25 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS REVIEW: HOW I MET YOUR MOTHER – THE FINAL PAGE – PART 1 & 2

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MAIN CAST

Josh Radnor (Mercy Street)
Jason Segel (The Muppets)
Cobie Smulders (Agents of SHIELD)
Neil Patrick Harris (Starship Troopers)
Alyson Hannigan (Date Movie)
Bob Saget (Full House)

GUEST CAST

Ellen D. Williams (Bskets)
Seth Green (Family Guy)
Peter Gallagher (Ameircan Beauty)
Alexis Denisof (Angel)
Marshall Manesh (The Brink)

PART 1

Ted’s new building is set to open and he invites his favorite architecture professor, Vinick, from his college days to the grand opening. The group says that Ted has put the professor in his “pit”, in that he has obsessed over him and hasn’t let him go since college. This is further confirmed when the professor declines the invite. Ted takes the group to Wesleyan, intending to unleash his wrath on Vinick. After hearing one of his inspiring lectures, Ted craves Vinick’s approval and shows him a sketch of the GNB building. Vinick is unimpressed and Ted brings a 3crD model, but Vinick views the attempt as pathetic. Ted realizes he has to move on.

Marshall and Lily explain they are in someone else’s pit. Daryl, a friend from college, became obsessed with the two, causing them to feel uncomfortable. They run into Daryl at Wesleyan, having formed a company selling hacky sacks named after the three of them. He invites them to his house; Marshall and Lily fear they will be killed, but find that Daryl’s company has become successful, and they unknowingly reject his offer to give them $100,000, claiming it was partly their idea. Daryl seems to accept that they don’t want any part of his life.

Marshall calls “Jinx” on Barney when they utter the same phrase simultaneously. Future Ted explains the group takes the game very seriously; Barney had previously broken the jinx out of mockery, but later had been hit by a bus, causing everyone to follow the rules whenever they’re jinxed. The group relishes Barney’s silence. Robin has someone in her pit, Patrice, and plans to fire her for getting together with the man she loves. She moves on and lets Patrice stay. Barney tricks Ted into saying his name by showing him a wedding ring, breaking the jinx. Barney explains that he’s serious and makes Ted promise not to tell anyone he plans to propose to Patrice.

PART 2

Ted’s new building is opening that night, but he is distracted by his promise to Barney; he winds up asking Robin to be his date to the gala when he loses the nerve to tell her. When Ted meets up with Robin, he tells her. Robin claims to be fine with Barney’s plans, she admits that she has still loved him for a long time, but cannot keep chasing after Barney if he will never feel the same way about her. Finally letting go of his pursuit of her, Ted takes Robin to the WWN building where Barney intends to propose to Patrice. Marshall and Lily are excited to have their first evening away from baby Marvin, thanks to her father Mickey taking care of him. Marshall hears about Barney and the two end up missing Marvin. They decide they are more content spending the night back home with him.

When Robin heads to the roof of the building, she sees no sign of Patrice. Instead she finds a page from Barney’s Playbook, titled “The Robin”. Barney had a long plan to get back together with Robin, which started with proclaiming his love for Robin and intentionally getting shot down. He went to Patrice for help and pretended to date her so that Robin would realize her feelings for him. When Barney arrives, Robin feels that she can’t trust Barney because of how he manipulated her to get to this moment. He still proclaims his love for her and proposes; Robin accepts, and they embrace and kiss. At the gala, a GNB executive proposes a toast to Ted. While Robin, Barney, Marshall, and Lily are shown happily in their respective couplings, Ted stares out from the GNB building alone.

The second Part is one of the best episodes of the season, and a lovely ending. A great final Christmas on HIMYM.

