REVIEW: BUFFY: THE VAMPIRE SLAYER – SEASON 1-7

Buffy the Vampire Slayer Logo 3840x2160 wallpaper

CAST

Sarah Michelle Gellar (Ringer)
Nicholas Brendon (Children of The Corn III)
Alyson Hannigan (How I Met Your Mother)
Charisma Carpenter (Scream Queens)
Anthony Stewart Head (The Iron Lady)
Davis Boreanaz (Bones)
Seth Green (Austin Powers)
James Marsters (Caprica)
Marc Blucas (Red State)
Emma Caulfield (Supergirl)
Michelle Tractenberg (17 Again)
Amber Benson (The Killing Jar)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST STARS

Mark Metcalf (Drive me Crazy)
Brian Thompson (Hired To Kill)
Ken Lerner (The Running Man)
Kristine Sutherland (One Life To Live)
Julie Benz (No Ordinary Family)
Eric Balfour (Skylive)
Persia White (The Vampire Diaries)
Mercedes McNab (The Addams Family)
Elizabeth Anne Allen (Bull)
Robin Riker (The Bold and The Beautiful)
Musetta Vander (Stargate SG.1)
Christopher Wiehl (Cold Hearts)
Geoff Meed (Little Miss Sunshine)
Andrew J. Ferchland (The Last Leprechaun)
Jennifer Sky (Cleopatra 2525)
Chad Lindberg (The Fast and The Furious)
Armin Shimerman (Star Trek: DS9)
Dean Butler (Little House on The Prairie)
Clea DuVall (The Lizzie Borden Chronicles)
Robia LaMorte (Spawn)
Michael Bacall (Django Unchained)
Juliet Landau (Ed Wood)
Ara Celi (American Beauty)
Clayne Crawford (Roswell)
Danny Strong (The Prophecy II)
Kavan Smith (Stargate SG.1)
Robin Sachs (Jurassic Park 2)
Larry Bagby (Walk The Line)
Jason Behr (Roswell)
Will Rothhaar (Kingpin)
Julia Lee (A Man Apart)
Bianca Lawson (The Vampire Diaries)
Saverio Guerra (Becker)
John Ritter (8 Simple Rules)
Jeremy Ratchford (Cold Case)
James Parks (Kill Bill)
Vincent Schiavelli (Batman Returns)
Jack Conley (Fast & Furious)
Willie Garson (Stargate SG.1)
Christopher Gorham (Ugly Betty)
John Hawkes (Winter’s Bone)
Meredith Salenger (Lake Placid)
Charles Cyphers (Halloween)
Wentworth Miller (Legends of Tomorrow)
Shane West (Nikita)
Max Perlich (Blow)
Richard Riehle (Office Space)
Carlos Jacott (3rd Rock From The Sun)
Nancy Lenehan (Two Guys and a Girl)
Jason Hall (American Sniper)
K. todd Freeman (The Dark Knight)
Fab Filippo (Guidestones)
Jeremy Roberts (The Mask)
Eliza Dushku (Tru Calling)
Ian Abercrombie (Army of Darkness)
Harry Groener (About Schmidt)
Jack Plotnick (Rubber)
Nicole Bilderback (Dark Angel)
Jeff Kober (New Girl)
Harris Yulin (Training Day)
Dominic Keating (Star Trek: Enterprise)
Michael Cudlitz (The Walking Dead)
Alexis Denisof (Dollhouse)
Christian Clemenson (Lois & Clark)
Ron Rogge (Power Rangers Lightspeed Rescue)
Ethan Erickson (Jawbreaker)
Andy Umberger (Deja Vu)
Katharine Towne (Evolution)
Lindsay Crouse (The Insider)
Phina Oruche (The Forsaken)
Adam Kaufman (Taken)
Walter Jones (Mighty Morphin Power Rangers)
Kal Penn (Van Wilder)
Bailey Chase (Longmire)
Leonard Roberts (Heroes)
Andy Hallett (Chance)
Doug Jones (Hellboy)
George Hertzberg (Too Much Magic)
Alastair Duncan (The Batman)
Rob Benedict (Birds of Prey)
Erica Luttrell (Lost Girl)
Kathryn Joosten (desperate Housewives)
Connor O’Farrell (Lie To Me)
Rudolf Martin (Swordfish)
Tom Lenk (The Cabin In The Woods)
Charlie Weber (Gacy)
Clare Kramer (Bring it On)
Ravil Isyanov (Alias)
Amy Adams (Man of Steel)
Brian Tee (Jurassic World)
Kali Rocha (Buried)
Kevin Weisman (Alias)
Abraham Benrubi (Open Range)
Cynthia LaMontagne (That 70s Show)
Oliver Muirhead (The Social Network)
Shonda Farr (Crossroads)
Adam Busch (Sugar & Spice)
Joel Grey (Cabaret)
Karim Prince (Mighty Morphin Alien Rangers)
Wade Williams (Gangster Squad)
Todd Stashwick (The Originals)
Amber Tamblyn (Two and a Half Men)
Jordan Belfi (Surrogates)
Mageina Tovah (Spider-Man 2 & 3)
Ivana Milicevic (Casino Royale)
Lee Garlington (Flashforward)
Jan Hoag (Scream Queens)
Nicole hiltz (Smallville)
Alexandra Breckenridge (The Walking Dead)
D.B. Woodside (24)
Zachery Ty Bryan (The Fast and the Furious 3)
Sarah Hagan (Freaks and Geeks)
Jonathan M. Woodward (Firefly)
Stacey Scowley (The Brotherhood 2)
Felicia Day (The Guild)
Megalyn Echikunwoke (Arrow)
Ashanti (Resident Evil: Extinction)
Indigo (Broken City)
Nathan Fillion (Firefly)
Dania Ramirez (Heroes)
Julia Ling (Chuck)

