REVIEW: DUDE. WHERE’S MY CAR ?

CAST

Ashton Kutcher (Two and A Half Men)
Seann William Scott (American Pie)
Jennifer Garner (Alais)
Marla Sokoloff (Sugar & Spice)
Kristy Swanson (Big Daddy)
David Herman (Futurama)
Hal Sparks (Spider-Man 2)
Charlie O’Connell (The New Guy)
Mary Lynn Rajskub (2 Broke Girls)
Justin Nimmo (Power Rangers In Space)
Nichole Hiltz (Bones)
Keone Young (Men In Black 3)
Cleo King (Mike & Molly)
Andy Dick (Zoolander 2)
Brent Spiner (Star Trek: TNG)

Bob Clendenin (Birds of Prey)

Jesse and Chester awaken with hangovers and no memory of the previous night. The television is on, showing an Animal Planet program about how animals use twigs and rocks as tools to get food. Their refrigerator is filled with containers of chocolate pudding, and the answering machine contains an angry message from their twin girlfriends Wilma and Wanda as to their whereabouts. They emerge from their home to find Jesse’s car missing, and with it their girlfriends’ one-year anniversary presents. This prompts Jesse to ask the film’s titular question: “Dude, where’s my car?”

Because the girls have promised them a “special treat”, which Jesse and Chester take to mean sex, the men are desperate to retrieve their car. The duo begins retracing their steps in an attempt to discover where they left the car. Along the way, they encounter a transgender stripper, a belligerent speaker box operator at a Chinese restaurants drive-through, discover two appropriately-worded tattoos on each other’s backs, run into UFO cultists led by Zoltan, a Cantonese-speaking Chinese tailor, the Zen-minded Nelson and his cannabis-loving dog, the aggressive jock Tommy and his friends, a couple of hard-nosed police detectives, and a reclusive French ostrich farmer. They also meet two groups of aliens, one group being five gorgeous women, the other being two Norwegian men, searching for the “Continuum Transfunctioner”; a mysterious and powerful device, capable of destroying the universe, that the boys accidentally picked up last night.

In an arcade, they discover that the Continuum Transfunctioner was a Rubik’s Cube that Chester has been working hard to solve, and eventually does (thus activating it). They are warned that once the five lights stop flashing, the universe will be destroyed. Jesse and Chester must determine which of two sets of aliens is entitled to the device. One of the groups is there to protect the universe, the other is there to destroy it. Both claim to be the protectors of the universe, stating that they were with Jesse and Chester the previous night (which Jesse and Chester still cannot remember) and ask for the Transfunctioner. The two correctly choose the men, because when the men were asked what they did the night before, they correctly respond that they got a hole in one at the 18th hole at a miniature golf park, and won a life time supply of pudding. At the last second, they deactivate the Transfunctioner, saving the universe.

Balked, the five alien women merge to become a giantess (Jodi Ann Paterson) who swallows Tommy alive. The giantess then crawls out of the amusement centre and chases Jesse and Chester. The cultists tell them to activate the Photon Accelerator Annihilation Beam on the Transfunctioner. However, the button that activates it is too far in to reach. At the last second, Chester remembers the nature show with the tool-using chimps and uses a straw to push the recessed button, thus destroying the alien. The protectors erase everyone’s minds concerning the events and time is reversed to the beginning of the film. The duo recover the car, a Renault Le Car, which turned out to be behind a Mail Truck the whole time, and salvage their relationships and discover the special treat from the girls turns out to be matching knitted caps and scarves. The protectors leave a gift for their girlfriends (and, for the two men): Breast Enhancement Necklaces.

The movie is hilarious all the way through, there aren’t any scenes that won’t cause the watcher to stop laughing. If anyone wants to watch a real comedy movie, which does it’s job of providing comedic entertainment, then “Dude, where’s my car?” is the movie to watch.

