original. It is sort of RoboCop with more of a conscience. In addition to its other virtues, the series adds surprisingly high production value and more than tolerable acting (Richard Eden especially does an interesting job as Robocop – very mechanical, quite appropriate). For anyone willing to experience something out of the ordinary, this is very good viewing. It is a shame it only made it one season, I would have loved to see more.

REVIEW: LOST – SEASON 1-6

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MAIN CAST

Matthew Fox (Alex Cross)
Evangeline Lilly (Ant-Man)
Naveen Andrews (Planet Terror)
Jorge Garcia (Alcatraz)
Emilie de Ravin (Roswell)
Maggie Grace (The Fog)
Josh Holloway (Colony)
Yunjin Kim (Shiri)
Daniel Dae Kim (Insurgent)
Dominic Monaghan (Flashforward)
Harold Perrineau (Constantine)
Malcolm David Kelley (Saving Grace)
Ian Sommerhalder (The Vampire Diaries)
Terry O’Quinn (Alias)
Michelle Rodriguez (The Fast and The Furious)
Cynthia Watros (Finding Carter)
Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje (Suicide Squad)
Elizabeth Mitchell (V)
Henry Ian Cusick (24)
Rodrigo Santoro (Westworld)
Kiele Sanchez (30 Days of Night: Dark Days)
Jeremy Davies (Hannibal)
Michael Emerson (Saw)
Rebecca Mader (Iron Man 3)
Ken Leung (X-Men: The Last Stand)
Jeff Fahey (The Lawnmower Man)
Nestor Carbonell (Bates Motel)
Zuleikha Robinson (Homeland)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Fredric Lehne (Zero Dark Thirty)
L. Scott Caldwell (The Net)
Kimberley Joseph (Xena)
Greg Grunberg (Heroes)
Billy Ray Gallion (Castle)
John Terry (Zodiac)
Veronica Hamel (The Last Leprchaun)
Neil Hopkins (The Net 2.0)
Michael Deluise (Wayne’s World)
Kristin Richardson (Rock Star)
William Mapother (Powers)
Mira Furlan (Babylon 5)
Andrea Gabriel (2 Broke Girls)
Nick Jameson (24)
Keir O’Donnell (Wedding Crashers)
Charles Mesure (V)
Tamara Taylor (Bones)
Robert Patrick (Terminator 2)
Swoosie Kurtz (Mike & Molly)
Kevin Tighe (K-9)
Zack Ward  (Postal)
Julie Bowen (Modern Family)
Daniel Roebuck (Final Destination)
Beth Broderick (Sabrina: TTW)
Anson Mount (CDollhouse)
Saul Rubinek (Warehouse 13)
Katey Sagal (8 Simple Rules)
Sam Anderson (Angel)
Marguerite Moreau (Easy)
DJ Qualls (Road Trip)
Brett Cullen (Injustice)
Rachel Ticotin (Total Recall)
Michael Cudlitz (The Walking Dead)
Lindsey Ginter (Hercules: TLJ)
Francois Chau (Stargate SG.1)
Adetokumboh M’Cormack (Blood Diamond)
M.C. Gainey (Django Unchained)
Kim Dickens (Hallow Man)
Kevin Dunn (Samantha Who?)
Theo Rossi (Luke Cage)
Tania Raymonde (Texas Chainsaw 3D)
Evan Handler (Californication)
Gabrielle Fitzpatrick (MMPR: The Movie)
Michael Bowen (KIller x)
April Grace (A.I)
Alan Dale (Ugly Betty)
Paula Malcolmson (Caprica)
Andrew Divoff (Wishmaster)
Aisha Hinds (Cult)
Nathan Fillion (Firefly)
Fionnula Flanagan (The Others)
Diana Scarwid (Wonderfalls)
Cheech Marin (Machete)
Sung Hi Lee (Nurse Betty)
Shaun Toub (Iron Man)
Clancy Brown (Highlander)
Cleo King (Mike & Molly)
Patrick J. Adams (Legends of Tomorrow)
Billy Dee Williams (Star Wars)
Sonya Walger (Flashforward)
Marsha Thomason (White Collar)
Carrie Preston (True Blood)
Tracy Middendorf(Scream: The Series)
Lance Reddick (Fringe)
Fisher Stevens (Hackers)
Thekla Reuten (Highlander 5)
Anthony Azizi (Eagle Eye)
Graham McTavish (The Hobbit)
Andrea Roth (Ringer)
Grant Bowler (Ugly Betty)
George Cheung (Dark Angel)
Kevin Durand (X-Men Origins)
Faran Tahir (Supergirl)
Michelle Forbes (Powers)
Raymond J. Barry (Cold Case)
Said Taghmaoui (American Hustle)
Reiko Aylesworth (24)
Eric Lange (Cult)
Alice Evans (The Originals)
Mark Pellegrino (Chuck)
Titus Welliver (Agents of SHIELD)
Brad William Henke (Fury)
Hiroyuki Sanada (The Wolverine)
John Hawkes (Winter’s Bone)
David H. Lawrence XVII (Heroes)
Dylan Minnette (Goosebumps)
William Atherton (Ghostbusters)
Jodi Lyn O’Keefe (Halloween: H20)

Lost Season 1 succeeds first and foremost in character development. Lost is about relationships and before we can understand the dynamic behind the various relationships that develop over the course of a season, we need to understand what motivates these characters. This shows approach of having an individual episode focus on a single character through flashback, while formulaic, is a brilliant decision.

Episodes like “The Moth” (Charlie), “Confidence Man” (Sawyer) and “Walkabout” give us a wealth of information about the people we are being introduced to. These episodes and others are entertaining, exciting and contain pivotal character moments that are still important to the story even in season four and undoubtedly beyond. As I’ve said, this is the foundation for the whole universe that we are being presented and the team behind Lost nailed it right from the “Pilot”.

With character being such an important focus of the first season, the major story and mysteries surrounding the island are deliberately underdeveloped. After the survivors’ first night and their encounter with the monster we know this island is anything but normal, but we are only given glimpses from that point on. Over the course of the season we discover that there are other people on the island but beyond that we really don’t learn anything. The truth is that if the writers had tried to develop the story at the same pace as the characters it would have all been too much, too soon and the whole world they are trying to build would have come tumbling down like a deck of cards. Saying that the story is underdeveloped may sound like a complaint but I feel that it was the best decision. We are given a thin vertical slice of what is to come in later seasons and that is all we really need.