Buffy The Vampire Slayer is one of the wittiest, most well developed, and consistent cult fantasy shows on television. Unlike other shows in the genre, it has been able to showcase a wide balance between fantastic character development, humor, topical plotlines, heart wrenching drama, science fiction, and horror- a horn a plenty of styles all in one 44 min episode. While entertaining, everyone probably can’t relate to the technobabble machinations of a Star Trek episode, or the convoluted paranoia of and X-Files episode, but we all went through high school and whether you were average, popular, or an outcast, we know, we remember, all too well, the emotional highs and lows of growing up. Its something everyone can relate to, and its the central fire that keeps Buffy grounded.


But, Buffy began as a humble mid season replacement on a non entity network, and its early days when it was gaining its footing, starting its mythology, seeing how far they could tweek the drama and the horror with a minuscule budget… well, its not nearly the powerhouse it would quickly become in its second season. There are of course, subtle signs of the drama and humor to come, little hints that it was more than a teen show with vampires. And, honestly, if you were going to try and impress someone who had never seen The X-Flies, you certainly wouldn’t show them the first season without saying, “It gets much better.”

KEY EPISODES ARE –


Episode 1: Welcome to the Hellmouth- Buffy Summers, a high school sophomore, transfers to Sunnydale High. There she meets her “Watcher” and learns she cannot escape her true destiny.— Like most pilots, its all about introductions- Buffy the reluctant Slayer, her pals and soon to be Scoobies, spazz with a heart of gold Xander, shy brain Willow, her stuffy Watcher Giles, the mysterious Angel, and the snobbish beauty queen Cordelia. Also, of course, establishes the first main villain, The Master, and the Hellmouth, the demonic portal that would provide the show with its main mythological device keeping the town of Sunnydale infested with all manner of creatures for Buffy to slay

Episode 2: The Harvest:- A Stranger named Angel tells Buffy that if she does not stop the Harvest, the Hellmouth will open and the Master roam free.— Whereas the first episode was focused on introducing the characters and didn’t have much room for tension or action, The Harvest provides a look at Buffy having to accept her role as Slayer as she realizes the deadly consequences if she abandons her destiny.

Episode 5 : Never Kill a Boy on the First Date:

While awaiting the arrival of a warrior vampire called the Anointed One, Buffy’s big date at the Bronze ends with an assault on a funeral home. — Once again, showing Buffy’s attempts to balance a normal life with her secret life as the Slayer. While a little weak and cornball, it also manages to show the villain thread well, how most main Buffy villains will have some sort of evolution, twists and turns to keep the viewer guessing.

Episode 7: Angel: A moment of passion turns to terror as Buffy discovers Angel’s true identity and learns about the Gypsy curse that has haunted him for almost 100 years.— Probably the most weak, ill-defined character early on, this episode finally showcased more about Angel and gave his character some considerable fleshing out. Taking into account the large part his character would play in the Buffyverse, and the leaps and bounds of change he would undergo, his affect on all the characters, particularly Buffy, in one way or another, it makes this one of the seasons better episodes.

Episode 11: Out of Mind, Out of Sight: As Cordelia prepares for Sunnydale High’s May Queen competition, an invisible force starts attacking her closest friends.— Another of the seasons better episodes, and a clever look an always pertinent issue, showing yet another sympathetic foe, those fringe kids who are always ignored, sometimes until it is too late.

Episode 12: Prophecy Girl:

As the Spring Fling dance approaches, Giles discovers an ancient book foretelling the Slayers death at the hands of The Master.— While a tad abrupt, this finale serves up everything one wants, tension, conflict, and turns you don’t quite see coming. Pivotal in the series for all players, but mainly Buffy, showing that she isn’t just an invulnerable buttkicker able to save the day alone, but through banding together her and the Scoobies will take on many a Big Bad to come.

Season 2 of Buffy the Vampire Slayer is quite possibly the best season of the bunch. Season 2 is by definition, where things get darker and more complex, this was the season that really made Buffy an unpredictably smart series.

The season opens with ‘When She Was Bad’ which deals with the fallout of Buffy’s momentary death in the previous year one finale; this episode is appropriately handled and sees Buffy acting rather out of character after returning from her summer away from Sunnydale. The preceding episodes are a fun affair and help the viewer to settle back into the rhythm of the series with various episodes focusing upon certain characters.