 

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31 DAYS OF HALLOWEEN REVIEW: ANGEL – LIFE OF THE PARTY

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MAIN CAST

David Boreanaz (Bones)
James Marsters (Caprica)
J. August richards (Agents of SHIELD)
Amy Acker (The Cabin In The Woods)
Andy Hallett (Shallow Hal)
Alexis Denisof (Dollhouse)
Image result for angel tv logo life of the party

GUEST CAST

Sarah Thompson (Cruel Intetions 2)
Mercedes McNab (The Addams Family)
Jonathan M. Woodward (firefly)
Leland Cooke (Maid to Order)
T.J . Thyne (Bones)

LIFE OF THE PARTY

As Halloween approaches, Lorne throws a Halloween party for all the firm’s clients and employees and even gets a reluctant Angel to invite a powerful demon lord, named Archduke Sebassis, to the party. During the gathering, Lorne’s timely advice to his friends starts happening literally, leading to Fred and Wesley getting drunk after Lorne tells them to loosen up, Gunn to embarrassingly relieve himself to “stake out his territory”, Angel and Eve to have sex, and even Spike and the dim-witted Harmony to have fun on the dance floor. The events lead to only more trouble when Lorne’s empathic subconscious begins manifesting itself in a hulking demon (resembling a larger Lorne on steroids). The demon appeared as a result of Lorne’s sleep deprivation after Lorne had Wolfram and Hart remove his sleep: an empath with long-term sleeplessness can write people’s destinies instead of just reading them, and the empath’s subconscious can physically manifest. The episode also reveals that Lorne is proud of his organizational skills, as he feels most of his other talents simply do not match up to what his friends can do.angel505The larger Lorne causes much violence before the gang restores Lorne’s sleep, thus neutralizing the monster. The chaos and destruction has a positive side: the rank and file of Wolfram and Hart express the opinion that it greatly improved the party.
This episode was really good and so funny exspexcially how spike was acting the things that he said were very funny and so was Angel, I exspecially liked the part were Gunn peed on Angel’s chair. This episode was my favorite episode out of the fifth season. I think it was funny that every thing Lorne said would come true and then towards the end when a huge giant Lorne came to life after he fell asleep was a gread addition to this episode.

REVIEW: ANGEL – SEASON 5

MAIN CAST

David Boreanaz (Bones)
James Marsters (Runaways)
J. August Richards (Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.)
Amy Acker (the Gifted)
Andy Hallett (Chance)
Mercedes McNab (The Addams Family)
Alexis Denisof (Dollhouse)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Sarah Thompson (Cruel Intentions 2)
Jonathan M. Woodward (Firefly)
Rodney Rowland (Veronica Mars)
Victor Raider-Wexler (Dr. Dolittle)
Jenny Mollen (Crazy Stupid Love)
John Billingsley (Star Trek: Enterprise)
Simon Templeman (The Neighbors)
Dorie Barton (Down With Love)
Leland Crooke (Parenthood)
T.J. Thyne (Bones)
Roy Dotrice (Beauty and The Beast)
Juliet Landau (Ed Wood)
Danielle Nicolet (The Flash)
Brendan Hines (Lie To Me)
Tom Lenk (Date Movie)
Navi Rawat (Feast)
Charisma Carpenter (Veronica Mars)
Christian Kane (Just Married)
Roy Werner (Power Rangers Time Force)
Gary Grubbs (Battleship)
Jennifer Griffin (Boyhood)
Alec Newman (A Lonely Place To Die)
Adam Baldwin (Firefly)
Vincent Kartheiser (The Unsaid)
Dennis Christopher (IT)
Jack Conley (The Purge Anarchy)
Jaime Bergman (Gone in 60 Seconds)
Jeff Yagher (V)
Julie Benz (Dexter)
Stacey Travis (Ghost World)
Julia Lee (Hellborn)