Of course, there are a plethora of individual character stories that thrive over the course of the season. Jin and Sun’s tumultuous relationship and betrayal, Charlie’s battle with drug addiction, Claire copping with being a parent and the love triangle between Kate, Jack and Sawyer are just a small few of the intriguing storylines that take place. All of these work to strengthen our understanding of the survivors and

Definitely of note is the story of John Locke and his relationship with the island. It’s a fascinating story to watch unfold over the course of the season and Locke’s journey is very different from the rest of the survivors. He starts perceiving the island as a living entity and develops an understanding of it that everyone else fails to understand and they fear him for it. I wouldn’t call him the villain of the show — for the first season I would say “the unknown” is the nemesis — but Locke definitely has his own agenda. Terry O’Quinn does an exceptional job of portraying Locke’s development over the course of the season. He brilliantly presents a troubled and destroyed man who has experienced a profound miracle and is now trying to make sense of what has happened to him.

As long time fans have come to expect, Michael Giacchino’s score adds an extra amount of depth to the season. He stands out as one of the premiere composers on television and Lost would simply not be the same without him. Most of Lost’s twists and turns may not have the same impact the second time around but that doesn’t mean that their importance isn’t appreciated. This show’s opening season set the foundation for things to come over the course of the series.

Attempting to build on the strength of Season One, Lost Season Two introduces several new characters and a new mysterious group to keep viewers enthralled. The introduction of the tail section characters does serve a purpose early in the season as it reinforces the Others as formidable villains. While the survivors on the beach have had it relatively easy, the tailies experience 48 days of hell in which their numbers shrink to a handful. Beyond that, Libby slides into a cute love story with Hurley while Ana Lucia stands around and takes up space until she is shot to death by Michael. Neither contributes a substantial amount to the season or the series besides being canon fodder for Michael.

As for Mr. Eko, he does have a couple of good flashback episodes but it also feels like the writers are never quite sure what to do with him. At some points he’s a passive observer to events unfolding and the later he actively gets involved in the pressing of the button. Those last few episodes in which he finds himself destined to push the button almost seem as if the were a scramble to give the character something substantial to do. Don’t get me wrong, I’m a big fan of Eko but I feel as if his character was completely mismanaged from the outside.

Only Bernard, who really doesn’t do much himself, feels like a relevant addition from the tail section as he ties up the loose end regarding Rose’s husband. Their reunion alone makes his introduction worth the effort. The best new addition to the Lost cast is the person we see the least throughout the season – Desmond David Hume. His appearance in the first couple of episodes of the season were used solely to introduce the concept of the button but his flashback and story in the two hour finale presented an intriguing new character. He’s a hopeless romantic on a quest to regain his honor and reunite with his true love. Desmond’s story is leaps and bounds more exciting than the rest of the new cast.

Locke’s journey this season doesn’t really start to get interesting until the introduction of Henry Gale. For the first half of the season we get to see Locke at his most confident. He’s finally opened his hatch and discovered a bevy of new treasures inside to support his claims that the island and his connection to it are part of some much larger destiny. However, Gale’s arrival brings with it seeds of doubt as John’s world begins to fall apart. This culminates in the discovery of the Pearl Station and Locke’s complete loss of faith in the button and the island. It’s a good journey that has a great conclusion in the finale.

I really enjoyed Sawyer’s return to form midway through this season. Sure it didn’t make much sense for Sawyer to turn the entire camp against him in “The Long Con” but it was one of my favorite story lines of the season. His return to a nastier, less fan-friendly Sawyer was short lived however as he fairly quickly crept back into the good graces of the rest of the group.

Michael’s battle to get Walt back from the Others had him depart midway through the season but his return in the final few episodes of the season were thoroughly entertaining. His murder of Ana Lucia and Libby gave way to an interesting game of deception as Michael is forced to convince the survivors that Henry was behind their deaths. His absolutely disgust in himself for taking a life mixed with the continued desperation he has to reunite with his son makes for some of the best character moments of the entire season. Harold Parrineau does a fantastic job of portraying Michael’s spastic range of emotions in those final few episodes.

The real gem of this season and my favorite story arc is the introduction of Michael Emerson as Henry Gale. He spends most of his time confined in the Swan Station but that doesn’t stop him from being a formidable foe for the survivors of Flight 815. With the survivors fractured and keeping secrets from one another, Henry frequently manages to turn one survivor against the other. He’s favorite prey is John Locke who we already know is quite susceptible to snide comments and underhanded suggestions. Henry turns Locke inside out and uses him against Jack causing the group of survivors to lose focus. Its brilliant to watch unfold and Emerson brings a lot of weight to the role.

This season is easily broken down into two separate parts; the first six episodes that aired before an eight week hiatus and then the rest of the season. Even though the first six are considered part of the third season, they feel much more like a prologue. Very little time is spent with the survivors on the beach and the main focus of the story is Jack (Matthew Fox), Kate (Evangeline Lilly) and Sawyer’s (Josh Holloway) imprisonment by the Others. T

The second half of the season also featured some of the show’s best episodes to date. Including the brilliantly told “Flashes Before Your Eyes”, which is an interesting twist on Lost’s  flashback scenario. Other episodes like “The Man from Tallahassee” and “The Brig” answered long asked questions while “The Man Behind the Curtain” and “One of Us” gave us a much needed back-story on both Ben (Michael Emerson) and Juliet (Elizabeth Mitchell).

Really, the only weak point of the final sixteen-episode run would be “Stranger in a Strange Land”, an episode that primarily focused on the origins and meaning of Jack’s tattoo. We still don’t really understand the significance and we’re not too sure if the writers do either as they never bring up the subject again for the rest of the season. Even “Expos¿”, an episode that featured fan-hated Nikki (Kiele Sanchez) and Paulo (Rodrigo Santoro), told an interesting “Twilight Zone” style story and we couldn’t be happier with the conclusion.

If you were to suggest that the theme for season one was man vs. the unknown and that season two’s was man vs. machine  it would be fair to suggest that the theme for season three is man vs. man, as the main crux of the season deals with the survivors of Flight 815 dealing with the Others. There is a constant power struggle between the two groups and the narrative frequently shifts back and forth from the Others camp to the survivor’s beach. Intertwined throughout, are personal struggles for several of the characters in both camps and we realize as the story pushes forward that even though they are enemies, their survival appears to be dependant on each other.

At the core of this struggle is Benjamin Linus, and it would be a sin not to mention Michael Emerson’s fantastic performance as the enigmatic leader of the Others. He never once falters in portraying a creepy and unnerving nemesis for the survivors of Flight 815 and in particular, John Locke. Terry O’Quinn puts in an equally inspired performance and every time these two appeared on screen together, you knew something special was about to happen. Everything culminates in what can be described as one of the best season finales in recent memory. Carlton Cuse and Damon Lindelof deliver a brilliantly told story that is full of emotion, suspense and action.