REVIEW: ROCK STAR

CAST

Mark Wahlberg (Transformers 4)
Jennifer Aniston (Rumor Has It..)
Dominic West (Punisher: Warzone)
Timothy Spall (Sweeney Todd)
Timothy Olyphant (Hitman)
Matthew Glave (Stargate SG.1)
Michael Shamus Wiles (Fight Club)
Beth Grant (Donnie Darko)
Jason Flemyng (Kick-Ass)
Kristin Richardson (Lost)
Kara Zediker (Hercules: TLJ)
Carrie Stevens (Black Scorpion)
Amy Rolle (Power Rangers Lost Galaxy)

Chris Cole (Mark Wahlberg) is a Pittsburgh fanatical admirer of a 1980s heavy metal band called Steel Dragon. By day, Chris is a photocopier technician and by night, he is the lead singer of a Steel Dragon tribute band called Blood Pollution (the name is taken from a Steel Dragon song).

Internal struggles among the actual Steel Dragon band members culminate with the firing of their lead singer, Bobby Beers (Jason Flemyng), and the starting of recruitment sessions to find a new vocalist. Chris experiences his own strife with his Blood Pollution bandmates, particularly guitarist Rob Malcolm (Timothy Olyphant). During a live performance, Rob’s playing fails to live up to Chris’ over-demanding standards regarding note-for-note accuracy to the original Steel Dragon recordings, and Chris sabotages Rob’s amplifier mid-song – a fight breaks out between the two onstage. The next day, Chris arrives at Blood Pollution’s rehearsal space (the basement of an X-rated theater) to find that he’s been fired and replaced with his arch-rival, the (now former) lead singer of another Steel Dragon tribute band. Rob also cites Chris’ inability to create his own musical style, preferring to remain the singer in a tribute band.

One day in 1984, Chris receives an unexpected phone call from Steel Dragon’s founder and rhythm guitarist, Kirk Cuddy (Dominic West), and is offered an audition for the band (thanks to two of Blood Pollution’s groupies, who showed Kirk a videotape of one of Blood Pollution’s concerts). After hanging up on Kirk once, thinking he’s being made fun of, Chris ecstatically agrees. At the studio, he meets the band, as well as learning that Bobby Beers was fired because he was a closeted gay, and gives an outstanding performance of “We All Die Young” (a Steel Dragon song in the movie, but it is actually a song by Steelheart, whose lead vocalist Miljenko Matijevic provides Cole’s singing voice for the film). Chris joins the band as their new singer, adopting the stage name “Izzy”. Following a successful debut concert with Steel Dragon, Izzy must come to grips with the pressures of his new-found fame and success. The band embarks on a lengthy tour and Izzy experiences the excesses of the lifestyle, with the group’s manager, Mats (Timothy Spall), serving as a sympathetic mentor to Izzy.

His new lifestyle impacts his life both for better and worse, particularly with his relationship with his supportive girlfriend, Emily Poule (Jennifer Aniston), when she decides not to continue with him throughout the remainder of the tour as a rock star girlfriend, though Emily and Izzy agree to get back together when the tour reaches Seattle. Eventually, Steel Dragon stops in Seattle for a show, and Emily arrives at his hotel room as they had previously arranged, although Izzy had become so inebriated while on tour he forgot about the arrangement and did not even know what city he was in. Although taken aback by all the groupies, Emily still tries to reconnect with him, reminding him of their plans to meet up once he got to Seattle, however he is too intoxicated to really understand what she is saying, eventually suggesting they go to Seattle together. Heartbroken with his inconsiderate behavior, intoxication and the fact that he is sleeping with so many groupies, Emily leaves him.

After the end of the tour, Izzy reports to the next series of Steel Dragon recording sessions with song concepts for the band’s next album. The rest of the band rejects Izzy’s ideas, with Kirk explaining that the band has to stay true to the “Steel Dragon thing” to fulfill fan expectations. Izzy is angered upon realizing that he was only recruited for his vocal abilities. After a heartfelt conversation with Mats about how he feared he had no control over the direction life has taken him, Izzy begins to reconsider his rock star lifestyle. On the next tour, in a scene directly paralleling one near the beginning of the film with their roles reversed, Izzy hears a fan (Myles Kennedy) singing along with him toward the end of a live concert. Impressed, Izzy pulls the fan, who introduces himself as Mike, onstage and hands him the microphone to finish the concert. Backstage, Izzy realizes that what he wanted for so long was not what he thought, and he says goodbye to Mats, departing from the band while doing so.