David Boreanaz and James Marsters in Angel (1999)Nobody, not the producers, not the actors, and certainly not the fans could have predicted where this show would go. Where it could go. After all, this is an hour-long fantasy about a guy who spends so much time sitting in the shadows and brooding so much he would give Batman a run for his money. Or utility belt, as the case may be. So why is it that after five years and over a hundred episodes this show was still one of the freshest on TV? Simple: this is a story about something. What started off as just a Buffy spin-off has ended up as a massive epic that challenges, if not surpasses, its parent show. Unfortunately, the WB didn’t think so. After giving the producers a hard time and insisting on several changes, the network decided to bring the show back for a fifth, and what would be its final year.Angel (1999)So, in previous seasons we’ve had operatic apocalypses, quests for meaning, and our hero even went evil for a while. There’s only one place left to go. Into the belly of the beast, into hell itself: a law firm. Based on the out-of-left-field plot twist that was thrown at Angel and the gang in previous season’s finale, the team is now in charge of wolfram and hart the evil law firm that they’ve spent the entire series battling. The trick then becomes changing the system from the inside, all the while making sure that it doesn’t change them.David Boreanaz in Angel (1999)Unfortunately when the network decided to renew the show for a fifth year, there were conditions. First and foremost, it had to be more stand-alone. No more back-to-back cliffhangers. Next, the budget was cut. And finally, to sweeten the deal, the producers decided to bring over Spike – who was barbequed in the Buffy finale – in the hopes that his fans would follow. Luckily the introduction of Spike worked out well. He added a nice flavor to the show and helped flesh out Angel’s character in a way that nobody else could have. The punky vampire brought out the worst in our hero, which ended up resulting in some great comedy. Even if this Spike was different from whom he became on Buffy, he made for a nice addition.Amy Acker, Alexis Denisof, Andy Hallett, Mercedes McNab, J. August Richards, and Sarah Thompson in Angel (1999)The most unwelcome change was the standalone mandate. Yes, it can work, but it’s just not as good. The greatest strength of this show has always been its own history and tying the hands of the writers was a mistake. It resulted in a bump in the show’s overall flow. Even though it seems rushed, things tie up nicely and the finale certainly puts the “grand” in grandiose; now there’s a balls-to-the wall showstopper for you. Most people will agree that the show finished with perfect thematic closure. These characters fight an impossible fight knowing they’ll probably lose, but that’s not the point. They fight, not to win, but because that’s who they are. They don’t give up. No matter what.

REVIEW: ANGEL – SEASON 4

MAIN CAST

David Boreanaz (Bones)
Charisma Carpenter (Veronica Mars)
J. August Richards (Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.)
Amy Acker (the Gifted)
Vincent Kartheiser (The Unsaid)
Andy Hallett (Chance)
Alexis Denisof (Dollhouse)

David Boreanaz, Amy Acker, Vincent Kartheiser, and J. August Richards in Angel (1999)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

John Rubinstein (Red Dragon)
Stephanie Romanov (Spy Hard)
Daniel Dae Kim (Lost)
Alexa Davalos (Clash of The Titans)
Rena Owen (Siren)
Belinda Waymouth (Hercules: TLJ)
Clayton Rohner (Bones)
Brittany Ishibashi (Runaways)
Vladimir Kulich (The Equalizer)
Kay Panabaker (No Ordinary Family)
Eliza Dushku (Wrong Turn)
Joel David Moore (Julia X)
Alyson Hannigan (How I Met Your Mother)
Gina Torres (Firefly)
Julie Benz (Dexter)
David Denman (Power Rangers)
Sam Witwer (Solo: A Star Wars Story)
Annie Wesching (The Vampire Diaries)
Danny Woodburn (Watchmen)
Patrick Fischler (The Pact II)
Bradley Stryker (Izombie)
Bonita Friedericy (chuck)
Jonathan M. Woodward (Firefly)