After a stunning conclusion to the show’s third season, the bar was raised and much was expected of the fourth season of Lost. With the final three seasons reduced to sixteen episodes each and a clear finish line. The creative team could now focus on telling their story without having to worry about how many episodes they had left to work with. Season four is the first to benefit and delivers a faster paced and leaner story that expands the Lost universe in some unexpected ways and delves into the mystery that was introduced at the end of last season.The “flash-forward” at the end of last season introduced an exciting new way in which Lost stories could be told. The use of these flash-forwards continues through the fourth season, revealing that even more Oceanic survivors made it off the island and also introduces an intriguing conspiracy of silence regarding those who weren’t so lucky. This storyline is the backbone of the fourth season as we discovered who was fortunate enough to escape the island and who was left behind. This is arguably the series’ best story arc since the mystery surrounding the hatch and is a well-developed, tightly paced narrative that actually has a satisfying conclusion at the end of the season.

The benefit of a shortened schedule is apparent and this season has far less “filler” than previous outings. Less episodes means that every minute of screen time becomes that much more precious and the outcome is a season that doesn’t have what we’d consider a bad episode in the bunch. Even this season’s Kate-centric episode is decent when compared to previous years’ outings. There are plenty of episodes that you will want to revisit here, including the pivotal “The Constant” that is a game-changer when it comes to the series’ mythology. It also features Henry Ian Cusick’s best performance as Desmond to date and one of the more memorable Michael Giacchino scores. The rest of the season is filled to the brim with moments that will have any Lost fan riveted.


Acting wise, all the great performances that you have come to expect from the series’ regulars are present. Michael Emerson and Terry O’Quinn continue to put in stellar performances as Ben Linus and John Locke respectively. As has been stated many times throughout the last couple of seasons, these two have some phenomenal chemistry on screen and they spend a great deal of time verbally sparring with each other this season. The newcomers to the show are no slouches either. Veteran actor Jeff Fahey is memorable as helicopter pilot Frank Lapidus. Ken Leung has already become a series favorite as the sharp-tongued Miles Straume and while some fans have had a negative reaction towards Rebecca Mader’s Charlotte Lewis, it is hard to deny that she puts in a respectable performance here.

Jeremy Davies deserves special recognition for his portrayal of physicist – Daniel Faraday. Simply put, Davies’ is awesome as the polite and awkward scientist whose unique viewpoint of the island’s core mysteries is a benefit to the series. If given more screen time he would have probably stolen the show and he stands alongside Ben Linus and Desmond Hume as yet another exceptional new addition to the series.

With the introduction of new characters and the already expanded Lost cast, some regulars take a step back and are not featured as prominently as you would expect. Most notable are series heavyweights Jack and Kate, who are present and accounted for, but see their roles slightly reduced as other characters are brought to the forefront. As the cast and story expand, it has obviously become a necessity to focus on a wider range of characters. The series’ writers are equal to the task and do a good job of handling a large cast without forgetting anyone in the mix.

Last season, Lost successfully made the transition into the realm of science fiction with classic episodes like “The Constant” and of course, making the island literally disappear in “There’s no Place Like Home.” Season 5 dives head first into weighty science fiction concepts with time travel playing a major role in the narrative for the entire year. There are inherent risks with introducing time travel into a story that is already as complex as the one Lost has become over the past few years. For the most part, the writers do a good job of keeping the time travel aspect of the story from becoming too complicated, but there is no dispute that it is the driving force of the season’s narrative.

The first half of the season is comprised of two very distinct storylines. One of those being Jack Shephard’s desperate attempt to reunite the Oceanic Six in order to return to the island and the other being the journey of those left behind as they find themselves inexplicably traveling through time. The Oceanic Six storyline is definitely the weaker of the two. The story of the Six, hours before they return to the island was weakened by a slow start with the somewhat Hurley-centric “The Lie.” This is an episode that featured a little too much of Hugo Reyes’ wacky exploits as he transports an unconscious Sayid around Los Angeles. The rest of the Oceanic Six story is essentially a waiting game as we watch the pieces fall into place so that these characters can return to where we really want them to be – on the island. In fact, their return to the island in “316” feels rushed, almost as if the writers realized that the best place for these characters is back on the island.

The aptly named “The Life and Death of Jeremy Bentham” is the best episode that takes place almost entirely off the island. The story chronicles John Locke’s attempt to convince the Oceanic Six that they need to return to the island in order to save those left behind. It’s a tragic story for John Locke who has spent the last four seasons in the belief that the survivors of Flight 815 are tied by a single destiny but only in death does he finally make people believe. It’s a well-scripted story and wonderfully acted by Terry O’Quinn who does a great job of portraying an interesting transition for Locke on screen.

Locke isn’t the only one who goes through a transition this season as Benjamin Linus is forced into a situation that is quite surprising for the character. Without delving into too much detail, the dynamic between Locke and Ben changes quite a bit but the great chemistry between O’Quinn and Michael Emerson is still as exceptional as it has always been. Linus fans should not be disappointed by some of the great developments for the character this season.

On the island, Sawyer and the rest of the survivors left behind are forced to cope with the fact that they are constantly flashing through time, either to the past or the future. The approach taken here is straightforward and clearly laid out in the first episode of the season; you cannot change events in the past – whatever happened, happened and couldn’t of happened any other way. Faraday acts as the mouth piece for much of the technobabble in the early part of the season with Sawyer playing the part of the ‘everyman’ who constantly questions why things are happening the way they are. This allows the writers an opportunity to ease the audience into this shift of events without making things too complex to follow. There is plenty of exposition, but with Sawyer’s classic charm to offset Faraday’s jargon, it makes it a lot easier to swallow.

Time travel is utilized to its fullest here to reveal some of the island’s back-story over the last 50 years. Sawyer and co. pay a visit to the Others of the 1950s and are introduced to past leaders of the mysterious group. We also see some much-needed loose ends tied up as we finally learn more about Rousseau and her research team and we also discover why Richard Alpert visited a young Locke just one season ago. As secrets are revealed and key puzzle pieces are slid into place it’s surprising to see just how well everything fits together. Some of this is certainly due to the asset of knowing how many episodes you have left to tell your story in, but I’m hard pressed to find many plot holes in any of the explanations given. Cuse and Lindelof deserve credit for maintaining a watertight narrative throughout most of the season.

Season 6 of Lost is quite possibly the most scrutinized season of television in history. With both longtime fans of the series and curious outsiders wondering if this season would deliver both on answers and a satisfying conclusion, series show runners Damon Lindelof and Carlton Cuse had an incredible task on their hands. With an edge-of-your-seat conclusion to Season 5, the small band of survivors we’ve grown to love set out on their final journey against a villainous shape shifter on an island of mystery.

