REVIEW: 13 REASONS WHY – SEASON 3

Dylan Minnette in 13 Reasons Why (2017)

MAIN CAST

Dylan Minnette (Don’t Breathe)
Christian Navarro (Bushwick)
Alisha Boe (Paranormal Activity 4)
Brandon Flynn (BrainDead)
Justin Prentice (Izombie)
Miles Heizer (Rails & Ties)
Ross Butler (Shazam)
Devin Druid (Louder Than Bombs)
Amy Hargreaves (Wonderstruck)
Grace Saif (Doctors)
Brenda Strong (Supergirl)
Timothy Granaderos (Runaways)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Anne Winters (Mom and Dad)
Chelsea Alden (Unfriended: Dark Web)
Tyler Barnhardt (Tales From The Loop)
Benito Martinez (Sons of Anarchy)
Mark Pellegrino (Lost)
Kate Walsh (After The Sunset)
Steven Weber (2 broke Girls)
Michele Selene Ang (Elementary)
Wilson Cruz (Star Trek: Discovery)
Bex Taylor-Klaus (Arrow)
Alex MacNicoll (The Society)
Parminder Nagra (God Friended Me)
Raymond J. Barry (Alias)
Mason Guccione (Jumanji: Welcome To The Jungle)
Derek Luke (Glory Road)
RJ Brown (The Carrie Diaries)
Bryce Cass (The Guardian)
Matthew Alan (Snowfall)
Ron Roggé (Power Rangers Lightspeed Rescue)
Deaken Bluman (Fall Into Me)
YaYa Gosselin (FBI: Most Wanted)
Meredith Monroe (Dawson’s Creek)
Hart Denton (Riverdale)

freepressjournal_2019-08_7de0229f-0b42-4203-b9cb-20cb73cfefb8_13Netflix’s popular series 13 Reasons Why has returned with its third season. The show has now shifted its focus from Hanna Baker and Jessica Davis’ rape to their abuser, Bryce Walker. The showrunners have tried hard to stay away from the controversies they stirred up with the first and second season. However, they do not deviate from highlighting bullying in schools and its consequences. While Season 1 makes you reflect upon your actions, Season 2 established that there’s another side to every story. Season 3 tries to explain that nothing’s black and white.Screenshot-2019-08-23-at-08.09.26-2The new season picks up right after the events of Liberty High Spring Fling when a gunned Tyler Down came in school premises to hurt his abusers. Since then, things have not changed much. These students are damaged as before but are trying to recover. But before they could recuperate completely, they are struck with the news of Bryce Walker’s death after a big Homecoming game. Everyone has a reason to kill the bad guy of Liberty, but you aren’t really sure who did it. The entire season is built on solving Bryce’s murder. During the course of the investigation, you realize nobody’s clean. They all have something they lied about. The trial and the revelations in season 1 and 2 have impacted these students a lot, especially Bryce Walker.cuka1jql6m5rndkuwaovFor a long time, we have seen that Bryce bullied students and he raped Hanna Baker, Jessica Davis and many other girls. He is convicted for sexually assaulting women but gets only 3 months of probation. In a way, we are habitual of seeing him in a certain way. Season three shakes that up and we finally see the other side of him. The good side of Bryce. The new season also progresses on Jessica front screening her journey from being a victim to a survivor. The girl who couldn’t gather enough courage to speak up until the end of season 2, leads the voices of survivors. Justin Prentice and Alisha Boe as Bryce and Jessica, offer intriguing, emotionally complex and layered performances. Prentice’s breakdown as Bryce will make you grieve for him despite all that he’s done in the past. Boe, on the other hand, stuns with her transformation. Her confidence is both rattling and inspiring.13rw-e1566448279569Season 3 also introduces new character Ani (Grace Saif), who’s kind of a replacement of Hanna Baker (Katherine Langford) to lead the plot. She does her job fairly well, to say the least. Apart from Bryce and Jessica, nobody is seen in a different light that you haven’t seen before. Clay Jenson (Dylan Minnette) is the same caring friend we have been watching since two seasons and Christian Navarro as Tony Padilla is also the same good looking tough guy with mysteries. The showmakers have made the transitions between timelines smoother than ever. Music wise, season three gets a remarkable soundtrack like its previous seasons and some of them will definitely make it to your playlist. If you have followed the show, 13 Reasons Why season 3 is likable. With lesser violence and more voice, it gives us some pondering moments. The new season is definitely better than the second one, however, the makers do not entirely reach the benchmark they had set with the first season.