J. August Richards in Angel (1999)Having already been on the air for three years, Angel had more then enough time to establish its theme, characters, and relationships. It was in its fourth year that it would bring all of these elements to the forefront and then mix them up in a season that would come to be known for its complex twists and turns.The season begins with our title character trapped at the bottom of the ocean – put there by his son – with the rest of his gang broken up. From this grim beginning, things only get darker – literally. Enter the Beast, a rock-encrusted devil whose arrival is heralded by a rain of fire and promptly blocks out the sun over L.A. All signs are pointing to the apocalypse, and it’s up to Angel and the rest of his demon-fighting crew to put a stop to it.David Boreanaz, Amy Acker, and J. August Richards in Angel (1999)From a storytelling point of view things just keep getting worse and worse and it’s a credit to the writers that they somehow manage to end it all on a positive note.Since Season 2 Angel has been a very arc-heavy show, but in its fourth year it would approach almost 24 levels of continuity and follow-through. In addition to being very cool to watch, the interlinked episodes add up to a season that is one big experience unto itself. It’s as if the entire season is one episode with many chapters.This year we get to watch everything get shaken up. Wedges are slowly driven between certain relationships while jealousy quickly divides others.David Boreanaz in Angel (1999)The great thing about it is that you get to see what has caused all of these problems. Despite their best efforts to hold together, these characters have no choice but to push each other apart. It makes for gripping television.Visually and stylistically the show is very well put together. The directing efforts of Joss Whedon (who is always excellent), Tim Minear (who has grown by leaps and bounds over the course of the series), and even Sean Astin (yes that Sean Astin) give the show a very polished and theatrical feel. The producers repeatedly stated that they were going for an ‘operatic’ feel to the season and they pulled it off very well. The use of darkness and shadow deserves special mention as does the great use of wide shots and the directors’ ability to fill each frame with as much information as possible.The Beast (Vladimir Kulich) in "Apocalypse, Nowish."Wesley goes from bumbling dork to dark James Bond. Cool! While the twists and turns are great, the really cool thing to the season is the multiple layers that you’ll find within. Just when you think you know who the real ‘big bad’ is or in which direction the show is going, the rug is pulled out from under your feet. The entire season keeps you guessing from start to finish. Of course, our heroes win in the end — but everyone is left wondering if they did the right thing. And that’s what sets the show apart: It’s action with substance.

REVIEW: ANGEL – SEASON 2

MAIN CAST

David Boreanaz (Bones)
Charisma Carpenter (Veronica Mars)
Alexis Denisof (Dollhouse)
J. August Richards (Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.)

David Boreanaz in Angel (1999)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Stephanie Romanov (Spy Hard)
Christian Kane (The Libarians)
Andy Hallett (Chance)
Justina Machado (Final Destination 2)
Julie Benz (Dexter)
Eliza Dushku (Dollhouse)
Melissa Marsala (The West Wing)
J.P. Manoux (Birds of Prey)
Tony Amendola (Annabelel: Creation)
Edwin Hodge (Sleepy Hollow)
Daisy McCrackin (Halloween: Resurrection)
David Herman (Futurama)
Sam Anderson (Lost)
Juliet Landau (Ed Wood)
Cheryl White (Major Crimes)
Brigid Brannagh (Runaways)
Patrick Kilpatrick (Eraser)
Mark Metcalf (Animal House)
James Marsters (Caprica)
W. Earl Brown (Bates Motel)
Tony Todd (Candyman)
Elisabeth Rohm (Heroes)
Jim Piddock (Mascots)
Matthew James (American Crime)
Joel Stoffer (Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.)
Gerry Becker (Spider-Man)
Mark Rolston (Alias)
Julia Lee (Grind)
Darby Stanchfield (Mad men)
Eric Lange (Lost)
Thomas Kopache (Catch Me If You Can)
Alyson Hannigan (How I Met Your Mother)
Mercedes McNab (The Addams Family)
Amy Acker (The Gifted)
Brody Hutzler (Legally Blonde)
Persia White (The Vampire Diaries)
Daniel Dae Kim (Lost)
Tom McCleister (Twins)
Mark Lutz (Bitch Slap)

