REVIEW: THE BIG BANG THEORY – SEASON 10

CAST

Johnny Galecki (Rings)
Jim Parsons (The Muppets)
Kaley Cuoco (8 Simple Rules)
Simon Helberg (Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog)
Kunal Nayyar (Trolls)
Mayim Bialik (Blossom)
Melissa Rauch (Batman and Harley Quinn)
Kevin Sussman (Ugly Betty)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Laurie Metcalf (3rd Rock From the Sun)
Keith Carraduine (The Duellists)
Judd Hirsch (Independance Day)
Katey Sagal (Futurama)
Christine Baranski (Cruel Intentions)
Jack McBrayer (30 rock)
Dean Norris (breaking Bad)
Josh Zuckerman (Significant Mother)
Brian George (Ghost World)
Brian Posehn (New Girl)
Maria Canals-Barrera (Camp Rock)
Stephen Hawking (The Theory of Everything)
Christopher Lloyd (Piranha)
Vernee Watson (Antwone Fisher)
Laura Spencer (Bones)
Kate Micucci (The Lego Batman Movie)
Alessandra Torresani (Caprica)
Katie LeClerc (Switched ar Birth)
Joel Murray (Two and a Half Men)
April Bowlby (How I Met Your Mother)
Brian Thomas Smith (The Wedding Party)
Riki Lindhome (Fun Size)

The Big Bang theory is a great show! This season does not disappoint. The laughs continue and the story continues to evolve. There are a few surprises this season that I didn’t see coming. The characters are relatable and worth watching. I’m happy this show was renewed for 2 additional seasons.THIS SEASON INCLUDES

10.1) The Conjugal Conjecture

The gang prepares for Leonard and Penny’s second wedding ceremony. Sheldon and Leonard fear that Mary slept with Alfred the previous night, though they swear nothing happened. They do, however, plan to visit each other, irritating Beverly. Penny’s family arrives. Her mother worries that her son’s recent jail stint will cause Leonard’s family to think of them as white trash. The ceremony goes well, with Leonard and Penny declaring their love for each other, Beverly and Alfred grateful they at least made Leonard together during their relationship, and Sheldon declaring his love for the couple. Howard is contacted by Colonel Richard Williams of the Air Force Research Laboratory, who scares both him and Raj. Howard eventually agrees to meet him, but the colonel refuses to give the reason for his interest.

10.2) The Military Miniaturization

Leonard and Howard worry the military might try to take over the guidance system project for weaponry, but Sheldon does not. They make him promise not to talk during the meeting with Colonel Williams. The Colonel is impressed with Howard as the main brain behind the project, making Sheldon squirm. The military wants a smaller version made, perhaps in four months. Sheldon, no longer able to contain himself, promises to have it in two. Though the others are angry about such a tight deadline, they all have fun with their new lab’s retinal scanner. Meanwhile, the pharmaceutical company employees have found out Bernadette is pregnant, infuriating her as they might take her off the next big medical project. Penny admits she was the one who let this slip. Bernadette forgives her because she intends to threaten her boss with a lawsuit if she is taken off the project.

10.3) The Dependence Transcendence

Sheldon, Leonard, and Howard are exhausted from trying to meet the Air Force’s deadline that Sheldon set into motion. In a dream, The Flash persuades Sheldon to take an energy drink. After it wears off, Sheldon is convinced he is addicted, further annoying the other two. Sheldon breaks down and admits he cannot figure out the math and isn’t as smart as he thought. The others comfort him. Facing Colonel Williams, they admit that they need at least two years, which is easily accepted as the military is used to contractors not meeting deadlines. Amy takes Penny to a party thrown by Bert the geologist, but they discover they are the only ones there. Bert shocks them by saying Amy is the most popular scientist at Caltech, and he falls in love with Penny. Raj tries to help Bernadette get the nursery ready, but she doesn’t enjoy it. She admits her lack of excitement makes her fear she cannot be maternal. Raj calls his OB-GYN father, who tells Bernadette that, while she may not like babies in general, she can still love her own child.

11.4) The Cohabitation Experimentation

After a plumbing problem makes Amy’s apartment uninhabitable for five weeks, Leonard and Penny suggest Amy move into Leonard and Sheldon’s apartment. After Amy proposes their cohabitation as an experiment, Sheldon agrees to move with her into Penny’s apartment, thrilling Leonard and Penny. Amy’s first night in Sheldon’s bed is rough and she doesn’t get much sleep due to Sheldon’s tossing and turning. The next morning, they fight over scientific integrity, working themselves up until Amy suggests they head for Penny’s apartment to make out. After an ultrasound, Howard and Bernadette are angry that Raj knows the sex of their baby when they had elected not to find out. They have a bad night debating whether to call Raj about it.

10.5) The Hot Tub Contamination

Amy and Sheldon storm into Leonard and Penny’s apartment arguing about Sheldon requiring a bathroom schedule. To help him cool off, Penny takes Sheldon to an ice cream parlor, where he tries to hunt for a different romantic partner. Sheldon confesses he once walked in on his father with another woman, which is why he always knocks three times when entering a room now, and it makes him worry that he’ll hurt Amy one day. Penny convinces him to give the relationship a chance. Leonard coaches Amy on how to live with Sheldon. Returning, Sheldon agrees to compromise, so he does away with the bathroom schedule and agrees to share a toothbrush holder, a big step for Sheldon. After a cancelled weekend away, Howard and Bernadette find Raj and Stuart secretly coming into their house and using the hot tub. They listen in as Raj reveals he is now single, but finally kick them out when Stuart says he isn’t wearing a bathing suit.10.6) The Fetal Kick Catalyst

Sheldon throws a brunch to surprise Amy, who wanted to invite guests over; Stuart, Bert from the geology lab, and a Romanian neighbor from downstairs attend. Stuart is insulted when he learns that the brunch was a test run before inviting others over; Sheldon apologizes and they get drunk, complimenting each other and annoying Amy. Penny gets invited to a Van Nuys Comic-Con event to sign autographs since she starred in two Serial Apeist movies; she is humiliated by fans deriding her poor acting ability but loving her topless shower scene. Leonard ends up holding court describing how he married such an attractive woman. Howard finally feels the baby kick. He and Raj go shopping, buying a crib and a minivan, but Howard injures his back and they drive to the ER.10.7) The Veracity Elasticity

Sheldon finds out via Bernadette and Howard that Amy’s apartment was repaired two weeks ago and that Amy lied about it to keep living with him. Sheldon forgives her and wants to keep living with her, but is torn about where he really belongs. He chooses to live with Amy. Meanwhile, Penny has been secretly moving Leonard’s collectibles into storage. He confronts her, but he agrees to let her decorate their bedroom to make her feel at home, putting his stuff into Sheldon’s old room.

10.8) The Brain Bowl Incubation

Amy uses skin cells from her and Sheldon to produce some primitive neurons through transdifferentiation. This inspires Sheldon to want to have a child with Amy, though she is not enthusiastic about his plan to have a child immediately. Sheldon launches a plan to seduce his girlfriend. Raj becomes attracted to Issabella, a cleaning woman at his lab, and fixes her dinner. She is insulted when she discovers that Raj told his friends that she was a fellow astronomer, but agrees to another date.

10.9) The Geology Elevation

Sheldon learns that Bert has won a MacArthur Fellowship prize for his work on endolithic organisms and has to deal with his professional jealousy. The rest of the group discuss their own internal jealousies. Professor Hawking calls Sheldon and explains that even he gets jealous. In order to make peace, Sheldon goes with Bert to a taping of The Ellen DeGeneres Show. Meanwhile, Howard finds a remote-controlled miniature Stephen Hawking he once built and, while everyone (except Kripke) thinks it is offensive, Hawking would actually like the idea.

10.10) The Property Division Collision

After Sheldon and Amy take the ugly portrait of Penny and Amy to Leonard and Penny’s apartment, the guys start to divide up their belongings. When Sheldon tries to take everything, a dispute over the official apartment flag starts a war between Sheldon and Leonard. Sheldon rents out his old room to an old man, Theodore (Christopher Lloyd), who helps them to realize that Sheldon moving out is affecting both of them deeply, leading Sheldon to acquiesce regarding the flag. Stuart brings Howard and Bernadette a gift and ends up moving back in because he was evicted from his apartment. Stuart helps them with baby things to justify his moving in, starting a war with Raj who claims he was first in line to help them. Finally, Bernadette goes into labor and everyone heads to the hospital for the arrival of the baby.

10.11) The Birthday Synchronicity

The impending birth of Bernadette and Howard’s baby coincides with Amy’s birthday, which interferes with Sheldon and Amy’s annual sex date. Raj accidentally reveals the baby is a girl and is kicked out of the Wolowitz house. When the time comes for the baby to be delivered, everyone waits in the lobby of the hospital. The friends all reminisce about how much has changed in ten years, though Raj feels he has done the least, which further upsets him. Halley Wolowitz is born and Raj is honored to be her godfather. The baby’s cry sounds like her grandmother, Debbie Wolowitz. After going to The Wizarding World of Harry Potter, Amy and Sheldon finally have their annual birthday coital festivities.

10.12) The Holiday Summation

After the Christmas holiday, Sheldon and Amy tell Leonard and Penny about their visit to his mother Mary, who upset Sheldon by confessing she never thought he would find a partner. Sheldon reacted by acting anti-socially and getting his ear pierced. Also, Leonard and Penny had a series of mishaps chopping down a Christmas tree and bringing it home, while Bernadette and Howard have been struggling to cope with a constantly screaming baby.

10.13) The Romance Recalibration

Penny feels Leonard is not putting enough effort into their relationship now that they are married. Leonard thinks that he is the only one putting in any effort at all. Angrily, Penny takes Amy with her to a spa weekend in lieu of Leonard. Sheldon and Leonard soon follow, solving the problem by having Sheldon create a Relationship Agreement for Leonard and Penny just like Sheldon and Amy’s. Meanwhile, Howard and Raj create a path in the baby’s room to the crib without causing the floorboards to squeak, thus disturbing baby Halley, with an overly complicated solution.

10.14) The Emotion Detection Automation

Sheldon wants to understand others’ emotions better and gets an experimental machine from MIT that reads other people for him. It reveals Leonard is angry about Penny inviting her ex-drug dealing brother to stay with them while he applies for a job at her pharmaceutical company. Sheldon is upset the machine works so well, as he feels he cannot understand others himself, but Amy comforts him, proud of his progress. Leonard and Penny apologize for blaming their fight on him, while Penny still intends to blame Leonard to her family as the reason why Randall cannot stay with them. Meanwhile, Raj calls together several of his ex-girlfriends to find out why he’s still single. Emily Sweeney, Lucy, Claire, and Emily the deaf woman leave him feeling down, since they all found better relationships after they dumped him. Howard promises that, if things don’t work out with Bernadette, he’ll become Raj’s partner in thirty years.10.15) The Locomotion Reverberation

Sheldon, Leonard, and Howard are nearly finished with their guidance system for the military, but Sheldon thinks it could be even smaller. To distract him, Leonard gifts him a trip to be a train conductor in Nevada. The trip greatly excites Sheldon, becoming all he thinks about. After seeing Sheldon’s theory, Colonel Williams orders his smaller version to be made instead, so Leonard and Howard try and get him to come back, with Howard promising to teach him the mechanics of trains in exchange for his help. Meanwhile, Penny and Amy take Bernadette out to get her mind off motherhood duties, but the new baby has made Penny and Amy sad over the slow progress in their own relationships. Raj and Stuart babysit Halley while having a few minor mishaps.

10.16) The Allowance Evaporation

Sheldon and Amy are out on a date when Bert the geologist is stood up. He says he admires them other than their only having sex once a year. Amy is angry Sheldon told everyone at the university. Sheldon apologizes, now understanding the need for privacy, and also informs Amy of one of his private secrets: that he got his driver’s license two years ago, but lets her chauffeur him to feel important. Meanwhile, Raj’s father has stopped trying to find him a wife since Raj still relies on him to pay for everything. Raj’s friends make him realize he is spoiled. Raj decides to stop taking the money to prove everyone wrong, though his father is very happy.