In Season 4, “The Constant” established Lost as a science fiction series when it introduced time travel into the equation. From that point forward, until the conclusion of Season 5, the series maintained and expanded on that concept by sending the survivors hurtling through time until they eventually landed in 1974 (or 1977, for those on Ajira 316). Season 6 drops the time travel story completely and introduces a different sci-fi concept: alternate realities. It appears that the detonation of Jughead in “The Incident” created a parallel universe in which events played out slightly different and Oceanic Flight 815 never crashed.Much like flash-backs and flash-forwards, we experience this parallel universe through a series of “centric” flash-sideways featuring the lives of these characters as if the crash had never happened. This gives Lindelof and Cuse a unique opportunity to reexamine the lives of these characters from a completely different perspective. The flash-sideways giving us incredibly important character moments and an intriguing new story that’s both surprising and engaging. With each “centric” flash-sideways story, parallels are drawn to the character’s plight while they are on the island. This relationship between timelines establishes a key connection between both storylines that give the flash-sideways an importance outside of simply being a different perspective on how things could have ultimately played out.

Connections between the two universes are explored more thoroughly as the series progresses and we do ultimately get a resolution to the flash-sideways storyline. How satisfying that resolution is will ultimately be based on a number of factors that stem from your own expectations. In other words, it’s a polarizing conclusion to a very unique story and you’re probably either going to love it or hate it. I loved the way the flash-sideways story ended because it satisfied the need for closure.

“Happily Ever After” stands out as the episode that had the most impact on both universes. Living, breathing Desmond David Hume (Henry Ian Cusick) has his consciousness transported into what we now know to be the afterlife and acts as the genesis for everything that happens in the “flash-sideways” realm after his departure. Desmond is also the catalyst for most events that occur leading up to and including the finale. He’s seen as nothing more than a tool by those around him; a means to an end. However, Desmond is infused with his own sense of purpose. With the events he experienced in the other universe infecting his mind, Desmond sets out to free those remaining on the island from their pain and suffering and take them to a better place. It’s funny how both Desmonds are essentially driven by the same goal, with only one succeeding. But Desmond’s error on the island gives Jack and Kate (Evangeline Lilly) the window they need to stop the Man in Black.untitledTerry O’Quinn, who spent most of the past five seasons playing John Locke, slips into his new role as the embodiment of dark temptation with ease. We actually saw him as the Man in Black last season, but even O’Quinn didn’t realize that he was technically playing a different character until close to the finale. Here he’s allowed to truly enjoy portraying a villain and it’s obvious he’s having a hell of a lot of fun in the role.The Man in Black tests the survivors like never before. Offering them freedom, survival and even  answers to some of the island’s more pressing mysteries. The way that the survivors respond to this temptation ultimately defines who they truly are, even if it takes them some time to make the right decision. Again, just like the flash-sideways, this gives us yet another fascinating new perspective on these characters. We see them at both their weakest and their strongest this season.Season 6 does a good job of explaining some mysteries while others are left up to the viewer to dissect for years to come. Lost: Season 6 is a strong conclusion to what has been an extraordinary series. All the elements that made the past five seasons so great are here, with the added bonus of this being the final season and the stakes being raised for all the characters. Whether or not the answers provided are satisfying or cover enough ground will vary drastically for different viewers, but ultimately, Lost: Season 6 delivers closure on a story that has captivated us for so long.

REVIEW: RINGER

CAST

Sarah Michelle Gellar (Cruel Intentions)
Kristoffer Polaha (Dollhouse)
Ioan Gruffudd (King Arthur)
Nestor Carbonell (Bates Motel)
Mike Colter (Luke Cage)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Zoey Deutch (Beautiful Creatures)
Jason Dohring (Veronica mars)
Justin Bruening (Knight Rider 2008)
Tara Summers (Hitchcock)
Zahn McClarnon (Longmire)
Billy Miller (American Sniper)
Jaime Murray (Spartacus: Gods of The Arena)
Andrea Roth (Robocop: The Series)
Gage Golightly (Cabin Fever 2016)
Sean Patrick Thomas (Halloween 8)
Nikki DeLoach (The Trial)
Gregory Harrison (One Tree Hill)
Matthew Del Negro (Teen Wolf)
Jonathan Banks (The Lizzie Bordan Chronicles)
Loren Lester (Batman: TAS)
Drew Powell (Gotham)
Nicole Gale Anderson (Beauty and The Beast)
Amber Benson (Buffy)
Brian Hallisay (Hostel: Part III)
Dylan Neal (Arrow)

What is the problem with CW that they took this off the air after one season? Yes, season 1 was tied up for the most part, but you knew from the end that there were lots of exciting plots for season 2. The characters were left in limbo.

Sarah Michelle Gellar stars as twins, Siobhan and Bridget. Bridget is a drug user and prostitute who witnessed a murder and right before she is supposed to testify against the killer, who is a monster, she becomes frightened and takes off for parts unknown. She runs to New York city and to her estranged sister, Siobhan. Siobhan married money, but she’s a piece of work, as you will see.

The Episodes

1) “Pilot”

Bridget Kelly (Sarah Michelle Gellar), a recovering drug addict, witnesses a murder committed by Bodaway Macawi and several members of his gang. FBI agent Victor Machado (Nestor Carbonell) assures her of her safety, but she escapes from her hometown, Wyoming, and takes refuge in New York City with her estranged twin sister Siobhan Martin (Gellar). After the mysterious disappearance of Siobhan on a boat outing, Bridget–believing her sister committed suicide–assumes her sister’s identity, to hide from the FBI and the mob. In the midst of renovation of Siobhan’s loft, Bridget is attacked by an unidentified man; she eventually kills her attacker in self defense.

2) “She’s Ruining Everything”

Machado chooses to stay in New York City to thorough his research about Siobhan. Bridget, while trying to hide the body of her attacker, confides in her Narcotics Anonymous sponsor Malcolm Ward (Mike Colter); together they develop a getaway plan for her. Siobhan’s best friend Gemma (Tara Summers) and her husband Henry’s (Kristoffer Polaha) fighting escalates and Bridget unexpectedly bonds with her rebellious stepdaughter Juliet (Zoey Deutch). Siobhan is hiding out in Paris with an unknown agenda.