Julie Benz and David Boreanaz in Angel (1999)The preceding season was,strong and coherent. While looking at the tribulations of life after High School in the big city, it managed to do so in a way that developed the characters within another major theme: Connection; Human emotions and growth that make us a part of the world, make us human. By the end of the season, Angel had been given a purpose, both short and long term, and a mission to fight for: Fighting in the final battles and surviving to be made a breathing human being again. Season Two, with a much broader theme, builds logically on that, and asks our vampire hero just what it means to really be human. Much of the season’s development is split in that way, with Angel increasingly being led off into his own world, with his friends developing entirely in a place away from him.David Boreanaz and Andy Hallett in Angel (1999)While he and the fate that ties him to Darla explore the complexities of human existence, Cordelia, Wesley and Gunn become forced to suffer through and succeed in it on their own. Though not as characterized by pain and hopelessness as much as S3 post “Sleep Tight” [3×16] through to the end of the series is, there’s much darkness and suffering abound, especially for Angel. His epic trials and will for revenge separate him harshly from humanity, only for him to realize that his worst actions are indeed wholly human, and that this is what humanity really can be. Season Two has such interesting ideas in spades, and its theme looks at all the best (“Untouched” [2×04], “Guise Will Be Guise” [2×06], “Epiphany” [2×16]) and worst (“Reunion” [2×10], “Reprise” [2×15]) sides of our existence: forgiveness, self-control, image, obsession, revenge, victory, belonging and the very nature of evil itself.Julie Benz, David Boreanaz, and Mark Metcalf in Angel (1999)By the time the season closes, Angel’s re-examined entirely what his mission is and how he’s to fight it, and goes from a champion vampire-with-a-soul to simply a genuinely good human being who helps people.fake-dwarvesWith the exception of the brilliant period piece Are You Now or Have You Ever Been?, and a few rare others, the season doesn’t have quite as much use for pure standalones. Its arc employs its best metaphors and situations in the interest of exploring all sides of the characters’ journey, and as such, the season gives the impression that more happens this year than last because of the depth of each phase of the arc: the four episode standalone period, the first part of the Darla arc (“Dear Boy” [2×05] to “Reunion” [2×10]), the second part of the Darla arc (“Redefinition” [2×11] to “Epiphany” [2×16]), another couple of standalones (“Disharmony” [2×17] and “Dead End” [2×18]) and the Pylea arc (“Belonging” [2×19] to “There’s No Place Like Plrtz Glrb” [2×22]).David Boreanaz and Andy Hallett in Angel (1999)This is likely why the season finds such a strong and undivided following. While some dispute the worth of the standalones or the Pylea arc, others like them, and everyone loves the story arc; there’s something for everyone. The best aspect of this year of the character’s journey in L.A. is how broad and all encompassing the season is. With the exception of Season Five, I find this to be the best season of the show. It has a few great metaphors, an engaging, unpredictable story arc, fun standalones, important character development, strong drama, and some of the most intelligent moral and social considerations I’ve ever seen on a TV show or in a movie.

REVIEW: ANGEL – SEASON 1

 

MAIN CAST

David Boreanaz (Bones)
Charisma Carpenter (Veronica Mars)
Glenn Quinn (R.S.V.P.)
Alexis Denisof (Dollhouse)

David Boreanaz, Charisma Carpenter, and Glenn Quinn in Angel (1999)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Tracy Middendorf (Scream: The Series)
Vyto Ruginis (Broken Arrow)
Christian Kane (The Libarians)
Josh Holloway (Lost)
Elisabeth Rohm (Heroes)
Lilli Birdsell (Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.)
Obi Ndefo (Star Trek: DS9)
Johnny Messner (Hostage)
Jennifer Tung (Masked Rider)
James Marsters (Caprica)
Kevin West (Junior)
Tushka Bergen (Horseplay)
Andy Umberger (Deja Vu)
Beth Grant (Wonderfalls)
Kristin Dattilo (Southland)
Carlos Jacott (Firefly)
Sarah Michelle Gellar (The Crazy Ones)
Anthony Cistaro (Sense8)
Sean Gunn (Guardians of The Galaxy)
Maury Sterling (The A-Team)
Jeremy Renner (Avengers Assemble)
Ken Marino (Veronica Mars)
Daphne Duplaix (Lost & Found)
Bai Ling (Southland Tales)
Will Kempe (All My Children)
Katy Boyer (The Island)
Jesse James (The Butterfly Effect)
Henri Lubatti (Zoo)
J. Kenneth Campbell (The Abyss)
John Mahon (Zodiac)
Julie Benz (Dexter)
Christina Hendricks (Mad Men)
Mark Ginther (MMPR: The Movie)
Stephanie Romanov (Spy Hard)
Tamara Gorski (Hercules: TLJ)
Michael Mantell (The Ides of March)
Eliza Dushku (Dollhouse)
Alastair Duncan (The Batman)
David Herman (Futurama)
J. August Richards (Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.)
Sam Anderson (Lost)
Todd Stashwick (The Originals)