REVIEW: BONES – SEASON 10

Starring

Emily Deschanel (Boogeyman)
David Boreanaz (Angel)
Michaela Conlin (Yellowstone)
Tamara Taylor (Lost)
T. J. Thyne (Ghost World)
John Francis Daley (Game Night)
John Boyd (Argo)

David Boreanaz and Emily Deschanel in Bones (2005)
Recurring / Notable Guest Cast

Patricia Belcher (Jeepers Creepers)
Carla Gallo (Superbad)
JD Cullum (The Lone Ranger)
Sam Anderson (Lost)
Rance Howard (Far and Away)
Ignacio Serricchio (Lost In Space)
Laura Spencer (The Big Bang Theory)
John Billingsley (Star Trek: Enterprise)
Sean Gunn (Super)
Nora Dunn (Bruce Almighty)
Pej Vahdat (Shameless)
Amy Davidson (Girl on The Edge)
Danny Woodburn (Watchmen)
François Chau (The Tick)
Brian Klugman (Cloverfield)
Gil Bellows (Sanctuary)
McKaley Miller (Hart of Dixie)
Charlene Amoia (How I Met Your Mother)
Sean Marquette (The Goldbergs)
Chastity Dotson (Veronica Mars)
Billy Gibbons (Two and a Half Men)
Andrew Leeds (Office Christmas Party)
Mather Zickel (Mike & Molly)
Michael Grant Terry (Grimm)
Ryan O’Neal (Love Story)
Cyndi Lauper (Vibes)
Steven Williams (Jason Goes To Hell)
Nathaniel Buzolic (The Originals)
Jason Gray-Stanford (Stargate SG.1)
Shalita Grant (Santa Clarita Diet)
Arden Myrin (Insatiable)
Kelly Schumann (Superstore)
Eric Allan Kramer (The Incredible Hulk Returns)
Todd Williams (The Vampire Diaries)
Vito D’Ambrosio (The Flash)
Jeremy Ratchford (Cold Case)
Eugene Byrd (Arrow)
Mike Starr (Ed Wood)
Noel Gugliemi (The Fast and The Furious)
Kurt Fuller (Ghostbusters II)
China Anne McClain (Black Lightning)
Jessica Camacho (The Flash)
Linda Lavin (The Good Wife)
Taylor Spreitler (Melissa & Joey)
Michael Cram (Flashpoint)
Alex MacNicoll (13 Reasons Why)
Rick Overton (Eught Legged Freaks)
Amanda Brooks (Aquarius)
Lindsey Kraft (The Big Bang Theory)

Eugene Byrd, Michaela Conlin, Emily Deschanel, and T.J. Thyne in Bones (2005)In the 10th season of Bones, suspense is at an all-time high as Seeley Booth (David Boreanaz) is framed and jailed for the murder of three FBI agents while Temperance Brennan (Emily Deschanel) considers committing blackmail to get him out of prison.David Boreanaz and Emily Deschanel in Bones (2005)The new season brings some changes. The team will lose a key player at a dramatic moment early in the season, and have to work in a replacement after an emotional farewell. Another primary character will develop a emotional bond with one of the rotational lab interns, one that threatens their official relationship. Still another will strike it rich, a couple of season after having been cleaned out by a particularly nasty serial killer.David Boreanaz and Emily Deschanel in Bones (2005)Yet another character will revisit a gambling habit that threatens a job and a relationship. And, one key character will become pregnant. And those events are just character development. There is a fresh lot of challenging cases that will need solving.Those week to week cases continue to be innovative and interesting, challenging the team and the viewer to keep up. At the same time, the series hasn’t lost its sense of humor, or its willingness to experiment. Bones is still good fun and recommended to its loyal fans in its tenth season.