3)  “If You Ever Want a French Lesson”

Bridget is getting closer to finding Siobhan’s killer by tracing his phone back. But someone is after her, and she will soon discover compromising information about Andrew. Meanwhile, Agent Machado is still in New York City, hunting Bridget, unaware that Bridget is Siobhan. Henry and Gemma have another crisis, but this time regarding their investment in Andrew’s hedge fund. In Wyoming, Malcolm is abducted by the sadistic gangster Bodaway Macawi, who tortures Malcolm in order to locate Bridget’s whereabouts. Elsewhere, Siobhan continues living her solitary life in Paris and basking in her freedom from her old life in which she encounters Tyler (Justin Bruening), a charming banker who is working for one of Andrew’s European branches.ringer_s1e17_andrewSMG

4)  “It’s Gonna Kill Me, But I’ll Do It”

Bridget, Andrew, Gemma, and Henry head to the Hamptons to celebrate Siobhan’s birthday, where Bridget reflects the rough past she and her sister experienced. In Paris, Siobhan uses her feminine charm to continue to lure Tyler closer to benefit her hidden motives for Bridget and Andrew. While Agent Machado uncovers crucial pieces of information, Bridget’s situation worsens when secrets of her own are revealed, leaving the consequences of her lies unknown and in the hands of Gemma.

5) “A Whole New Kind of Bitch”

After Bridget confides her secret in Gemma, she asks Bridget a tricky favor. Henry’s writing career is swaying while Andrew and Juliet’s relationship is not getting any better. Bridget, on the other hand, is meeting another NA sponsor, Charlie (Billy Miller), in a desperate attempt to stay sober. Meanwhile, the captive Malcolm is put in a position that tests his sobriety after Bodaway forces heroin into him, in another attempt to get him to talk on where Bridget is. Gemma disappears and blood is seen all over the wall and floor in Henry and Gemma’s house.

6) “The Poor Kids Do It Everyday”

Agent Machado focuses his attention on Bodaway Macawi as he investigates Malcolm’s disappearance. In New York, Bridget and Henry are placed in a sticky situation, trying to find out who murdered Gemma. Juliet runs into trouble with a bully, Tessa (Gage Golightly), at her new school but is helped out by her teacher Mr. Carpenter (Jason Dohring).

 

7)  “Oh Gawd, There’s Two of Them?”

Bridget is forced to reveal that she has a twin to Andrew and Henry as the police begin questioning them about Gemma’s disappearance. She also asks Charlie for his help in finding Gemma. Unknown to Bridget, Charlie is revealed to be Siobhan’s contact and Gemma’s attacker. Meanwhile, Malcolm escapes from Bodaway’s thugs and heads to New York. After Bridget sees him she collapses and whilst in hospital the doctors want to check on the baby. After Juliet is in a car accident with her friend, Monica (Nicole Gale Anderson), Andrew cuts off her $10 million trust fund in punishment.

8)  “Maybe We Can Get a Dog Instead”

Bridget lies to Andrew about having had a miscarriage when the nurse reveals that there is no baby. After Juliet flirts with Mr. Carpenter, he transfers her out of his class. Malcolm arrives in New York and is confronted by Agent Machado. Tyler comes to New York and meets Bridget, who he believes is Siobhan/Cora. Siobhan tells Tyler that she is married to Andrew and that she was having marriage problems, even though it was Bridget that Tyler saw in New York.

9)  “Shut Up and Eat Your Bologna”

Bridget realizes she’s growing fond of Andrew. Henry and Andrew’s business partner bond; Malcolm has doubts about Bridget’s new NA sponsor; and Bridget decides to meet Siobhan’s therapist, Dr. Anabel Morris (Merle Dandridge), in order to gain insight into her sister’s life and learns that Siobhan sometimes went by the alias Cora Farell. Elsewhere, Gemma is being held captive by Charlie in his basement.

10)  “That’s What You Get for Trying to Kill Me”

In New York, Bridget and Malcolm discover and inform the police that Charlie is holding Gemma. Upon realizing he is close to being caught, he tells Siobhan he wants double his pay, otherwise he will kill Gemma. Bridget and Andrew get even closer, while Juliet continues to dangerously flirt with her teacher Mr. Carpenter. She also claims that he raped her to new friend Andrea (Chelsea Tavares). While in Paris, Siobhan is trying to fix things with Tyler. In Wyoming, thanks to an informant (Amber Benson), Agent Machado discovers someone on the force is passing information to Bodaway. Charlie kills Gemma even though Siobhan told him not to, and Siobhan travels to New York to stop Charlie from killing Gemma. When she finds out it is too late, she shoots Charlie because he killed Gemma, and to make sure he doesn’t hurt anyone else.

11) “It Just Got Normal”

While the relationship between Bridget and Andrew grows more intimate, Bridget learns about the alleged rape of Juliet, leading to a confrontation between her and Mr. Carpenter. Since the murders of Gemma and Charlie, Siobhan has decided to remain in New York for a while and tries to learn more information about Bridget and her former life with a little help from an unsuspecting Tyler. Back in Wyoming, Agent Machado interrogates Jimmy and learns some new information, putting Bridget’s cover as Siobhan at risk, and uncovers some news about Malcolm. Back in New York, Bridget offers to host a fundraiser that her friend Greer (Mädchen Amick) is holding for Juliet’s school and discovers that Greer knew one of Siobhan’s deep dark secrets. Meanwhile, Malcolm decides to work for Andrew at Martin/Charles in order to keep an eye on him, and Henry mourns the death of his wife. Siobhan discovers that Bridget has settled into her former life more easily than Siobhan expected and she is determined to change that by interacting with everyone to turn them against her… and being careful not to run into Bridget, who still does not know that she is still alive nor of her evil agenda.

12) “What Are You Doing Here, Ho-Bag?”

Juliet’s mother, Catherine (Andrea Roth), is back in town in order to support her daughter during her lawsuit, but she is messing with the whole family, causing all kinds of trouble. The real Siobhan is coping with Henry and Tyler while selling Bridget’s engagement ring to buy a fake passport. Meanwhile, Detective Machado is trying to get information from Jimmy. Bridget investigates the Pivoine Hotel mystery and ends up hearing about some guy named Solomon. Henry is on to Siobhan who he thinks is in reality Bridget. Juliet’s rape story is put into question when a tape is discovered showing her hitting on Mr. Carpenter. In prison, Jimmy is making a pact with Bodaway to get out, revealing where Bridget is while Bridget finds out that Siobhan went to Wyoming before she reached out for help. Against all odds, Tessa shows up at the Martins, claiming she was also raped by Mr. Carpenter. Siobhan finally shows Henry the truth that Bridget is the one living the lie with Andrew and that she is still pregnant with his child.