10.17) The Comic-Con Conundrum

Raj appoints Sheldon as his financial manager and is told he cannot afford to go to San Diego Comic-Con this year. Raj tries selling his collectibles and working for Stuart to make extra money. Howard does a bunch of chores so Bernadette will let him leave for five days. Penny says she wants to go with the guys to make Leonard happy, but they both think she’ll be miserable, leading to tension until Sheldon and Amy reveal the truth. Howard and Bernadette try to pay Raj for babysitting Halley, but he rejects the money along with his chance to go. Leonard decides to stay home to be with Penny and Howard does the same for his family. Sheldon still plans on going, confounding Amy with his attempts to have her join him.

10.18) The Escape Hatch Identification

Raj can no longer afford his apartment, so Leonard and Penny temporarily give him Sheldon’s old room. This makes Sheldon uncomfortable and he calls Beverly to have her analyze why. She claims he views his old room as an escape hatch should things go wrong with Amy and that Leonard and Penny need a roommate to distract themselves from their own relationship problems. The group’s fighting leads to Raj leaving and scaring Howard, Bernadette, and Stuart in the middle of the night. The couples are able to work through their issues and Raj is invited back to stay with Leonard and Penny.

10.19) The Collaboration Fluctuation

Sheldon and Amy attempt to analyze the Copenhagen interpretation using the neurobiology of decision-making. Professionally collaborating for the first time, they try to be nice for the sake of their relationship, but their work is of poor quality. They find that insulting each other makes them more creative, so they compile a list of topics on which insults are allowed. Meanwhile, Penny and Raj bond over girly things, causing Leonard to feel left out. Howard and Bernadette suggest that he talk to them, but Raj and Penny talk over Leonard about his feelings.

10.20) The Recollection Dissipation

Sheldon pushes himself to work on the guidance system with Howard and Leonard and his project with Amy on the same day. He catches a cold and wakes up the next day, half-naked and with no memory of what he did after he took cold medicine. His notebook of classified information on the military project is gone. Tracking his phone, they realize Sheldon went to a Western-themed bar. He gets the notebook back, but learns he told everyone there about the project after making them pinky swear to secrecy. Meanwhile, Bernadette feels guilty about returning to work so soon and leaving Halley. Howard thinks she is mad at him, but makes her feel better by saying that they can change their choices if they want and Halley won’t remember this anyway. Amy performs Soft Kitty for Sheldon in different languages using an autoharp.

10.21) The Separation Agitation

Bert the geologist interrupts the latest “Fun with Flags” episode to tell everyone he has a girlfriend now, a personal trainer named Rebecca. He brings her to meet the gang, but it becomes clear that she is only with Bert for his grant money. They convince him to dump her. However, he misses her, calling “Fun With Flags” again to say that he got her back by purchasing her a jet ski. Meanwhile, Howard, Bernadette, and Stuart are all upset about leaving Halley at the university’s daycare. Howard and Stuart take her out the first day to go to an aquarium.

10.22) The Cognition Regeneration

Sheldon loses his edge at online gaming and tries several new tasks to keep his mind sharp: baking with Raj, juggling with Howard, and riding a unicycle. Amy says maybe he should just focus on living well, though Sheldon wants to try stilts. Penny runs into her ex-boyfriend Zack, who offers her a job at his menu company. Penny likes the idea and Leonard reluctantly supports her. However, Zack says she cannot have the job as his fiance thinks it is a stupid idea for him to work with an ex-girlfriend. Meanwhile, Howard is tired of Bernadette making fun of his magic tricks and finds her old ventriloquist dummy, though she uses it to scare Howard.

10.23) The Gyroscopic Collapse

Leonard, Howard and Sheldon finish their gyroscope for the Air Force, only to have it confiscated by the military for classified reasons. The loss of the project causes Howard to become clingy with Bernadette, though he reminds her she’s behaved in a similar manner after setbacks at her own job. Raj plans to move out of Leonard and Penny’s apartment, and into a room above Bert’s garage. Amy is offered a summer position as a guest researcher at Princeton. Though Sheldon initially takes the news badly, he ultimately agrees she should accept the offer.

10.24) The Long Distance Dissonance

With Amy away, Sheldon’s old admirer Dr. Ramona Nowitzki begins to hang around him at Caltech and later his home. The rest of the gang become convinced she is pursuing Sheldon, alarming Amy. They do their best to keep her away from him, even following her to her car after dinner as a group. Sheldon doesn’t believe Ramona is romantically interested in him, but when he asks her about it, she kisses him. Sheldon immediately departs and flies to New Jersey, proposing to Amy the second she answers the door.With an exciting cliffhanger ending that wets the appetites for season 11. The show continues to be a juggernaut of comedy with many more adventures to come.

 

 

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REVIEW: TERMINATOR: THE SARAH CONNOR CHRONICLES – SEASON 1 & 2

SarahConnorChronicles

MAIN CAST

Lena Headey (Game of Thrones)
Thomas Dekker (Heroes)
Summer Glau (Arrow)
Richard T. Jones (Godzilla)
Brian Austin Green (Anger Management)
Leven Rambin (The Hunger Games)
Garret Dillahunt (Winter’s Bone)
Shirley Manson (Knife Fight)
RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Owain Yeoman (Supergirl)
Sonya Walger (Flashforward)
Nick Wechsler (Roswell)
Dean Winters (Brooklyn Nine-Nine)
Charlayne Woodard (The Crucible)
Tony Amendola (Annabelle)
Sasha Roiz (Caprica)
Jonathan Sadowski (Friday the 13th)
Brendan Hines (Lie To Me)
Catherine Dent (Taken)
Alessandra Torresani (The Big Bang Theory)
Tiya Sircar (The Vampire Diaries)
Andy Umberger (Angel)
Lee Thompson Young (Smallville)
Neil Hopkins (Lost)
Peter Mensah (Spartacus)
Bruce Davison (High Crimes)
Karina Logue (Scream: The Series)
Craig Fairbrass (Cliffhanger)
Dean Norris (Breaking Bad)
Zack Ward (Transformers)
Busy Philipps (The Smokers)
Leah Pipes (The Originals)
Jon Huertas (Sabrina: TTW)
Mackenzie Brooke Smith (Supergirl)
Dorian Harewood (Earth: Final Concflict)
Stephanie Jacobsen (Alex Cross)
Adam Busch (Buffy)
Richard Schiff (The Cape)
Eric Steinberg (Stargate SG.1)
Todd Stashwick (The Originals)
Rebecca Creskoff (Bates Motel)
Carlos Jacott (Firefly)
Samantha Krutzfeldt (A Mann’s World)
Connor Trinneer (Stargate: Atlantis)
Chad Lindberg (The Fast and The Furious)
Chad L. Coleman (Arrow)

When we first heard that FOX was making a Terminator series, we mostly groaned and rolled our eyes. It just sounded like a bad idea and a cynical ploy to capitalize on a flagging movie property. What’s more, when you think of Terminator, you think of big movies with huge effects and action sequences that set new standards. You don’t think of “Terminators of the Week” battling on smaller screens with tighter budgets.

 It was the first regular episode after the pilot that I feel the show really came into its own. That’s when the tone of the series was established, the more deliberate and introspective pace. Summer Glau’s performance as Cameron changed a bit.
 It’s the mark of a good show when, one by one, all of your issues are accounted for. In the episode Heavy Metal John does what he has to do despite Sarah’s overprotection. He’s becoming the leader he needs to become, and when Sarah says it’s too soon, Cameron says something to the effect of “Is it? The world ends in 4 years…” At the same time, Sarah came to value Cameron’s strategic value. She might not trust her (and should she?), but she no longer denies her the tactical advantage they have when using her.
As for the missing Terminator parts, the show picked up the ball there and ran with it. Agent Ellison finds the missing hand, and destroying the Terminator Cameron disabled becomes a great scene and establishes the use of thermite. When a show proves to you that it’s got the bases covered, and that it isn’t being sloppy with its storytelling – it gains your confidence and makes tuning in each week that much more satisfying. Terminator pulled this off in just nine episodes – which is remarkable considering they had only so much time and never planned on having such a short season because of the writers strike. There were a number of stylistic flourishes throughout the show that demonstrated how the series was different from the movies, and that this wasn’t going to be a show that was afraid to strike out on its own. Sarah’s dream where she assassinates the creators of the atomic bomb was particularly inspired. Bruce Davison (as Dr. Silberman) describing in awed rapture the events from T2 was a terrific bridge between this series and one of the most famous sequences of the entire franchise. The series ended on a high note, with Johnny Cash’s “The Man Comes Around” playing while a Terminator does what Terminators do. Only this time it’s done in a stylistically original way. It’s another scene that serves as an example of how the show stepped out on its own. It shows a level of creative maturity not usually found in franchised properties.
Then there’s the introduction of Brian Austin Green as Derek Reese. This was a decision that had us – and other fans – concerned that the show was making a big mistake. Why Green? It seems there could have been dozens, if not hundreds of other actors to take on this role. Actors who didn’t play the keyboard wielding dweeb on Beverly Hills 90210. Yet, again, the show proved worthy of our confidence and trust. Green did an excellent job, and played Reese not as your standard badass, but instead a man of emotional depth who had been turned into a soldier because the world around him fell apart.
Green’s best moments came in the finale. First, he uses a little girl to creatively settle a hostage situation. Then, he takes John to the park to celebrate his birthday. Without getting specific, there’s a touching moment, playing on the time travel device. “Happy Birthday,” Derek says, and leaves it at that. It’s an emotional note that was never quite achieved in the movies – and proof that the episodic format allows for greater complexity and character development than we’ve seen in the franchise. It’s also encouraging that the characters had become so resonant in these early episodes – and bodes well for the future.
No one likes to see a good show go under, especially just as it’s approaching new heights, and the recent cancellation of Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles (2008-2009) proved almost equally disheartening. At least the latter had a fighting chance, though: the mid-season replacement pulled down great numbers at first, but its popularity rapidly declined during the initial nine-episode run. Higher production costs didn’t help matters, either…yet Chronicles was renewed for a full-sized second season, where it expanded the series’ mythology and tossed in a few stand-alone episodes. Featuring plenty of terrific characters, tense action and special effects on par with Hollywood blockbusters, there was plenty to like…but roughly a month after the season finale aired, it was confirmed that the series wouldn’t return.
Nonetheless, this second and final season stands as one of the better stretches of television in recent memory. In an accompanying behind-the-scenes featurette, creator Josh Friedman admits that the cast and crew had no idea that Season 1 would end where it did—but you’d never know from watching, since the series stops and re-starts so seamlessly. Opening adventure “Samson and Delilah” kicks things off in a major way, punctuated by a gripping slow-motion sequence set to a musical cover by Shirley Manson of Garbage fame. Speaking of Manson, she’s front and center this season as Catherine Weaver, the mysterious leader of ZeiraCorp, a growing corporation with an interest in advanced technology. She’s eventually joined by former FBI agent James Ellison (Richard T. Jones); Ellison acts as her head of security and a mentor to ZeiraCorp’s experimental computer, who’s known as “John Henry”. Though more intelligent and efficient than the world’s greatest minds put together, this powerful entity is still a child learning about the the world and the humans in it.
Naturally, such a vague company—especially one with its hands in high-tech gadgetry—soon ends up on the radar of Sarah Connor (Lena Headey), who continues to forge onward with her son John (Thomas Dekkar), John’s uncle Derek Reese (Brian Austin Green) and Cameron, a Terminator sent from the future to aid them. New to the crowd are Jesse Flores (Stephanie Jacobsen) and Riley Dawson (Leven Rambin); both serve as love interests to Derek and John respectively…but like Catherine Weaver, they seem to have somewhat questionable pasts. Far more than the typical good-versus-evil formula that typically dominates modern sci-fi, The Sarah Connor Chronicles takes a decidedly different approach: it focuses on human existence and emotion as much as firefights and chase sequences. The formula works amazingly well during this season of 22 episodes.
 After the blistering “Samson and Delilah”, things don’t let up for a while. “Automatic for the People” introduces Riley and takes our heroes inside a nuclear power plant—but a major clue is unearthed, as Sarah discovers a list of events, places and other clues about Skynet, the company that Sarah believes will bring about Judgment Day. “Mousetrap” is a standout episode for a number of reasons: not only does it push the story further onward, but it’s one of the more suspenseful and exciting episodes in the bunch. “Allison from Palmdale” stands tall as a solid origin story for Cameron, while the extended “Goodbye to All That” sends John and Derek on a field trip with a Terminator model 888 in hot pursuit. These episodes—and several others, of course—show how much Season 2 has expanded the story’s scope. Well over half the episodes are shot on location in various parts of California and beyond—and with the vague threat of ZeiraCorp looming overhead, tension remains high throughout the first half of the season.
As the season’s second half approaches, things start to get a little cloudy…both for the narrative itself and the show’s ratings, which gradually slid as the season progressed. “Self-Made Man” and “Alpine Fields” are two stand-alone episodes designed to draw in new fans, as the creative team felt that a continuous thrust forward would hurt the series’ chances of survival. Unfortunately, these two episodes are some of the least impressive: while decent enough on their own terms, they feel completely out of context and arrive at the wrong time. These may have added a few viewers, but I imagine they probably confused and frustrated those expecting the series to continue its steady pace forward. Nonetheless, “Earthlings Welcome Here” gets things back on track…but within the context of the series’ original broadcast dates, it may have come too late. This would be the last episode before the holiday break, with Chronicles returning two months later in the dreaded Friday night timeslot…which television fans refer to as “the kiss of death”.
It’s sad, really, because The Sarah Connor Chronicles really got back on its feet from that point onward. “The Good Wound” was much better suited to draw in new fans than a stand-alone episode: taking several cues from Terminator 2, this Sarah-centered adventure re-acquaints us with an important figure from her past. The next several episodes flesh out story elements introduced earlier in the season, as Sarah, John, Derek and Cameron set out to solve a mysterious factory explosion in the desert. After “Some Must Watch While Some Must Sleep”, Chronicles sprints to the finish line: Jesse and Riley’s pasts begin to unravel, John Henry and ZeiraCorp’s true intentions are revealed, Sarah and company head off into unfamiliar territory and several major characters meet their doom. It all culminates with “Born to Run”, which ends the series on a high note, tying up several loose ends but leaving others to the imagination. Poignant, clever and almost hopeful, it’s a fitting farewell to a series that was killed off too early.