The ‘Big Bads’ of the season appear early on and come in the form of Drusilla and Spike, the former being a rather off-her-rocker vampire and the latter a bleached, leather wearing, cocky undead Englishman! As villains they are a lot of fun and help to shape season 2 as something unique and well constructed. However, come the end of the year things are considerably shaken up in terms of ‘the Big Bads’, with the appearance of Angelus.

Willow, Xander and Giles all find themselves venturing into new territory: dating! Cordelia continues to redeem herself and becomes a fully fledged scoobygang member, whilst Buffy and Angel undergo many changes to their relationship which is mostly the driving force of the season. By the middle of the season the episodes gradually become darker and a more coherent storyarc begins to emerge, starting with the events of ‘Surprise (Part 1)’ which culminate in the emotional and incredibly shocking ‘Innocence’ (Part 2). Said episodes are some of the best in the history of the series and set in motion events that help to lead to the end of the season. The circumstances surrounding this two parter does literally change everything once established between Buffy and Angel; and brings into question their future. The continuity, witty one liners, oblique use of language does continue into this season and helps to boost the chemistry between the actors as they discuss, for example the oddness of some TV movies and sore thumbs. These subtle touches give the season a vibrancy and kooky edge; what makes Buffy such an enjoyable show is the warmth and heart it retains, mostly provided by the actors but also by the wonderfully consistent writing.

The two part finale ‘Becoming’ is well set up as a consequence of the episode ‘I Only Have Eyes For You’, which happens to be beautifully moving and tragic respectively. The complexity of the Angelus arc presented here really sets up and supports the actions that lead to the occurrences of the finale. ‘Becoming’ part 1 & 2 with all it’s flashback goodness brings about tumultuous change and throws one through the emotional wringer all the while its still surprising, sad and gut wrenching upon each rewatch. The issues dealt with this season are far more adult and dark than is the usual, and in turn it delivers a wonderfully realized arc which never fails to amaze.


This third season of Buffy the Vampire Slayer contains some of my favourite episodes from the entire run of the show and also has the fewest offbeat episodes. This year Buffy and the gang are in their final year of high school but living on the Hellmouth is never easy and in addition to the usual demons and vampires they must deal with the schemes of the Watchers Council, a new slayer and a politician after even more power.

Buffy has really found its feet with this season and I would say that it is this year that the show reaches its peak. All the regular cast members give their usual brilliant performances but the season is really stolen by the new cast members, specifically Eliza Dushku as Faith the new Slayer and Harry Groener as the eccentrically evil Mayor Wilkins, who is probably my favourite of all the Buffy villains.

It is difficult to choose favorite episodes from this season as it includes so many great ones. `Bad Candy’, `Amends’, `Earshot’ and the two part season finally `Graduation’ are all excellent episodes being both funny and enthralling but my favorite episode has to be `Lover’s Walk’ where a lovesick Spike returns to Sunnydale after breaking up with Drusilla in order to find a way to get her back. James Marsters is truly excellent in this episode and livens up the series brilliantly. Another couple of episodes of note are `The Wish’ and `Doppelgangland’ both of which involve a parallel universe where vampires have taken over and feature a vamped up Willow, brilliantly portrayed by Alyson Hannigan who seems to enjoy the role immensely. Although none of the episodes could truly be considered awful, `Gingerbread’ and `The Zeppo’ are the weakest episodes of this season and are slightly painful to watch in places.

Overall this season is truly great, with brilliant writing and a plot that never ceases to be in turns exciting, funny and touching.

With the loss of David Boreanaz and Charisma Carpenter to the spin-off show, “Angel”, there were voids to be filled in this, the first season out of high school, and Marc Blucas and Emma Caulfield suitably obliged. The fragmentation of the Scooby Gang was for many the core reason why Season Four didn’t match the heights of the previous three: nobody seemed to care enough about each other any more. With Giles out of work, Xander flitting from one deadbeat job to another, and Buffy and Willow settling in to life on campus, there was concern that the old gang would never get back together.


A big risk was taken in introducing a more sci-fi element with the arrival of a secret government demon-hunting operation. But there’s a big difference from other genre shows: the Initiative was never in control of its actions. And that’s the gist of the season: that Buffy and her traditional methods will always be superior, and that it’s through her skills and her friends that evil is defeated, not bureaucracy. Which is why there’s no big finish in episode 22 (the grand climax happens in episode 21), because the most important storyline is about the reaffirmation of friendships, demonstrated in the most bizarre way imaginable in an episode composed almost entirely of dream sequences.


There are some classics (the Emmy-nominated “Hush” was possibly the boldest piece of television attempted before “The Body” the following year). And in the final scene of the season, we get a great setting-up of what’s to come, without knowing any specific details. All in all, a season that left a few minor gripes, but which in the overall scheme of things, has continued the journey of life into adulthood. Now they’re all supposed to be grown up, but the future still holds a great deal of uncertainty, and that can only be good for the show.

Although Season 5  still has comedic moments, it also has many more serious moments. Not to spoil it for those who have not seen the series yet, two major deaths rock the Sunnydale Slayage Crew. These are excellently handled, and in no way seem like they are tying off loose ends.