Upon ditching his stage name, Izzy, Chris makes his way to Seattle and starts a new band with his old friend and former bandmate Rob. At the same time Steel Dragon, failing to evolve to changing tastes and styles, has its fame fizzle out. Chris finds Emily working in the coffee shop she and her roommate purchased a few years earlier, but is initially too ashamed to speak to her. While walking one evening, Emily sees a flyer for his band posted on the wall and takes it down. In the final scene, Chris is singing with his band in a bar and Emily walks in. Chris leaves the stage and speaks to her. They reconcile, ending the film with a kiss and the final note of Chris’ first original song “Colorful”.

After reading previews for this movie I thought it would be a let down, however after I got my dvd  I was pleasantly surprised, strong performances from all cast members make this a very enjoyable movie.

REVIEW: ORGAZMO

CAST

Trey Parker (South Park)
Dian Bachar (Galaxy Quest)
Robyn Lynne Raab (Hey Dude)
Michael Dean Jacobs (Over My Dead Body)
Ron Jeremy (Citizen Toxie)
Andrew Kemler (Cannibal: The Musical)
Matt Stone (Team America)
Toddy Walters (South Park)

Everyman Mormon missionary Joseph Young (Trey Parker), assigned with his mission partner to Los Angeles, finds the city to be a hostile and unenthusiastic place for their work. The problems worsen when they knock on the door of sleazy porn director Maxxx Orbison (Michael Dean Jacobs) and several security guards are sent to dispose of them. Joe defeats all of them single-handedly with a variety of competent martial arts skills. Impressed by his performance and bored of his current project’s lead actor being a wimp, Orbison attempts to hire Joe to be the titular lead of his pornographic superhero film, Orgazmo. Joe is conflicted because of his beliefs but the salary offered would pay for a wedding in the temple in Utah where his fiancée Lisa (Robyn Lynne Raab) has expressed a strong desire to wed. Joe reluctantly accepts despite being given a sign from God.

Joe finds the crew of the film intimidating but manages to befriend co-star Ben Chapleski (Dian Bachar), a technical genius and graduate from M.I.T. who works in the pornographic industry to satiate his overactive sex drive. He plays Orgazmo’s sidekick Choda Boy, who assists Orgazmo with specially designed sex toys, including Orgazmo’s signature weapon, the Orgazmorator, a ray gun that forces orgasm upon whomever it is fired. Ben invites Joe to his home later on and shows Joe a real, working Orgazmorator Ben has built and he and Joe spend an evening using it on unsuspecting citizens for amusement. At a sushi bar owned by Ben’s Japanese friend G-Fresh (Masao Maki), the two witness a group of thugs vandalizing the bar in an attempt to force out G-Fresh so their dance club next door can expand. Later on, when Ben and Joe are not present, G-Fresh is coerced to leave. Upon finding this out, Joe and Ben don costumes and utilize their film props and the Orgazmorator to sneak into the club and steal back the contract G-Fresh was forced to sign. Joe is agitated after nearly being shot in the head but Ben is excited by finally getting to be a real superhero.


Orgazmo becomes an amazing success, both financially and critically, and Orbison withholds Joe’s paycheck to keep him in town long enough to announce a sequel, and he wishes for Joe to reprise his role. Tempted with a doubled salary, Joe is confronted by his fiancée who has found out what he has been doing and leaves him. Facing production difficulties and harassment from Orbison’s unsympathetic nephew A-Cup (David Dunn), Joe tries to back out of the project but Orbison won’t hear of it and, when Joe stands up to him, Orbison has Lisa kidnapped to force Joe into agreement. When Ben finds out the thugs who assaulted G-Fresh are also working for Orbison, he joins Joe in storming Orbison’s mansion before Lisa can be forced to perform in one of Orbison’s films.  Fighting through Orbison’s group of henchmen ranging from other male pornographic actors to boom microphone operators, Joe and Ben meet their match in A-Cup. Joe helps Ben overcome a mental block from childhood that forced him to repress the Hamster Style discipline of martial arts, allowing Ben to beat A-Cup. After repairing his damaged Orgazmorator, Joe manages to repeatedly shoot Orbison with it, incapacitating him and capturing all the henchmen. Ben blows up the mansion with another device, the “Cock Rocket”, destroying Orbison’s base of operations. Joe and Lisa reconcile and she gives him her blessing to remain in Los Angeles and continue being a hero alongside Ben. As the film ends, Orbison is seen in a doctor’s office being told that after so many orgasms in a row, his testicles have swollen to the size of oranges and that a surgical removal is the only option. Orbison laughs insanely, declaring revenge on Orgazmo as he will now be the personification of A-Cup’s character and Orgazmo’s nemesis who is immune to the Orgazmorator: Neutered Man.