REVIEW: THE SOCIETY – SEASON 1

The Society (2019)

Main Cast

Kathryn Newton (Pokémon Detective Pikachu)
Gideon Adlon (Blockers)
Sean Berdy (Switched at Birth)
Natasha Liu Bordizzo (The GReatest Showman)
Jacques Colimon (Endless Light)
Olivia DeJonge (Better Watch Out)
Alex Fitzalan (Slender Man)
Kristine Froseth (Apostle)
José Julián (Shameless)
Alex MacNicoll (The 5th Wave)
Toby Wallace (Romper Stomper TV)
Rachel Keller (Legion)

Kathryn Newton, José Julián, Sean Berdy, Gideon Adlon, Rachel Keller, and Salena Qureshi in The Society (2019)

Recurring / Notable Guest Cast

Emilio Garcia-Sanchez (The Boonies)
Grace Victoria Cox (Heathers TV)
Salena Qureshi (Madam Secretary)

Jack Mulhern, Kathryn Newton, José Julián, Sean Berdy, Gideon Adlon, Alex MacNicoll, Natasha Liu Bordizzo, and Kristine Froseth in The Society (2019)Netflix may have built its original series initially around adults, but these days, it really loves teens — especially teens who behave badly. That’s the cornerstone of “The Society,” a series constructed around the premise of what happens to 200 teenagers who think they’re going on a school field trip, and are instead deposited in a carbon copy version of their small town, except with no adults and no younger children around. Things aren’t too bad at first for the teens — the power is still on, and there’s a supermarket full of food — but the situation quickly takes on new urgency as they slowly realize that they’ve been completely cut off from the rest of the world. How, exactly, the teens ended up in this mirror universe is one question that only sort of haunts the series, as eventually the mystery behind its premise gets de-emphasized in favor of the kids discovering that their survival will require some heavy duty growing up, fast.the-society-2-1557328841This theoretically makes the show a microcosm for discussing philosophical issues surrounding the creation of a society like this, as well as an opportunity to explore the nature of power, as factions arise and battle is waged for control. And while the show drags a bit in its early episodes, as the teens keep getting distracted from the bigger issues by their interpersonal woes, the pacing improves dramatically in the back half of the season as the drama escalates. “Are we in an episode of ‘Riverdale’ or in Soviet Russia?” one teen asks, and the answer ends up being far more the latter. To “The Society’s” credit, its commitment to exploring the big questions raised by the premise, specifically in regards to how the kids might come to manage each other and their resources, is unquestionable — because while initially led by Cassandra (Rachel Keller), the ad-hoc society quickly develops life and death stakes.
https___blogs-images.forbes.com_merrillbarr_files_2019_05_SOCIETY_109_Unit_00415RThe show’s characters, despite being played by many not-exactly teenagers — Keller’s casting as a girl just out of high school feels particularly out of place after her breakout roles as older characters in “Fargo” and “Legion” — feel extremely teenager-y. And the vast nature of the cast, combined with a notable lack of diversity (the cast could be better served by a larger percentage of people of color) occasionally makes it hard to track individual characters — an issue not made easier by the fact that many of the characters lack much in the way of definition. (Like, how many jocks in letter jackets are there, exactly?) However, there are some standouts within the cast, including Kathryn Newton (most recently seen as Reese Witherspoon’s spirited daughter in “Big Little Lies”) as Allie, who finds herself having to step up in order to keep the town from descending into chaos.
TheSociety_101_Unit_00251RMeanwhile Toby Wallace, as resident sociopath Campbell, develops well into his role as a charmingly evil villain. Another strong supporting player who deserves a lot more screen time than she gets is Salena Qureshi as Bean, and Sean Berdy from “Switched at Birth” gets to play a character whose hearing impairment is not his sole defining quality. (The show’s casual embrace of the nuances of sign language is one of its best details.) Too gritty and dark to have much fun scratching the pleasant itch of teen soap tropes, “The Society’s” adult content keep it from feeling like a natural fit for a network like the CW (though it does stir up memories of that network’s “The 100”). From the pilot directed by Marc Webb (“The Amazing Spider-man,” “500 Days of Summer,” the latter film making a cameo appearance later in the season), it feels slightly better in its execution than really necessary — though, no spoilers for the end of the season, but there are plenty of questions left unresolved, to an almost unsatisfying degree.
untitledThat said, at a certain point the drama does get addictive, as the show eventually reveals what it’s really about: a grim reckoning with the fact that these teens have had to grow up too fast. And these days, with climate change and school shootings and a government that’s rotting from the inside, teens today might find “The Society” painfully relatable.