Regardless, Warner Bros. has given The Sarah Connor Chronicles a strong send-off on DVD, as this second season arrives in a fully-loaded six-disc collection. The series’ crisp cinematography and ambitious sound mix—both of which feel more like big-screen efforts than typical TV fare—are supported by a solid technical presentation, while fans can also look forward to a collection of entertaining and informative bonus features. Though Friedman’s excellent series now joins the gone-too-early ranks

REVIEW: THE BIG BANG THEORY – SEASON 9

MAIN CAST

Johnny Galecki (Hancock)
Jim parsons (Garden State)
Kaley Cuoco (Killer Movie)
Simon Helberg (Dr. Horrible)
Kunal Nayyar (Trolls)
Kevin Sussman (Ugly Betty)
Melissa Rauch (I Love You, Man)
Mayim Bialik (Blossom)
Laura Spencer (Bones)
untitled
RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Laurie Mercalf (3rd Rock From The Sun)
Melissa Tang (Mom)
Keith Carradine (The Duelists)
John Ross Bowie (The Heat)
Michael Rapaport (My Name Is Earl)
Wil Wheaton (Powers)
Stephen Merchant (The Office)
Analeigh Tipton (Warm Bodies)
Elon Misk (Machete Kills)
Bob Newhart (Elf)
Jane Kaczmarek (Malcolm In The Middle)
Alessandra Torresani (Caprica)
Chrstine Baranski (Into The Woods)
Sara Gilbert (Poison Ivy)
Adam West (60s Batman)
Stephen Hawking (Futurama)
Brian Smith (Caller ID)
Judd Hirsch (Independence Day)

Image result for THE BIG BANG THEORY The Matrimonial Momentum

In a TV landscape where lasting success is incredibly difficult to come by, The Big Bang Theory has defied all odds and managed to survive for a full nine seasons (with at least one more yet to come). In terms of ratings, the show is as popular and successful as ever. Season 9 took some interesting gambles that helped shake up the familiar formula. The fallout of Season 8 necessitated a few major changes when the show returned last fall. For one thing, Sheldon (Jim Parsons) was coping with being dumped by long-time girlfriend Amy (Mayim Bialik) even as he was on the verge of proposing to her. Meanwhile, Leonard (Johnny Galecki) and Penny (Kaley Cuoco) were still determined to carry out their impulsive Vegas wedding despite Leonard admitting to a drunken faux pas during his extended absence months before. Both of those storylines set the tone for the first few months of the season.

Image result for THE BIG BANG THEORY The Separation Oscillation

Sheldon is the biggest change. He’s gotten a lot more human. That actually makes sense because he’s been surrounded by social people for 8 plus years now. Even Sheldon would have had to pick up a thing or two. And as much as I love the season 1 Sheldon, that act would have gotten completely old by now had his character not expanded a little. He’s still Sheldon, but Amy has softened him up a bit. This season he’s dealing with Amy breaking up with him because their relationship was going nowhere. The comedy is that Sheldon in his 30’s and is going through dating and breakups for the first time so he’s reacting to it like normal people do when they are 16. It’s funny.

Image result for THE BIG BANG THEORY The Separation Oscillation

Leonard hasn’t changed much since the beginning. But his relationship with Penny has. It continues to evolve, it’s fun watching them adapt to marriage life.

Image result for THE BIG BANG THEORY The Bachelor Party Corrosion

Howard and Bernadette marriage is still just as fun as before. That was a good change for the show. Howard would have become insufferable by now in his original form. The marriage works well for the show. These two have on screen chemistry and great comic timing with one another. With a baby looming it will be fun to see what that brings. With Raj starting to get more social and having been able to talk to women without being drunk for several seasons now, Stuart has taken over the role as the lovable pathetic loser on the show. That starts getting pushed harder at the start of season 9. The inclusion of Laura Spencer from Bones to the main cast was nice, it’s also nice seeing Raj having a regular girlfriend.

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Other highlights this season include

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The Bachelor Party Corrosion: Raj and Howard plan to kidnap Leonard to a secret location for the weekend as a belated bachelor party and forcefully take Sheldon with them. Meanwhile, the women have a small bachelorette party at Penny’s apartment.

The 2003 Approximation

The 2003 Approximation: Leonard and Penny finally tell Sheldon they have moved in together now that they are married. Sheldon is upset, but Bernadette says he should try to find another roommate, though Stuart firmly rejects her idea that he move in with Sheldon. Sheldon rejects everyone he meets and Amy refuses to live with him, as they have just broken up. Sheldon tries to pretend that it is 2003, before he met Leonard, Penny and Amy, and before he developed emotional connections to other people.The Perspiration ImplementationThe Perspiration Implementation: Howard builds a machine to add mileage to the Fitbit Bernadette buys to track his exercise. Leonard, however, decides that the group should become more active and they take up the sport of fencing, attending a class taught by Barry KripkeImage result for the big bang theory the spock resonance

The Spock Resonance: Wil Wheaton arranges for Sheldon to be interviewed for a documentary about Spock and Leonard Nimoy by his son Adam.

Image result for the big bang theory the earworm reverberation

The Earworm Reverberation: Sheldon is humming the melody to a song of which he does not know the name, especially unusual because of his eidetic memory. He spends two days obsessing over the tune and recording a log while he is still mentally sound.1474473991_128475_1474474187_noticia_normalThe Opening Night Excitation: After an iconic Star Wars-like opening credit crawl, the men are overjoyed to get opening night tickets to the Star Wars: The Force Awakens movie, which premieres on Amy’s birthday. Sheldon still wants to see it, despite Penny saying he should be with Amy.

 

Image result for the big bang theory the empathy optimization

The Empathy Optimization: While Amy is still away, Sheldon has recovered from the flu, but, though his friends attempt to help him, his rude behaviour during his illness offends them. They decide to rent a party bus to Las Vegas to get away from him.

bbt-guys-on-the-van

The Meemaw Materialization: Sheldon’s grandmother “Meemaw” visits Pasadena to check out Amy. While, Raj has a debate about Frozen with Howard, attracting the attention of Claire, a bartender working on a sci-fi screenplay for a children’s film.

Image result for the big bang theory The Celebration Experimentation

The Celebration Experimentation: When Amy plans a birthday party for Sheldon because he made her birthday so special, he is reluctant on account of a traumatic childhood experience in which his sister’s friends lied to him that Batman was coming to his sixth birthday, thereby ruining his birthday thereafter

Image result for the big bang theory The Solder Excursion Diversion

The Solder Excursion Diversion: While Leonard and Howard work in Howard’s lab, their wives join them and help them with their project. After leaving to pick up more solder, the two men are invited to see a preview of Suicide Squad and decide to lie to their wives and attend.Image result for the big bang theory The Convergence ConvergenceThe Convergence Convergence: When Leonard and Penny announce their second wedding ceremony, conflict arises between Leonard’s parents, Beverly and Alfred.

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Another great season which leaves you waiting for season 10.

12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS REVIEW: BONES – THE SANTA IN THE SLUSH

THE SANTA IN THE SLUSH

MAIN CAST

Emily Deschanel (Boogeyman)
David Boreanaz (Angel)
Michaela Conlin (Enchanted)
T.J. Thyne (Timecop 2)
Zach Millegan (On_Line)
Tamara Taylor (Serenity)
John Francis Daley (Waiting)

GUEST CAST

Ryan O’Neal (Love Story)
Patricia Belcher (Jeepers Creepers)
David DeLuise (3rd Rock From The Sun)
Reginald Veljohnson (Ghostbusters)
Bess Wohl (Flightplan)
Alessandra Torresani (Caprica)
Loren Dean (Apollo 13)
Ty Panitz (Because I Said So)

Three days before Christmas, Booth, Brennan and their team are sent to investigate the death of a Santa Claus impostor after his body was discovered in the sewer near a mall. The team discovers the man’s legal name was Kristopher Kringle and was highly regarded in his profession while he worked for a local “Rent-A-Santa” business. Meanwhile, Brennan and Booth find themselves under a mistletoe, and Brennan decides to spend Christmas with her father, brother and his family.

Another great Christmas episode for Bones. Hilarious in many places especially when all the clues lead them to thinking the victim could be the real Santa. the heart warming story of Brennan trying to give her Father and Brother a good Christmas is very touching and moving.

REVIEW: BONES – SEASON 1-10

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MAIN CAST

Emily Deschanel (Boogeyman)
David Boreanaz (Angel)
Michaela Conlin (Enchanted)
T.J. Thyne (Ghost World)
Eric Millegan (The Phobic)
Jonathan Adams (Castle)
Tamara Taylor (Serenity)
John Francis Daley (Waiting…)
John Boyd (Argo)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST STARS