13) “It’s Easy to Cry When This Much Cash Is Involved”

Bridget decides to enlist Solomon’s (Sean Patrick Thomas) help in order to retrace Siobhan’s last steps and discovers her connection to John/Charlie. Meanwhile, Juliet’s trial against Mr. Carpenter is dismissed when Tessa admits she lied about him attacking her, and after he attempts to sue Andrew he is given a substantial amount of money to settle out of court. It is then revealed this was the plan all along set up between Mr. Carpenter, Juliet, and Tessa to get at Andrew’s money. Elsewhere, Henry is blackmailed by Olivia to bring Gemma’s wealthy lawyer father on as a client at Martin/Charles. On the other hand, Siobhan struggles to keep everything together as Henry and Tyler become suspicious that she is using both of them and Bridget continues to inadvertently ruin her, as yet, unclear plans.

14) “Whores Don’t Make That Much”

Following her investigations from the last episode, Bridget takes Malcolm to Siobhan’s secret office only to find it empty. Back in the Martin’s apartment, Bridget gets a call that causes her to remember what drove her apart from her sister. Flashbacks from seven years ago reveal Siobhan’s troubled relationship with Dylan (Misha Collins), an ex-boyfriend who dumped her after she got pregnant, but after a few years wants to prove that he was a changed man. Bridget, who is babysitting Siobhan’s son, Sean, allows Dylan to take Sean out just for one day despite Siobhan forbidding it. On their way home, Dylan asks Bridget if she can support him when he files to be Sean’s legal guardian, and a car hits them in the middle of the road, killing Sean in the process. Back in the present day, Bridget, as Siobhan, forgives Dylan after understanding that what happened was an accident, and not necessarily their fault. In the meantime, after finding out that Henry has got the key to Siobhan’s Safe deposit box, Malcolm, who’s helping Bridget to find out who’s chasing her, decides to keep an eye on Henry. Juliet’s scheme takes a dark path when Tessa is brutally attacked after buying a car with Andrew’s money, which causes Juliet to believe Mr. Carpenter did it. She then tells her father that she is willing to live with her mother in Miami for a “change of scenery”. That leads to the revelation that Catherine was the one who had the idea for the scheme.

15) “P.S. You’re an Idiot”

Andrew asks Bridget (thinking she is Siobhan) to renew their vows and they begin planning a wedding ceremony, with Juliet as the Maid of honor. Siobhan, visiting an OB/GYN in Paris, learns she is having twins but doesn’t tell Henry that the conception date means the baby may be Andrew’s. Malcolm is fired when he is caught stealing information from Olivia’s computer, and later tells Bridget that Andrew’s company is running a Ponzi scheme. Catherine is romantically involved with Mr. Carpenter but then steals his money and blackmails him into leaving Juliet alone. It is also revealed that Andrew came up with the Ponzi scheme and that Catherine paid someone to attack Tessa, but to roughen her up, not beat her severely.


16) “You’re Way Too Pretty to Go to Jail”

Andrew confides in Bridget (who he thinks is Siobhan) about running a giant Ponzi scheme, which fills her with doubt and fear as she debates on what to do. Meanwhile, it is revealed that Agent Machado’s past relationship with his informant, the murder victim/stripper Shaylene Briggs (Nikki DeLoach), was more than professional. Siobhan deceives Malcolm when she pretends to be Bridget in order to remove him from the scene. In Paris, Tyler takes something from Siobhan that is a key piece of evidence in her plot for revenge against Andrew. Andrew tells Olivia that Bridget (who is acting as Siobhan) is aware of their Ponzi scheme and she suggests they take action to keep Malcolm, Bridget (acting as Siobhan) and Tyler quiet. Also, Henry realizes Bridget knows more than she should and has to follow Siobhan’s orders to keep Bridget from interfering with their plans.

17) “What We Have Is Worth the Pain”

Bridget fears that something has happened to Malcolm when she cannot get in touch with him. In an effort to find him, Bridget, with Solomon in tow, visits the hotel where Malcolm was staying and discovers on security footage that Andrew was the last person to see Malcolm before he disappeared. She suspects that Andrew may have killed Tyler as well as Malcolm. Solomon also reveals to Bridget that he has known all along that she was impersonating Siobhan. Meanwhile, Juliet discovers that her mother played a part in the attack on Tessa after Juliet meets a young man with a distinctive tattoo on his right arm by which Tessa identifies him as her assailant. Siobhan travels back to New York where she admits to Henry the truth about why she faked her own death and that Andrew and Olivia are in fact the ones behind the attempts on her life. Elsewhere, Agent Machado arrives back in New York to look for Malcolm and begins to suspect that Andrew may have had a hand in his disappearance.

18)  “That Woman’s Never Been a Victim Her Entire Life”

After an attempt made on Bridget’s life results in Andrew being shot, Agent Machado is more determined than ever to find out who was responsible and what Bridget (still impersonating Siobhan) knows about it. Henry accuses Siobhan of putting a hit out on Bridget, which Siobhan denies, while Bridget thinks the missing Olivia was behind it as well as the murder of Tyler. Meanwhile, Andrew admits to asking Malcolm to leave town and Juliet tells Bridget the truth about her mother.

19) “Let’s Kill Bridget!”

Henry grows impatient with Siobhan’s plan and tells her she needs to let go of her murderous revenge plot against both Andrew and Bridget or they cannot be together. Bridget decides that the only way she will feel safe is if she gives up her charade of impersonating Siobhan and returns to Wyoming to testify against the sadistic Bodaway Macawi. Agent Machado gets suspended from the FBI after he beats up a suspect in full view of witnesses. Later, he gets an idea to make Bodaway Macawi think Bridget’s dead, since that’s what he wants. The plan ends up going down terribly wrong and reveals that Catherine wants Siobhan dead.

20 “If You’re Just an Evil Bitch Then Get Over It” Roger Kumble Cathryn Humphris
Still posing as Siobhan, Bridget admits to Agent Machado that someone tried to kill her months earlier and she thought it was Andrew. Bridget goes to Henry’s apartment, where the very pregnant Siobhan overhears Bridget accuse Henry of Tyler’s murder. At the same time, Henry learns that his father-in-law is responsible for his arrest for Tyler’s murder and also has an agenda to use the flash drive to work for him. Meanwhile, Catherine goes to desperate extremes to kill Siobhan by attempting suicide to play on Juliet’s sympathies.

21) “It’s Called Improvising, Bitch!”

Andrew catches Catherine trying to fake Bridget’s suicide, so she holds them both hostage along with Juliet. Running out of options, Catherine calls Olivia, who is revealed to be her lover. Olivia tells Catherine to bring Bridget to her house, so they can run away together. When Catherine and Bridget arrive, Agent Machado arrests Catherine, having heard the conversation at the apartment after Bridget secretly calls him. Meanwhile, the main witness against Henry dies of a drug overdose and Siobhan gives birth to twin girls. Henry asks the nurse for a paternity test, showing his doubts about Siobhan.