David Boreanaz in Angel (1999)When Joss Whedon pitched Angel: the Series, he described it as a detective-style film-noir-themed take on the supernatural, much in the same way Buffy was pitched as a look from the viewpoint of the Horror genre. Buffy’s style took some time to get right, but the aesthetics of this show in its first year are well thought out and crafted; darkness and emotive shadow creep over, tense musical swells linger, and the picture is shot in a large resolution to provide just a bit of grain. I’d be damned if it didn’t seem intentional. Joss also said that where Buffy looked, metaphorically, at the hell of High School, Angel’s show would look at life past it in your early adulthood and the life and relationship issues of that unique, big city world. This metaphor is dominant in the first season, and is one of the main themes.Sarah Michelle Gellar and David Boreanaz in Angel (1999)Angel, as a series, is always and will always be about redemption, but the themes of its respective seasons are about the different facets to it. Exploring what it is, losing the chance at it or the responsibility one pledges to it is all covered over the duration of the show. With season one, it was most direct: How do you get it? At the start of the season we see Angel arrive in LA, see him save lives, but we also watch him slip deeply into apathy about his goal. To understand the importance and worth of a human and life and soul, Angel learns in “City of” (1×01) that one must have a human connection; friends and allies that make his life worth living so his mission can be worth fighting for, and most importantly so that he doesn’t become detached from (and even dangerous to) those he hopes to save.David Boreanaz and Jeremy Renner in Angel (1999)The season, as I mentioned, does lack a cohesive arc, but it also has a tremendous amount of hugely entertaining and well-written standalones. Many of them focus on Angel’s mission: “helping the helpless.” Angel makes it his goal to not only save lives, but save souls and make life worth living for others, and as a result of this his connections are solidified as he carries this out. He and his group slowly form into a legitimate investigation team which takes cases and makes money off of them, and many of the seasons situations out of which the characters are developed are a result of these cases. Cordelia, who in “Rm w a Vu” (1×05) is still defining herself by her possessions, searches for a place to live. Instead what she finds is a stronger sense of self, and in that a connection to the world of humans rather the one of plastic. Doyle and Wesley both find their own connections, as well. Episodes such as these are the season’s order, in every one of which something new happens that alters the main or supporting characters, or teaches the audience something about them.Julie Benz and David Boreanaz in Angel (1999)This is, in my opinion, what sets shows like Buffy and Angel apart: relevance. More than any other show, each episode contains progressive, ongoing development that charts development in a very realistic way. On a more specific level, this particular season has an extremely strong episode to episode consistency, with each individual showing striking its own tone and exploring the main theme in different ways. A few larger, more exciting events may have helped, but at the same time I appreciate this season for what it is and how it does something a bit different from most other seasons of Buffy or Angel. There’s a lot more to talk about, including the metaphorical basis’ used and what we’re being fed through them, as well as the general ups and downs. The strongest suit this season has is its extremely fluid use of theme. Though the ponderings on connection, redemption and starting a new life are not as intricately detailed, subtle or socially penetrating as the themes of any other season, the careful and consistent way they’re used to develop characters and give the stories real world relevance is masterful. Angel made it his mission to save souls, and we were shown him connecting with people by helping them, failing to help them, or losing them altogether. All the supporting characters followed, gaining their own redemption through helping Angel and the helpless.David Boreanaz and Eliza Dushku in Angel (1999)With the exception of Wesley being overly bumbling at times, nothing felt out of character this season, and that’s extremely impressive considering the length of a season. Doyle’s sacrifice in “Hero” (1×09), Angel’s re-ignited belief in himself in “To Shanshu in LA” [1×22] or Kate’s decision to see Angel kiss daylight in “Sanctuary” [1×19] were all thematically conclusive, resonant and well built up to.