The episodes are excellent. From fighting Dracula, to multiple Xanders. From a new sister, to an old foe swapping sides. This season is excellent. the first disc houses such gems as the introduction of Dawn, without any back story or any clues into why she is there. These facts are revealed slowly through the next disc, with amusing storylines for Spike, clearly an excellent addition to the principal cast. Anya also comes into her own, and becomes revels in the joys of capitalism.

Through the next disc a departure of a relatively new character, Riley, hurts Buffy tremendously, whilst the appearance of a troll lightens the mood considerably. The fourth disc includes the fun episode where the Watcher’s Council return to Sunnydale, and reveal a shocking secret about the main enemy of this series. Spike also has a choice to make, whether to fall back into the arms of his old flame, Drusilla, or to move on and persue his newest conquest, a source of exasperation for Buffy.

The fifth disc is a solemn affair, with the death of a principal cast member, who had been with Buffy from the beginning. As Buffy and her ‘Scoobies’ attempt to cope, the attacks on them by the villain of the series grow more violent and frequent, leaving a dissuaded Buffy sure that she cannot beat the villain. When his new enemy learns of an importance in the Scooby gang, and this member of the gang get captured, Buffy goes into meltdown. With the help of Willow, Buffy recovers and faces the most terrifying villain ever in the history of Buffy The Vampire Slayer, with a conclusion that is heart wrenching.


“The Gift”, the season five finale, ended with Buffy dead and buried after battling deranged fallen goddess Glory. Dying is kind of old hat for Buffy, and I don’t think I’m giving too much away by revealing that the show’s title character quickly gets over the whole death thing. Although the ensuing gang of biker demons is corny, I thought her return from the grave in the feature-length “Bargaining” hit all the right notes. Her reappearance is heartbreaking and almost horrifying, and it avoids undermining the events that concluded the previous season.

Rather than just toss her back in this mortal coil as if she’d never left, Buffy is distant and depressed, not quite the elated response her friends were expecting to see. The opening of the season offers an evenhanded blend of humor and drama, particularly the early escapades of the Troika. The all-nerd supersquad — robotics whiz Warren (Adam Busch), clumsy sorceror-lite Jonathan (Danny Strong), and summoner Andrew (Tom Lenk). They added a well-needed dose of geeky comedy to the season, which made the bitter pill of the agony Buffy and friends endure later on easier to swallow.

The darker spin the three of them eventually take also resonates more having seen several episodes worth of their giddiness at being supervillains. I also thought the aftermath of Buffy’s return, seen in “After Life”, “Flooded”, and “Life Serial”, worked well as she tried to find her place in the world (and her friend’s worlds) after being plucked from the afterlife. These episodes also manage to strike that perfect balance between humor and drama.

Another early highlight is “Tabula Rasa”, where a spell gone awry robs the Scoobies of their memories.  Of special mention from this chunk of the season, of course, is the musical episode “Once More with Feeling”. The version presented here is the original broadcast, a few minutes lengthier than your average Buffy installment. Although the concept of characters in an established drama singing and dancing for an hour screams ‘gimmick’, it’s not a standalone episode, tying in heavily to the previous episodes of the season and setting up some of what would soon follow. The songs are surprisingly good, particularly impressive considering that they were written by someone without much of a musical background.Image result for buffy once more with feeling

The season closes out with a series of strong episodes. “Hell’s Bells” features the chaos of a wedding between a human raised in a dysfunctional family and his millennia-old former vengeance demon fiancee, the aftermath of which is explored in “Entropy”.

One of the season’s best is “Normal Again”, which questions the reality of what we’ve seen for the past six seasons, and Buffy’s assault on her possibly-delusional friends and family is as chilling as anything seen up to that point on the series. The darkness pervasive throughout much of the season culminates in “Seeing Red”, which has two monstrous turning points. Its fatal closing events lead into the three-episode arc that rounds out the season. Similar to Angelus’ appearances on both Buffy and Angel, the immeasurably powerful antagonist in these final episodes tear down the main characters.

In its final season, Buffy the Vampire Slayer issued a mission statement you might not expect from a series that’s been on the air for seven years: go back to the beginning. After a foray at college and a year spent toiling away in the working world, Buffy’s going back to high school. Several years after its destruction at the hands…or giant coiled tail, whatever…of the ascended Mayor Wilkins, Sunnydale High has been rebuilt from the ground up. The Hellmouth beneath the school happens to lurk directly below the office of Principal Robin Wood (D.B. Woodside), who’s harboring some sort of dark secret that may or may not work to Buffy’s favor. Anyway, Wood continually stumbles upon Buffy as she spirits Dawn off to her first day of school as a freshman and ensuring both Summers girls make the most of the lovingly-crafted Sunnydale High set, Wood offers Buffy a job as a part-time counselor. Holed up in the bowels of Sunnydale High is Spike, who’s been driven mad by a combination of his newly-acquired soul and an entity that’s been haunting him, one that’s soon going to expand its grasp to the rest of the Scooby Gang and the world at large.