22) “I’m the Good Twin”

As the vow renewal nears, Bridget realizes she needs to tell Andrew the truth about who she really is, but worries about losing everything. Jimmy has escaped from prison and demands that Bridget (who he believes is Siobhan) give him part of the cash for scaring Bridget away where she finally learns that Siobhan and Charlie hired him to scare her into fleeing Wyoming. Afterwards, Bodaway demands Jimmy reveal where Bridget is, and after getting an answer, he kills Jimmy with a knife in cold blood. Agent Machado is deported back to Colorado where he is ordered to stay off the Bodaway case. Back in New York, Tim Arbogast, Gemma’s father, believing that Siobhan was responsible for Gemma’s death, becomes the new owner of Martin/Charles Inc. and tells Andrew that Siobhan has been having an affair with Henry over the past year. Andrew is furious and cancels their vow renewal and announces that he and Siobhan are getting divorced. Now forced to do so, Bridget finally tells Andrew and Juliet the truth about who she really is. Unfortunately, they both take the news very badly, with Juliet calling Bridget worse than her own mother. Andrew and Juliet take a leave to the Hamptons after Andrew tells Bridget that she now has one month to move out. Meanwhile, Henry steals Siobhan’s money (that she stole from Andrew) and kicks her out of his house after he begins to mistrust her, including finding out that he’s not the biological father of her twins. Siobhan returns to her old apartment to steal all the jewelry that once was hers. Bodaway then attacks her believing she’s Bridget, and the real Bridget then shows up and after a brief struggle she kills him, thinking he was attacking Juliet. Agent Machado arrives after getting Bridget’s call and reassures her that Andrew and Juliet are safe in the Hamptons. At the hospital, Siobhan, now broke and homeless, tries to think of a way to get her old life back. Later, Solomon shows Bridget security footage that shows Siobhan was alive on the day of her “suicide” talking with Charlie. Bridget angrily confronts Henry, who after being punched by Andrew earlier, finally tells Bridget the truth about her sister. A horrified Bridget then says: “Siobhan wanted me dead?”

This show was a great suspense show and really needed closure, sadly that was not meant to be, we didn’t even get a dvd release.

 

REVIEW: EARTH: FINAL CONFLICT – SEASON 1-5

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MAIN CAST

Kevin Kilner (Dollhouse)
Lisa Howard (Robocop: THe Series)
Von Flores (Never Cry Werewolf)
David Hemblen (La Femme Nikita)
Richard Chevolleau (Rookie Blue)
Leni Parker (Screamers)
Anita La Selva (Rogue)
Robert Leeshock (Dead End Road)
Jayne Heitmeyer (Snake Eyes)
Melinda Deines (Mutant X)
Alan van Sprang (Reign)
Guylaine St-Onge (Mutant X)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Michael Flipowich (Charlie Jade)
Lisa Ryder (Andromeda)
Majel Barrett (Star Trek)
Miranda Kwok (Ride or Die)
Sharu Guthrie (Pitch Black)
Malin Ackerman (Watchmen)
Emily Hampshire (Cosmopolis)
Peter Krantz (Exotica)
John Evans (Dirty Pictures)
Colette Stevenson (This is Wonderland)
Kristin Lehman (The Killing)
Nigel Bennett (Cypher)
Maurice Dean Wint (Cube)
Damon D’Oliveira (Short Circuit 2)
Kari Matchett (Wonderfalls)
Shauna MacDonald (Reign)
Peter Mensah (Sleepy Hollow)
William De Vry (Beauty and The Beast)
Paul Johansson (Highlander: The Raven)
Barry Flatman (Odyssey 5)
Montse Viader (Whipped)
Shawn Doyle (Reign)
Polly Shannon (Lie With Me)
Andrew Jackson (Andromeda)
Monika Schnarre (The New Addams Family)
Christina Cox (Stargate SG.1)
Janet Kidder (Arrow)
Fiona Highet (Bitten)
Francoise Yip (Robocop: Prime Directives)
Dean McDermott (Open Range)
Carlo Rota (Stargate Universe)
Frank Moore (Rabid)
Richard Zeppieri (Driven)
Chandra West (White Noise)
Andrew Airlie (Final Destination 2)
Reagan Pasternak (Being Erica)
Mark Lutz (Angel)
J.C. MacKenzie (Dark Angel)
Marina Sirtis (STar Trek: TNG)
Steve Bacic (Andromeda)
Lindy Booth (Odyssey 5)
Michael Hogan (Red Riding Hood)
Sarah LaFleur (Ugly Betty)
Garwin Sanford (Stargate: Atlantis)
Stacy Grant (Shanghai Noon)
Larissa Laskin (John Q)
Victor A. Young (Highlander: the Series)
Ramona Milano (Pushing Tin)
Lexa Doig (Andromeda)
Andrew Gillies (Mutant X)
Noam Jenkins (Saw II)
Helen Taylor (Thoughtcrimes)
Peter Outerbridge (Beauty and The Beast)
Margot Kidder (Superman)
Anthony Lemke (Mutant X)
Rachel McAdams (Mean Girls)
James Gallanders (Bride of Chucky)
Andrea Roth (Ringer)

I started watching this with rather low expectations — everything with Roddenberry’s name on it, other than Star Trek , has been a bit of a flop. So I was pleasantly surprised that this story of alien contact with a hidden ulterior motive is done quite well.

The Taelons arrived on Earth three years ago, and have helped eliminate much poverty and hunger. Selected members of their race — Companions — live on earth, and are aided by human agents implanted with a CVI, an alien virus that increases intelligence and has a motivational imperative to be loyal to the Taelons. But the Taelons are secretive, and not all humans are convinced of their good intentions. A Resistance sets up, and they place an agent, William Boone, with a modified CVI that has no such motivational imperative. The series follows Boone’s adventures as he tries to find out what the Taelons are up to, without blowing his cover.

That the Talons do have a secret purpose becomes clearer as the season progresses, but what it is precisely remains a mystery. The uncovering of the secrets, and the story arcs, are well handled. The Taelons come across as an interestingly conflicted race, some more pro-human, and less happy with whatever it is they are up to, than others. And the Resistance is nicely complex, too — sometimes seeming to be irrationally fanatic, sometimes seeming to be Earth’s last best hope for freedom. Boone does the agonised man trapped between two worlds bit quite well.

There is thankfully very little techno-babble, although some implausible technology rears its head (yet another case of whipping up an antidote to a disease in less than an episode — and a DNA sequence alone is not sufficient to recreate an adult person — and if the Taelons simply monitored Boone’s video phone, they’d get a nasty shock!) Yet, minor quibbles aside, this has been a fun journey.