 

REVIEW: 13 REASONS WHY – SEASON 2

Dylan Minnette in 13 Reasons Why (2017)

MAIN CAST

Dylan Minnette (Don’t Breathe)
Katherine Langford (The Misguided)
Christian Navarro (Bushwick)
Alisha Boe (Paranormal Activity 4)
Brandon Flynn (BrainDead)
Justin Prentice (Izombie)
Miles Heizer (Rails & Ties)
Ross Butler (Riverdale)
Devin Druid (Louder Than Bombs)
Amy Hargreaves (Wonderstruck)
Derek Luke (Biker Boyz)
Kate Walsh (After The Sunset)
Michele Selene Ang (Elementary)
Brian d’Arcy James (Smash)
Matthew Alan (Snowfall)
Brittany Perry-Russell (Family Reunion)
Alex MacNicoll (The Society)
Makenzie Vega (Saw)
Jeffrey Vincent Parise (Supernatural)

2

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Steven Weber (Izombie)
Wilson Cruz (Star Trek Discovery)
Sosie Bacon (Scream: The Series)
Tommy Dorfman (Fludity)
Allison Miller (17 Again)
Tom Everett Scott (Race To Witch Mountain)
Ben Lawson (No Strings Attached)
Robert Gant (Supergirl)
Chelsea Alden (Face 2 Face)
Bryce Cass (Battle Los Angeles)
Brandon Butler (Ring of Silence)
Anne Winters (Mom and Dad)
Jackie Geary (NCIS)
Mason Guccione (Jumanji: Welcome To The Jungle)
Jeffrey Vincent Parise (Supernatural)
Brenda Strong (Supergirl)
Anthony Rapp (Star Trek: Discovery)
Meredith Monroe (Hart of Dixie)
Mark Pellegrino (Lost)
Jake Weber (Homeland)
Brandon Butler (Trinkets)
Ajiona Alexus (Runaways)
Josh Hamilton (Alive)
Andrea Roth (Cloak & Dagger)
Sean Blakemore (Bones)
Brandon Larracuente (Bright)
Steven Silver (Council of Dads)
Keiko Agena (Gilmore Girls
Parminder Nagra (God Friended Me)
Hank Greenspan (The Neighborhood)
Timothy Granaderos (Runaways)
Samantha Logan (All American)
Kelli O’Hara (Masters of Sex)
RJ Brown (Tycoon)
Cindy Cheung (House of Cards)