Larry Poindexter (Blade: The Series)
Tyrees Allen (Robocop)
Bonita Friedericy (Chuck)
Chris Conner (Walk of Shame)
Anne Dudek (White Chicks)
Heavy D (The Cider House Rules)
Toby Hemingway (The Finder)
Alex Carter (Out of Time)
Bokeem Woodbine (Spider-Man: Homecoming)
Morris Chestnut (Kick-Ass 2)
Rachelle Lefevre (Twilight)
Michael Mantell (Angel)
Jeffrey Nordling (Arrow)
David Starzyk (Veronica Mars)
Heath Freeman (Nancy Drew)
John M. Jackson (JAG)
Josh Hopkins (Cold Case)
Leonard Roberts (Agent Carter)
Rachel Miner (The Butterfly Effect 3)
Alicia Coppola (Bull)
Jim Ortlieb (Roswell)
Billy Gibbons (Two and a Half Men)
Ty Panitz (Because I Said So)
Harry Groener (Buffy)
Michael B. Silver (I Am Sam)
Penny Marshall (The Simpsons)
Suzanne Cryer (Two Guys and a Girl)
Lawrence Pressman (Dark Angel)
Jaime Ray Newman (Bates Motel)
Zeljko Ivanek (Heroes)
Judith Hoag (Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles)
Ivar Brogger (Andromeda)
Josh Keaton (Transformers Prime)
Adriana DeMeo (Killer Movie)
Robert LaSardo (Nip/Tuck)
Jose Pablo Cantillo (Standoff)
Emilio Rivera (Renegade)
Michael Bowen (Lost)
Adam Baldwin (Firefly)
David Denman (Power Rangers)
Brian Gross (2 Broke Girls)
James Parks (Kill Bill)
Robert Foxworth (Evil Beneath Loch Ness)
Rodney Rowland (Veronica Mars)
Cullen Douglas (Agents of Shield)
Michelle Hurd (Jessica Jones)
Patricia Belcher (Mike & Molly)
Giancarlo Esposito (Son of Batman)
Alexandra Krosney (Lost)
Loren Dean (Apollo 13)
Ray Wise (Robocop)
Sam Witwer (Smallville)
Shane Johnson (Birds of Prey)
Jessica Capshaw (Valetnine)
Chris Conrad (Young Hercules)
Leah Pipes (The Originals)
Christie Lynn Smith (Swamp Thing: The Series)
Keri Lynn Pratt (Cruel Intentions 2)
Carlos Lacamara (Heroes Reborn)
Cerina Vincent (Cabin Fever)
Kali Rocha (Buffy)
Kyle Gallner (Smallville)
Lisa Thornhill (Veronica Mars)
Ariel Winter (Kiss Kiss Bang Bang)
Nelson Lee (Blade: The Series)
Benito Martinez (Million Dollar Baby)
Julie Ann Emery (Hitch)
Charles Mesure (V)
Sali Richardson-Whitfield (I Am Legend)
Joshua Leonard (The Blair Witch Project)
Michael Trevino (The Vampire Diaries)
Eddie McClintock (Agents of SHIELD)
Alex Winter (Waynes World)
French Stewart (Mom)
Stephen Fry (The Hobbit 2 & 3)
Ernie Hudson (Ghostbusters)
James Hong (The Big Bang Theory)
Deborah Theaker (Best In Show)
Eric Stonestreet (Modern Family)
George Coe (The Entity)
Johnny Lewis (Felon)
Ryan O’Neal (Love Story)
Brian Hallisay (Bottoms Up)
Roxanne Hart (Highlander)
Cleo King (Mike & Molly)
Eugene Byrd (Arrow)
Cynthia Preston (Prom Night III)
Scout Taylor-Compton (Halloween)
Ron Canada (Ted 2)
Michael Cudlitz (The Walking Dead)
Christina Cox (Earth: Final Conflict)
Erin Chambers (Stargate: Atlantis)
Beth Grant (Wonderfalls)
Scoot McNairy (Batman V Superman)
Denise Crosby (Star TreK: TNG)
Rider Strong (Cabin Fever)
Azura Skye (28 Days)
Lyndsey Bartilson (Grounded for Life)
Sam Jones III (Smallville)
Xander Berkeley (Kick-Ass)
Patrick Fabian (Veronica MArs)
Patrick Fischler (Birds of Prey)
Bess Wohl (Flightplan)
David Deluise (Vampires Suck)
Reginald VelJohnson (Die Hard)
Alessandra Torressani (Caprica)
Chris William Martin (Dollhouse)
James Black (Anger Management)
Jamil Walker Smith (Stargate Universe)
Dasniel Roebuck (Lost)
Whitney Anderson (Zombie Strippers)
Taylor Kinney (Zero Dark Thirty)
Mekia Cox (Undercovers)
Austin O’Brien (The Lawnmower Man)
George Wyner (American Pie 2)
Ethan Phillips (Bad Santa)
Ian Reed Kesler (2 broke Girls)
Sean Blakemore (Star Trek Into Darkness)
Indira Varma (Game of Thrones)
Carla Gallo (Superbad)
Elizabeth Lackey (Heroes)
Jill wagner (Blade: The Series)
Richard Grant (Rocky V)
Dean Norris (Breaking Bad)
Devon Gaye (Dexter)
Adam Rose(Veronica Mars)
Michael Grant Terry (Cold Case)
Joel David Moore (Julia X)
David Gallagher (7th Heaven)
Bruce Thomas (Legally Blonde)
Blake Shields (Heroes)
Jonathan LaPaglia (Seven Days)
Nichole Hiltz (Smallville)
Eric Lange (Lost)
Brendan Fehr (Roswell)
Gina Torres (Firefly)
Ryan Cartwright (Alphas)
Mageina Tovah (Spider-Man 2 & 3)
Andy Ritcher (Arrested Development)
Stephen Lee (The Negotiator)
Bianca Lawson (Buffy)
Nathan West (The SKulls 2)
Marisa Coughlan (Super Troopers)
Noel Fisher (Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 2014)
Deirdre Lovejoy (American Gothic)
Tara Buck (True Blood)
Zachary Knighton (Flashforward)
Christine Lakin (Family Guy)
Kayla Ewell (The Vampire Diaries)
Pej Vahdat (Lie To Me)
Spencer Breslin (Wonderfalls)
Dana Davis (Heroes)
Audrey Wasilewski (Pushing Daisies)
John Pyper-Ferguson (Caprica)
Linda Hart (The Insider)
Mayim Bialik (The Big Bang Theory)
Tania Raymonde (Texas Chainsaw)
Brian Tee (Jurassic World)
Bumper Robinson (Sabrina: TTW)
Jaimie Alexander (Thor)]
Rick Peters (Veronica Mars)
Edwin Hodge (The Purge)
Ryan Pinkston (Bad Santa)
Scottie Thompson (Skyline)
Seth MacFarlane (Ted)
Cyndi Lauper (Girls Just Want To Have Fun)
Michael Arden (Anger Management)
Christopher B. Duncan (Veronica Mars)
Riki Lindhome (Million Dollar Baby)
Tiffany Hines (Lie To Me)
Billy Gardell (Mike & Molly)
Josie Davis (Sonny)
Amy Gumenick (Arrow)
Diedrich Bader (Vampires Suck)
Andy Umberger (Angel)
Tracy Middendorf (Scream: The Series)
Dan Castellaneta (The Simpsons)
Debbie Lee Carrington (Total Recall)
Wynn Everett (Agent Carter)
Martin Klebba (The Cape)
Lindsay Hollister (Blubberella)
Ralph Waite (The Waltons)
Nakia Burrise (Power Rangers Turbo)
Mickey Jones (V)
Dorian Missick (The Cape)
Zooey Deschanel (New Girl)
Dale Dickey (My Name Is Earl)
Penny Johnson Jerald (Star Trek DS9)
Richard T. Jones (Terminator: TSCC)
Rusty Schwimmer (Highlander 2)
Henri Lubatti (Angel)
Joshua Malina (The Big Bang Theory)
Clea DuVall (The Faculty)
Ben Falcone (New Girl)
Robert Englund (A Nightmare on Elm Street)
Victor Webster (Mutant X)
Ravil Isyanov (Alias)
Rena Sofer (Heroes)
Michael Des Barres (Ghoulies)
Jillian Bach (Two Guys and a Girl)
Kate Vernon (Battlestar Galactica)
Wade Williams (Buffy)
Dylan Bruno (The Rage: Carrie 2)
Danielle Bisutti (Curse of Chucky)
Justina Machado (Final Destination 2)
Bobby Hosea (Xena)
Karina Logue (Bates Motel)
Katheryn Winnick (Vikings)
B.J. Britt (Agents of SHIELD)
Antonio Sabato Jr (Lois & CLark)
David Alan Grier (Jumanji)
Thomas Kopache (Catch Me If You Can)
Greg Cipes (Anger Management)
Kelly Stables (Two and a Half Men)
Wayne Knight (3rd Rock The Sun)
Enrico Colantoni (Veronica Mars)
Francis Capra (Heroes)
Arnold Vosloo (The Mummy)
Matthew John Armstrong (Heroes)
Laura Regan (Minority Report TV)
Leslie-Anne Huff (The Vampire Diaries)
Marisa Ramirez (Spartacus: Gods of The Arena)
Michael Welch (All The Boys Lvoe Mandy Lane)
Sarah Baker (Mike & Molly)
Saffron Burrows (Agents of SHIELD)
Danny Trejo (Machete)
Michael Clarke Duncan (Sin City)
Mini Anden (Chuck)
Suzie Plakson (Red Eye)
Geoff Stults (Wedding Crashers)
Carlo Rota (Stargate Universe)
Sean O’Bryan (Roswell)
McKenzie Applegate (Torchwood)
Luke Kleintank (The Man In The High Castle)
John Ross Bowie (The Big Bang Theory)
Morgan Fairchild (Chuck)
Tina Majorino (Veronica Mars)
Chrlie Weber (Buffy)
Andrew Leeds (Cult)
Jessica Tuck (Super 8)
Pruitt Taylor Vince (Heroes Reborn)
Neil Hopkins (Lost)
Jennifer O’Dell (The Lost World)
William Sanderson (Blade Runner)
J.p. Manoux (Birds of Prey)
John Ducey (Sabrina: TTW)
Rosalind Chao (Star TRek: DS9)
Scott Lowell (Queer as Folk)
Reed Diamond (Dollhouse)
Alexandra Holden (The Hot Chick)
Drew Powell (Gotham)
Lori Alan (Family Guy)
Danielle Panabaker (The Flash)
Abraham Benrubi (Buffy)
Charlayne Woodard (Unbreakable)
Brad William Henke (Fury)
Henry Simmons (Agents of SHIELD)
Vik Sahay (Chuck)
Larry Poindexter (Blade: The Series)
Tamlyn Tomita (Highlander: The Series)
Brooke Langton (The Net: The Series)
Brian Klugman (Cloverfield)
Danny Woodburn (Watchmen)
Ntare Guma Mbaho Mwine (Queen of Katwe)
J.D. Walsh (Two and a Half Men)
Nishi Munshi (The Originals)
Curtis Armstrong (New Girl)
Dave Thomas (Rat Race)
Allison Scagliotti (Warehouse 13)
Danielle Harris (urban Legend)
Joanna Cassidy (Blade Runner)
Kenneth Mitchell (Odyssey 5)
Alimi Ballard (Sabrina: TTW)
Sarah Stouffer (Chastity Bites)
Mather Zickel (The Cape)
Kathleen York (Crash)
Alastair Duncan (The Batman)
Freddie Prinze Jr (Scooby-Doo)
John Ratzenberger (Cheers)
Millicent Martin (Alfie)
Rebecca McFarland (Two and a Half Men)
Angela Alvarado (Freedom Writers)
Joaquim de Almeida (Desperado)
Loren Lester (Batman: TAS)
Nora Dunn (New Girl)
Margo Harshman (The Big Bang Theory)
Ben Lawson (No Strings Attached)
Bonnie Root (Coming Soon)
Kelly Rutherford (Gossip Girl)
Chad Donnella (Smallville)
Robert Picardo (Stargate: Atlantis)
Chris Browning (Supergirl)
Nazneen Contractor (Heroes Reborn)
Ignacio Serricchio (The Wedding Ringer)
Elizabeth Ann Bennett (The Passing)
Courntey Gains (Children of The Corn)
Sam Anderson (Lost)
Rance Howard (Angel)
JD Cullum (Glory)
Laura Spencer (The Big Bang Theory)
Francois Chau (Lost)
Gil Bellows (Flashforward)
Sean Marquette (All My Children)
Chastity Dotson (Veronica Mars)
Steven Williams (Jason Goes to Hell)
Nathaniel Buzolic (The Originals)
Jason Gray-Stanford (Monk)
Jeremy Ratchford (Cold Case)
Vito D’Ambrosio (The Flash 90s)
Kurt Fuller (Midnight In Paris)
Taylor Spreitler (Melissa & Joey)

Bones very quickly garnered rave reviews and amassed a loyal following. Bones is loosely inspired by real life forensic anthropologist and author Kathy Reichs. This funny, clever, sometimes gross, and totally addictive crime drama centers around forensic anthropologist Dr. Temperence Brennan (Emily Deschanel), who toils out of the Jeffersonian Institution and, on the side, writes mysteries starring her fictional heroine (and here’s the twist) Kathy Reichs. Because Brennan has an almost supernatural ability to generate accurate assumptions based on her examination of the corpse’s bones, she is often consulted by the FBI on difficult, seemingly unsolvable cases. She is frequently partnered by brash wiseacre FBI Special Agent Seely Booth (David Boreanaz), who seems to hold a bias against science and those who practice in that field. It’s Booth who breezily saddles Brennan with the nickname “Bones.” Naturally intuitive and freewheeling, Booth immediately is at odds with the clinically analytical Brennan. But, despite their personality clashes, and with the aid of Brennan’s gifted and quirky colleagues, the cases do get solved.