These early episodes really do capture the feel of the first few seasons of the series, a very welcome change after the grim year that came before it. This is one of the stronger opening salvos of Buffy. “Him” is played pretty much for laughs, revolving around a football player whose letter jacket makes him irresistible to the fairer sex, compelling Dawn, Buffy, Willow, and Anya to take drastic and wholly over-the-top measures to win his complete adoration.

Three of the season’s best episodes run back-to-back. “Same Time, Same Place” follows Willow’s return to the group, still reeling from the near-apocalyptic events of the previous year and further disheartened when she’s apparently abandoned by her friends. Buffy and company really are there for Willow, but the problem is that there are kind of two separate and distinct “there”s. The cannibalistic Gnarl is one of the most effectively creepy creatures of the show’s entire run, and his confrontation with Willow is unsettling and horrifying…and I mean that in the best possible way. “Help” quickly follows, chronicling Buffy’s quest to save the life of an awkward, introverted poet who foretells her own death.

Although I really like all of the first batch of episodes, this season has two particularly strong stand-outs. Following the excellent “Same Time, Same Place” and “Help” is “Selfless”, which features Anya returning to form as a mass-murdering vengeance demon, a decision that awes her demonic coworkers and conflicts her former friends as Buffy must make a difficult decision. The episode makes use of flashbacks from several vastly different time periods and juggles drastically different tones. We see what led young Aud to become the vengeful Anyanka in a hysterical glimpse back at her life with her wench-drenched, troll-hating brute of a husband, Olaf. There’s also a flashback to “Once More, With Feeling”, complete with a new musical number, followed by a brutal, brilliant cut to the present.

The other standout is “Conversations with Dead People”, an inventively structured episode penned by four different writers. The title is a decent enough synopsis, as a number of characters communicate in varying forms with the dearly departed. Buffy allows herself to be psychoanalyzed by a recently-risen Psych major, Dawn is haunted by a poltergeist that takes on a shockingly familiar image, Willow is delivered a message from a lost love one, Spike goes out on the town, and the remnants of last year’s nerdy Troika return to Sunnydale.

In general, season seven feels like Joss Whedon and company had a clear beginning and a clear ending. The Finale does give the show a nice ending, but is left open should the show ever return in any format.

REVIEW: POWER RANGERS – SEASON 8-12

MAIN CAST

Michael Chaturantabut (The Time Machine)
Sean CW Johnson (My Little Eye)
Alison MaCiinis (Bewitched)
Keith Robinson (Dear John)
Sasha Craig (Dark Wolf)
Monica Louwerens (The Vampire Diaries)
Ron Rogge (That 70s Show)
Jennifer L. Yen (Dark Assassin)
Rhett Fisher (Micro Mini Kids)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Neil Kaplan (Digimon)
David Lodge (Naruto)
Ken Merckx (Orgazmo)
Rachel Koda (Birds of Prey)
Hal England (The Bonfire of The Vanities)
Bob Papenbrook (Jeepers Creepers 2)
David Leitch (V For Vendetta)
Diane Salinger (Batman Returns)
Archie Kao (Heroes)
Michael Forest (Cast Away)
Vaughn Armstrong (Star Trek: Enterprise)
Shannon Welles (Inception)
Jeff henry (In Pursuit)
Justin Ross Martin (Scream Bloody Murder)
Danny Slavin (The Boy Next Door)
Cerina Vincent (Cabin Fever)
Valerie Vernon (Power Rangers Time Force)
Jennifer Burns (Nightfall)

The series takes place in the fictitious city of Mariner Bay, California, which was built on an ancient demon burial ground. When the demons were accidentally released from their tomb in the desert, they threaten to destroy Mariner Bay. Therefore, a government organization called Lightspeed Rescue, headed by Captain William Mitchell, recruits four civilians and his own daughter to defend the city. Each of the four civilians chosen had a special area of expertise: Carter Grayson, the Red Lightspeed Ranger, was a fire fighter in the local fire department; Chad Lee, the Blue Lightspeed Ranger, worked as a lifeguard and marine animal trainer at a local aquarium and a marine amusement park; Joel Rawlings, the Green Lightspeed Ranger, was a stunt pilot; Kelsey Winslow, the Yellow Lightspeed Ranger, was an extreme sports athlete; and Dana Mitchell, the Captain’s daughter, who agreed to become the Pink Lightspeed Ranger, was a nurse and practiced medical arts. The five Power Rangers were aided by a team of scientists and engineers led by Miss Angela Fairweather, and operated out of the Lightspeed Aquabase, an underwater military compound that also deters the hydrophobic demons from directly attacking the base.

The five Rangers would be joined by Captain Mitchell’s (long thought to be dead) son, Ryan Mitchell, who would become the Titanium Ranger. Together, the six Rangers would prevail against the demon forces time after time, culminating in a final showdown where, in the Power Rangers tradition, all of the Zords and much of the weapons and other equipment that was used by the Power Rangers over the series was destroyed. In addition, Lightspeed Rescue featured a reunion reappearance of characters from Power Rangers Lost Galaxy, when the villainess Trakeena comes to Earth to destroy it and the Lightspeed Rangers team up with the Galaxy Rangers.