“I know some people don’t want us to talk about what happened,” Tyler (Devin Druid) says in voiceover at the start of “13 Reasons Why’s” second season. “But if we don’t talk about it, it’s never going to change. So it’s important for everyone to understand how it all happened. The whole story.”  This is the very first thing viewers of the new season will hear — well, second, if you include the new trigger warning video featuring members of the cast that plays ahead of the premiere. But the warning and monologue are intertwined, because they’re ultimately about the same thing. The warning acknowledges that, while Netflix’s mega-hit series was well-received in its first season, it also drew plenty of controversy over how it treated its sensitive subject material: suicide, sexual assault, drug abuse, and so on.MV5BMThiMjMyMmUtMjcwMC00NjAxLWI0MDMtMmEwN2UzYTExNjIzXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMzUwMTgwMw@@._V1_SY1000_CR0,0,733,1000_AL_But Tyler’s monologue, which we soon learn is delivered from the witness stand, is a defense of season two’s very existence. Yes, the creators (including showrunners Brian Yorkey and Diana son) know of the criticisms. Yes, they know there are questions as to why a season two even needed to happen. But their argument is that the season is necessary — “important,” even. And considering how successful the show has been, the story we see in season two may not even be the end. The trial in question, which has compelled troubled gun aficionado Tyler’s testimony, is a lawsuit against Liberty High School by the parents of late student Hannah Baker (Katherine Langford). Hannah’s tapes explaining why she committed suicide provided the narrative arc of season one, with each tape focused on a different person in Hannah’s life. The trial serves the same function this season, with each episode centering on a particular witness’ testimony.13-reasons-why-season2The result is something of an inverse of the first season: instead of Hannah’s voice on the tapes, we hear the other students, teachers, and her parents. They open up parts of the story we didn’t hear in season one, though we’re left to to decide on our own if we trust them as our narrators. Reversing the narrative doesn’t do much to change the core of the series. Clay is the rock of “13 Reasons Why,” the anchor who keeps us chained to Hannah’s story. No matter whether we disagree with Hannah’s actions, get frustrated with the treatment of rapist baseball player Bryce Walker (Justin Prentice), or would perhaps rather follow the complex, challenging story of survivor Jessica Davis (Alisha Boe), Clay keeps us on track. This is about Hannah, the girl he loved but never got up the guts to tell. This is about his journey to make sure her suicide is avenged — whatever that personally means to him. And this is about his relationship to her and her memory, no matter how many forces of doubt come to challenge that.https _blueprint-api-production.s3.amazonaws.com_uploads_card_image_771242_269f95fd-56f8-4925-86ec-20d889c7690dMinnette is a marvel, turning in one of the most committed, insular, intense performances you’ll see anywhere on television. The 21-year-old actor reads as a blank slate when he’s still — maybe a hint of a perpetual grimace on his face, but ultimately inoffensive. As a result, Clay is often seen looking pensive, quiet, and expressionless. When he breaks, however, Minnette shines. Clay screams, cries, and generally loses his cool this season, and Minnette captures it all without missing a beat. Every bit of pain seems to leave an extra wrinkle or crag on Clay’s face. Minnette himself makes Clay feel heavier as the season goes on, like having to do any small thing would cause the young man to explode. Minnette plays Clay as a teen on the verge of a nervous breakdown, and you can’t take your eyes off him. A good deal of the cast is good this season — particularly Kate Walsh as Hannah’s grieving-but-furious mother Olivia — but Minnette stands above the pack. His is a tour-de-force performance that goes a long way to making “13 Reasons Why’s” second season feel worth the drama.

REVIEW: 13 REASONS WHY – SEASON 1

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MAIN CAST

Dylan Minnette (Don’t Breathe)
Katherine Langford (The Misguided)
Christian Navarro (Bushwick)
Alisha Boe (Paranormal Activity 4)
Brandon Flynn (BrainDead)
Justin Prentice (Izombie)
Miles Heizer (Rails & Ties)
Ross Butler (Riverdale)
Devin Druid (Louder Than Bombs)
Amy Hargreaves (Wonderstruck)
Derek Luke (Biker Boyz)
Kate Walsh (After The Sunset)
Keiko Agena (Labor Pains)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Brian d’Arcy James (Smash)
Steven Weber (Izombie)
Josh Hamilton (J. Edgar)
Tom Everett Scott (Scream: The Series)
Giorgia Whigham (The Punisher)
Robert Gant (Supergirl)
Ajiona Alexus (Runaways)
Michele Selene Ang (Elementary)
Tommy Dorfman (Insatiable)
Mark Pellegrino (Lost)
Sosie Bacon (Scream: The Series)
Tom Maden (All Night)
Dorian Lockett (Mr. Invincible)
Andrea Roth (Cloak & Dagger)
Steven Silver (Council of Dads)
Brandon Larracuente (Bright)
Henry Zaga (Trinkets)
Wilson Cruz (The Finder)
Gary Perez (When They See Us)
Gabrielle Haugh (Jeepers Creepers 3)
Timothy Granaderos (Runaways)
Cindy Cheung (House of Cards)
Alisha Mullally (Bee Season)
Jackie Geary (White House Down)
Alex MacNicoll (The Society)
Brittany Perry-Russell (Lucky Stiff)
Anna Zavelson (Revolution)
Matthew Alan (Castle Rock)
Hannah Payne (How I Met Your Mother)