It’s no great secret that the palpable chemistry between Deschanel and Boreanaz is what actually propels the show and is what separates it from the other, more formulaic, dispassionate crime dramas. Every week, fans tune in for the leads’ deliciously caustic banter more so than for the weekly dose of mystery. You see, the mystery jones can be fixed by viewing any other one of the gazillion forensic dramas so currently prevalent on the airwaves. So the mystery is basically the MacGuffin that drives the show forward. But the cantankerous chemistry – that palpable “something” between the two leads as they hilariously bicker and wrangle – is definitely unique to this show.
Emily Deschanel is a find. I haven’t seen her before but she’s awfully good and ingratiating enough with her acerbic character. She imbues Brennan with a cooly detached yet vulnerable and lonely quality that intrigues and endears her to the fans. Her social awkwardness and pop culture ignorance are also quite charming. It’s pretty funny that a mention made regarding a pop culture reference almost always elicits a response of “I don’t know what that means” from the clueless Bones. And, of course, her expertise in the martial arts doesn’t detract from her allure.

And David Boreanaz. Yeah, I found it difficult going, at first, watching him in a new role, seeing as how I’m a fan of Buffy and Angel. But it helps that Booth isn’t much like our vampire with a soul. This ex-Army Ranger Special Agent is breezy, personable, and outgoing, not brooding, tortured, and introspective like Angelus. So, the transition, while disconcerting for me, was ultimately smooth enough. Boreanaz brings such command, self-assurance and charm to his character that I bought into it soon enough.
My favorite episodes are the pilot episode, where we are introduced to the cast; “The Man in the Fallout Shelter” – the team is quarantied together in the Jeffersonian during Christmas and we learn personal stuff about the characters; “Two Bodies in the Lab” – character development galore in this episode as Brennan dates on-line and is targeted while she works on two cases; “The Superhero in the Alley” – a decomposed body is found wearing a superhero costume; and “The Woman in Limbo” – a gripping, emotional season finale as Brennan discovers shocking facts about her parents.

The start of the season sees a new boss, Cam, arrive at the Institute. Not only is she very hands on, she is a former love of Booth, and Tempe and Cam do not hit it off in the early episodes. The new character is well written and softens as the season progresses until it is hard to imagine the team without her input. Meantime Zac undergoes a make-over in order to secure a permanent place on the staff once he gains his doctorate, and Hodkins and Angela begin a tentative office romance.
Booth and Brennan continue to spar verbally with each other and some of their exchanges will have you laughing out loud. When a fellow agent, Sully, begins a relationship with Tempe, Booth’s feelings are confused – but as is observed, Tempe “is rubbish at being a girl” and her own complicated life does not bode well for a permanent relationship. Tempe continues to put her foot in it socially, particularly when a case involves Booth’s Catholic religion.

Among the classy episodes are ‘The Girl with the Curl’ about child beauty Queens, (with a wonderful scene of Tempe trying to talk to a group of 8 year olds at a dance class!), ‘Aliens in a Spaceship’ which has Tempe and Hodgkins buried alive by a serial killer, and ‘The Headless Witch in the Woods’ which has more than a nod to The Blair Witch Project. Guest stars this season include Stephen Fry as a laid back, insightful Psychiatrist whom Booth must see after he shoots an ice cream van, and Ryan O’Neal as Tempe’s estranged and mysterious father whose elusive character comes into his own when Booth is targetted by the Mob. And, once again, Angela’s instantly recognisable father – from ZZ Top – pops up!

BONES keeps on keeping on. Two excellent seasons under its belt, and a truncated Season 3 (damn you, writers’ strike!) finally all wrapped up, and predictably, these are good episodes, as well. But only fifteen of them! As Season 3’s first episode (“The Widow’s Son in the Windshield”) opens up, we learn that Bones has been reluctant to go in the field with Booth and she won’t say why. However, a head flung off a bridge forces her to reconnect with Booth. This episode also begins a new serial killer arc, this one being particularly even more gristly and diabolical than most, and of which resolution later down the season would have tragic consequences.

Season 3 doles out several other subplots. As per the startling news learned at the altar from Season 2’s finale, Angela is already married. An ongoing story arc becomes Hodgins and Angela’s search for her long-time but vaguely remembered husband. “The Secret of the Soil” introduces Dr. Sweets, a 22 year old psychotherapist assigned to counsel Bones and Booth, this stemming from the FBI’s concern due to Booth having arrested Bones’ father. These sessions are generally funny stuff as, mostly, Booth can’t help but treat Sweets like a kid. Plus, these scenes tend to open things up even more between Bones and Booth.

I’ve a couple of Season 3 favorites. “The Widow’s Son in the Windshield” introduces the cannibalistic Gormogon killer, which would become a key ongoing story arc of the season. “Mummy in the Maze” is a very neat Halloween show, wherein Booth’s shameful phobia is unveiled and Bones’s costume is…simply awesome. “The Knight on the Grid” is a taut thriller as the Gormagon killer returns, this time with a personal vendetta against Bones and Booth. And “The Santa in the Slush” is a standout sentimental episode and provides one of the best moments in the series as Bones cuts a deal to have Christmas brought to her incarcerated father and brother. Cool ending, too. “The Baby in the Bough” has Bones forced to babysit an infant involved with a case (you see the potential, right?). Meanwhile, “The Wannabe in the Weeds” (in which Zach and Bones both sing) and “The Pain in the Heart” are striking for their ability to stun the audience, even if the latter episode definitely had a rushed feeling to it. I feel that the after-effects of “The Wannabe in the Weeds” should’ve been developed further in “The Pain in the Heart.” In fact, “The Pain in the Heart” – which wraps up the Gormogon killer storyline and, by the way, will upset busloads of fans.
The cases are still bizarre and the corpses borderline grotesque. But the draw remains Emily Deschanel and David Boreanaz, and that electric “thing” between them. These two still get aces in chemistry, and are still the smokingest hot couple on television. Emily Deschanel continues to nail her role of Temperance “Bones” Brennan. And while her character might’ve loosened up a little bit (not too much), there’s still that endearing naivette and vulnerability which peek out occasionally. And, of course, her refreshing bluntness (some call it social awkwardness) has never left. Boreanaz, he’s just a great leading man. Confident and charming, bristling with machismo, yet with a sensitive side. His unveiling of his Christmas present to Bones in “The Santa in the Slush” is one of the best, most touching scenes of the season.

World-renowned forensic anthropologist Temperance “Bones” Brennan is as brusque and tactless as ever, as confounded by the subtleties of social decorum as ever (or as Sweets exclaims: “She is wicked literal!”). Bones is still very much that intimidating icy intellect, still a wounded soul, and still solving murders. FBI Special Agent Seeley Booth is still the one with the people skills and that well-developed bump of intuition. More onions are peeled in this season as we learn even more about the underpinnings of our core characters. The absolute big draw of this show is that sizzle between David Boreanaz and Emily Deschanel, their fabulous interplay tantalizing and frustrating the viewers. Could this be the season that they get together? Well, kind of, sort of. Taking what the show is giving, I wallow in their ever evolving relationship.

Staying on the personal, Hodgins and Angela are trying to move past their break-up. “The Skull in the Sculpture” demonstrates that Angela is more ready to move on than Hodgins, and if you thought Angela was a free spirit before, well, now… This episode also has Sweets demonstrating the best way ever to fire someone. Young FBI psychologist Lance Sweets, by the way, becomes a regular cast member in this season, and I like him more and more as each episode progresses, even if Booth and Bones continually treat him like a pesky little brother. Even Dr. Saroyan’s past is delved into.

Zack Addy, apprentice to the Gormagon Killer, has been institutionalized, which doesn’t keep him from strolling out to help the squints on a baffling case. Still, this gives rise to a running theme, that of the rotating roster of interns as Saroyan and Bones attempt to fill Zack’s spot, and the fun thing is that each of these interns comes with baggage. There’s the morbid one, the excessively chirpy one, the one constantly dispensing trivia, etc. The most martyred one may well be that repressed intern who insists on keeping things professional at all times – except that, the squints being a tight bunch, he keeps getting exposed to a deluge of innuendo and gossip in the workplace.

There isn’t really a running mystery arc to tie these episodes together – no one like the Gormagon Killer running around, for example. But that doesn’t mean that the cases aren’t gripping; some of them are really interesting. The season opens with “Yanks in the U.K.”  which plants Brennan and Booth in jolly old England, investigating a murder and running into a British version of themselves. In “The Passenger in the Oven” Bones and Booth are on a flight bound to China and have only four hours to solve a murder before the plane lands and Booth loses jurisdiction. “Double Trouble in the Panhandle” has Booth and Bones infiltrating the Big Top as “Buck & Wanda and their Knives of Death,” and their circus act is actually fraught with more suspense than in just about any other scene in this season.

Some other favorites? In “The Double Death of the Dearly Departed,” Bones and Booth steal a corpse due for cremation from a funeral home, Bones believing that the body had been “translated,” which is Booth’s made-up code for murder. “Mayhem on a Cross” unveils some dark stuff about Sweets’ past, this episode also featuring the return of the awesome Stephen Fry as FBI shrink Gordon Gordon Wyatt. It also had me cracking up whenever Bones insisted on correctly pronouncing “skalle” (the Norwegian word for “skull”). “The Hero in the Hold” features the return of the Grave Digger serial killer. “The Princess and the Pear” plonks Bones and Booth’s temp replacement in the world of comic book conventions, and Bones finally gets another chance to flash her martial arts mojo.
Image result for bones the critic in the cabernetIn “The Critic in the Cabernet” Bones drops a bomb on Booth and Booth gets advice from a cartoon character, a frivolous conceit which goes on to have a terrifying payoff. Finally Season 4 closes with a quirky fantasy episode featuring a re-shuffling of roles. In this reality, Dr. Saroyan and Booth’s brother are homicide detectives and Booth and Bones are a married couple who run a nightclub and who end up as suspects in a murder case. It’s neat that just about everyone is in this one.

At the beginning of the fifth season of the wildly popular forensic drama “Bones,” many viewers tuned in trepidatiously after the spectacularly strange fourth season finale. Thankfully, all fears were allayed and relieved when the fifth season kicked into high gear in the very first episode and maintained that pace throughout the season; “Bones”‘ fifth season is perhaps its greatest yet.
The one thing that has always set “Bones” apart from the countless other procedurals on the airwaves right now is the focus on the characters solving the crimes rather than the crimes themselves, and the strength of this approach shines through brilliantly in every episode of this season.
David Boreanaz and Emily Deschanel return to the roles of Booth and Bones and deliver their strongest performances yet as each character is shaken to their core. As Booth struggles to regain his sense of self, he has to confront the knowledge of his feelings for his partner, while Bones herself goes through a whirlwind of emotion as the emotional barriers she has erected around her heart begin to crumble down, leaving her questioning not only herself but her relationship with Booth as well as her work at the Jeffersonian itself. The tension between the two has never been more delicious or more addictive, and both lead actors knock their roles absolutely out of the park.
But while the relationship between Booth and Brennan becomes increasingly more complex, the wonderful supporting cast of engaging characters at the Jeffersonian keep the show moving along briskly and lightly. Cam (Tamara Taylor) must run the lab while dealing with the challenge of being a good mother, guiding the team effectively toward each conclusion; Sweets (John Francis Daley) continues to provide invaluable insight into the minds of the team; Angela (Michaela Conlin) remains the emotional heart and soul of the team as she opens her heart to love’s possibilities; and Hodgins (TJ Thyne) struggles with his feelings for Angela as he returns to his abrasive, loveable self.