MAIN CAST

Jason Faunt (Totem)
Michael Copon (The Scorpion King 2)
Kevin Kleinberg (Ethan Mao)
Deborah Estelle Philips (The Cavanaughs)
Erin Cahill (Skinwalker Ranch)
Vernon wells (Mad Max 2)
Kate Sheldon (The Chronicle TV)
Edward Albert (Beauty and The Beast 1987)
Dan Southworth (Mortal Kombat: Legacy)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Roy Werner (Weeds)
Brianne Brozey (Digimon)
Douglas Fisher (Intolerable Cruelty)
Britt Robinson (The Secret Circle)
Bob Papenbrook (Jeepers Creepers 2)
Ken Merckx (Orgazmo)
Jordan Belfi (Surrogates)
Lacey Beeman (American Pie 2)
Minae Noji (Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles)
Eiko Nijo (Eagle Eye)
Michael Chaturantabut (The Time Machine)
Sean CW Johnson (My Little Eye)
Alison MaCiinis (Bewitched)
Keith Robinson (Dear John)
Sasha Craig (Dark Wolf)
Monica Louwerens (The Vampire Diaries)
Ron Rogge (That 70s Show)
Jennifer L. Yen (Dark Assassin)

In the year 3000, Time Force is a police agency that deals with the crimes of mutants, outcasts of society who have developed super powers. Ransik, one of the most dangerous mutants, is arrested and sentenced to life for his crimes including murder and the plan to travel back in time to take over the world. However, after sentencing, he escapes and manages to go back in time to the year 2001, but seemingly kills Alex, the Red Time Force Ranger, in the process. Alex’s fiance Jen, as well as Time Force members Lucas, Katie, and Trip, decide to break protocol and go back in time after Ransik. However, upon arriving in the year 2001, they find that the rest of the Time Force morphers are locked, and cannot be used until someone with Alex’s DNA uses the Red Ranger morpher. To that end, they find Alex’s ancestor Wes Collins, who unlock the morphers, and then helps them battle Ransik’s army of mutants as the Time Force Power Rangers, though Wes and Jen, upset over Alex’s death, don’t see eye-to-eye initially.

As Ransik continues his quest for total domination of Earth, archaeologists discover a box that, unknown to them, contains the Quantum Ranger morpher and powers. Both Ransik and the Rangers are well aware of its contents, and make attempts to retrieve it. The box eventually falls into the hand of Eric Myers, a member of the Silver Guardians, the city’s police force managed by Wes’ father, Mr. Collins and Wes’s old rival. Eric activates the power, and becomes the Quantum Ranger. Eric, however, becomes cocky and irresponsible with his power, forcing Wes and the Rangers to try and get it back from him; however, Eric defeated them and he kept his powers. Soon he learns the responsibility of using the Quantum Powers and becomes the leader of the Silver Guardians as the Quantum Ranger.

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Eventually, the Rangers begin receiving help from an unseen ally from the future in the form of the Time Shadow Megazord. Soon, this ally arrives in 2001 and reveals himself to be Alex, stating that he is alive because something the Rangers have done in the present has altered the future, and that he has returned to fix it. Alex reveals to Wes what was meant to happen in the original timeline and encourages him to take action to set it right. Wes reluctantly agrees, and relinquishes control of his morpher to Alex so he can take care of his father’s business while his father lays ill. Alex then briefly leads the team, but his relationship with the Rangers becomes strained when they realize Alex has changed. Alex eventually realizes that Wes is the true Red Ranger and, having nearly destroyed his relationship with Jen, returns the morpher.

When Ransik makes his final assault on Earth, with a powerful army in large amounts Alex orders the Rangers to return to the future, for fear that if they hesitate, they may not be able to return at all. Wes, however, would have to remain behind. The Rangers refuse, and fight Ransik alongside Wes, who, knowing his friends can’t stay, forces them into returning to the year 3000, leaving only himself and Eric to stop Ransik, or die trying. When the Rangers return to the future, they learn that Silver Hills was saved, but Wes died in the process. The Rangers are ordered to have their minds erased of their memories from 2001, and encouraged to resume their lives. Angered, Jen returns Alex’s engagement ring, and the Rangers return to 2001 to help Wes and Eric. During the final battle, Ransik accidentally injures his daughter Nadira and, traumatized over nearly killing her, surrenders to the Rangers. Right before the Rangers return Ransik and Nadira to the future, Wes and Jen, having soothed over their initially rocky relationship, profess their love for one another. As the Rangers depart, Wes stays behind with Eric to co-command the Silver Guardians.