 

 

REVIEW: BUFFY: THE VAMPIRE SLAYER – SEASON 3

 

MAIN CAST

Sarah Michelle Gellar (Cruel Intentions)
Nicholas Brendon (Faking It)
Alyson Hannigan (How I Met Your Mother)
Charisma Carpenter (Veronica Mars)
David Boreanaz (Bones)
Seth Green (Family Guy)
Anthony Stewart Head (The Iron Lady)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Julia Lee (A Man Apart)
Carlos Jacott (Firefly)
Larry Bagby (Walk The Line)
Kristine Sutherland (The Perfect Wedding)
Nancy Lenehan (Castch Me If You Can)
Armin Shimerman (Star Trek: DS9)
Danny Strong (Billions)
Jason Hall (American Sniper)
K. Todd Freeman (A Series of Unfortunate Events)
Fab Filippo (Queer as Folk)
Jeremy Roberts (The Mask)
Eliza Dushku (Wrong Turn)
John Patrick White (Can’t Hardly Wait)
Danielle Weeks (Campus Ladies)
Phill Lewis (Heathers)
Ian Abercrombie (Birds of Prey)
Harry Groener (How I Met Your Mother)
Jeremy Ratchford (Cold Case)
Jack Plotnick (Myserty Men)
Robin Sachs (Galaxy Quest)
Serena Scott Thomas (The World Is Not Enough)
James Marsters (The Runaways)
Mark Metcalf (Animal House)
Emma Caulfield (Removal)
Mercedes McNab (The Addams Family)
Nicole Bilderback (Dark Angel)
Robia LaMorte (Spawn)
Saverio Guerra (Becker)
Jeff Kober (Sully)
Elizabeth Anne Allen (Timemaster)
Harris Yulin (Ghostbusters 2)
Dominic Keating (Star Trek: Enterprise)
Channon Roe (Boogie Nights)
Michael Cudlitz (The Walking Dead)
Vaughn Armstrong (The Net)
Alexis Denisof (Dollhouse)
Christian Clemenson (Apollo 13)
James MacDonald (Broken Arrow)
Ethan Erickson (Jawbreaker)
Andy Umberger (The Accountant)
Keram Malicki-Sánchez (Texas Chainsaw)
Bonita Friedericy (Chuck)

Sarah Michelle Gellar in Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1996)This third season of Buffy the Vampire Slayer contains some of my favourite episodes from the entire run of the show and also has the fewest offbeat episodes. This year Buffy and the gang are in their final year of high school but living on the Hellmouth is never easy and in addition to the usual demons and vampires they must deal with the schemes of the Watchers Council, a new slayer and a politician after even more power.Sarah Michelle Gellar and David Boreanaz in Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1996)Buffy has really found its feet with this season and I would say that it is this year that the show reaches its peak. All the regular cast members give their usual brilliant performances but the season is really stolen by the new cast members, specifically Eliza Dushku as Faith the new Slayer and Harry Groener as the eccentrically evil Mayor Wilkins, who is probably my favourite of all the Buffy villains.Sarah Michelle Gellar and David Boreanaz in Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1996)It is difficult to choose favorite episodes from this season as it includes so many great ones. `Bad Candy’, `Amends’, `Earshot’ and the two part season finally `Graduation’ are all excellent episodes being both funny and enthralling but my favorite episode has to be `Lover’s Walk’ where a lovesick Spike returns to Sunnydale after breaking up with Drusilla in order to find a way to get her back. James Marsters is truly excellent in this episode and livens up the series brilliantly. Another couple of episodes of note are `The Wish’ and `Doppelgangland’ both of which involve a parallel universe where vampires have taken over and feature a vamped up Willow, brilliantly portrayed by Alyson Hannigan who seems to enjoy the role immensely. Although none of the episodes could truly be considered awful, `Gingerbread’ and `The Zeppo’ are the weakest episodes of this season and are slightly painful to watch in places.Sarah Michelle Gellar in Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1996)Overall this season is truly great, with brilliant writing and a plot that never ceases to be in turns exciting, funny and touching.