To say that Orgazmo is funny is an understatement. From the opening song it is a non-stop side-splitter of a movie, incorporating everything a film should contain; Kung Fu, Breasts, Spandex, and old people shouting “pigfucker”. A movie that has definately earned a top spot in my collection. This film has achieved cult status, It’s a must see. Once you’ve seen it, you will never be the same again.

 

 

REVIEW: HUNK

CAST

John Allen Nelson (Sheena)
Steve Levitt (The Incredible Hulk Returns)
Deborah Shelton (Plughead Rewired)
Rebecca Bush (Growing Up Brady)
James Coco (Muppets Take Manhattan)
Robert Morse (The Loved One)
Cynthia Szigeti (Repo Man)
Hilary Shepard (Power Rangers Turbo)
Brad Pitt (Burn After Reading)

A computer nerd makes a deal with a sexy she-devil to become a muscle-bound beach hunk. Hunk shares quite a similar idea to the one later used  in Bedazzled (2000), where we have a hopeless nerd given the chance to become cool by a super-sexy she-devil, with the result that he realizes that it is more important to be yourself than superficially good-looking. In that later film we had Elizabeth Hurley turn in a mind-bogglingly seductive performance, in Hunk its Deborah Shelton who is somewhat convincing as a rather hot seductress. The leading ladies certainly are very important to the success of these films but they both also feature other decent performances.

While I wouldn’t describe this as an especially funny film, it is definitely a likable one. It is much less moronic than quite a few of the teen comedies of its day and I think it stands up fairly well. It naturally has oodles of 80’s cheese as well but that is pretty much a positive detail as far as I am concerned. All-in-all, a very fun film.

REVIEW: THE PRINCESS DIARIES 2: ROYAL ENGAGEMENT

CAST

Julie Andrews (The Sound of Music)
Anne Hathaweay (The Dark Knight Rises)
Hector Elizondo (Cane)
Heather Matarazzo (Hostel – Part 2)
John Rhys-Davies (Lord of The Rings)
Chris Pine (Star Trek)
Callum Blue (Smallville)
Raven-Symone (Dr. Dolittle)
Caroline Goodall (Hook)
Sean O’Bryan (Yes Man)
Spencer Breslin (The Happening)
Brian Klugman (Bones)
Rajia Baroudi (Mighty Morphin Alien Rangers)
Abigail Breslin (Scream queens)
Stan Lee (Deadpool)

Five years after the first film, Crown Princess of Genovia Amelia “Mia” Thermopolis (Anne Hathaway) has just graduated from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School and is returning to Genovia with her bodyguard Joe (Héctor Elizondo). There, she will await her reign once her grandmother, Queen Clarisse (Julie Andrews), steps down as Queen. During Mia’s 21st birthday party, she dances with all the eligible bachelors in hope of finding a husband. She becomes attracted to a handsome gentleman named Nicholas (Chris Pine). During the course of the night, Mia’s tiara falls off and is caught by Parliament member Viscount Mabrey (John Rhys-Davies) who secretly plans to steal Mia’s crown. While the Parliament is in-session the next morning, Mia stumbles upon a hidden room that allows her to secretly listen in. Viscount Mabrey reveals his nephew, Lord Devereaux, is another heir to the Genovian throne. Despite Queen Clarisse’s objection, the only way Mia can assume her duties as Queen is if she marries within the month. Clarisse invites Lord Devereaux to stay at the palace, while Mia is shocked to discover Lord Devereaux is Nicholas. Mia’s best friend Lilly Moscovitz (Heather Matarazzo) surprises her by visiting. Together, they pick through potential husbands. Mia eventually chooses Andrew Jacoby (Callum Blue), Duke of Kenilworth and days later they are engaged. Mabrey plans to have Nicholas woo Mia and dissolve the engagement.