CAST

Ricardo Medina Jr. (Bad Blood)
Alyson Sullivan (Helll Ride)
Phillip Jeanmarie (Passions)
Jessica Rey (Rules of Engagement)
Jack Guzman (Chuck)
Ann Marie Crouch (Bar Flies)
Ilia Volok (Mission Impossible 4)
Sin Wong (Miss Universe)
Philip Andrew (Dead Scared)

Image result for POWER RANGERS WILD FORCERECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Wendell wright (Highlander: The Series)
Sandra McCoy (Cry Wolf)
Bob Papenbrook (Jeepers Creepers 2)
Jason Faunt (Totem)
Billy Forester (Big Bad Beetleborgs)
Ken Merckx (Masked Rider)
J.D. Hall (Undercover Brother)
Brancombe Richmond (The Scorpion King)
Michael Copon (The Scorpion King 2)
Kevin Kleinberg (Ethan Mao)
Deborah Estelle Philips (The Cavanaughs)
Erin Cahill (Skinwalker Ranch)
Vernon wells (Mad Max 2)
Kate Sheldon (The Chronicle TV)
Dan Southworth (Mortal Kombat: Legacy)
Jason David Frank (The One Warrior)
Sean CW Johnson (My Little Eye)
Christopher Khayman Lee (That 70s Show)
Jason Narvy (Masked Rider)
Paul Schrier (Wicked Games)
Danny Salvin (The Boy Next Door)
Austin St. John (Footsteps)
Selwyn Ward (A Simple Promise)
Catherine Sutherland (The Cell)
Walter Jones (Buffy)
Ryan Hansen (2 Broke Girls)

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The series follows the adventure of Cole Evans, who had been staying with a tribe in a jungle for many years, as he tries to find his destiny in the fictitious town of Turtle Cove. He encounters the Animarium, a place that many believed to be a fairy tale. He joins four others who had a common path to become the new leader of the Wild Force Power Rangers.Image result for power rangers wild forceThe Animarium is an island that floats in the sky. It is shaped like a turtle and is the home of the Wild Zords and the Princess Shayla, the Rangers’ mentor. (It is unclear how the Rangers travel between the Animarium and the Earth surface, but in one of the last episodes Merrick and Kite are teleported onto the Animarium, so presumably they used the same teleportation throughout the rest of the series.)

The Power Rangers use their powers to defeat the forces of the Orgs, led by one Master Org. As Cole was fond of other animals, he was shocked to discover that the Orgs were heartless monsters. As the series continues, he finds out the truth about his real parents: his parents, Richard and Elizabeth Evans, were professors at Turtle Cove University, along with a family friend, Viktor Adler. When they were sent to the jungle for research, they discover the remains of Master Org, in which a jealous Adler consumes in order to exact revenge on Richard, who had proposed to Elizabeth before he could. However, Adler goes insane, and kills both Richard and Elizabeth. For a while, their newborn son, Cole, was also presumed dead.

In addition to the annual team-up episodes, Power Rangers Wild Force also had a special episode commemorating it as the tenth incarnation, Forever Red, by having Cole team up with the nine Red Rangers before him, (in order of incarnations, Jason Lee Scott, Aurico, Tommy Oliver, Theodore J. Jarvis Johnson, Andros, Leo Corbett, Carter Grayson, Wesley Collins and Eric Myers), in order to prevent the remaining generals of the Machine Empire from unearthing and reactivating Lord Zedd’s zord, Serpentera, which had been left buried on the moon

CAST

Pua Magasiva (30 Days of Night)
Sally Martin (Wendy Wu)
Glenn McMillan (Zenon: Z3)
Jason Chan (Stealth)
Adam Tuominen (Underbelly)
Jorge Vargas (Arrow)
Katrina Browne (Young Hercules)
Katrina Devine (Xena)
Grant McFarland (Hercules: TLJ)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Megan Nicol (Xena)
Peter Rowley (The Tommyknockers)
Craig Parker (Reign)
Bruce Hopkins (Housebound)
Jason Hoyte (We’re Here to Help)
John Leigh (The Frighteners)
Kim Michalis (Toy Love)
Paul Norell (River Queen)
Daniel Sing (Shortland Street)
Roseanne Ling (The Dark Horse)
James Gaylyn (Avatar)
Ismay Johnston (This Is Not a Love Story)
Michael Hurst (Maddigan’s Quest)
Brett Stewart (Everything We Loved)
Joel Tobeck (Spartacus: War of The Damned)
Ian Hughes (Bliss)
Jaime Passier-Armstrong (Jubilee)
Angela Bloomfield (Bonjour Timothy)
Robbie Magasiva (Wentworth Prison)
Geoff Dolan (Gloss)
James Napier Robertson (The Tribe)

MV5BMjM2OTMxMTgwOV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwNjQ0NzcxMTE@__V1_Shane, Tori and Dustin are three students at the Wind Ninja Academy. Their less than stellar performance gets them the occasional lecture from their Sensei. One day, the academy was attacked by Lothor, a banished ninja master who has returned to capture all ninja students. Shane, Tori and Dustin are the only three remaining students, and along with Sensei, who has been transformed into a guinea pig by Lothor, and his son Cam, retreat into the underground Ninja Ops. There, the three are given morphers, which allow them to transform into Wind Rangers and protect the city of Blue Bay Harbor from Lothor’s forces.When Lothor demonstrates his ability to make his monsters grow into giants, the Rangers unleash the Ninja Zords, which could combine into the Storm Megazord and destroy monsters with its arsenal of Power Spheres. Lothor again raises the stakes by sending his new allies to battle the Wind Rangers – the Thunder Rangers, Blake and Hunter, who had their own Thunder Zords. The Thunder Rangers are on a mission to destroy the Wind Rangers’ Sensei, who they believed to be responsible for their parent’s death, but a visit from the afterlife from Blake and Hunter’s parents show them the truth – that it was Lothor who killed them. The Thunder Rangers see the error of their ways and join the Wind Rangers in the battle against Lothor, bringing the Thunder and Ninja Zords together to form the Thunderstorm Megazord.When the Rangers lose their powers, Cam uses the Scroll of Time to travel into the past and retrieve the Samurai Amulet, a family heirloom in the possession of his late mother. Cam travel back to present day and uses the amulet to become the Green Samurai Ranger, armed with the Samurai Star. A lost scroll would later reveal to Cam the Lightning Riff Blaster, which could summon the Mighty Mammoth Zord.