The cases themselves have regained a fascinating light as the mysteries the team confronts become more complex, and the special effects department has outdone themselves in the gore and goop department this year as Booth and Bones investigate some of the most gruesome crime scenes in history, all moved along by the brisk black humor the show excels at; the team investigates a possible secret agent locked in a truck for days, a would-be rocker torn to pieces by an industrial washer/dryer, a gamer literally melted in a vat of fast-food grease, and a dozen more cheerfully disgusting cases where the outcomes of the mysteries hold the power to shock and surprise the audience; the writers have once again caught the perfect balance between the whodunnit and the drama to craft a truly unique show. But it’s not merely the cases that hold the viewers’ attention this season; season five is full of true powerhouse episodes: heartbreaking cases like “The Plain in the Prodigy”; darkly comical shows like “The Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood”; truly shocking mysteries like “The Proof in the Pudding,”; and even a historically fascinating case written by the author of the original Temperance Brennan novels Kathy Reichs herself (“The Witch in the Wardrobe”) — however, all of these merely lead up to the three knockout moments of the season:
In the fifth season, “Bones” reaches its 100th episode, “The Parts in the Sum of the Whole.” Likely the most beloved and most contested episode in the show’s history, the 100th episode completely redefined Booth and Brennan’s relationship as it showed the viewers the pair’s first meeting, something never before revealed, and circles around to one of the most hearbreaking and yet most powerfully hopeful moments of the series. “Parts” was also directed by David Boreanaz, one of the series’ leads, and the sheer emotion wrung out of Boreanaz and Deschanel by the end speaks volumes to the talent of the show’s leads.
As the series continues, however, the characters were shocked to their cores as they were forced to come face-to-face with their most terrifying adversary yet: the cunningly frightening sociopath dubbed The Gravedigger, in “The Boy with the Answer,” a nail-bitingly tense hour of television that had viewers’ hearts pounding as Heather Taffet, the Gravedigger, proved that her true arena was the courtroom, tearing apart her victims and throwing the entire future of Brennan’s life into question.
This only segues into the season’s amazingly dramatic finale, “The Beginning in the End.” As the team investigates the home of a hoarder, Bones questions what she truly wants to do with her life, Booth’s past comes calling, and Angela’s father blows back into town, all leading to a truly shocking season ender, a masterful finale that not only redefined the very foundations of the show and the characters but also continued to set the show on a rising point, ensuring that every faithful viewer of “Bones” will be frantically waiting for the sixth season to premiere in the fall.

To resuscitate a dead team out of their scattered disappearance is not an easy task. Luckily the DA in Washington DC is a powerful woman, stubborn and resolute, and she generally gets what she wants. So she brought Agent Booth back from Afghanistan, and Temperance Brennan, aka Bones, from the exotic place where she was trying to get some archaeologically interesting bones with Daisy, Dr Sweet’s girl friend, and Dr Sweet from his hideout somewhere in Paris where he was having a showbiz career as a cabaret singer. They all come back, change clothes and back in the business in a jiffy. Angela and Dr Hodgins are also back though from not so far away and Angela is pregnant.
As usual one case per episode, clean and neat, always dealing with a lot of bones, gross and dirty, soaked in a lot of decomposed muck with a tremendous number of maggots, worms and other corpse parasites. A series not to watch while eating anything more delicate than dry cookies.
Angela and Dr Hodgins have a full plate with the pregnancy and the delivery of the baby. For them that’s enough and that will require some help from a friendly psychiatrist because it is hard for the father not to become overprotective and it is hard for the mother to accept the physical handicap this pregnancy may represent. Yet they decided that working with the people they are used to work and live with was the best thing for the pregnancy, the mother and the child. Angela was not alone at any moment of her days or nights.
Agent Booth brought a journalist back from Afghanistan, a sort of love substitute for Temperance. But will that not cause some problems, like conflicting interests between the two professions? And Booth with his own son is already very busy in life. Will that new woman in the picture be able to cope with a child, what’s more the child of another woman? And the question of marriage will come up sooner or later and how are the two going to react to that eventuality? Probably not very well, maybe not too bad. A decision that is always difficult to take for someone who is constantly in the field of police investigation and for a journalist just back from a war zone.

You have the interns still rotating, the four of them. They are the surprise of each episode because they are so different and they can be so funny, though at times they are just funny for us because they are mismatched with what is happening around them, but that’s what interns are all about. Unluckily one will end up very badly. That’s not the first case, but so far none had ended up that badly. But a song will carry him through: lime and coconut, sung in a chorus all together, mellow and heart stirring.
There will be a case that will run over the whole season, the case of a sniper who had been a colleague and friend of Booth in Afghanistan and who came back slightly berserk and decided that what he did over there was good enough for the USA too and he started killing those who were rotten, and those who were in his way for his type of justice and these were only collateral victims for him, hence justified by the end. It will take the whole team to stop him and it will bring a lot of suffering and even mourning to that team.

This refreshingly different season of Bones is gearing up to be one of the series’ best! It is just the reinvigoration the show needed! Life has changed at the Jeffersonian since we last saw our favorite crime-solvers. After last season’s pregnancy bombshell of an ender, we pick up with forensic anthropologist Dr. Temperance Brennan entering her third trimester, hormones all over the place as she bumbles in that adorable way that only Brennan can into the frightening role of motherhood. As always, her partner FBI Agent Seeley Booth is there by her side, more loving and more happy than we’ve ever seen him.

I think David Boreanaz and Emily Deschanel slipped into this new relationship quite easily. What’s great is that not a lot has changed, and yet, everythinghas. They live together, they’re planning on buying a house, they kiss and cuddle on the couch and Booth croons to Brennan’s belly in the cutest baby voice you will ever hear… and yet, they’re still “Booth and Bones”. They still solve murders. They still bicker good-naturedly over everything under the sun.

They banter. They get overprotective. They make mistakes- and own up to them after. They’re like any new couple expecting a child. But are they normal? Far from it, because at its core, Bones is still the same show: a journey of love between two very different people… one a woman who views the world through utmost rationalism and who is still learning how to open her heart; the other a man who relies on instincts and gut feeling to do his job, and who lets faith and emotion drive his personal life. Both coming from traumatic pasts and both craving a new beginning.That, and the other characters are still as charming and as “comedic gold” as ever. Hodgins and Angela’s baby situation juxtaposes nicely with Booth and Brennan’s, Cam struggles with keeping the workplace professional, there’s a new intern, a new recurring villain, and other familiar faces return.

The end of the seventh season of “Bones” left Bones on the run with her infant child after being framed for murder by the highly skilled serial killer Christopher Pelant. The opening of the eighth season finds Booth and her colleagues at the Jeffersonian Institute trying to clear her name. Fortunately for the series, they succeed, although Pelant eludes justice to pose a future threat. This eighth season continues to feature crime-of-the-week murders for Bones, Booth, and the Jeffersonian lab rats to solve through clever forensics and Booth’s old-fashioned police work. One of the most interesting episodes is told through the eyes of the murder victim, with the assistance of a psychic (a well-cast Cindy Lauper). Another standout episode involves a group effort to resolve a cold case whose victim turns out to be a forgotten hero of the 9/11 attack on the Pentagon.

Outside the lab, Bones has an uncomfortable but touching period of readjustment to living with Booth, after her time on the run. Her changed perspective will lead to some of the most interesting conversations as she and Booth commute to crime scenes. Just to complicate things, staff psychiatrist Dr. Sweets will temporarily move in with the couple right after he breaks up with girlfriend Daisy, a technician in the lab. Series regulars Angela and Hodgins will have their own challenges as working parents. The continuing parade of interns through the Jeffersonian crime lab will feature in several episodes, and one of them will become a surprising emotional complication for Dr. Saroyan. Christopher Pelant will return to menace the team in a gut-wrenching season finale.

“Bones” returns for a welcome ninth season with its core cast, clever plots, and sense of humor intact. Forensic anthropologist Dr. Temperance “Bones” Brennan and her crack team of specialists at the Jeffersonian Institute continue to work with their FBI liaison, Special Agent Seeley Booth, on new and challenging criminal cases. First, however, the team will have to resolve their long-running, lethal battle with cyber-genius serial killer Christopher Pelant, who has stayed one step ahead of them while inflicting pain on each member of the cast.
When we last saw the team, they had barely survived their most recent encounter with Pelant. In a final twist of spite, Pelant blackmailed Booth into withdrawing his marriage proposal to Bones, while forbidding him to reveal the reason why. Booth’s promise puts a strain on his relationship with Bones. He will reach out to old Army buddies, including a CIA agent and a former priest turned bartender, for advice. Pelant has his own plan for separating Bones from Bones from Booth, permanently. The entire team will have to be on its mettle to head off Pelant’s insidious plot.
The ninth season continues to feature crime of the week murders for Bones, Booth, and the Jeffersonian lab rats to solve. One episode will have Booth and Bones resurrecting their undercover “Tony” and “Roxie” identities for a hilarious marriage retreat in which they talk all too frankly about their relationship. Psychologist Dr. Sweets will take a leave of absence to work in an outreach center, only to find himself drawn back into a gut-wrenching case involving a gang feud. As in past seasons, other members of the team, including Lab boss Dr. Saroyan, Dr. Hodgins, Angela, and the interns will have their moments in the spotlight.
The biggest highlight is the Woman in White, featuring the  wedding of the two leads after nine years they final tie the knot.

In the 10th season of Bones, suspense is at an all-time high as Seeley Booth (David Boreanaz) is framed and jailed for the murder of three FBI agents while Temperance Brennan (Emily Deschanel) considers committing blackmail to get him out of prison.


The new season brings some changes. The team will lose a key player at a dramatic moment early in the season, and have to work in a replacement after an emotional farewell. Another primary character will develop a emotional bond with one of the rotational lab interns, one that threatens their official relationship. Still another will strike it rich, a couple of season after having been cleaned out by a particularly nasty serial killer. Yet another character will revisit a gambling habit that threatens a job and a relationship. And, one key character will become pregnant. And those events are just character development. There is a fresh lot of challenging cases that will need solving.

Those week to week cases continue to be innovative and interesting, challenging the team and the viewer to keep up. At the same time, the series hasn’t lost its sense of humor, or its willingness to experiment. As an example, you just have to see this season’s throwback Hitchcock episode. “Bones” is still good fun and recommended to its loyal fans in its tenth season.

REVIEW: TWO AND A HALF MEN – SEASON 9-12

 

MAIN CAST

Ashton Kutcher (That 70s Show)
Jon Cryer (Superman 4)
Angus T. Jones (Bringing Down The House)
Marin Hinkle (I Am Sam)
Holland Taylor (D.E.B.S.)
Conchata Ferrell (Krampus)
Amber Tamblyn (Django Unchained)
Edan Alexander (Emily & Tim)

RECURRING / NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Jenna Elfman (EdTV)
Thomas Gibson (Criminal Minds)
John Stamos (Full House)
Tricia Helfer (Battlestar Galactica)
Katherine LaNasa (Lie To Me)
Jenny McCarthy (Scary Movie 3)
Jodi Lyn O’Keefe (The Vampire Diaries)
Missi Pyle (Dodgeball)
Jeri Ryan (Star Trek: Voyager)
Jennifer Taylor (Rumor Has It…)
Liz Vassey (tru Calling)
Emmanuelle Vaugier (Human Target)
Melanie Lynskey (Up In The Air)
Ryan Stiles (Hot Shots)
Joel Murray (Mad Men)
Martin Mull (Sabrina: TTW)
Stephanie Jacobsen (Terminator: TSCC)
Judy Greer (Jurassic World)
Nicholas Gonzalez (Sleepy Hollow)
Courtney Thorne-Smith (Melrose Place)
Jane Lynch (Glee)
Joe Manganiello (How I Met Your Mother)
Macey Cruthird (Deeply Irresponsible)
Taylor Cole (Heroes)
Rebecca McFarland (Faking It)
Gary Busey (Predator 2)
Vernee Watson (The Big Bang Theory)
Sophie Winkleman (The Chronicles of Narnia)
Jonathan Banks (The Lizzie Borden Chronicles)
Jim Piddock (The Man)
Mimi Rogers (Ash Vs Evil Dead)
Jane Carr (The Five-Year Engagement)
Travis Van Winkle (Meet The Spartans)
Matthew Marsden (Rambo)
Talyan Wright (The Secret Life of Me)
Patton Oswalt (Caprica)
Georgia Engel (Grown Ups 2)
Kathy Bates (Tammy)
Graham Patrick Martin (MAjor Crimes)
Michael Bolton (Glee)
Brit Morgan (Supergirl)
Miley Cyrus (Big Fish)
Lindsay Price (Club Dread)
Steven Krueger (The Originals)
Brooke D’Orsay (The Skulls 3)
Rebecca Marshall (Raze)
Willie Garson (Stargate SG.1)
Jaime Pressly (Mom)
Elaine Hendrix (Anger Management)
Mikaela Hoover (Super)
Emily Osment (Mom)
Jessica Lundy (Single White Female)
Amanda Detmer (Final Destination)
George Coe (Smallville)
Marilu Henner (The Crazy Ones)
Hilary Duff (Agent Cody Banks)
April Bowlby (Mom)
Jason Alexander (Shallow Hal)
Carl Reiner (The Cleveland Show)
Shanti Lowry (The Game)
D.B. Sweeney (Mountain men)
Lynda Carter (Woman Woman)
Spencer Locke (Monster House)
Paula Marshall (Veronica Mars)
Kate Miner (Fifty Shades of Black)
Diane Farr (Roswell)
Aly Michalka (Izombie)
Odette Annable (The Unborn)
Clarke Duke (Kick-Ass)
Brooke Lyons (2 Broke Girls)
Marion Ross (Happy Days)
Garry Marshall (Pretty Woman)
Kimberly Williams-Paisley (Father of The Bride)
Mila Kunis (Ted)
Diedrich Bader (Bones)
Maggie Lawson (Pleasantville)
Alessandra Torresani (Caprica)
Gwendoline Yeo (The Batman)
Bill Smitrovich (Ted)
Arnold Schwarzenegger (Total Recall)
Christian Slater (True Romance)

 

This season focus on Alan (Jon Cryer) and his son Jake (Angus T. Jones) moving on with their lives after Charlie Harper (Charlie Sheen) unexpectedly dies off-screen due to a subway train while in Paris with Rose with the help of their new housemate, internet billionaire Walden Schmidt (Ashton Kutcher), who buys the Malibu Beach House which was put up for sale by Alan and Jake Harper. Walden, who is a dot-com billionaire, is in the process of being divorced by his wife.