For a ceremony, Mia is to ride sidesaddle but does not know how. Queen Clarisse provides an ancestral wooden leg decoy to make it look like she’s riding sidesaddle. Mabrey spooks Mia’s horse with a rubber snake and Joe rushes to Mia’s aide, but accidentally tears off the wooden leg. Humiliated, Mia flees to the stables, where Nicholas fails to comfort her. At a garden party, Mia and Nicholas quarrel about Mia’s relationship with Andrew; Nicholas tricks Mia into admitting she doesn’t love him. Angered, she argues but instead gets bombarded by a kiss. At first, she kisses him back but then backs away. Nicholas pursues her even more, which causes both of them to fall into a fountain. Queen Clarisse finally tells Mia that her behavior with Nicholas needs to stop.

During the Genovian Independence Day parade, Mia sees some boys picking on a little girl (Abigail Breslin), and abruptly halts the parade to comfort the girl. Learning the children are orphans, Mia has a vendor give them all tiaras and lets them walk with her in the parade. Everyone is impressed by her act of generosity, while Mabrey sees it as a political maneuver. Mia later decides to convert one of the royal palaces into a temporary children’s center. That night, Mia has her bachelorette/sleepover party, where Queen Clarisse surfs on a mattress and sings a duet with Princess Asana (Raven-Symoné), one of Mia’s good friends. In the meantime, Mabrey realizes Nicholas has fallen for Mia, but Nicholas says that Mia will never love him. Nicholas comes upon Mia as she is practising her archery as part of her coronation rites. He helps her succeed in getting the arrow to hit the bullseye, something she had been struggling with. Nicholas then informs Mia that he is leaving, but asks to see her just one more time before he goes. She declines, saying she is under close guard.

That night, Nicholas appears outside Mia’s window and asks her to come out. Lilly encourages her to go, and Mia sneaks out. They ride out to a lake where they share secrets, dance and eventually fall asleep. They awaken to find a man in a boat videotaping them. Mia thinks Nicholas set her up, while he insists had no idea. By the time Mia gets back to the palace, the scandalous footage is already being broadcast. Andrew is disappointed and kisses Mia to see if there is a romantic spark between them. They realize they do not love each other, but do not call off the wedding for the good of Genovia. The wedding is to take place the following day, and Mia’s mother Helen (Caroline Goodall) comes with her new husband Patrick (Sean O’Bryan) and their newborn son Trevor. Nicholas decides against attending, but his surly housekeeper Gretchen informs him that Mabrey engineered their televised scandal.

Right before the wedding, Joe informs Mia that Nicholas is innocent. Queen Clarisse encourages Mia to follow her heart, something she has never done and has now cost her Joe, the only man she truly loved. Mia reenters the church, and asks the members of the Parliament to consider the women in their families and questions if they would force them what they’re forcing her to do (marrying people they don’t love). Mabrey cites the law again, suggesting that Nicholas be named King, only for Nicholas to arrive and refuse the crown as well as disown his uncle. Mia proposes the law on royal marriages be abolished, and Parliament unanimously gives its assent. Encouraged by Mia to have her own happy ending, Clarisse proposes to Joe and they are promptly married.

About a week later, Mia is preparing for her coronation when Nicholas shows up. He professes his love for Mia on bended knee, and they share a romantic kiss. The next day, Mia is crowned “Her Majesty Amelia Mignonette Thermopolis Renaldi, Queen of Genovia”, with all in attendance in the royal palace. An epilogue shows that Genovian Parliament now allows female members, one of whom is Charlotte. And Queen Mia officially opens the children’s home. This film is exactly what you expect it to be, lightly amusing, easy to watch and enjoyable – lovely way to while away a little time.