High school is a crappy, messy experience for the vast majority of people. That fact has never really changed, even with all the talk of Millennials being more sensitive and open-minded than any generation that preceded them. If anything, high school bullying has only become a more serious problem in recent years with the advent of social media and smartphones. Kids have always had a knack for being horrible to one another, but give them the anonymity of the Internet and a screen to shield themselves from the consequences of their actions, and suddenly you have teenagers driven to suicide thanks to revenge porn or targeted online harassment. 13 Reasons Why is perfectly positioned to explore bullying and high school culture in the post-Facebook era. It’s an often depressing and even uncomfortable show to watch, but that only makes it all the more powerful.Based on the best-selling YA novel from Jay Asher and adapted for television by Brian Yorkey, 13 Reasons Why opens several weeks after the tragic suicide of high school junior Hannah Baker (Katherine Langford). Despite her death, Hannah remains a very active participant in the show’s narrative thanks to copious flashbacks and a narrative device involving a series of cassette tapes she recorded shortly before her suicide. Those tapes fall into the hands of Clay Jensen (Dylan Minnette), a socially awkward classmate still struggling to come to terms with Hannah’s death. Each of the series’ 13 episodes revolve around one of these tapes, with Hannah explaining in minute detail how her peers (including Clay himself) drove her to take her own life.It’s a pretty grim premise for a high school drama, even by the standards of death-obsessed YA stories like The Fault in Our Stars and Me and Earl and the Dying Girl. And apart from the occasional friendly banter between Clay and Hannah or the recurring joke about Clay and his fellow students being utterly mystified by the concept of cassette tapes, there’s little room for humor here. That can make 13 Reasons Why a pretty emotionally draining experience, particularly towards the end as the pieces really start to fall into place. The final episode in particular features one of the most uncomfortable scenes on TV.Not really a show that encourages binge-watching, in other words. But 13 Reasons Why definitely succeeds in its goal of exploring how countless small and large acts of malice, as well as simple indifference or inattention, can fuel a terrible tragedy. Hannah herself references Chaos Theory in one episode, and it applies to this situation as well as it does an amusement park full of hungry dinosaurs. Hannah encounters just about every form of humiliation high school life can possibly throw at someone – from social isolation and petty gossip to sexual harassment and worse. The outcome is a foregone conclusion, so it’s really more a story about how and why so many of those close to Hannah failed to save her in time.Though a newcomer, Langford shines in the lead role. There’s a bright spark to Hannah that slowly fades over the course of the series as she becomes progressively more worn down by life’s disappointments. Langford embodies that optimism and that profound sadness well. Minnette’s Clay is, by design, a much more stoic and reserved character. In the present, Clay is practically a walking zombie stricken equal helpings of grief, confusion and fear about what he’ll learn when he eventually reaches his tape. Even in the past, Clay is someone who struggles to express his emotions and open up to those around him. Minnette does a fine job in what’s often a difficult role, though the show does rely a little too much on shots of Clay gazing wistfully into the distance as he reminisces about his interactions Hannah.Langford and Minnette are often at their best together, channeling just the right sort of warm but awkward chemistry you’d expect from two teens who can’t quite admit to their feelings for one another. Each new bit of progress in their relationship feels like a major victory, one rendered all the more poignant by the knowledge that their friendship/nascent romance is inherently doomed. There’s a nice sense of mystery and unease to their relationship as well. For a long time, it’s very unclear just how close the two characters were prior to Hannah’s death or what exactly Clay might have done to earn himself a spot among the dreaded thirteen .In general, 13 Reasons Why boasts a strong cast that tends to make the most of the material. Initially, Clay and Hannah’s classmates seem to fit into the usual high school stereotypes – your jocks, your cheerleaders, your preppy overachievers, your slackers, etc. But as each member of the thirteen is fleshed out in turn, they show a real depth and angst that reminds viewers that Hannah was hardly the only one who suffered from loneliness and a deep malaise. Standouts include Alisha Boe as psychologically troubled cheerleader Jessica Davis and Brandon Flynn as her equally tortured boyfriend, Justin Foley. The show places a greater emphasis on adult characters than the novel, with memorable, emotionally charged performances from Kate Walsh as Hannah’s grieving mother and Derek Luke as the school’s embattled counselor.13 Reasons Why is far from the most pleasant viewing experience Netflix has to offer, but it is a very powerful and hard-hitting series. The show explores the build-up to and aftermath of a teen’s tragic suicide with great care, painting a compelling portrait of one teen broken by life and another determined to find answers. The show easily ranks among the best high school dramas of the 21st Century.