Alan temporarily moved in with his and Charlie’s mother Evelyn after Charlie’s beach house was sold to Walden. Alan and Jake were invited to move back into Charlie’s beach house by Walden after Alan with the help of Walden’s ex-wife Bridget saved him from a con-artist. Walden, Alan and Jake eventually bond and formed a surrogate family unit. Walden starts to date Zoey, a British woman he met at The Malibu Grocery Store. Charlie pays Alan a visit from the afterlife, as a ghost trapped in a woman’s body (Kathy Bates) but his intentions for coming back are rather suspicious. Jake approaches adulthood fast pending his graduation from high school. Jake joins the army after graduation and leaves Malibu at the end of the season.

Although season 9 takes some getting use to without Charlie Sheen, I think Ashton Kutcher adds a freshness to the show, with his child like nature and blossoming friendship with Alan makes this season worth while. Waldans relationship with Zoey is just adorable and its nice to see her in several episodes

Walden is still dating Zoey and plans a big surprise for her Birthday dinner. Walden takes her out to eat where he has Michael Balton perform and he proposes marriage to her. Zoey refuses and breaks up with Walden revealing she has met someone else. After a night of binge drinking, Walden has some of Berta’s pot filled brownies and picks up a drunk girl. Walden brings her home to have sex, but he starts hallucinating his Zoey, his ex-wife, Bridget, his mother, Robin, and Michael Balton, and drives his date away. Meanwhile, Jake adjusts to life in the military, sporting a shaved head, and Alan is on edge because any permanent relationship between Walden and Zoey will lead to his eviction from the house and inevitable homelessness.

Walden doesn’t take his break up from Zoey pretty well and releases his anger on Alan, Robin, and his business partner Billy. After a slight intervention, Walden runs away from the beach house and returns the following day with a dog. After the dog destroys his home, he goes to Zoey’s apartment and gives her daughter, Ava, the dog as a birthday present which she names Walden.

Alan and Lyndsey decide to progress their relationship by having a threesome. Alan likes the idea at first, but he soon learns that she wants to have two guys and one girl. Alan only agrees if they can have a threesome with two girls and one guy afterward. The first threesome involves Walden, but after he can’t go through with it and starts crying over loosing Zoey, Alan and Lyndsey move on to Alan’s version of a threesome. They pick up a woman at a bar, but before they can have the threesome, she meets Walden, and Alan and Lyndsey spend the night listening to them have sex.

Walden begins to feel his age when a family friend of his, Missi (Miley Cyrus), comes to visit. He mistakes her advances for flirtation, only to find that she really wants to set up Walden with her mother. Missi is revealed early-on to be very talkative, not giving others a chance to get a word in. Jake comes home on a weekend leave from the Army, meets Missi, and is smitten right away. They begin a short affair, but as Jake is leaving to return to base, Missi reveals to him that she has a boyfriend. This leaves Jake wondering how he can compete, but also wishing he “did it” more with her.

After a few weeks in the relationship, Walden asks Rose to move in so they can spend more time together. The next day, however, Walden gets a call from Zoey, and the two go out for coffee, where Zoey confesses that she still loves Walden and wants to give the relationship another try. Walden agrees, but does not know how to tell Rose, as she has already moved in. That night, on the deck, Walden tells Rose about Zoey and that he wants to get back together with her. Rose seemingly understands and accepts the decision, but as Walden begins to feel comfortable, Rose sends her ferrets to attack him. She later shows up at Zoey’s place and makes it look like Walden knocked her [Rose] up. Zoey confronts Walden about this and, despite Walden telling her the entire true story, ends up leaving him again after finding out that Rose moved in. Later, Alan borrows Walden’s car and is attacked by two of Rose’s ferrets that she had planted in the car.

Alan gets a visit from his hot second ex-wife, Kandi (April Bowlby), who became a famous actress in the CSI-parody Stiffs and, to the surprise of Walden (who loves the actress and finds her very attractive), wants to get back together with Alan. However, being in a committed relationship with Lyndsey, Alan tries to do the right thing by turning down Kandi and telling Lyndsey. Lyndsey is happy and tearful that Alan turned down a hot celebrity for her, and she engages in an incredibly wild night of sex with him. Lyndsey later sees paparazzi photos of Alan and Kandi looking like they were having sex, when Alan was really trying (successfully) to thwart Kandi’s seduction attempt. After Alan fails to clear up the misunderstanding with Lyndsey, Kandi goes over to her house to explain the truth. The two women for no apparent reason end up having sex, which they agree should never be revealed to Alan. Meanwhile, Walden visits Berta on her birthday with a marijuana-laced cupcake, and they get stoned beyond humanly possible. Walden surprises Berta with a new luxury sports car for her birthday, and they mirror the Kandi-Lyndsey agreement by declaring they cannot let Alan (who has a rundown vehicle) know about the gift. Lyndsey, now knowing the truth and rejuvenated from cheating on Alan with Kandi, forgives Alan, while Berta prepares to cheerfully let Alan know of her “good fortune”.

Walden has tired of dating or even meeting women who are only interested in his vast fortune; he decides to create an online persona as a poor schlub named “Sam Wilson” who is very much like Alan Harper (no job, no prospects, and no charm). When he goes shopping for discount clothing, he meets a wannabe fashion designer named Kate (Brooke D’Orsay) who is currently a salesperson at the store. She agrees to go to dinner with him, and they really hit it off. Kate later meets Alan, after “Sam” tells her that Alan owns the house he lives in. Alan immediately takes on a rich man’s persona, and acts like a jerk to both Kate and “Sam”. After two weeks of a budding relationship, Kate suggests that “Sam” get out from under Alan’s influence and move in with her until he can get on his feet, so Walden heads off and leaves a gleeful Alan at the beach house. While cuddling together, Kate asks “Sam” that they have no secrets or lies between each other. So Walden tells her he is a billionaire, but she does not believe him and laughs off his “joke”. Meanwhile, Alan ends up getting drunk and ordering people off his “private beach” while wandering around in an expensive bathrobe and no pants.

Still pretending to be the poverty-stricken “Sam Wilson”, Walden spends Christmas with Kate, who urges him to get a job. He then gets a call from his internet business partner Billy, who tells him that they have been offered $800 million for their “electronic suitcase”. Billy wants to sell, but Walden wants to hold out for a higher price. “Sam” gets a job selling Christmas trees, which he takes to immediately and enjoys. Billy stops by the Christmas tree lot multiple times with new offers, urging Walden to sell, but Walden repeatedly shoos him away, saying he will not sell for less than $1.4 billion. Just as “Sam” closes a $40 deal with a Christmas tree customer, Walden and Billy close a deal to sell their electronic suitcase for $1.2 billion. After Kate’s sewing machine breaks, Walden uses his Christmas tree commissions to buy her a new one for Christmas. Walden feels much happier with Kate in his new blue collar world. Meanwhile, Alan plans to spend Christmas Eve with Evelyn, Jake and Lyndsey, but none of them are able to come. Jake plans to spend Christmas with his girlfriend and her children, Evelyn is having plastic surgery, and Lyndsey has to go to Cleveland to help her grandmother, who broke her hip. Alan begins to feel alone and miserable, until a less-than-willing Berta comes to seemingly comfort him.

Kate falls into depression after failing to achieve her dream of becoming a fashion designer, so Walden tries to help out. He gives Alan $100,000 to invest in Kate’s fashion line, which Alan takes a disliking to, but invests anyway. Meanwhile, Walden’s stress of being himself and “Sam Wilson” begins to get to him, causing him to lose his hair, and making him unable to sleep or get an erection. Alan tries to help him with his erection problem by taking him to Charlie’s pharmacist, Russell (Martin Mull), who offers weird solutions. After Kate leaves for a fashion show in New York City, Walden decides he will abandon his “Sam” persona and reveal to her who he really is. Stressed about how he is going to do it, Walden spends the next three weeks at Kate’s apartment gorging himself with junk food, and becoming fat.

Kate is having a fashion show in New York City. Walden, now fed up with his double-life and feeling that Kate might be “the one”, finally decides that he should throw away his “Sam Wilson” alias and confess to her who he really is. Walden decides that he and Alan must go to the show so that “Sam” can tell Kate the truth in person. Alan is relishing the trip, and hoping to convince Walden to take him to a Broadway musical. Despondent over Kate’s reaction when Walden confesses his lies, the musical comes to them (“You’re a Douche”).

After Lyndsey waits outside the beach house for an hour before Alan gets home (forcing her to urinate in the shrubs), she gets upset with Alan when he refuses to give her a key to the house. Alan reasons that he cannot give her a key because the house belongs to Walden. When Alan goes to apologize, he discovers that she is going on a date with her gynecologist, Steven Staven (Willie Garson). Meanwhile, Walden is despondent over his breakup with Kate and Billy gets dumped by Walden’s ex-wife Bridget. They also run into Herb, who reveals that Judith left him after she caught him cheating on her with his receptionist. The four, bonding over their relationships-gone-bad, go for a night out without picking up any women. While in the hot tub at Herb’s place, Walden, Billy and Herb ridicule Alan’s reason for leaving Lyndsey, and encourage him to get her back, as he is the only one of the group who has a chance. Walden has no problem with her having a key, and Alan admits he really just wanted some occasional space from Lyndsey. With help from the others, who grab Steven, Alan gives Lyndsey a key and confesses that while she can do better than him, he cannot do better than her. The two reconcile. Steven reveals to the others that it would not have worked out with him and Lyndsey anyway, and they end up running from a rottweiler, leaving Herb behind.

Jake brings home his 36-year-old girlfriend, Tammy (Jaimie Pressley), and Alan becomes concerned about her and Jake, due to her job as a tattoo artist, her kids and time in prison. Despite her appearance, Tammy is a good-hearted woman, who knows how Alan feels about her and her relationship with Jake. Meanwhile, Jake tells Walden that he plans to marry Tammy in Las Vegas right away, but tells him not to tell Alan. Unfortunately, Walden spills the beans during dinner and Alan and Jake have a falling out over Jake’s decision to get married. As they pack for Vegas, Tammy tells Jake she wants their families to be there when (and if) they do get married and tells Jake to make amends with Alan. He does so, and Alan also apologizes, saying he just wants him to be happy. He is relieved that they are not getting married right away and thanks Tammy.

These are just some of the highlights of a great season, now were use to Ashton Kutcher, the show can move forward, this would be Jakes last appearance till the final episode (in season 12). The show continues to grow and bring in new recurring characters.

The creators  decided to spice things up and give Charlie’s daughter Jennifer a prominent role in the series. Yes, apparently one time, Charlie wasn’t careful enough when he was dating a certain woman and so along came ‘Jenny’ (Amber Tamblyn). The minute she appears on the show, you can clearly see why the makers of Two and a Half Men decided to bring her along for the ride. She’s just another Charlie, but in the form of a lesbian girl. And she’s just as hilarious as her late father.