 

REVIEW: THE PRINCESS DIARIES

CAST

Julie Andrews (The Sound of Music)
Anne Hathaway (The Dark Knight Rises)
Hector Elizondo (Cane)
Heather Matarazzo (Hostel – Part 2)
Mandy Moore (Saved)
Caroline Goodall (Hook)
Robert Schwartzman (The Virgin Suicides)
Erik Von Detten (Complete Savages)
Sean O’Bryan (Yes Man)
Sandra Oh (The Defendor)

Teenager Mia Thermopolis lives with her artist mother, Helen, and her cat, Fat Louie, in a remodeled San Francisco firehouse. A somewhat awkward and unpopular girl, she is terrified of public speaking and often wishes to be “invisible”. She has a crush on the popular Josh Bryant, but is frequently mocked by both him and his cheerleader girlfriend, Lana Thomas. Mia’s only friendships are in the form of the equally unpopular Lilly Moscovitz and Lilly’s brother Michael, who secretly has a crush on Mia. Just before her 16th birthday, Mia learns her paternal grandmother, Clarisse, is visiting from (the fictional) Genovia, a small European kingdom. When Mia goes to meet her at a large house (later revealed to be the Genovian consulate), Clarisse reveals she is actually Queen Clarisse Renaldi, and that her son, Mia’s late father, was Crown Prince of Genovia. Mia is stunned to learn she is a princess and heir to the Genovian throne. In shock, Mia runs home and angrily confronts her mother, who explains she had planned to tell Mia on her 18th birthday, but that her father’s death has forced the issue. Queen Clarisse visits and explains that if Mia refuses the throne, Genovia will be without a ruler (a subplot involves a scheming baron and his unsightly baroness quietly rooting for Mia’s downfall). Helen persuades a hesitant Mia to attend “princess lessons” with the Queen, telling her she does not have to make her decision until the upcoming Genovian Independence Day ball.
Mia is given a glamorous makeover, the use of a limousine and a bodyguard (the Queen’s head of security, Joe). This and Mia’s frequent absences for the lessons make Lilly suspicious and jealous, so she accuses Mia of trying to be like the popular girls. Mia breaks down and tells Lilly everything, swearing her to secrecy. However, the San Francisco Chronicle learns that Mia is the Genovian Crown Princess after hairdresser Paolo breaks his confidentiality agreement (so his work would be known), causing a press frenzy, and a sudden surge in popularity at school for Mia. In a crave and urge for fame, many of her classmates bluff that they’re friends of and or are the princess to reporters.
At a state dinner, Mia embarrasses herself with her clumsiness, delighting her rivals for the crown. However, all is not lost as the situation amuses a stuffy diplomat, and the Queen tells Mia the next day she found it fun. Deciding it is time the two bonded as grandmother and granddaughter, the Queen allows Mia to take her out in Mia’s late 60s Ford Mustang convertible for the day to the Musée Mécanique, an amusement arcade. The day almost ends badly when Mia’s car gives out on a hill and rams backward into a cable car, but Queen Clarisse saves the day by “appointing” the attending police officer and the tram driver to the Genovian “Order of the Rose” (something she clearly made up on the spot), flattering them into dropping any charges. Mia sees this and is impressed with her grandmother. Later, Mia is delighted when Josh Bryant invites her to a beach party, but her acceptance hurts Lilly and Michael, with whom she had plans (the former wanting Mia to appear on her self-made cable show, and the latter wanting her to watch his band perform). Things go wrong when the press arrive, tipped off by Lana. Josh uses Mia to get his 15 minutes of fame by publicly kissing her, while Lana tricks her into changing in a tent, pulling it away as the paparazzi arrive, giving them a scandalous shot of her in a towel. She breaks down into tears in her mother’s arms when she gets home. The photos appear on tabloid covers the following day, leaving Queen Clarisse furious at Mia. A humiliated Mia tells her that she is renouncing the throne, feeling she is nowhere near ready to be a true princess. Joe later reminds the Queen that although Mia is a princess, she is still a teenager and her granddaughter.
Back at school, Mia attempts to rescue her friendships with Lilly and Michael by inviting them to the Genovian Independence Day Ball, gets back at Josh for using her by hitting a baseball into his scrotum during gym class, and finally stands up to Lana when she is cruel to Lilly’s friend Jeremiah, publicly humiliating her by smearing ice cream on her cheerleader outfit and tells her that while she (Mia) might grow out of her proclaimed odd ways, she (Lana) will never stop being a jerk; the teachers don’t interfere, knowing Lana deserved it. Whilst Lilly is excited at the prospect of attending a royal ball, Michael, brokenhearted over Mia’s initial feelings for Josh, turns her down. Clarisse apologizes to Mia for being furious at her over the beach incident, and states that she must publicly announce her decision to become princess of Genovia. Mia, terrified at this large responsibility placed upon her, plans to run away. However, when she finds a letter from her late father, his touching words make her change her mind, and she makes her way to the ball. Mia’s car breaks down in the rain, but she is rescued by Joe, who had suspected she was going to run.