Lothor attempts to open the Abyss of Evil and release its evil into the world. In a final battle, he steals all of the Rangers’ powers, but is defeated by their ninja skills and thrown into the abyss. After the battle the powerless Rangers became ninja teachers at Sensei’s Ninja Academy.

CAST

James Napier Robertson (The Tribe)
Kevin Duhaney (Honey)
Jason David Frank (The One Warrior)
Emma Lahana (Alien Agent)
Jeffrey Parazzo (Flashpoint)
Lathan Gaines (King Kong)
Miriama Smith (Filthy Rich)
Katrina Devine (Xena)
Tom Hern (Maddigan’s Quest)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST STARS

Ismay Johnston (This Is Not a Love Story)
James Gaylyn (Wendy Wu)
Morgan Reese Fairhead (Xena)
Stephan Hall (Killing Time)
Dwayne Cameron (The Locals)
Stuart Devenie (Jack of All Trades)
Susan Brady (Hercules: TLJ)
Cameron Rhodes (Deathgasm)
Kelson Henderson (Ash vs Evil Dead)
Joel Tobeck (Spartacus: War of The Damned)
Anthony Ray Parker (The Matrix)
Antonia Prebble (Westside)
Peter Daube (The Warrior’s Way)
Geoff Dolan (Wendy Wu)
Pua Magasiva (30 Days of Night)
Sally Martin (Wendy Wu)
Glenn McMillan (Zenon: Z3)
Jason Chan (Stealth)
Adam Tuominen (Underbelly)
Jorge Vargas (Arrow)
Katrina Browne (Young Hercules)
Grant McFarland (Hercules: TLJ)
Neill Rea (Spooked)

A soccer player, a computer expert, a singer, an artist, and a teacher with a long history of such situations join forces to become Power Rangers and help save the Earth from the scheming of Mesagog, a dinosauric villain who wishes to eradicate all human life and return Earth to the age of dinosaurs.

In this season, Tommy Oliver, from Mighty Morphin Power Rangers to Power Rangers Turbo fame, returns as a paleontology professor in Reefside, California. When he is assigned three detention students, Conner, Ethan, and Kira, they end up finding the Dino Gems, paving the way for them to become the Dino Rangers. Conner gains the power of the Tyrannozord (based on the Tyrannosaurus), as well as super-speed; Ethan gains the power of the Tricerazord (based on the Triceratops), as well as the ability to make his skin invulnerable; and Kira gains the power of the Pterazord (based on the Pteranodon), as well as a sonic scream. Tommy (known often as Dr. O) himself once again becomes a Power Ranger by joining the team as the Black Dino Ranger with the power of invisibility, and they are also later joined by Trent Mercer as the White Dino Ranger, with the powers of invisibility and camouflage, respectively. Trent must deal with the inner struggle of good and evil, as Tommy himself once had to do as the evil Green Ranger, due to the fact that he gained his powers from a raw Dino Gem in Mesogog’s lab, with the powers originally intended to be Mesogog’s. Mesogog is in fact, Trent’s adopted father Anton Mercer, who, in a faulty lab experiment, began to mutate into Mesogog. Trent later sides with good and saves his father from the mutation.hqdefaultDuring the course of the series, the team adds to its arsenal Zords, Cephalozord (based on the Pachycephalosaurus), Dimetrozord (based on the Dimetrodon), Stegozord (based on the Stegosaurus), Parasaurzord (based on the Parasaurolophus), and Ankylozord (based on the Ankylosaurus). The Stegozord later combines with Trent’s zord, the Dragozord (based on the Tupuxuara), to form the Dino Stegozord. Tommy pilots the Brachiozord (based on the Brachiosaurus), the carrier for all the other Zords. Conner is also given the power to become the Triassic Ranger, and pilots the Mezodon Rover/Megazord (based on the Styracosaurus), which can combine with the Cephalo, Dimetro, Parasaur and Ankylozords to form the Triceramax Megazord.At the end of the series, the Rangers destroy Mesagog with their raw Dino Gem power, but the gems are burned out in the process. Just before this, they are also forced to sacrifice all the Zords in their last battle with Zeltrax, one of Mesogog’s strongest minions.hqdefaultIt’s brilliant that Shout Factory puts multiple seasons in one with big set, all five seasons are enjoyable, even Wild Force, which is classed as a weaker season. I could sit and watch these over and over again