Don’t be fooled by the box cover. I don’t know why they chose to have Kevin Kilner (William Boone) on the cover. I guess maybe because Boone’s fate was the cliffhanger of Season 1. But rest assured, this is not some sort of “alternate version” of Season 1 that’s repackaged as a misleading “Season 2,” as some fans had speculated, including myself. Trust me, this is Season 2 for real, just as advertised. The back of the box mentions Liam Kincaid, but shows pictures of Kilner (Boone). Ironic, considering Boone is already “dead” by Season 2 and makes no appearances until Season 5. So yes, the first episode of Season 2 is “First Of Its Kind,” Liam Kincaid being born. The rest of the episodes of Season 2 follow.

A lot of E:FC fans were turned off when the series changed direction, when they killed off Kevin Kilner (Boone’s) character, and brought Robert Leeshock (Liam) to replace him. I for one fell in love with it, then watched it to the end during its normal run on television, including the  Season 5. I can see how a lot of people would be pissed off that they axed Kevin Kilner (Boone) from the series. However, I must say that Liam Kincaid’s story arc, of him being a “man who’s more than human,” having Shaqarava in his palms (for Season 2 at least), having supposedly 75% Jaridian DNA, having precognitive powers, and his relationship with Augur, Lili, Doors, (as well as others introduced in Seasons 3 and 4) made for a good show.

I must say that E:FC would be nothing without the Liam Kincaid story arc. He carried the series from Season 2 to Season 4. Liam Kincaid, Ronald Sandoval, Da’an, and Zo’or. These are the players to watch out for, the major movers and shakers whose interplays determine the future of Earth. Liam’s relationship with Da’an was the strongest in Season 2, and it was very entertaining to see him use powers such as the Shaqarava, which can, among other things, fire lethal blasts, revive recently slain allies, deflect Jaridian Replicant energy beams, expel Dark Matter.

By the beginning of Earth: Final Conflict: Season Three, it is learned that the Taelons are ruthless and cunning; willing to manipulate anything and anyone to benefit their agenda. Their agenda is primarily fueled by their inter-galactic war with a race of aliens that share a common ancestor with them, the Jaridians. While the Taelons are long-lived and based on an energy physiology, the Jaridians are flesh & bone, with very short life expectancies. The Taelons main advantage has been their lifespan and technological edge, as well as their ability to travel faster than light. The Jaridians, on the other hand, have the advantage of sheer numbers with a scorch & burn policy towards their enemy and any who assist them.

 

Season three introduced Renee Palmer (Jayne Heitmeyer) as the main female lead, to assist Liam in his fight against the Taelon agenda but it also showed her as having her own agenda, based on acquiring wealth. It also phased Lili out as a regular and solidified the relationship between Liam and Auger, a computer genius with a leaning towards capitalism (much like Renee). The show evolved with each season and the plot threads of these 22 episodes focused more on unveiling the secrets (and weaknesses) of the aliens than any other season. The show was very much a social commentary and on its good days, showed the mindset of the radical Roddenberry whose idealism was obvious in all of his television shows .

Da’an helps to make sure that the Human/Jaridian hybrid lives. The Jaridians are dying, and Vorjack had hoped that the child would hold the key to their salvation, but this does not happen as expected. Before Vorjack dies from being on Earth for too long for his body to handle, Liam thinks quickly and saves his life. Lili, the Jaridian, and their hybrid child, manage to escape as Liam wishes them well.

Augur runs into trouble with the law and is forced into hiding. He offers his friend Juliet Street, a.k.a. J.Street, the opportunity to take over his role in the Resistance, and she accepts. She proves savvy and intelligent, eventually revealing that she has rare ability to think and calculate in multiple dimensions, which makes her a target for the increasingly desperate Taelons.The Resistance goes above ground once again when Renee and Liam team up with an international group, the Atlantic National Alliance, dedicated to defending human interests against the Taelons.Toward the end of the season, it is discovered that the Taelons are a dying race as well; their core energy is almost spent. More and more Taelons are entering stasis, and Zo’or becomes increasingly desperate to save his species. It is also revealed that Zo’or is Da’an’s child.

Liam and Renee discover a regeneration chamber hidden deep in a volcano, set in place long ago by Ma’el. Liam realizes that all species are interconnected and he must play a role in saving the Taelons, despite all the trouble they have caused. He brings them out of stasis. To conserve energy, they combine their essence into just six Taelons who go down to the regeneration chamber. At the same time, the remainder of Vorjack’s Jaridian fleet arrives on the scene. Zo’or, greedy to ensure his own survival, touches an energy pool in the chamber and is absorbed into it. Liam convinces the Jaridians to attempt a “joining” with the Taelons, which, it is believed, will return them to an earlier evolutionary form that is better suited to survival. As the volcano erupts, the joining procedure begins with Liam’s help, but it is unclear who or what will survive.

Liam, the Taelons, and the Jaridians have disappeared but their efforts, far from saving everyone, have doomed the galaxy: they have awakened the Atavus, a race of energy vampires that preceded the Taelons and Jaridians. Renee and Street are the only ones who know the truth of what’s happening: the Resistance is disbanded and the human governments are in no rush to accept the beginning of another war with an alien race. Their only ally is Raj’el, the first and now the last of the Taelons, who is forced to provide covert support from the heart of the Taelon mothership.

To make matters worse, Sandoval, left in control of the Taelon mothership, allies with the Atavus leaders Howlyn and Juda. Together, they are able to keep their presence hidden for much of the season. Their plan is to create an army of Atavus-Human hybrids by means of a joining process, then use the hybrids to awaken other Atavus hives hidden around the world. As the season progresses, a few familiar faces re-enter the fight: William Boone is brought back as a trap for Renee, but he quickly joins her side. In response, Sandoval and Howlyn revive Zo’or, giving him a new body as a female Atavus, but Renee and Boone are able to defeat their nemesis once and for all.

Final Conflict comes to a head when Liam returns to help Renee stop Howlyn from unleashing his elite warriors from the long-buried Atavus mothership. At the end of the series, Liam, Renee and Raj’el depart in the Taelon mothership, resolving to bring the few trustworthy Atavus home and indulge in a little adventure along the way.

Season 5 was universally despised by most fans, this was because of the lost of da’an and Liam, bringing in  new aliens in the final season was a bold move.  Alan Van Sprang joining the cast as Howlyn was brilliant and it allowed Renee to take centre stage. the final episode was a satisfying conclusion, leaving just enough rope to dangle just in case they continued.