Twoandahalfmen

Besides Jenny, there’s another new recurring character who’s called Barry Foster (Clark Duke). Barry is a typical geek: very naïve, not that good with the ladies and a bit socially awkward. The newcomers are a much needed fresh wind in the series and they add a lot to the creation of hilarious moments. Besides those newcomers, you’ll see a lot more from Alan and Charlie’s mother Evelyn (Holland Taylor) as she has found a new lover (not coincidentally a very old man with lots and lots of money). Although Evelyn herself isn’t such a caricature like, for example, Alan or Jenny; she always succeeds in waiting for the right moment to drop sarcastic and ironic one-liners. As her screen time is mostly quite brief, it’s fantastic to notice how much of an impression she leaves behind every single time she crosses paths with the main actors. The same can be said of the-always-napping-housekeeper Berta (Conchata Ferrel) for that matter.

Twoandahalfmen2

Story wise, season 11 offers a lot of variety which keeps the viewer from getting bored with the plot. Acting performances are pretty good. Especially newcomer Amber Tamblyn knows how to put down a very likeable character without getting annoying. It’s great to see how Charlie’s role has been transferred to his daughter and it really fits the show perfectly. Kutcher too does a fantastic job with his Walden personage and of course, Two and a Half Men wouldn’t be the same without Jon Cryer.

Walden has a near-death experience, which causes him to take a good, long look at his life. Realizing his life has amounted to a whole lot of nothing so far, he tells Alan that he would like to adopt a child in order to add some meaning to his life. Walden soon discovers that it is next to impossible to adopt a child as a single dad, so he proposes to his roommate and long-time friend, Alan, and the two pose as a gay couple and ultimately adopt Louis. Of course, it wouldn’t be a season of Two and a Half Men if our guys didn’t behave badly, so it’s not long before Walden and Alan are scrambling to keep their secret while figuring out how to have some manly fun with the women in their lives!

The Season story is mostly about the adoption of Louis, its a nice heartfelt story of two men trying t oraise an adoptive child, whilst trying to hide the fact they are both straight. When we get to the last few episodes we see both men in happy relationships, but the main event is obviously the last episode which features great guest stars such as Arnold Schwarzenegger, Christian Slater, and a whole host of returning cast members including, Jake. after 12 season the show still surprises and the final episode is a worth while conclusion to a show that has been on the air for 12 years.

REVIEW: CAPRICA

MAIN CAST

Eric Stoltz (The Butterfly Effect)
Esai Morales (Fast Food Nation)
Paula Malcolmson (The Hunger Games)
Alessandra Torresani (The Big Bang Theory)
Magda Apanowicz (The Bionic Woman)
Sasha Roiz (Grimm)
Brian Markinson (Izombie)
Polly Walker (Clask of The Titans)

RECURRING /NOTABLE GUEST CAST

Sina Najafi (Stargate – SG.1)
Genevieve Buechner (Jennifer’s Body)
Hiro Kanagawa (Heroes Reborn)
Patton Oswalt (Two and a Half Men)
John Pyper-Ferguson (Bones)
Peter Wingfield (Highlander: The Series)
Luciana Carro (Battlestar Galactica)
Panou (Flash gordon)
Scott Porter (Speed Racer)
Karen Elizabeth Austin (When A Stranger Calls)
Richard Harmon (Painkiller Jane)
James Marsters (Buffy)
Avan Jogia (The Outskirts)
Teryl Rothery (Stargate SG.1)
Christian Tessier (Goosebumps)
Anna Galvin (Smallville)
Francoise Yip (Arrow)
Anita Torrance (Shortland Street)
Kendall Cross (Andromeda)
Eve Harlow (Bitten)
Patrick Sabongui (The Flash)
Ryan Robbins (Sanctuary)
Kacey Rohl (Hannibal)
Ryan Kennedy (Smallville)
Christopher Heyerdahl (Gotham)
Tom McBeath (Stargate SG.1)

The story revolves around the polytheistic, technologically-advanced colony of Caprica roughly sixty years before “the downfall”, focusing on the conflict between, and within, two families: The Graystones, and the Adamas Adams. Lawyer Joseph Adams (Esai Morales) lives a somewhat normal life with his wife and two children, Tamara and Billy, attempting to juggle his high-profile stature in the legal realm with his domestic life. He fights a bit with keeping himself as distanced as he can from his unsavory lineage, the Tauron mob Ha’la’tha, though it’s hard since the organization funded his education and requires his services regularly — usually by messages delivered through his brother, Sam (Sasha Roiz). BSG devotees with get a jolt in seeing the blossoming of young “Billy” in this environment early on, watching the growth of the semi-troubled youth that’d transform into the disquieting, powerful Galactica commander Bill Adama.

Caprica’s central draw, however, is the Graystones. Daniel Graystone (Eric Stoltz) heads a tech development firm working on a mechanized super-soldier that’s just not cutting the mustard, all the while generating profit (60% of net, to be exact) with virtual reality headsets — holobands — that connect to a network of fully-interactive, realistic digital worlds. Graystone’s seemingly safe digital construct quickly broke down into a laissez-faire underground, filled with hacked sections that exploit sex, drug-use, and violence. Daniel’s daughter, a silver-tongued high-school student named Zoe (Alessandra Torresani) who battles with her mother Amanda (Paula Malcomson) over authority, frequents the holoband V-Club with boyfriend Ben (Avan Jogia) and timid best friend Lacy (Magda Apanowicz), yet they’re beyond the carnal satisfaction that the place has to offer. Instead, they’ve found purpose in monotheistic religious belief within an activist organization, the Soldiers of The One (STO), and, in the process, created an exact digital copy of Zoe who will somehow aid the resistance.

Observant fans will see where Caprica’s going with the duplicate Zoe, coming together in an introductory pilot that realizes the germ of an idea behind the genesis of the Cylon race, but it certainly doesn’t leave newcomers in the cold. Moore and Eick, with this freshness in mind, go in a startling direction with the content surrounding the Cylon conception; a murderous STO-related terrorist attack on a train rattles the city of Caprica, leaving the Graystones without their daughter and Joseph with only his son, Billy. The grief they endure becomes a convincing dramatic catalyst for what’s to come, breaking a floodgate for aggressive decision-making regarding family memories and Daniel’s technological advancement — with the idea of an exact digital replication of both mind and memory, such as the avatar of Zoe that lingers after her death, propelling it forward. It’s a thought-provoking launch that tackles some rather challenging concepts, including that of the human psyche as raw data and the extent that open-minded intellectuals might go to preserve those they’ve lost. And, of course, the narcissistic power behind potential immortality.imagesUpon the second episode, “Rebirth”, one fact becomes very clear: Caprica isn’t cut from the same cloth as its inspiration, instead existing as a compelling new creation with its own hurdles to cross. In retrospect, the reimagined Battlestar Galactica painlessly continued the momentum from its original two-part miniseries, thrusting forward with space warfare and political components into the dazzling episode “33”. With Caprica, a shrewd character-driven thriller with complexity surrounding terrorism and family grief, the carry-over isn’t as easy. Thankfully, the Moore-Eick team never shies away, hitting the gas with some rather incisive writing as they drive deeper into Caprica’s unraveling and the Graystone company’s waning success in the wake of the terrorist attack. Along the way, they also grapple with themes of Tauron racism (“dirt eaters”) and religious extremism through the STO and one of its leaders, Zoe’s teacher Sister Clarice (Polly Walker), that correlate to actual issues, while also cleverly using the concept of a digital underground — especially in the anarchistic “New Cap City” game simulation, a mix of World of Warcraft and Grand Theft Auto — as a way of escape and purpose-finding.

Yet as Caprica focuses on these modern analogous ideas while its characters develop into a mixture of morally desolate entities, the first batch of six or so episodes move at a deliberate, slow-burning tempo that shifts between intrigue and sluggishness. The harsh chemistry between Daniel and Joseph as scorned parents electrifies, driven by Eric Stoltz and Esai Morales in two stark, authentic performances, and the pacing focuses on the causal events that unfold around their family-affecting decisions. But focusing on this calculated slow-burn can, at times, temper the series’ manner and cause the multiple plot threads to stray from the course, weaving intuitive dramatic performances around a lot of existential meditation and shots of neo-religious content without the right energy to propel it forward. I still find it compelling; the depth of Daniel’s egotism reaches a genuine depth that’s unexpected, while offering a cluster of explosive moments — such as the board meeting in “There is Another Sky” that actually starts the Cylon race — spliced within the persistent, astute drama.

 


Then, as Caprica approaches “Ghosts in the Machine” and the mid-season finale “End of Line”, the gradual tension sees a much-needed outburst. These prior episodes extend into what’s essentially a rather lengthy fuse leading to this batch of dynamite, using brewing family turmoil and growing suspicions into an emotionally-taxing, brilliantly-realized culmination point. “Ghosts in the Machine” plays with the intensity of psychological torment in a staggering rush of emotion, while “End of Life” finds the first episode of the series to use the familiar “__ Hours Before” time mechanic frequently used in Battlestar Galactica. Quite simply, the build-up becomes worth the time at this point, igniting the series with the narrative outbreak it desperately lacked to become fully involving. Whether Caprica can maintain this momentum still remains to be seen, but the succession of these explosive developments that derive from subtly-evolving plot points — Amanda’s weakening sanity, Daniel’s obsession with meeting the development deadline, and the presence of the STO as violent radicals — satisfies with evocative, edge-of-your-seat chills at this midpoint, finally achieving that addictive science-fiction adrenaline that hallmarked its predecessor.

The Second half of season 1 Caprica would be the end as Syfy decided to cancel it. Caprica utilized a cliffhanger episode at the end of the first half of the season, one that leaves the mortality of several characters up in the air. It’s uncertain whether the depression-driven grief that Amanda’s been going through truly led her to suicide; similarly, we’re unsure if the full-throttle abrasiveness that Zoe was enacting inside the U-87 Cylon body destroyed her at the end. Then, Syfy opted to go on a very lengthy mid-season break, leaving curious minds in the dark for roughly seven months and, effectively, knocking the wind out of Caprica. It establishes a fine world that explores the emotions coursing through decisions to either reject or embrace digital memories of loved ones, while also giving some deep-rooted glimpses into the underpinnings of Moore and Eick’s Emmy-winning Battlestar Galactica.


None of Caprica’s issues root in the performances, however, or the production design. From the ground up, Moore and Eick continue the shrewdly-cast and stylish thrust of science-fiction with a fine vein of suspense, capturing the city’s expanses with a unique blend of metropolitan polish, futuristic gris-gris, and slick ’50s-esque allure. Locations like the Graystone mansion sport angular windows and a glaring pour of cold light, while the Adama household encapsulates a warm yet dark demeanor. These fitting aesthetic touches cradle some exceptional dramatic performances, including Eric Stoltz and Esai Morales whom have come into their own as tried-and-true denizens of Caprica. The same can be said for Magda Apanowicz as Lacy, who takes the complications surrounding a semi-innocent girl lost in the world of terrorism and runs with them with stalwart momentum. Lacy’s role, which gets sloshed around in the first half of the season, begins to grow more focused as she embeds further into the STO (and learns of her affinity with post-Zoe Cylons). Really, the issues hinge on a general question: “What’s the driving force behind Caprica?” At first, the series closed in on the machinations of the Cylon origins, as well as exploring monotheism vs. polytheism, the benefits and hindrances of an abandon-free V-World, and the reluctance for people to let go of those whom have died. Upon the second half of Caprica, all that’s somewhat switched out for direct drama involving the robots’ “creator”, as well as concentration on the gangster Adama network and the blossoming of the terrorist organization as idealists.


Starting with “False Labor”, Caprica begins to see an awakening, In this episode, Daniel attempts to recreate Zoe’s “resurrection” software, while in the process using an avatar of Amanda as a basis for comparison. Since he knows all the mannerisms and minutiae of his wife, he’s able to determine exactly how human or inhuman she’s acting, and the content that unfolds as he dissects this digital Amanda can be both penetrating and emotionally stirring. On top of that, Lacy gets her first hearty taste of the STO’s domineering, contentious presence, while meeting other “recruits” similar to her. Moreover, it rediscovers its tonality; difficult drama remains, but the way it’s handled regains the excitement of its inspiration.


With Syfy cancelling the show and five episodes still left to run, the big question likely will be: “Does it get a proper, strong conclusion?” Piggybacking off the regained proficiency that it rediscovers in “Blowback”, Caprica sprints through the remaining episodes as if it knows that the end’s coming. With a Coda at the end of the season you do get a conclusion that answers the questions of where the show would of gone had it been around for 5 years.