REVIEW: THE 5TH WAVE

 

CAST

Chloe Grace Moretz (Kick-Ass)
Nick Robinson (Jurassic World)
Ron Livingston (Swingers)
Maggie Siff (Push)
Alex Roe (Sniper: Legacy)
Maria Bello (A History of Violence)
Maika Monroe (Independence Day: Resurgence)
Liev Schreiber (X-Men Origins: Wolverine)
Tony Revolori (Spider-Man: Homecoming)
Alex MacNicoll (13 Reasons Why)

 

MV5BZDgwNzZkNTItZjdmYy00ZWYwLWIwYjktZjY0MDliZmU2MjczXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNTc0Njg2Mzg@._V1_SY1000_SX1600_AL_Cassie Sullivan, armed with an M4 carbine, emerges from the woods to raid an abandoned gas station. Upon entering, she hears a male voice calling for help. While searching the store, she hears a man, who points a gun at her, but they each put their weapons down. His hand is under his jacket and as he takes it out, she sees a glint of metal and kills him. He was holding a crucifix and the screen cuts to black to show her backstory.
MV5BMDRjMDIwMmQtYzc1OS00NmJiLWE4MjktMDA5NmI2ZjRmODMzXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNTEyNTg0ODY@._V1_At home, the news reports a strange, city-sized hovering structure over their home in Ohio, containing invading extraterrestrials referred to as “The Others”. Ten days later The Others cut the power off, causing Cassie’s classmates’ cars to crash into each other and a plane to fall from the sky. The Second Wave sees The Others drop a large metal rod on to the Earth’s fault lines causing massive tsunamis to kill those living in coastal cities. While at a new refuge location, Cassie and her younger brother Sammy go to collect water as the area is struck by earthquakes and floods, and they climb a tree to avoid the flood. For the Third Wave, The Others weaponize a strain of avian flu using three million birds as carriers of the virus. Cassie then reunites with her mother, Lisa. Cassie’s mother warns her to take her brother to safety to avoid the plague. Cassie’s mother then dies from the plague and her family create a memorial in their backyard.MV5BZjY3YzBlYzktYTFlNC00YWYwLWI1ODctZGE4Yjc2NmE4NTUzXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMjQwMDg0Ng@@._V1_In search of a safe community, Cassie leaves home with her father and brother and stumbles upon a refugee camp in the jungle. A few days later, an army unit rolls into the camp and places all of the children on a bus. The commander claims that there is an imminent threat and that they want to take the children to a safe place before coming back for the adults. Cassie gets separated from Sam, and she watches as her father and other survivors are massacred by the army after being told they would never see their children again. Cassie scavenges her way toward the base to find her brother, but is shot in the leg by an unseen enemy and passes out. Seven days later, Cassie wakes up and meets Evan Walker, who saved her. Cassie learns that he is an Other in humanoid form. She leaves on her own to go find Sam, but not before Evan tells her that Colonel Vosch and the Military are actually Others, and that the Fifth Wave would be human children, tricked into eliminating the remaining survivors.
MV5BMTI1OTkwNjg4Nl5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTYwMzk4Mzc3._V1_The only thing that keeps Cassie going is the hope that she can save her brother from the training camp established by the Military at the captured Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Ben Parish and her brother are in the same squad and Ben learns of The Others’ plans. Evan tells Cassie and Ben to go find Sam before he blows up the training facility. The Others are in the process of evacuating and deploying the children to other cities. Evan sets off the explosives and destroys the military facility with him. Cassie, Ben, and Sam manage to escape with a little help from squad member Ringer. But most of the Others, including their leader Colonel Vosch, manage to escape too and transport their child soldiers for places elsewhere. In the final scene, Ben and his squad are enjoying their evening meal with Cassie, who ponder hope as humanity’s driving force for survival.MV5BNDE1NDhjNDUtODRiZS00NTA3LTlmMTAtZWIyNTBkMDEzOWM5XkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNTc0Njg2Mzg@._V1_SY1000_CR0,0,1500,1000_AL_Chloe Moretz was great in the main role. The whole apocalypse scenario was well done and there were a couple of twists and you could pretty much see coming but they were still well done. The only problem for me was the sudden ending which resolved a few things but obviously was intended to spark a sequel. So if you like apocalypse movies and or Chloe Moretz you should enjoy it.