When they arrive, a drenched and untidy Mia voices her acceptance of her role as Princess of Genovia. Mia gets dressed up and accompanies Clarisse to the ballroom, where she is formally introduced and invited to dance. Micheal, accepting an apologetic gift from Mia (a pizza with M & M candies cleverly topped to say “sorry”), arrives at the ball, and after a quick dance, they adjourn to the courtyard. Mia confesses her feelings to him, stating that even when she was constantly teased and embarrassed at school, he liked her for who she truly was. Mia shares her first kiss with Michael, while Clarisse and Joe are seen holding hands. In the final scene Mia is shown on a private plane with Fat Louie, writing in her diary, explaining she is moving with her mother to Genovia, just as the beautiful royal palace and landscape come into view below.Anne Hathaway in The Princess Diaries (2001)Julie Andrews is perfect as the royal grandmother, and Anne Hathaway as Mia is excellent too – she manages both the awkward clumsy stage and the increasing elegancy of the transformation. There are some delightful scenes with the two of them together, and a few low-key ethical issues such as the shallowness of high school cheerleaders and sports stars, and the need for people to stand up for what they believe in. I found it very enjoyable early outing for Anne Hathaway.

 

 

REVIEW: SAWED

CAST

Johnny Young Bosch (Power Rangers Zeo)
Karen Ashley (Mighty Morphin Power Rangers)
Reza Bahador (Lonelygirl15)
Jonny Cruz (Walking Tall: Lone Justice)
Meill Skylar (Redline)
Joey Greco (Cheaters)

devonsghost1-e1439215234477Plagued by a ten-year-old legendary story of the mysterious murder of Devon Anderson, this community still harbors curiosity when the current victims and the evidence surrounding their murders appears to be very similar to what happened to Devon and the parents accused of murdering him. Did Devon Anderson die? That is the question. How did Devon’s lovestruck, deranged, abusive parents get off for his murder when all the evidence pointed to them? And who killed them in turn?

This legendary event causes strife in the tiny city, but also leaves a trail of questions and enough obscurity to keep a community still scared, obsessed by the tragic event and concerned that it is happening again. With more people dying and all the similarities mounting, the legend of Devon’s ghost has surfaced and sent an already suspicious community into a tailspin. Convinced that Devon Anderson is alive and the murderer, Josh and Symphony, along with their friends, stay one step ahead of the authorities and try to find Devon, to stop him from killing again. Not really knowing what is setting the guy off, they narrow down that every couple was attacked while being affectionate. They have to do something quick, before they too become victims. With the police and the media just assuming it’s a copycat crime, they must face Devon alone and re-open old emotional wounds, and hunt down their once-classmate. But Devon is much too smart and too strong, and running is not an option. The only way to get Devon is to fight back together.

ojqv78Karan is as beautiful as ever, and the end of the movie leaves you uncertain, which is good.The end of any movie or book should leave your imagination wide open to think of all the possibilities, and this one does. It’s also great to see Power Ranger actors Johnny Yong Bosch and Karan Ashley reunited on screen.